1711 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
R. Thomas [133]Ivo Thomas [78]Laurence Thomas [65]Alan Thomas [46]
David R. Thomas [41]J. David Thomas [35] Thomas [34]Michael Thomas [32]

Not all matches are shown. Search with initial or firstname to single out others.

See also:
Profile: Robert Thomas (Randolph-Macon College)
Profile: Laurence Thomas (Syracuse University)
Profile: Alan Thomas (Tilburg University)
Profile: Nigel Thomas (California State University, Los Angeles)
Profile: David Thomas (University of Maryland, College Park)
Profile: Philip Thomas (Retired)
Profile: Christine Thomas (Oklahoma State University)
Profile: George Coleman Thomas (Academy Canada)
Profile: Charlotte Carroll Smith Thomas (Mercer University)
Profile: George Thomas
Other users were found but are not shown.
  1. Alan Thomas, Moran on Self-Knowledge and Practical Agency.
    Richard Moran’s Authority and Estrangement develops a compelling explanation of the characteristic features of self-knowledge that involve the use of ‘I’ as subject. Such knowledge is immediate in the sense of non-inferential, is not evidentially grounded and is epistemically authoritative.1 A&E develops its distinctive explanation while also offering accounts of other features of self-knowledge that are often overlooked, such as the centrality of self-knowledge characterised in this way to the concept of the person and its ethical importance. Moran recognises that (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Alan Thomas, Reconciling Conscious Absorption and the Ubiquity of Self-Awareness.
    This paper argues that there are two compelling intuitions about conscious experience, the absorption intuition and the ubiquity intuition. The former is the claim that conscious experience consists in intentional absorption in its objects; the latter is the claim that conscious experience ubiquitously exhibits a sense that the mental subject is conscious that she is so conscious. These two intuitions are in tension with each other and it seems no single theory of consciousness can respect both. Drawing on the early (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Alan Thomas, Maxims and Thick Ethical Concepts: Reply to Moore.
    Adrian Moore’s paper continues the development of a radical re-interpretation of Kant’s practical philosophy initiated by his Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty. [Moore, 2003] I have discussed elsewhere why it seems to me that Moore’s work, taken as a composite with that of his co-symposiasts today Philip Stratton-Lake and Burt Louden, adds up to a comprehensive and radical re-assessment of the contemporary significance of Kant’s practical philosophy which moral philosophers generally ought not to ignore. [Thomas, 2004] Moore states that (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Alan Thomas, Practical Reasoning and Normative Relevance: A Reply to Ridge and McKeever.
    The central concern of McKeever & Ridge’s paper is with whether or not the moral particularist can formulate a defensible distinction between default and non-default reasons. [McKeever & Ridge 2004] But that issue is only of concern to the particularist, they argue, because it allows him or her to avoid a deeper problem, an unacceptable “flattening of the normative landscape”. The particularist ought, McKeever & Ridge claim, to view this corollary of his or her position as a serious embarrassment. Unpacking (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Alan Thomas, Practical Reasoning, the First Person and Impartialism About Reasons.
    This paper considers the problem posed for impartialism about reasons by the claim that practical reasoning is essentially first personal. This argument, first put forward by Bernard Williams, has an obscure rationale. Barry Stroud has suggested that in the only sense in which it is true it is misrepresents the issue which is that substituting in a particular identity to a conclusion true of anyone can change the degree of support for a practical conclusion. This paper develops a complementary line (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Alan Thomas, The Permissibility of Prerogative Grounded Incentives in Liberal Egalitarianism.
    G. A. Cohen's critique of Rawlsian special incentives has been criticised as internally inconsistent on the grounds that Cohen concedes the existence of incentives that are legitimate because they are grounded on agent-centred prerogatives. This, Cohen's critics argue, invites a slippery slope argument: there is no principled line between those incentives Cohen permits and those he condemns. This paper attempts a partial defence of Cohen: a prerogative can be granted but then its operation internally qualified. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Alan Thomas, Tilburg School of Humanities.
    This is a paper about ‘human rights pluralism’, and about how human rights’ inherent flexibility can be embraced by development policy-makers and practitioners in ways that can aid the goals of both development and human rights. The paper argues that, even though human rights are often expressed in legal terms – terms that are usually associated with the rigidity of obligation – human rights are inherently pluralistic. This is for two reasons. First, upon closer inspection, human rights laws, and especially (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David A. Thomas, Anglo-American Land Law: Diverging Developments From a Shared History - Part I: The Shared History.
