Search results for 'SOCIAL RECOGNITION' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Italo Testa (2011). Social Space and the Ontology of Recognition. In Heikki Ikäheimo Arto Laitinen (ed.), Recognition and Social Ontology. Brill Books (pp. 287-308).score: 84.0
    In this paper recognition is taken to be a question of social ontology, regarding the very constitution of the social space of interaction. I concentrate on the question of whether certain aspects of the theory of recognition can be translated into the terms of a socio-ontological paradigm: to do so, I make reference to some conceptual tools derived from John Searle's social ontology and Robert Brandom's normative pragmatics. My strategy consists in showing that recognitive phenomena (...)
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  2. Arto Laitinen, Social Equality, Recognition, and Preconditions of Good Life. Social Inequality Today.score: 75.0
    In this paper I analyze interpersonal and institutional recognition and discuss the relation of different types of recognition to various principles of social justice (egalitarianism, meritarianism, legitimate favouritism, principles of need and free exchange). Further, I try to characterize contours of good autonomous life, and ask what kind of preconditions it has. I will distinguish between five kinds of preconditions: psychological, material, cultural, intersubjective and institutional. After examining what the role of recognition is among such preconditions, (...)
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  3. Patrizia D'Ettorre Nick Bos (2012). Recognition of Social Identity in Ants. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 75.0
    Recognizing the identity of others, from the individual to the group level, is a hallmark of society. Ants, and other social insects, have evolved advanced societies characterized by efficient social recognition systems. Colony identity is mediated by colony specific signature mixtures, a blend of hydrocarbons present on the cuticle of every individual (the “label”). Recognition occurs when an ant encounters another individual, and compares the label it perceives to an internal representation of its own colony odor (...)
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  4. Andrew Chitty (1998). Recognition and Social Relations of Production. Historical Materialism 2 (1):57-98.score: 72.0
    This article presents a new interpretation of the concept of social relations of production in Marx. Against G.A. Cohen, it argues that social relations of production are relations of interaction between persons, not relations of de facto control between persons and means of production. It argues further that these relations are relations of 'de facto recognition', that is, relations constituted by actions in which individuals treat each other as if they recognised each other in certain ways, whether (...)
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  5. Heikki Ikäheimo & Arto Laitinen (eds.) (2011). Recognition and Social Ontology. Brill.score: 72.0
    This unique collection examines the connections between two complementary approaches to philosophical social theory: Hegel-inspired theories of recognition (Anerkennung), and analytical social ontology.
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  6. Gottfried Schweiger (2013). Recognition and Social Exclusion. A Recognition-Theoretical Exploration of Poverty in Europe. Ethical Perspectives 20 (4):529-554.score: 72.0
    Thus far, the recognition approach as described in the works of Axel Honneth has not systematically engaged with the problem of poverty. To fill this gap, the present contribution will focus on poverty conceived as social exclusion in the context of the European Union and probe its moral significance. It will show that this form of social exclusion is morally harmful and wrong from the perspective of the recognition approach. To justify this finding, social exclusion (...)
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  7. Stephan de la Rosa, Sarah Mieskes, Heinrich H. Bülthoff & Cristobal Curio (2013). View Dependencies in the Visual Recognition of Social Interactions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 72.0
    Recognizing social interactions, e.g. two people shaking hands, is important for obtaining information about other people and the surrounding social environment. Despite the visual complexity of social interactions, humans have often little difficulties to visually recognize social interactions. What is the visual representation of social interactions and the bodily visual cues that promote this remarkable human ability? Viewpoint dependent representations are considered to be at the heart of the visual recognition of many visual stimuli (...)
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  8. Louis J. Goldberg (2013). Face Recognition and the Social Individual. Biosemiotics 6 (3):573-583.score: 72.0
    Face recognition depends upon the uniqueness of each human face. This is accomplished by the patterns formed by the unique relationship among face features. Unique face-patterns are produced by the intrusion of random factors into the process of biological growth and development. Processes are described which enable a unique face-pattern to be represented as a percept in the visual sensory system. The components of the face recognition system are analyzed as is the manner in which the precept is (...)
