Search results for 'feature integration' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anjali Raja Beharelle, Danielle Tisserand, Donald T. Stuss, Anthony R. Mcintosh & Brian Levine (2011). Brain Activity Patterns Uniquely Supporting Visual Feature Integration After Traumatic Brain Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 90.0
    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients typically respond more slowly and with more variability than controls during tasks of attention requiring speeded reaction time. These behavioral changes are attributable, at least in part, to diffuse axonal injury (DAI), which affects integrated processing in distributed systems. Here we use a multivariate method sensitive to distributed neural activity to compare brain activity patterns of patients with chronic phase moderate-to-severe TBI to those of controls during performance on a visual feature-integration task assessing (...)
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  2. Darinka Truebutschek & Tobias Egner (2012). Negative Emotion Does Not Modulate Rapid Feature Integration Effects. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 90.0
    Emotional arousal at encoding is known to facilitate later memory recall. In the present study, we asked whether this emotion-modulation of episodic memory is also evident at very short time scales, as measured by “feature integration effects”, the moment-by-moment binding of relevant stimulus and response features in episodic memory. This question was motivated by recent findings that negative emotion appears to potentiate 1st-order trial sequence effects in classic conflict tasks, which has been attributed to emotion-modulation of conflict-driven cognitive (...)
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  3. Anne Treisman (1980). A Feature Integration Theory of Attention. Cognitive Psychology 12:97-136.score: 75.0
  4. Bernhard Hommel, Jutta Kray & Ulman Lindenberger (2011). Feature Integration Across the Lifespan: Stickier Stimulus–Response Bindings in Children and Older Adults. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 73.0
    Humans integrate the features of perceived events and of action plans into episodic event files. Here we investigated whether children (9-10 years), younger adults (20-31 years), and older adults (64-76 years) differ in the flexibility of managing (creating and updating) event files. Relative to young adults, performance in children and older adults was more hampered by partial mismatches between present and previous stimulus-response relations, suggesting less efficient updating of episodic stimulus-response representations in childhood and old age. Results are discussed in (...)
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  5. Austen Clark (2001). Some Logical Features of Feature Integration. In Werner Backhaus (ed.), Neuronal Coding of Perceptual Systems. World Scientific. 3-20.score: 60.0
    One of the biggest challenges in understanding perception is to understand how the nervous system manages to integrate the multiple codes it uses to represent features in multiple sensory modalities. From different cortical areas, which might separately register the sight of something red and the touch of something smooth, one effortlessly generates the perception of one thing that is both red and smooth. This process has been variously called "feature integration", "binding", or "synthesis". Citing some current models and (...)
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  6. Dale J. Cohen & Michael Kubovy (1999). Even Feature Integration is Cognitively Impenetrable. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):371-372.score: 60.0
    Pylyshyn is willing to assume that attention can influence feature integration. We argue that he concedes too much. Feature integration occurs preattentively, except in the case of certain “perverse” displays, such as those used in feature-conjunction searches.
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  7. André W. Keizer Bernhard Hommel (2012). Binding Success and Failure: Evidence for the Spontaneous Integration of Perceptual Features and Object Evaluations. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 57.0
    Humans represent perceptual events in a distributed, feature-specific fashion, which called for some sort of feature integration. It has been suggested that processing an event leads to the creation of a temporary binding of the corresponding feature codes—an object file. Here we show that object files do not only comprise of perceptual feature codes but also include codes that reflect evaluations of the perceptual event.
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  8. Quoc C. Vuong Katja M. Mayer (2013). Automatic Processing of Unattended Object Features by Functional Connectivity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 48.0
    Observers can selectively attend to object features that are relevant for a task. However, unattended task-irrelevant features may still be processed and possibly integrated with the attended features. This study investigated the neural mechanisms for processing both task-relevant (attended) and task-irrelevant (unattended) object features. The Garner paradigm was adapted for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test whether specific brain areas process the conjunction of features or whether multiple interacting areas are involved in this form of feature integration. (...)
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  9. Haluk Ögmen Michael H. Herzog, Thomas U. Otto (2012). The Fate of Visible Features of Invisible Elements. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 48.0
    To investigate the integration of features, we have developed a paradigm in which an element is rendered invisible by visual masking. Still, the features of the element are visible at other elements (sequential metacontrast). In this sense, we can “transport” features non-retinotopically across space and time. The features of the invisible element integrate with features of other elements if and only if the elements belong to the same spatio-temporal group. In this case, features unconsciously integrate. The mechanisms of this (...)
