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Nancy Sherman [51]Robert R. Sherman [33]David Sherman [28]Howard J. Sherman [9]
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Profile: Brett Sherman (University of Rochester)
Profile: Jacob Sherman (California Institute of Integral Studies)
Profile: Thomas Sherman
Profile: James Sherman (University of Toronto)
Profile: Benjamin Sherman (Boston University)
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Profile: Neal Philip Sherman (United States-Israel Educational Foundation)
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Profile: Summer Sherman
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  1. Nancy Sherman (1989). The Fabric of Character: Aristotle's Theory of Virtue. Oxford University Press.
    Most traditional accounts of Aristotle's theory of ethical education neglect its cognitive aspects. This book asserts that, in Aristotle's view, excellence of character comprises both the sentiments and practical reason. Sherman focuses particularly on four aspects of practical reason as they relate to character: moral perception, choicemaking, collaboration, and the development of those capacities in moral education. Throughout the book, she is sensitive to contemporary moral debates, and indicates the extent to which Aristotle's account of practical reason provides an alternative (...)
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  2.  37
    Nancy Sherman (1997). Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first to offer a detailed analysis of Aristotelian and Kantian ethics together, in a way that remains faithful to the texts and responsive to debates in contemporary ethics. Recent moral philosophy has seen a revival of interest in the concept of virtue, and with it a reassessment of the role of virtue in the work of Aristotle and Kant. This book brings that re-assessment to a new level of sophistication. Nancy Sherman argues that Kant preserves a (...)
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  3.  24
    Nancy Sherman (2005). Stoic Warriors: The Ancient Philosophy Behind the Military Mind. Oxford University Press.
    While few soldiers may have read the works of Epictetus or Marcus Aurelius, it is undoubtedly true that the ancient philosophy known as Stoicism guides the actions of many in the military. Soldiers and seamen learn early in their training "to suck it up," to endure, to put aside their feelings and to get on with the mission. Stoic Warriors is the first book to delve deeply into the ancient legacy of this relationship, exploring what the Stoic philosophy actually is, (...)
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  4. Cynthia Willett, Julie Willett & Yael D. Sherman (2012). The Seriously Erotic Politics of Feminist Laughter. Social Research: An International Quarterly 79 (1):217-246.
  5.  1
    Janet Cohen Sherman & Barbara Lust (1993). Children Are in Control. Cognition 46 (1):1-51.
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  6.  26
    Gary D. Sherman & Jonathan Haidt (2011). Cuteness and Disgust: The Humanizing and Dehumanizing Effects of Emotion. Emotion Review 3 (3):245-251.
    Moral emotions are evolved mechanisms that function in part to optimize social relationships. We discuss two moral emotions— disgust and the “cuteness response”—which modulate social-engagement motives in opposite directions, changing the degree to which the eliciting entity is imbued with mental states (i.e., mentalized). Disgust-inducing entities are hypo-mentalized (i.e., dehumanized); cute entities are hyper-mentalized (i.e., “humanized”). This view of cuteness—which challenges the prevailing view that cuteness is a releaser of parental instincts (Lorenz, 1950/1971)—explains (a) the broad range of affiliative behaviors (...)
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  7.  96
    Gilbert Harman & Brett Sherman (2004). Knowledge, Assumptions, Lotteries. Philosophical Issues 14 (1):492–500.
    John Hawthorne’s marvelous book contains a wealth of arguments and insights based on an impressive knowledge and understanding of contemporary discussion. We can address only a small aspect of the topic. In particular, we will offer our own answers to two questions about knowledge that he discusses.
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  8.  41
    Brett Sherman (2015). Constructing Contexts. Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2.
    It is commonly held that the context with respect to which an indexical is interpreted is determined independently of the interpretation of the indexical. This view, which I call Context Realism, has explanatory significance: it is because the context is what it is that an indexical refers to what it does. In this paper, I provide an argument against Context Realism. I then develop an alternative that I call Context Constructivism, according to which indexicals are defined not in terms of (...)
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  9.  40
    Alexis Burgess & Brett Sherman (eds.) (2014). Metasemantics: New Essays on the Foundations of Meaning. OUP Oxford.