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  9. Rex Martin (2012). Natural Rights Human Rights and the Role of Social Recognition. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 17 (1):91-115.score: 60.0
    This paper pays special attention to T.H. Green's account of rights as developed in the Lectures on the Principles of Political Obligation. Green's theory can be viewed as having at least two main levels. The first level is his general account of rights, emphasizing the notions of social recognition, of a power or capacity that each right-holder has, and of the common good subserved by proper rights. The second level is that of universal rights; here special attention will (...)
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  10. Terry Lovell (ed.) (2007). (Mis)Recognition, Social Inequality and Social Justice: Nancy Fraser and Pierre Bourdieu. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This collection of essays considers some of the conceptual and philosophical contentions that Fraser?s model has provoked and presents some compelling examples ...
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  11. Marco Solinas (2010). Review of Bert van den Brink and David Owen (eds.), Recognition and Power. Axel Honneth and the Tradition of Critical Social Theory. [REVIEW] Iride (59):223-224.score: 60.0
  12. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). An African Theory of Social Justice. In Camilla Boisen & Matt Murray (eds.), Distributive Justice Debates in the History of Political and Social Thought: Finding A Fair Share. Routledge.score: 57.0
    A comprehensive account of justice grounded on salient Afro-communitarian values, the article attempts to unify views about the distribution of economic resources, the protection of human rights and the provision of social recognition as ultimately being about proper ways to value loving relationships.
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  13. Bert van den Brink & David Owen (eds.) (2007). Recognition and Power: Axel Honneth and the Tradition of Critical Social Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    The topic of recognition has come to occupy a central place in contemporary debates in social and political theory. Rooted in Hegel's work, developed by George Herbert Mead and Charles Taylor, it has been given renewed expression in the recent program for Critical Theory developed by Axel Honneth in his book The Struggle for Recognition. Honneth's research program offers an empirically insightful way of reflecting on emancipatory struggles for greater justice and a powerful theoretical tool for generating (...)
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  14. Matt Ferkany (2009). Recognition, Attachment, and the Social Bases of Self-Worth. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (3):263-283.score: 54.0
    Recognition theorists have claimed that a culturally egalitarian societal environment is a crucial social basis of a sense of self-worth. In doing so they have often drawn on noncogntivist social-psychological theorizing. This paper argues that this theorizing does not support the recognition theorist's position. It is argued that attachment theory, together with recent empirical evidence, support a more limited vision of self-worth's social bases according to which associational ties, basic rights and liberties, and economic and (...)
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  15. Coenraad J. Hattingh, Jonathan Ipser, Sean Tromp, Supriya Syal, Christine Lochner, Samantha Jane Brooks Brooks & Dan J. Stein (2013). Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging During Emotion Recognition in Social Anxiety Disorder: An Activation Likelihood Meta-Analysis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:347-347.score: 54.0
    Background: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterised by abnormal fear and anxiety in social situations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a brain imaging technique that can be used to illustrate neural activation to emotionally salient stimuli. However, no attempt has yet been made to statistically collate fMRI studies of brain activation, using the activation likelihood-estimate technique, in response to emotion recognition tasks in individuals with social anxiety disorder. Methods: A systematic search of fMRI studies of (...)
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  16. Matthew D. Adler, Social Facts, Constitutional Interpretation, and the Rule of Recognition.score: 51.0
    This chapter is an essay in a volume that examines constitutional law in the United States through the lens of H.L.A. Hart's "rule of recognition" model of a legal system. My chapter focuses on a feature of constitutional practice that has been rarely examined: how jurists and scholars argue about interpretive methods. Although a vast body of scholarship provides arguments for or against various interpretive methods -- such as textualism, originalism, "living constitutionalism," structure-and-relationship reasoning, representation reinforcement, minimalism, and so (...)
