Search results for 'illiberal groups and ideas' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kristian Skagen Ekeli (2012). Liberalism and Permissible Suppression of Illiberal Ideas. Inquiry 55 (2):171-193.score: 369.0
    The purpose of this paper is to consider the following question: To what extent is it permissible for a liberal democratic state to suppress the spread of illiberal ideas (including anti-democratic ideas)? I will discuss two approaches to this question. The first can be termed the clear and imminent danger approach, and the second the preventive approach. The clear and imminent danger approach implies that it is permissible for liberal states to suppress the spread of illiberal (...)
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  2. Nahshon Perez (2010). Why Tolerating Illiberal Groups is Often Incoherent. Social Theory and Practice 36 (2):291-314.score: 112.0
    This article suggests that in cases in which illiberal groups face internal disagreement, plausible liberal arguments for toleration of such groups are hard to find. Since internal disagreement is widespread, this article proposes that arguments that attempt to justify toleration vis-à-vis illiberal groups are mostly incoherent views. I differentiate this argument from a different issue, namely, whether there is a justification for an external liberal agent to actively intervene in cases in which there exists a (...)
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  3. Horatiu Crisan (2010). Sorin Adam Matei, Boierii mintii. Intelectualii romani intre grupurile de prestigiu si piata libera a ideilor/ The Mind Boyars. Romanian Intellectuals between Status Groups and the free Market of Ideas. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (9):150-151.score: 72.0
    Sorin Adam Matei, Boierii mintii. Intelectualii romani intre grupurile de prestigiu si piata libera a ideilor Ed. Compania, Bucuresti, 2004.
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  4. Corey Brettschneider (2010). When the State Speaks, What Should It Say? The Dilemmas of Freedom of Expression and Democratic Persuasion. Perspectives on Politics 8 (4):1005-1019.score: 43.0
    Hate groups are often thought to reveal a paradox in liberal thinking. On the one hand, such groups challenge the very foundations of liberal thought, including core values of equality and freedom. On the other hand, these same values underlie the rights such as freedom of expression and association that protect hate groups. Thus a liberal democratic state that extends those protections to such groups in the name of value neutrality and freedom of expression may be (...)
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  5. Carl Knight (2012). Unit-Ideas Unleashed: A Reinterpretation and Reassessment of Lovejovian Methodology in the History of Ideas. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):195-217.score: 42.0
    This article argues for an unconventional interpretation of Arthur O. Lovejoy’s distinctive approach to method in the history of ideas. It is maintained that the value of the central concept of the ‘unit-idea’ has been misunderstood by friends and foes alike. The commonality of unit-ideas at different times and places is often defined in terms of familial resemblance. But such an approach must necessarily define unit-ideas as being something other than the smallest conceptual unit. It is therefore (...)
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  6. Samir Okasha (2009). Individuals, Groups, Fitness and Utility: Multi-Level Selection Meets Social Choice Theory. Biology and Philosophy 24 (5):561-584.score: 42.0
    In models of multi-level selection, the property of Darwinian fitness is attributed to entities at more than one level of the biological hierarchy, e.g. individuals and groups. However, the relation between individual and group fitness is a controversial matter. Theorists disagree about whether group fitness should always, or ever, be defined as total (or average) individual fitness. This paper tries to shed light on the issue by drawing on work in social choice theory, and pursuing an analogy between fitness (...)
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  7. Nino B. Cocchiarella (2005). Denoting Concepts, Reference, and the Logic of Names, Classes as Many, Groups, and Plurals? Linguistics and Philosophy 28 (2):135 - 179.score: 42.0
    Bertrand Russell introduced several novel ideas in his 1903 Principles of Mathematics that he later gave up and never went back to in his subsequent work. Two of these are the related notions of denoting concepts and classes as many. In this paper we reconstruct each of these notions in the framework of conceptual realism and connect them through a logic of names that encompasses both proper and common names, and among the latter, complex as well as simple common (...)
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  8. Ali Paya & Mohammad Amin Ghaneirad (2006). The Philosopher and the Revolutionary State: How Karl Popper's Ideas Shaped the Views of Iranian Intellectuals. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (2):185 – 213.score: 42.0
    The present paper is an attempt to explore the impact of Karl Popper's ideas on the views of a number of intellectual groups in post-revolutionary Iran. Throughout the text, we have tried to make use of original sources and our own personal experiences. The upshot of the arguments of the paper is that the Viennese philosopher has made a long-lasting impression on the intellectual scene of present-day Iran in that even those socio-political groups which are not in (...)
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  9. David A. Rabson, John F. Huesman & Benji N. Fisher (2003). Cohomology for Anyone. Foundations of Physics 33 (12):1769-1796.score: 36.0
    Crystallography has proven a rich source of ideas over several centuries. Among the many ways of looking at space groups, N. David Mermin has pioneered the Fourier-space approach. Recently, we have supplemented this approach with methods borrowed from algebraic topology. We now show what topology, which studies global properties of manifolds, has to do with crystallography. No mathematics is assumed beyond what the typical physics or crystallography student will have seen of group theory; in particular, the reader need (...)
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  10. Mark Bevir (2012). In Defence of Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):111-114.score: 36.0
    Abstract This paper defends a historicist approach to the history of ideas. A historicist ontology implies that texts have meaning only for specific people, whether these be individual authors, particular readers, or the intersubjective beliefs of social groups. Texts do not have intrinsic meanings in themselves.