    Metasemantics presents new work on the philosophical foundations of linguistic semantics. Experts in the philosophy of language, metaphysics, and the theory of content provide new perspectives on old problems about linguistic meaning, pose questions that suggest novel research projects, and sharpen our understanding of linguistic representation.
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  10. Brett Sherman & Gilbert Harman (2011). Knowledge and Assumptions. Philosophical Studies 156 (1):131--140.
    Knowledge and assumptions Content Type Journal Article Pages 131-140 DOI 10.1007/s11098-011-9797-z Authors Brett Sherman, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, USA Gilbert Harman, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116 Journal Volume Volume 156 Journal Issue Volume 156, Number 1.
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  11. Robert Sherman (forthcoming). Reclaimed by Sabbath Rest. Interpretation 59 (1):38-50.
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  12.  77
    Jeremy Sherman & Terrence W. Deacon (2007). Teleology for the Perplexed: How Matter Began to Matter. Zygon 42 (4):873-901.
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  13.  29
    Ben Sherman (2015). Unconfirmed Peers and Spinelessness. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):425-444.
    The Equal Weight View holds that, when we discover we disagree with an epistemic peer, we should give our peer’s judgment as much weight as our own. But how should we respond when we cannot tell whether those who disagree with us are our epistemic peers? I argue for a position I will call the Earn-a-Spine View. According to this view, parties to a disagreement can remain confident, at least in some situations, by finding justifiable reasons to think their opponents (...)
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  14.  9
    William C. Waggoner & Barbara B. Sherman (forthcoming). Who Understands? II: A Survey of 27 Words, Phrases, or Symbols Used in Proposed Clinical Research Consent Forms. IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
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  15. Benjamin Sherman, Epistemology of Disagreement and the Moral Non-Conformist.
    When people disagree about what is moral, we face an epistemological challenge—when the answer to a moral question is not obvious, how do we determine who is right? What if, under the circumstances, we do not have the means to show one party or the other is right? In recent years, a number of epistemologists have turned their attention to the general epistemic problem of how to respond reasonably to disagreement, and we can look to their work for guidance. While (...)
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  16.  38
    Nancy Sherman (1998). Empathy and Imagination. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):82-119.
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  17.  17
    Jorge N. Ferrer & Jacob H. Sherman (eds.) (2008). The Participatory Turn: Spirituality, Mysticism, Religious Studies. State University of New York Press.
    The contributors to this volume argue that we can, and they offer a new way: the "participatory turn," which proposes that individuals and communities have an ...
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  18.  4
    James Sherman (2010). Unresolved Problems in the Service Conception of Authority. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (3):419-440.
    This article introduces and discusses a series of problems which any adequate account of legitimate practical authority must be able to solve. I then argue that Joseph Raz's influential Service Conception of Authority is unable to solve them. I develop a new account of legitimate authority by integrating many of the important insights of the Service Conception into my own framework for understanding the nature of moral rights and duties. I argue that this account has the resources to solve these (...)
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  19.  45
    Nancy Sherman (1993). Wise Maxims / Wise Judging. The Monist 76 (1):41-65.
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  20.  62
    David Sherman (2003). Jean-Paul Sartre. In Robert C. Solomon & David L. Sherman (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Continental Philosophy. Blackwell Pub. 12--163.
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  21.  9
    Ben Sherman (2016). Ignorance and Moral Obligation By Michael J. Zimmerman. Analysis 76 (2):263-265.
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  22.  54
    Nancy Sherman (1987). Aristotle on Friendship and the Shared Life. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (4):589-613.
    IN THIS PAPER I CONSIDER THE VALUE OF FRIENDSHIP FROM AN ARISTOTELIAN POINT OF VIEW. THE ISSUE IS OF CURRENT INTEREST GIVEN RECENT CHALLENGES TO IMPARTIALIST ETHICS TO TAKE MORE SERIOUSLY THE COMMITMENTS AND ATTACHMENTS OF A PERSON. HOWEVER, I ENTER THAT DEBATE IN ONLY A RESTRICTED WAY BY STRENGTHENING THE CHALLENGE ARTICULATED IN ARISTOTLE'S SYSTEMATIC DEFENSE OF FRIENDSHIP AND THE SHARED LIFE. AFTER SOME INTRODUCTORY REMARKS, I BEGIN BY CONSIDERING ARISTOTLE'S NOTION THAT GOOD LIVING OR HAPPINESS ("EUDAIMONIA") FOR AN (...)