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  17. Bart van Leeuwen (2007). A Formal Recognition of Social Attachments: Expanding Axel Honneth's Theory of Recognition. Inquiry 50 (2):180 – 205.score: 48.0
    Axel Honneth draws a distinction between three types of recognition: (1) love, (2) respect and (3) social esteem. In his The Struggle for Recognition, the recognition of cultural particularity is situated in the third sphere. It will here be argued that the logic of recognition of cultural identity also demands a non-evaluative recognition, namely a respect for difference. Difference-respect is formal because it is a recognition of the value of a particular culture not (...)
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  18. Carl-Göran Heidegren (2002). Anthropology, Social Theory, and Politics: Axel Honneth's Theory of Recognition. Inquiry 45 (4):433 – 446.score: 48.0
    This article presents and discusses Axel Honneth's theory of recognition as a specific constellation, i.e. as a theoretical endeavour spanning over and interrelating positions in the fields of anthropology, social theory, and politics. As essential components in this constellation I discern an anthropology of recognition, a social philosophy of different forms of recognition, a morality of recognition, a theory of democratic ethical life as a social ideal, and a notion of political democracy as (...)
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  19. Italo Testa (2009). Second Nature and Recognition: Hegel and the Social Space. Critical Horizons 10 (3):341-370.score: 48.0
    In this article I intend to show the strict relation between the notions of “second nature” and “recognition”. To do so I begin with a problem (circularity) proper to the theory of Hegelian and post- Hegelian Anerkennung. The solution strategy I propose is signifi cant also in terms of bringing into focus the problems connected with a notion of “space of reasons” that stems from the Hegelian concept of “Spirit”. I thus broach the notion of “second nature” as a (...)
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  20. Christopher F. Zurn (2005). Recognition, Redistribution, and Democracy: Dilemmas of Honneth's Critical Social Theory. European Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):89–126.score: 48.0
    What does social justice require in contemporary societies? What are the requirements of social democracy? Who and where are the individuals and groups that can carry forward agendas for progressive social transformation? What are we to make of the so-called new social movements of the last thirty years? Is identity politics compatible with egalitarianism? Can cultural misrecognition and economic maldistribution be fought simultaneously? What of the heritage of Western Marxism is alive and dead? And how is (...)
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  21. Christian Spiess (2007). Recognition and Social Justice: A Roman Catholic View of Christian Bioethics of Long-Term Care and Community Service. Christian Bioethics 13 (3):287-301.score: 48.0
    Contemporary Christian ethics encounters the challenge to communicate genuinely Christian normative orientations within the scientific debate in such a way as to render these orientations comprehensible, and to maintain or enhance their plausibility even for non-Christians. This essay, therefore, proceeds from a biblical motif, takes up certain themes from the Christian tradition (in particular the idea of social justice), and connects both with a compelling contemporary approach to ethics by secular moral philosophy, i.e. with Axel Honneth's reception of Hegel, (...)
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  22. Rex Martin (2013). Human Rights and the Social Recognition Thesis. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (1):1-21.score: 48.0
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  23. Axel Honneth (1996). The Struggle for Recognition: The Moral Grammar of Social Conflicts. The Mit Press.score: 48.0
    In this pathbreaking study, Axel Honneth argues that "the struggle for recognition" is, and should be, at the center of social conflicts.
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  24. Sybol Anderson (2012). Heikki Ikäheimo and Arto Laitinen (Eds), Recognition and Social Ontology. Critical Horizons 13 (1):134 - 137.score: 48.0
    Heikki Ikäheimo and Arto Laitinen (eds), Recognition and Social Ontology Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 134-137 Authors Sybol Cook Anderson, St. Mary's College of Maryland, USA Journal Critical Horizons: A Journal of Philosophy & Social Theory Online ISSN 1568-5160 Print ISSN 1440-9917 Journal Volume Volume 13 Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1 / 2012.