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  10. Wolf Singer & Charles M. Gray (1995). Visual Feature Integration and the Temporal Correlation Hypothesis. Annual Review of Neuroscience 18:555-86.score: 45.0
  11. Bernhard Hommel, Jochen Müsseler, Gisa Aschersleben & Wolfgang Prinz (2001). The Theory of Event Coding (TEC): A Framework for Perception and Action Planning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):849-878.score: 45.0
    Traditional approaches to human information processing tend to deal with perception and action planning in isolation, so that an adequate account of the perception-action interface is still missing. On the perceptual side, the dominant cognitive view largely underestimates, and thus fails to account for, the impact of action-related processes on both the processing of perceptual information and on perceptual learning. On the action side, most approaches conceive of action planning as a mere continuation of stimulus processing, thus failing to account (...)
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  12. W. Amiri Prinzmetal (1981). Principles of Feature Integration in Visual Perception. Perception and Psychophysics 30:330-40.score: 45.0
  13. Schoenfeld Ariel (2011). Symposium Session 1. Neural Mechanisms of Feature Integration in Object Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 45.0
  14. Anjali Raja Beharelle, Danielle Tisserand, Donald T. Stuss, Anthony R. McIntosh & Brian Levine (2011). Brain Activity Patterns Uniquely Supporting Visual Feature Integration After Traumatic Brain Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 45.0
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  15. D. S. DeStefano (2000). From Feature Integration to Unified Experience: Proposed Directions for Research on the Binding Problem. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S75 - S76.score: 45.0
     
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  16. Stuss Donald (2010). Benefits of Periodic and Regular Tones on Speed and False Positives on a Feature Integration Task in Patients with Right Frontal Lesions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 45.0
  17. Bernhard Hommel (2004). Neural Mechanisms of Feature Integration. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (11):494-500.score: 45.0
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  18. Woldorff Marty (2011). The Role of Attention in Multisensory Processing and Feature Integration. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 45.0
  19. Jim Pomerantz (2012). Emergent Features, Gestalts, and Feature Integration Theory. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. 187--192.score: 45.0
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  20. William Prinzmetal (2012). At the Core of Feature Integration Theory : On Treisman and Schmidt. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. 211.score: 45.0
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  21. Lynn Robertson (2012). Sptital Deficits and Feature Integration Theory. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press.score: 45.0
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  22. Snehlata Jaswal (2013). The Process of Feature Binding. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 42.0
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  23. David Bimler, Chingis Izmailov & Galina Paramei (2013). Processing Bimodal Stimuli: Integrality/Separability of Color and Orientation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 37.0
    We examined how two distinct stimulus features, orientation and colour, interact as contributions to global stimulus dissimilarity. Five subjects rated dissimilarity between pairs of bars (N = 30) varying in colour (four cardinal hues, plus white) and orientation (six angles at 30° intervals). An exploratory analysis with individual-differences multidimensional scaling resulted in a 5D solution, with two dimensions required to accommodate the circular sequence of the angular attribute, and red-green, blue-yellow and achromatic axes for the colour attribute. Weights of the (...)
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  24. I. H. Fraser & D. M. Parker (1986). Reaction Time Measures of Feature Saliency in a Perceptual Integration Task. In. In H. Ellis, M. Jeeves, F. Newcombe & Andrew W. Young (eds.), Aspects of Face Processing. Martinus Nijhoff. 45--52.score: 36.0
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  25. Anne Treisman (1993). The Perception of Features and Objects. In A. Baddeley & L. Weiskrantz (eds.), Attention: Selection, Awareness and Control. Clarendon Press. 5-35.score: 33.0
  26. Michael Gibbert, James A. Hampton, Zachary Estes & David Mazursky (2012). The Curious Case of the Refrigerator–TV: Similarity and Hybridization. Cognitive Science 36 (6):992-1018.score: 31.0
    This article examines the role of similarity in the hybridization of concepts, focusing on hybrid products as an applied test case. Hybrid concepts found in natural language, such as singer songwriter, typically combine similar concepts, whereas dissimilar concepts rarely form hybrids. The hybridization of dissimilar concepts in products such as jogging shoe mp3 player and refrigerator TV thus poses a challenge for understanding the process of conceptual combination. It is proposed that models of conceptual combination can throw light on the (...)