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  23. Nancy Sherman (1999). Character Development and Aristotelian Virtue. In David Carr & J. W. Steutel (eds.), Virtue Ethics and Moral Education. Routledge 35--48.
  24.  48
    Nancy Sherman (1999). Taking Responsibility for Our Emotions. Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):294.
    We often hold people morally responsible for their emotions. We praise individuals for their compassion, think less of them for their ingratitude or hatred, reproach self-righteousness and unjust anger. In the cases I have in mind, the ascriptions of responsibility are not simply for offensive behaviors or actions which may accompany the emotions, but for the emotions themselves as motives or states of mind. We praise and blame people for what they feel and not just for how they act. In (...)
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  25.  48
    Nancy Sherman (2010). The Moral Psychology of War. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):100-101.
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  26.  36
    Edward Sherman (2005). Authenticity and Diversity: A Comparative Reading of Charles Taylor and Martin Heidegger. Dialogue 44 (1):145-160.
    Authenticity and diversity have both become catch words in contemporary North Atlantic societies. What has not, however, been widely explored is the interrelation ofthese two ideas. To this end, the present article takes up the sometime convergent, sometime divergent writings of Charles Taylor and Martin Heidegger, drawing out their thoughts on authenticity and showing how they can serve as a ground for a new form of cultural diversity. For both, authentic being-in-the-world affords us access to our own deep reservoir of (...)
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  27.  28
    Rachel Sherman (1999). From State Introversion to State Extension in Mexico: Modes of Emigrant Incorporation, 1900-1997. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 28 (6):835-878.
  28.  20
    Benjamin R. Sherman (2015). There’s No Justice: Why Pursuit of a Virtue is Not the Solution to Epistemic Injustice. Social Epistemology 30 (3):229-250.
    Miranda Fricker’s book Epistemic Injustice calls attention to an important sort of moral and intellectual wrongdoing, that of failing to give others their intellectual due. When we fail to recognize others’ knowledge, or undervalue their beliefs and judgments, we fail in two important respects. First, we miss out on the opportunity to improve and refine our own sets of beliefs and judgments. Second—and more relevant to the term “injustice”—we can deny people the intellectual respect they deserve. Along with describing the (...)
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  29.  15
    Nancy Sherman (1995). Review: Sherman, Reasons and Feelings in Kantian Morality. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (2):369 - 377.
  30.  31
    Jacob Holsinger Sherman (2010). Nick Trakakis the End of Philosophy of Religion . (London: Continuum, 2009). Pp. VII+173. £60.00 (Hbk). Isbn 9781847065346. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 46 (3):415-420.
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  31. Nancy Sherman & Heath White (2003). Intellectual Virtue: Emotions, Luck, and the Ancients. In Linda Zagzebski & Michael DePaul (eds.), Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives From Ethics and Epistemology. New York: Oxford University Press 34--53.
     
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  32.  40
    Nancy Sherman (2010). The Moral Psychology of War. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):100-101.
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  33. Paul W. Sherman & Hudson K. Reeve (1997). Forward and Backward: Alternative Approaches to Studying Human Social Evolution. Human Nature: A Critical Reader 11:147.
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  34.  25
    Nancy Sherman (1998). Empathy, Respect, and Humanitarian Intervention. Ethics and International Affairs 12 (1):103–119.
    Sherman presents a slightly revised definition of empathy, in which empathy is the cognitive ability to place oneself in the world of another, imagining all of the realities, feelings, and circumstances of that person in the context of their world.
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  35.  14
    Jacob Sherman (2010). Metaphysics and the Redemption of Sacrifice: On René Girard and Charles Williams. Heythrop Journal 51 (1):45-59.
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  36.  21
    Nancy Sherman (2005). Being in Sync. The Philosophers' Magazine 29:49-51.
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  37. Lawrence W. Sherman (1985). Becoming Bent: Moral Careers of Corrupt Policemen. In Frederick Elliston & Michael Feldberg (eds.), Moral Issues in Police Work. Rowman & Allanheld 253--273.