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  25. Peter Mundy Kwanguk Kim (2012). Joint Attention, Social-Cognition, and Recognition Memory in Adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 48.0
    The early emerging capacity for Joint Attention, or socially coordinated visual attention, is thought to be integral to the development of social-cognition in childhood. Recent studies have also begun to suggest that joint attention affects adult cognition as well, but methodological limitations hamper research on this topic. To address this issue we developed a novel virtual reality (VR) paradigm that integrates eye-tracking and virtual avatar technology to measure two types of joint attention in adults, Initiating Joint Attention (IJA) and (...)
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  26. Kwanguk Kim & Peter Mundy (2012). Joint Attention, Social-Cognition, and Recognition Memory in Adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 48.0
    The early emerging capacity for Joint Attention, or socially coordinated visual attention, is thought to be integral to the development of social-cognition in childhood. Recent studies have also begun to suggest that joint attention affects adult cognition as well, but methodological limitations hamper research on this topic. To address this issue we developed a novel virtual reality (VR) paradigm that integrates eye-tracking and virtual avatar technology to measure two types of joint attention in adults, Initiating Joint Attention (IJA) and (...)
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  27. Ruth Lister (2007). Mis)-Recognition, Social Inequality and Social Justice : A Critical Social Policy Perspective. In Terry Lovell (ed.), (Mis)Recognition, Social Inequality and Social Justice: Nancy Fraser and Pierre Bourdieu. Routledge.score: 48.0
     
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  28. Michael Quante (2011). Recognition as the Social Grammar of Species Being in Marx. In Heikki Ikäheimo & Arto Laitinen (eds.), Recognition and Social Ontology. Brill. 239--267.score: 48.0
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  29. W. Rehg (forthcoming). Review of 'Recognition and Social Ontology'. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews. Online: Http://Ndpr. Nd. Edu/News/27905-Recognition-and-Social-Ontology.score: 48.0
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  30. John Bickle (2006). Reducing Mind to Molecular Pathways: Explicating the Reductionism Implicit in Current Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience. [REVIEW] Synthese 151 (3):411-434.score: 45.0
    As opposed to the dismissive attitude toward reductionism that is popular in current philosophy of mind, a “ruthless reductionism” is alive and thriving in “molecular and cellular cognition”—a field of research within cellular and molecular neuroscience, the current mainstream of the discipline. Basic experimental practices and emerging results from this field imply that two common assertions by philosophers and cognitive scientists are false: (1) that we do not know much about how the brain works, and (2) that lower-level neuroscience cannot (...)
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  31. J. Bickle (2008). The Molecules of Social Recognition Memory: Implications for Social Cognition, Extended Mind, and Neuroethics. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (2):468-474.score: 45.0
  32. Connie R. Bateman, Sean Valentine & Terri Rittenburg (2013). Ethical Decision Making in a Peer-to-Peer File Sharing Situation: The Role of Moral Absolutes and Social Consensus. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):229-240.score: 45.0
    Individuals are downloading copyrighted materials at escalating rates (Hill 2007; Siwek 2007). Since most materials shared within these networks are copyrighted works, providing, exchanging, or downloading files is considered to be piracy and a violation of intellectual property rights (Shang et al. 2008). Previous research indicates that personal moral philosophies rooted in moral absolutism together with social context may impact decision making in ethical dilemmas; however, it is yet unclear which motivations and norms contextually impact moral awareness in a (...)
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  33. Emmanuel Renault (2013). Three Marxian Approaches to Recognition. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (4):699-711.score: 45.0
    If it seems fully legitimate to introduce Marx in the contemporary discussion about recognition, it is more disputable to attribute to Marx an unified conception of recognition. There is no doubt that Marx hasn’t provided any systematic account of recognition, but he has tackled the issue of recognition from various points of view. Could these various points of view be unified in a general conception of recognition? This article claims that this is not the case (...)