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  27. Austen Clark (2004). Feature-Placing and Proto-Objects. Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):443-469.score: 30.0
    This paper contrasts three different schemes of reference relevant to understanding systems of perceptual representation: a location-based system dubbed "feature-placing", a system of "visual indices" referring to things called "proto-objects", and the full sortal-based individuation allowed by a natural language. The first three sections summarize some of the key arguments (in Clark, 2000) to the effect that the early, parallel, and pre-attentive registration of sensory features itself constitutes a simple system of nonconceptual mental representation. In particular, feature (...)--perceiving something as being both F and G, where F and G are sensible properties registered in distinct parallel streams--requires a referential apparatus. Section V. reviews some grounds for thinking that at these earliest levels this apparatus is location-based: that it has a direct and nonconceptual means of picking out places. Feature-placing is contrasted with a somewhat more sophisticated system that can identify and track four or five "perceptual objects" or "proto-objects", independently of their location, for as long as they remain perceptible. Such a system is found in Zenon Pylyshyn's fascinating work on "visual indices", in Dana Ballard's notion of deictic codes, and in Kahneman, Treisman, and Wolfe's accounts of systems of evanescent representations they call "object files". Perceptual representation is a layered affair, and I argue that it probably includes both feature-placing and proto-objects. Finally, both nonconceptual systems are contrasted with the full-blooded individuation allowed in a natural language. (shrink)
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  28. Catherine Craver-Lemley Adam Reeves (2012). Unmasking the Perky Effect: Spatial Extent of Image Interference on Visual Acuity. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 30.0
    We have previously argued that visual mental images are not substitutable for visual percepts, because the interfering effects of visual stimuli such as line maskers on visual targets differ markedly in their properties from the interfering effects of visual images (the ‘Perky effect’). Imagery interference occurs over a much wider temporal and spatial extent than masking, and unlike masking, image interference is insensitive to relative orientation. The lack of substitutability is theoretically interesting because the Perky effect can be compared meaningfully (...)
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  29. Hermann J. Müller Joseph Krummenacher (2012). Dynamic Weighting of Feature Dimensions in Visual Search: Behavioral and Psychophysiological Evidence. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 30.0
    The notion that the neural activations representing a limited set of visual features in the brain are modulated by a process prioritizing a circumscribed part of the visual field has turned out to be a powerful account of selective attention. Extensions of the original approach assuming the existence of feature-based saliency signals governing the allocation of focal attention have recently evolved to explain the spatial and temporal dynamics of the relative strengths of feature-based saliency representations. Here we review (...)
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  30. S. Orestis Palermos (2013). Knowledge and Cognitive Integration. Synthese (8):1-21.score: 27.0
    Cognitive integration is a defining yet overlooked feature of our intellect that may nevertheless have substantial effects on the process of knowledge-acquisition. To bring those effects to the fore, I explore the topic of cognitive integration both from the perspective of virtue reliabilism within externalist epistemology and the perspective of extended cognition within externalist philosophy of mind and cognitive science. On the basis of this interdisciplinary focus, I argue that cognitive integration can provide a minimalist yet (...)
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  31. Florian Waszak Arvid Herwig (2012). Action-Effect Bindings and Ideomotor Learning in Intention- and Stimulus-Based Actions. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 25.0
    According to ideomotor theory, action-effect associations are crucial for voluntary action control. Recently, a number of studies started to investigate the conditions that mediate the acquisition and application of action-effect associations by comparing actions carried out in response to exogenous stimuli (stimulus-based) with actions selected endogenously (intention-based). There is evidence that the acquisition and/or application of action-effect associations is boosted when acting in an intention-based action mode. For instance, bidirectional action-effect associations were diagnosed in a forced choice test phase if (...)
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  32. Zoe Kourtzi & Mark Augath, Integration of Local Features Into Global Shapes: Monkey and Human fMRI Studies.score: 24.0
    was to test the role of both early and higher visual areas in the integration of local features into global shapes. To this end, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Although fMRI lacks the high spatial resolution of intracortical recordings, it allows simultaneous collection of responses to the same stimulus set from multiple visual areas that is not possible with standard recording techniques. We performed these studies in monkeys, where much is known about the properties of neurons (...)
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  33. Neville Chiavaroli & Constance Ellwood (2012). The Medical Humanities and the Perils of Curricular Integration. Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (4):245-254.score: 23.0
    The advent of integration as a feature of contemporary medical curricula can be seen as an advantage for the medical humanities in that it provides a clear implementation strategy for the inclusion of medical humanities content and/or perspectives, while also making its relevance to medical education more apparent. This paper discusses an example of integration of humanities content into a graduate medical course, raises questions about the desirability of an exclusively integrated approach, and argues for the value (...)