    This series of three articles describes the history of land law shared by the British and American legal systems, and how and why these legal traditions have diverged from each other in modern times. This Article - part 1 in this series - describes the emerging customs and laws regarding land rights among early inhabitants of Britain, and how succeeding invasions and occupation by Celtic, Roman, Germanic, and Norman peoples altered these customs and laws. The Article details the profound changes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. David A. Thomas, Restatements Relating to Property: Why Lawyers Don't Really Care.
    This Article examines the genesis and evolution of the Restatements of Property. The author argues that, while the Restatement (First) of Property took as its original purpose to restate the law, in the course of its creation it was turned to reform. Subsequent Restatements of Property are dedicated almost wholly to reform. The author concludes that this shift in objectives has sparked criticism and rendered these works of less value and interest to the legislatures, bench and the bar, which have (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Gene Thomas & Chris Picone, Say No to GMOs! (Genetically Modified Organisms).
    Time was when you could bite a tomato and not ingest fish genes. Time was when you could eat french fries and just worry about the fat and salt, not the bacterial genes that produce insecticides in the potato. Those times are over, thanks to corporate control over both genetic engineering and the lack of food-labeling. Unless you are a “hard core” consumer of organic foods, you eat genetically engineered foods everyday. While 80-90% of US consumers believe genetically engineered foods (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Nigel J. T. Thomas, Which Part of the Brain Does Imagination Come From?
    Not long ago, I received an email from a man who had been trying to get his seven-year-old son interested in science, and teach him a little bit about the workings of the brain. He had been showing his son one of those diagrams of a brain with various regions labeled as "speech center," vision center," and the like (something similar to this, I suppose), when the little boy suddenly asked, "Daddy, which part of the brain does imagination come from?". (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Alan Thomas, Consequentialism and the Subversion of Pluralism.
    This paper critically analyses Brad Hooker's attempt to undercut pluralism by arguing that any plausible set of prima facie duties can be derived from a more fundamental rule consequentialist principle. It is argued that this conclusion is foreshadowed by the rationalist and epistemologically realist interpretation that Hooker imposes on his chosen methodology of reflective equilibrium; he is not describing pluralism in its strongest and most plausible version and a more plausible version of pluralism is described and defended.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Alan Thomas, Consequentialism, Integrity and Demandingness.
    In this paper I will develop the argument that a cognitivist and virtue ethical approach to moral reasons is the only approach that can sustain a non-alienated relation to one’s character and ethical commitments. [Thomas, 2005] As a corollary of this claim, I will argue that moral reasons must be understood as reasonably partial. A view of this kind can, nevertheless, recognise the existence of general and positive obligations to humanity. Doing so does not undermine the view by leading to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Alan Thomas, Liberal Republicanism and the Role of Civil Society.
    The political liberalism of Rawls and Larmore is presented as uniquely able to solve the problems of modern political theory. In the face of a plurality of reasonable comprehensive conceptions of the good, a legitimate liberal state can legislate solely on the basis of a modular conception of justice affirmed from within each reasonable conception. However, it is argued that this view, while restrictive, has to permit the promotion of its own pre-conditions. This demanding duty of civic restraint requires citizens (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Alan Thomas, Minimalism and Quasi-Realism.
    Expressivism's problem in solving the Frege/Geach problem concerning unasserted contexts is evaluated in the light of Blackburn's own methodological commitment to assessing philosophical theories in terms of costs and benefits, notably quasi-realism's aim of minimising the ontological commitments of a broadly naturalistic worldview. The problem emerges when a competitor theory can explain the same phenomena at lower cost: the minimalist about truth has no problem with unasserted contexts whereas the quasi-realist/expressivist package does. However, this form of projectivism is supposed to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Alan Thomas, Perceptual Knowledge, Representation and Imagination.
    The focus of this paper will be on the problem of perceptual presence and on a solution to this problem pioneered by <span class='Hi'>Kant</span> [1781; 1783] and refined by Sellars [Sellars, 1978] and Strawson [Strawson, 1971]. The problem of perceptual presence is that of explaining how our perceptual experience of the world gives us a robust sense of the presence of objects in perception over and above those sensory aspects of the object given in perception. Objects possess other properties which (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Alan Thomas, Remorse and Reparation: A Philosophical Analysis.