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  34. David M. Wasieleski & Sefa Hayibor (2008). Breaking the Rules: Examining the Facilitation Effects of Moral Intensity Characteristics on the Recognition of Rule Violations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):275 - 289.score: 45.0
    This research project seeks to discover whether certain characteristics of a moral issue facilitate individuals’ abilities to detect violators of a conditional rule. In business, conditional rules are often framed in terms of a social contract between employer and employee. Of significant concern to business ethicists is the fact that these social contracts are frequently breached. Some researchers in the field of evolutionary psychology argue that there is a biological basis to social contract formation and dissolution in (...)
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  35. Marija Slavkovik & Guido Boella (2012). Recognition-Primed Group Decisions Via Judgement Aggregation. Synthese 189 (S1):51-65.score: 45.0
    We introduce a conceptual model for reaching group decisions. Our model extends a well-known, single-agent cognitive model, the recognition-primed decision (RPD) model. The RPD model includes a recognition phase and an evaluation phase. Group extensions of the RPD model, applicable to a group of RPD agents, have been considered in the literature, however the proposed models do not formalize how distributed and possibly inconsistent information can be combined in either phase. We show how such information can be utilized (...)
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  36. Dorit Kliemann, Gabriela Rosenblau, Sven Boelte, Hauke R. Heekeren & Isabel Dziobek (2013). Face Puzzle—Two New Video-Based Tasks for Measuring Explicit and Implicit Aspects of Facial Emotion Recognition. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 45.0
    Recognizing others’ emotional states is crucial for effective social interaction. While most facial emotion recognition tasks use explicit prompts that trigger consciously controlled processing, emotional faces are almost exclusively processed implicitly in real life. Recent attempts in social cognition suggest a dual process perspective, whereby explicit and implicit processes largely operate independently. However, due to differences in methodology the direct comparison of implicit and explicit social cognition has remained a challenge. Here, we introduce a new tool (...)
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  37. Michael D. Breed & Robert Buchwald (2009). Cue Diversity and Social Recognition. In Juergen Gadau & Jennifer Fewell (eds.), Organization of Insect Societies: From Genome to Sociocomplexity. Harvard.score: 45.0
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  38. Axel Honneth (2012). The I in We: Studies in the Theory of Recognition. Polity Press.score: 45.0
    Pt. I Hegelian Roots -- 1. From Desire to Recognition: Hegel's Grounding of Self-Consciousness -- 2. The Realm of Actualized Freedom: Hegel's Notion of a P̀hilosophy of Right' -- pt. II Systematic Consequences -- 3. The Fabric of Justice: On the Limits of Contemporary Proceduralism -- 4. Labour and Recognition: A Redefinition -- 5. Recognition as Ideology: The Connection between Morality and Power -- 6. Dissolutions of the Social: The Social Theory of Luc Boltanski and (...)
     
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  39. Ângela Cristina Salgueiro Marques (2010). As relações entre ética, moral e comunicação em três âmbitos da experiência intersubjetiva. Logos 16 (2):54-66.score: 45.0
    Ethical-moral communicative processes are instituted by language, in three spheres of the intersubjective experience: the argumentative oriented to agreement and/or solution of collective problems (with the amplification of particular perception and the consideration of the point of view offered by others); the demand for social recognition, that intersects citizens’ self-realization with their socialization; and the production of media representations that continuously stimulates moral feelings towards the other.
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  40. Steve Martindale (1984). Infatuation and Infuriation Comparative Social Recognition Patrick Colgan. Bioscience 34 (10):661-661.score: 45.0
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  41. Luc Vigneault (2006). La reconnaissance comme puissance spéculative du pacte social. Reflexión sur la lecture hégélienne de Hobbes. Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 31 (1):75-99.score: 42.0
    Contemporary debates about political identity are deeply grounded in Hegelian’s paradigm of State. Hegel develops an original identity structure, build on a dynamics of recognition which allows interaction between subjective and objective liberty. The purpose of this Hegelian approach is to define a State which would be able to auto-justify and legitimize itself. This article studies the Hegelian theory of recognition, as a critical reading of Hobbes and of the philosophical insufficiency of the contractualist theories. Analyzing the concept (...)