     
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  38. Nancy Sherman (1993). Aristotle on the Shared Life. In Neera Kapur Badhwar (ed.), Friendship: A Philosophical Reader. Cornell University Press 91--107.
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  39.  3
    David Sherman (2016). Adorno's Negative Dialectics. Philosophy Compass 11 (7):353-363.
    The concept of negative dialectics constitutes the philosophical core of Adorno's wide-ranging thought. It reflects his attempt both to consider the status of dialectics in the face of a history that has failed to actualize its prognostications and to rework dialectics to make it adequate to his own time. Among the themes considered are Adorno's critique of conceptuality in the German idealist tradition, his critique of enlightenment reason and its relationship to capitalist society, his qualified rejection of universal history, his (...)
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  40.  33
    Thomas P. Sherman (2002). Human Happiness and the Role of Philosophical Wisdom in the Nicomachean Ethics. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (4):467-492.
    Aristotle describes human happiness as a life of virtuous activity in Book One of the Nicomachean Ethics but as a life of contemplative activity and a life of ethically virtuous activity in Book Ten. In which kind of life does Aristotle ultimately believe that happiness consists? The answer lies in the role of philosophical wisdom within ethically virtuous activity. I argue that philosophical wisdom has a dual role: its exercise is the end of ethically virtuous activity and the virtue by (...)
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  41.  19
    Nancy Sherman (1998). Concrete Kantian Respect. Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (1):119.
    When we think about Kantian virtue, what often comes to mind is the notion of respect. Respect is due to all persons merely in virtue of their status as rational agents. Indeed, on the Kantian view, specific virtues, such as duties of beneficence, gratitude, or self-perfection, are so many ways of respecting persons as free rational agents. To preserve and promote rational agency, to protect individuals from threats against rational agency, i.e., to respect persons, is at the core of virtue. (...)
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  42.  3
    Rachel Sherman & John Hickner (2008). Placebos: Current Clinical Realities. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (1):62.
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  43.  9
    Nancy Sherman (2006). Holding Doctors Responsible at Guantanamo. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (2):199-203.
  44.  1
    David L. Hamilton & Steven J. Sherman (1996). Perceiving Persons and Groups. Psychological Review 103 (2):336-355.
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  45.  47
    Thomas Sherman (2008). Wisdom and Action Guidance in the Agent-Based Virtue Ethics of Aristotle. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (4):481 - 506.
    While Aristotle in the Nicomachean Ethics does not provide a guide for action in the form of rules for a decision process as deontological or consequentialistethical theories purport to do, he does present a description of the virtuous agent and the virtues that this agent exercises in his choices of action. In this paper Iargue that Aristotle’s mature virtuous agent characteristically exercises the virtue of wisdom (sophia) as well as the practical virtues of character and intelligence in his choices of (...)
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  46. Jacob H. Sherman (2008). A Genealogy of Participation. In Jorge N. Ferrer & Jacob H. Sherman (eds.), The Participatory Turn: Spirituality, Mysticism, Religious Studies. State University of New York Press
     
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  47. Jeffrey W. Sherman, Bertram Gawronski, Karen Gonsalkorale, Kurt Hugenberg, Thomas J. Allen & Carla J. Groom (2008). The Self-Regulation of Automatic Associations and Behavioral Impulses. Psychological Review 115 (2):314-335.
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  48.  23
    Nancy Sherman (2004). "It is No Little Thing to Make Mine Eyes to Sweat Compassion": APA Comments of Martha Nussbaum's Upheavals of Thought. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (2):458–464.
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  49.  30
    Ben Sherman (2012). "First Philosophy: Fundamental Problems and Readings in Philosophy," Concise Edition, 2nd Edition, Ed. Andrew Bailey with Robert M. Martin. Teaching Philosophy 35 (4):441-445.
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  50.  7
    Glen L. Sherman (2016). Service Learning in Light of Emmanuel Levinas. Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (5):477-492.
    Emmanuel Levinas, a twentieth century French Continental philosopher, proposed an original understanding of ethics which has serious implications for the particular activities within higher education designated as service learning and community service. First I will define service learning and community service and briefly review the theoretical and philosophical justifications typically employed to substantiate and ground these activities within higher education. Next, I will explicate key aspects from Levinas’ ethical philosophy important for reconceptualizing service learning, and discuss their significance for related (...)
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