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  34. Christopher Menzel, Basic Semantic Integration. Semantic Interoperability and Integration, Proceedings of Dagstuhl Seminar 04391.score: 21.0
    The use of highly abstract mathematical frameworks is essential for building the sort of theoretical foundation for semantic integration needed to bring it to the level of a genuine engineering discipline. At the same time, much of the work that has been done by means of these frameworks assumes a certain amount of background knowledge in mathematics that a lot of people working in ontology, even at a fairly high theoretical level, lack. The major purpose of this short paper (...)
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  35. Uriah Kriegel (2007). A Cross-Order Integration Hypothesis for the Neural Correlate of Consciousness. Consciousness & Cognition 16 (4):897-912.score: 21.0
    b>. One major problem many hypotheses regarding the neural correlate of consciousness (NCC) face is what we might call “the why question”: _why _would this particular neural feature, rather than another, correlate with consciousness? The purpose of the present paper is to develop an NCC hypothesis that answers this question. The proposed hypothesis is inspired by the Cross-Order Integration (COI) theory of consciousness, according to which consciousness arises from the functional integration of a first-order representation of an (...)
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  36. Gabriel Vacariu (2012). Cognitive Neuroscience Versus Epistemologically Different Worlds. University of Bucharest Publishing Company.score: 21.0
    From the “epistemologically different worlds” perspective, I analyze the status of cognitive neuroscience today. I investigate the main actual topics in cognitive neuroscience: localization and the brain imaging, the binding problem (Treisman’s feature integration theory and synchronized oscillations approach), differentation and integration, optimism versus skepticism approaches, perception and object recognition, space and the mind, crossmodal interactions, and the holistic view against localization. The conclusion is that this “science” has “No ontology landscape” and, therefore, cognitive neuroscience is a (...)
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  37. Werner Ceusters, Barry Smith & James Matthew Fielding (2004). LinkSuite™: Software Tools for Formally Robust Ontology-Based Data and Information Integration. In Proceedings of DILS 2004 (Data Integration in the Life Sciences), (Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics, 2994). Springer.score: 21.0
    The integration of information resources in the life sciences is one of the most challenging problems facing bioinformatics today. We describe how Language and Computing nv, originally a developer of ontology-based natural language understanding systems for the healthcare domain, is developing a framework for the integration of structured data with unstructured information contained in natural language texts. L&C’s LinkSuite™ combines the flexibility of a modular software architecture with an ontology based on rigorous philosophical and logical principles that is (...)
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  38. Lawrence Gregory Appelbaum, Sarah E. Donohue, Christina J. Park & Marty G. Woldorff (2013). Is One Enough? The Case for Non-Additive Influences of Visual Features on Crossmodal Stroop Interference. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
    When different perceptual signals arising from the same physical entity are integrated, they form a more reliable sensory estimate. When such repetitive sensory signals are pitted against other competing stimuli, such as in a Stroop Task, this redundancy may lead to stronger processing that biases behavior towards reporting the redundant stimuli. This bias would therefore be expected to evoke greater incongruency effects than if these stimuli did not contain redundant sensory features. In the present paper we report that this is (...)
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  39. Klaus Mathiak Mikhail Zvyagintsev, Carmen Parisi, Natalia Chechko, Andrey R. Nikolaev (2013). Attention and Multisensory Integration of Emotions in Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
    The impairment of multisensory integration in schizophrenia is often explained by deficits of attentional selection. Emotion perception, however, does not always depend on attention because affective stimuli can capture attention automatically. In our study, we specify the role of attention in the multisensory perception of emotional stimuli in schizophrenia. We evaluated attention by interference between conflicting auditory and visual information in two multisensory paradigms in patients with schizophrenia and healthy participants. In the first paradigm, interference occurred between physical features (...)
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  40. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration: Conference Report.score: 18.0
    This report highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011: 1. What is the relationship between the unity of consciousness and sensory integration? 2. Are some of the basic units of consciousness multimodal? 3. How should we model the unity of consciousness? 4. Is the mechanism of sensory integration spatio-temporal? 5. How Should We Study Experience, Given Unity Relations?
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  41. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, Space, Time, and Sensory Integration (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 4).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: Is the mechanism of sensory integration spatio-temporal?