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  42. Jean-Philippe Deranty (2004). Injustice, Violence and Social Struggle. The Critical Potential of Axel Honneth's Theory of Recognition. Critical Horizons 5 (1):297-322.score: 39.0
    Honneth's fundamental claim that the normativity of social orders can be found nowhere but in the very experience of those who suffer injustice leads, I argue, to a radical theory and critique of society, with the potential to provide an innovative theory of social movements and a valid alternative to political liberalism.
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  43. J. Trejo-Mathys (2010). Review Essay: Identifying Recognition in the Age of Neo-Liberalism (Under Consideration: Emmanuel Renault's Mepris Social: Ethique Et Politique de la Reconnaissance). Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (9):1143-1148.score: 39.0
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  44. Gabriele Wagner (2012). The Two Sides of Recognition: Gender Justice and the Pluralization of Social Esteem. Critical Horizons 12 (3):347 - 371.score: 39.0
    This article seeks to sketch the contours of a good society, distinguished by its gender justice and the plural recognition of egalitarian difference. I begin by reconstructing Nancy Fraser’s arguments highlighting the link between distributive justice and relations of recognition, in particular as it applies to gender justice. In a second step, I show that the debate on the politics of recognition has confirmed what empirical analyses already indicated, namely that Fraser’s status model takes too reductive a (...)
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  45. Nancy Fraser (2007). Feminist Politics in the Age of Recognition: A Two-Dimensional Approach to Gender Justice. Studies in Social Justice 1 (1):23-35.score: 39.0
    In the course of the last thirty years, feminist theories of gender have shifted from quasi-Marxist, labor-centered conceptions to putatively “post-Marxist”culture- and identity-based conceptions. Reflecting a broader political move from redistribution to recognition, this shift has been double-edged. On the one hand, it has broadened feminist politics to encompass legitimate issues of representation, identity, and difference. Yet, in the context of an ascendant neoliberalism, feminist struggles for recognition may be serving to less to enrich struggles for redistribution than (...)
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  46. Neocolonial Age (1999). Gallagher, Shaun, Ed. Hegel, History, and Interpretation. State University of New York Press, 1997. Pp. 275. $19.95 Paper. Gauthier, Jeffrey A. Hegel and Feminist Social Criticism: Justice, Recognition, and the Feminine. State University of New York Press, 1997. Pp. 250. $18.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (1):119-122.score: 39.0
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  47. Tia DeNora & Hugh Mehan (1994). Genius: A Social Construction, the Case of Beethoven's Initial Recognition. In Theodore R. Sarbin & John I. Kitsuse (eds.), Constructing the Social. Sage. 157--173.score: 39.0
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  48. Robin Celikates (2008). Recognition and Power: Axel Honneth and the Tradition of Critical Social Theory, Edited by Bert Van den Brink and David Owen. European Journal of Philosophy 16 (3):474-478.score: 36.0
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  49. C. M. Heyes (1998). Theory of Mind in Nonhuman Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):101-114.score: 36.0
    Since the BBS article in which Premack and Woodruff (1978) asked “Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?,” it has been repeatedly claimed that there is observational and experimental evidence that apes have mental state concepts, such as “want” and “know.” Unlike research on the development of theory of mind in childhood, however, no substantial progress has been made through this work with nonhuman primates. A survey of empirical studies of imitation, self-recognition, social relationships, deception, role-taking, and (...)
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  50. Joel Krueger & John Michael (2012). Gestural Coupling and Social Cognition: Möbius Syndrome as a Case Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6 (81):1-14.score: 36.0
    Social cognition researchers have become increasingly interested in the ways that behavioral, physiological, and neural coupling facilitate social interaction and interpersonal understanding. We distinguish two ways of conceptualizing the role of such coupling processes in social cognition: strong and moderate interactionism. According to strong interactionism (SI), low-level coupling processes are alternatives to higher-level individual cognitive processes; the former at least sometimes render the latter superfluous. Moderate interactionism(MI) on the other hand, is an integrative approach. Its guiding assumption (...)
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