    The aim of this paper is to analyse the concept of remorse from the perspective of moral philosophy. This perspective may be less familiar than other approaches in this anthology, such as those of forensic psychiatry or law. In what ways does moral philosophy claim to be able to illuminate the nature of the concept of remorse? First, by presenting an account of this concept and its structure within a more general account of the nature of moral thought. Second, by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Laurence Thomas, Autonomy, Moral Behavior & the Self.
    UTONOMY IS VERY HIGHLY PRAISED as something that it is always good to have, and always good to have more of rather than less of.1 The idea seems to be that persons should be autonomous whatever else they might be, and that should act autonomously whatever else it is that they might do. Kantians are fond of saying that a person is autonomous if she or he chooses to live in accordance with the dictates of reason. This, in turn, directly (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Laurence Thomas, The West's Fear, Self-Indulgence, Silence Aid Terrorists.
    The terrorists will win because they have nothing to lose if they try and fail, whereas we here in the West have become so concerned with the amenities of life (such as our gas-guzzling SUVs) that, lest we should have to forgo them, we would rather appease evil itself.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. M. A. Thomas, The Governance Bank.
    While the cancellation of a number of high-profile loans because of corruption concerns has made headline news, the World Bank's principal approach to poorly governed countries is lending in order to support reforms. Although designed to be an apolitical technocratic development financier, increasingly the Bank has focused its attention and resources on promoting good governance in its borrowers. Bank lawyers and presidents have attempted to hive of apolitical aspects of governance by arguing a distinction between the rule of law and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Nigel Thomas, A Note on "Schema" and "Image Schema".
    The term schema (plural: schemata, or sometimes schemas) is widely used in cognitive psychology and the cognitive sciences generally to designate "psychological constructs that are postulated to account for the molar forms of human generic knowledge" (Brewer, 1999). The vagueness of this definition is no accident (and no sort of failing on Brewer's part). In fact schema is used in such very different ways by different cognitive theorists that the term has become quite notorious for its ambiguity (Miller, Polson, & (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Nigel Thomas, Avoiding the Porsche-Driving Zombie.
    It may not be too much to hope that, despite heavy reliance on the underdeveloped metaphor of "mastery", this excellent article portends the arrival of a new, more realistic paradigm for the science of perception. The attempt to explain qualitative consciousness may fail, however, unless we read the authors' position as being more metaphysically venturesome than it might superficially appear.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Nigel Thomas, The Study of Imagination as an Approach to Consciousness.
    The concept of consciousness appears to have had little currency before the 17th century. Not only did philosophers before Descartes fail to worry about how consciousness fitted into the natural world, they did not even claim to be conscious. If we are conscious, however, we must assume that they were too, and it hardly seems plausible that they could have been unaware of it. In fact, when the mind was discussed in former ages, both before and within the work of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Nigel J. T. Thomas, Attitude and Image, or, What Will Simulation Theory Let Us Eliminate?
    Stich & Ravenscroft (1994) have argued that (contrary to most people's initial assumptions) a simulation account of folk psychology may be consistent with eliminative materialism, but they fail to bring out the full complexity or the potential significance of the relationship. Contemporary eliminativism (particularly in the Churchland version) makes two major claims: the first is a rejection of the orthodox assumption that realistically construed propositional attitudes are fundamental to human cognition; the second is the suggestion that with the advancement of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Nigel J. T. Thomas, Are There People Who Do Not Experience Imagery? (And Why Does It Matter?).
    To the best of my knowledge, with the exception of Galton's original work (1880, 1883), Sommer's brief case study (1978), and Faw's (1997, 2009) articles, this is the only really substantial discussion of the phenomenon of non-brain-damaged "non-imagers" available anywhere.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Nigel J. T. Thomas, Coding Dualism: Conscious Thought Without Cartesianism or Computationalism.
    The principal temptation toward substance dualisms, or otherwise incorporating a question begging homunculus into our psychologies, arises not from the problem of consciousness in general, nor from the problem of intentionality, but from the question of our awareness and understanding of our own mental contents, and the control of the deliberate, conscious thinking in which we employ them. Dennett has called this "Hume's problem". Cognitivist philosophers have generally either denied the experiential reality of thought, as did the Behaviorists, or have (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Nigel J. T. Thomas, Images, Dreams, Hallucinations, and Active, Imaginative Perception.