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  42. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 1).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: What is the relationship between the unity of consciousness and sensory integration?
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  43. Richard Menary (2009). Intentionality, Cognitive Integration and the Continuity Thesis. Topoi 28 (1):31-43.score: 18.0
    Naturalistic philosophers ought to think that the mind is continuous with the rest of the world and should not, therefore, be surprised by the findings of the extended mind, cognitive integration and enactivism. Not everyone is convinced that all mental phenomena are continuous with the rest of the world. For example, intentionality is often formulated in a way that makes the mind discontinuous with the rest of the world. This is a consequence of Brentano’s formulation of intentionality, I suggest, (...)
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  44. Jakob Hohwy (2007). Functional Integration and the Mind. Synthese 159 (3):315-328.score: 18.0
    Different cognitive functions recruit a number of different, often overlapping, areas of the brain. Theories in cognitive and computational neuroscience are beginning to take this kind of functional integration into account. The contributions to this special issue consider what functional integration tells us about various aspects of the mind such as perception, language, volition, agency, and reward. Here, I consider how and why functional integration may matter for the mind; I discuss a general theoretical framework, based on (...)
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  45. Massimo Pigliucci (2004). Studying the Plasticity of Phenotypic Integration in a Model Organism. In M. Pigliucci K. Preston (ed.), The Evolutionary Biology of Complex Phenotypes. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    How to use a model organism to study phenotypic integration and constraints on evolution.
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  46. Massimo Pigliucci (2003). Phenotypic Integration: Studying the Ecology and Evolution of Complex Phenotypes. Ecology Letters 6:265-272.score: 18.0
    Phenotypic integration refers to the study of complex patterns of covariation among functionally related traits in a given organism. It has been investigated throughout the 20th century, but has only recently risen to the forefront of evolutionary ecological research. In this essay, I identify the reasons for this late flourishing of studies on integration, and discuss some of the major areas of current endeavour: the interplay of adaptation and constraints, the genetic and molecular bases of integration, the (...)
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  47. Gabriel Vacariu (2014). More Troubles with Cognitive Neuroscience. Einstein's Theory of Relativity and the Hyperverse. University of Bucharest Publishing Company.score: 18.0
    In Part I, Chapter 1, I introduce the EDWs perspective (from my book published in 2012)2. In Part II, I investigate more troubles with cognitive neuroscience. (For other troubles of this “science”, see Vacariu 2012, Vacariu and Vacariu 2013) In Chapter 2, I analyze in detail a particular aspect of human visual perception: spatial cognition. In order to be able to offer more arguments on the idea that cognitive neuroscience is a pseudoscience, I need to investigate spatial cognition, an essential (...)
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  48. Richard Menary (2007). Cognitive Integration: Mind and Cognition Unbounded. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 18.0
    In Cognitive Integration: Attacking The Bounds of Cognition Richard Menary argues that the real pay-off from extended-mind-style arguments is not a new form of externalism in the philosophy of mind, but a view in which the 'internal' and 'external' aspects of cognition are integrated into a whole. Menary argues that the manipulation of external vehicles constitutes cognitive processes and that cognition is hybrid: internal and external processes and vehicles complement one another in the completion of cognitive tasks. However, we (...)
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  49. Michael Lee & Mieczyslaw Wolsan (2002). Integration, Individuality and Species Concepts. Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):651-660.score: 18.0
    Integration (interaction among parts of an entity) is suggested to be necessary for individuality (contra, Metaphysics and the Origin of Species). A synchronic species is an integrated individual that can evolve as a unified whole; a diachronic lineage is a non-integrated historical entity that cannot evolve. Synchronic species and diachronic lineages are consequently suggested to be ontologically distinct entities, rather than alternative perspectives of the same underlying entity (contra Baum (1998), Syst. Biol. 47, 641–653; de Queiroz (1995), Endless Forms: (...)
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  50. Jennifer Greenwood (2011). Contingent Transcranialism and Deep Functional Cognitive Integration: The Case of Human Emotional Ontogenesis. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):420-436.score: 18.0
    Contingent transcranialists claim that the physical mechanisms of mind are not exclusively intracranial and that genuine cognitive systems can extend into cognizers' physical and socio-cultural environments. They further claim that extended cognitive systems must include the deep functional integration of external environmental resources with internal neural resources. They have found it difficult, however, to explicate the precise nature of such deep functional integration and provide compelling examples of it. Contingent intracranialists deny that extracranial resources can be components of (...)
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