    A comprehensive theory of the structure and cognitive function of the human imagination, and its relationship to perceptual experience, is developed, largely through a critique of the account propounded in Colin McGinn's Mindsight. McGinn eschews the highly deflationary (and unilluminating) views of imagination common amongst analytical philosophers, but fails to develop his own account satisfactorily because (owing to a scientifically outmoded understanding of visual perception) he draws an excessively sharp, qualitative distinction between imagination and perception (following Wittgenstein, Sartre, and others), (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. W. P. Alston, W. C. Salmon, V. Thomas, G. Nakhnikian & A. Anderson (forthcoming). Old Aquinas. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. H. C. Brown, S. Paranjothy, T. Dowswell & J. Thomas (forthcoming). Manejo Ativo Do Trabalho de Parto Para Reduzir a Taxa de Cesariana Em Mulheres de Baixo Risco. Tópicos.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John M. DeCicco & Martin Thomas (forthcoming). Vygotsky's and Buber's Pedagogical Perspectives: Some Affinities. Educational Philosophy and Theory.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. John M. DeCicco & Martin Thomas (forthcoming). Waorani Grief and the Witch-Killer's Rage: Worldview, Emotion, and Anthropological Explanation. Ethos.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. U. Gerhardt, R. Breitschwerdt & O. Thomas (forthcoming). Relapse Prevention in Drug Addiction: Addressing a Messy Problem by IS Action Research. AI and Society.
  33. Helena Halmari, Lewis Thomas, Mike Adams, GaryPavela Nancy Sommers & John R. Trimble (forthcoming). Includes Selections By. Techne.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Adrian L. R. Thomas (forthcoming). On the Tails of Birds. BioScience.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Brook Thomas (forthcoming). " Billy Budd" and the Untold Story of the Law. Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Carol G. Thomas (forthcoming). Penelope's Worth: Looming Large in Early Greece. Hermes.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Chantal Thomas & David F. Bell (forthcoming). Terror in Lyon. Substance 27 (2).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Douglas Thomas (forthcoming). Utilising Foucault's Nietzsche; Nietzsche, Genealogy, Autobiography. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. E. G. Thomas (forthcoming). Workers Who Set Own Time Clocks. Business and Society.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Emily Thomas (forthcoming). Catharine Cockburn on Substantival Space. History of Philosophy Quarterly 30(30).
  41. Guillaume Thomas (forthcoming). Nominal Tense and Temporal Implicatures: Evidence From Mbyá. Natural Language Semantics:1-56.
    In this paper, I discuss the distribution and the interpretation of the temporal suffix -kue in Mbyá, a Guaraní language that is closely related to Paraguayan Guaraní. This suffix is attested both inside noun phrases and inside clauses. Interestingly, its nominal uses give rise to inferences that are unattested in its clausal uses. These inferences were first identified in Paraguayan Guaraní by Tonhauser (PhD thesis, 2006; Language 83:831–869, 2007), who called them the existence property and the change of state property. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Heather Thomas (forthcoming). Wild Pinx. Feminist Studies.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Holli Thomas (forthcoming). Cosmopolitanism and Cultural Diversity. Logos.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. J. C. Thomas (forthcoming). Distinguishing Public Health Ethics From Medical Ethics. North Carolina Institute of Public Health. Public Health Ethics. Available At: Http://Www2. Sph. Unc. Edu/Oce/Phethics/Module1/Presentation. Htm. Accessed Apr.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. J. C. Thomas (forthcoming). Law and Ethics in Public Health. North Carolina Institute of Public Health. Public Health Ethics. Available At: Http://Www2. Sph. Unc. Edu/Oce/Phethics/Module4/Index. Htm. Accessed Apr.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. J. C. Thomas (forthcoming). The Public Health Code of Ethics. North Carolina Institute of Public Health. Public Health Ethics. Available At: Http://Www2. Sph. Unc. Edu/Oce/Phethics/Module3/Presentation. Htm. Accessed Apr.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. J. C. Thomas (forthcoming). Values and Beliefs Inherent to a Public Health Perspective. North Carolina Institute of Public Health. Public Health Ethics. Http://Www2. Sph. Unc. Edu/Oce/Phethics/Module2/Presentation. Htm. Accessed Apr.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. J. W. Thomas & J. Ward (forthcoming). Integrity as Professionalism: Ethics and Leadership in Practice. Environmental Ethics: Divergency and Convergence.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Jean-Jacques Thomas (forthcoming). The Ephemeral Era: Gilles Lipovetsky. Substance.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Jean-Jacques Thomas & Jeff Loveland (forthcoming). Poststructuralism and the New Humanism. Substance.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1711