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  11. Keith Graham (2002). Practical Reasoning in a Social World: How We Act Together. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    In this book Keith Graham examines the philosophical assumptions behind the ideas of group membership and loyalty. Drawing out the significance of social context, he challenges individualist views by placing collectivities such as committees, classes or nations within the moral realm. He offers a new understanding of the multiplicity of sources which vie for the attention of human beings as they decide how to act, and challenges the conventional division between self-interest and altruism. He also offers a systematic (...)
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  12. Enrique Gonzalez (2012). 1810-2010: ¿doscientos años de qué? De construir un camino con 32 piedras. Apuntes Filosóficos 20 (38).score: 36.0
    Resumen Hemos querido en este ensayo presentar algunas conclusiones gruesas de la investigación que fuimos realizando desde la Cátedra de Pensamiento Latinoamericano de la Escuela de Filosofía de la UCV, desde que la fundamos (1990) hasta nuestra jubilación (2010). Nos parecen centrales las siguientes ideas para la elaboración de una filosofía de la historia de Venezuela: comprender que no hubo guerra de independencia sino de secesión pues fue una guerra civil, no confundir patria con república, pues esta es sólo (...)
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  13. Robert Thomas (2002). Idea Analysis of Algebraic Groups: A Critical Comment on George Lakoff and Rafael Núñez's Where Mathematics Comes From. Philosophical Psychology 15 (2):185 – 195.score: 32.0
    The study that George Lakoff and Rafael Núñez call "idea analysis" and begin in their recent book Where mathematics comes from is intended to dissect mathematical concepts into their metaphorical parts, where metaphor is used in the cognitive-science sense promoted by Lakoff and Mark Johnson in Metaphors we live by and subsequent works by each of them and together. Lakoff and Núñez's analysis of the (modern) algebraic concept of group is based on the attribution to contemporary mathematics of what will (...)
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  14. Simon Huttegger & Rory Smead (2011). Efficient Social Contracts and Group Selection. Biology and Philosophy 26 (4):517-531.score: 30.0
    We consider the Stag Hunt in terms of Maynard Smith’s famous Haystack model. In the Stag Hunt, contrary to the Prisoner’s Dilemma, there is a cooperative equilibrium besides the equilibrium where every player defects. This implies that in the Haystack model, where a population is partitioned into groups, groups playing the cooperative equilibrium tend to grow faster than those at the non-cooperative equilibrium. We determine under what conditions this leads to the takeover of the population by cooperators. Moreover, (...)
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  15. David Hilbert & Nick Huggett (2006). Groups in Mind. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):765-777.score: 30.0
    Both Henri Poincaré and (more recently) Roger Shepard have argued that the geometry and topology of physical space are internalized by the mind in the form, not (or not only) of a Euclidean manifold, but in terms of the group of rigid Euclidean transformations. Since this issue can have bearing on various metaphysical and epistemological questions, we explore the different reasons they offer for holding this view. In this context, we show how most commentators misunderstand Poincaré's `heated sphere/plate' model and (...)
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  16. Joan Woolfrey (2008). Group Moral Agency as Environmental Accountability. Social Philosophy Today 24:69-88.score: 30.0
    If there is such a thing as a virtuous community, as Aristotle would have it, and if members of communities need to understand themselves in relation to community, then we have a large space from within which to grapple with the issues of social responsibility. Iris Marion Young developed a “social connection model” of justice which requires individuals to think outside of the borders of any one society when considering their responsibility to others. Donald Beggs advocates for a “group moral (...)
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  17. Grant Jordan (1999). The Relevance of Bentley for Group Theory: Founding Father or Mistaken Identity? History of the Human Sciences 12 (1):27-54.score: 30.0
    A. F. Bentley’s The Process of Government (1908) is widely accepted as an important source of contemporary interest group study. This paper argues to the contrary that Bentley’s arguments in this area are obscure and have contributed little to the programme of modern interest group research. His importance is as a contributor to the debate on the nature of social science and social science method and not as the starting-point for interest group analysis. The judgement about his role as a (...)
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  18. Paul Stock (2011). “Almost a Separate Race”: Racial Thought and the Idea of Europe in British Encyclopedias and Histories, 1771–1830. Modern Intellectual History 8 (1):3-29.score: 30.0
    This article explores the association between racial thought and the idea of Europe in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain. It begins by noting the complexities surrounding the word in this period, before considering whethercontemporary race thinkers identify a or . This reveals important ambiguities and correlations between anatomical, genealogical and cultural understandings of human difference. The essay then discusses how some of these ideas find expression in British encyclopedias, histories and geographical books. In this way, it shows how (...)
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  19. Helena Valve (2012). Qualified for Evaluation? A GM Potato and the Orders of Rural Worth. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):315-331.score: 28.0
    This paper examines a small-scale attempt to support collective evaluation of a transgenic potato variety. By mobilizing Laurent Thevénot’s ideas on the connectedness of the ontological and normative, it investigates how the controversial object was associated with coordinating perspectives or orders of worth in two focus groups. In these groups, the GM potato qualified for evaluation in relation to deterministic market forces. However, it was unclear whether the potato would operate as a beneficial market asset or merely (...)
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  20. Tеtiana Boіeva (2013). Українське Державотворення Та Погляди Григорія Сковороди На Державний Устрій. Схід 5.score: 28.0
    Ukraine's integration into European economic and cultural field, building a democratic state, the emergency of new social and economic relations require finding a new national idea. Today our society needs new demands on reforming of all Ukrainian state infrastructure. In the twenty-first century in Ukraine there are two trends of the state - the Ukrainian state on the basis of conservative the Cossack era traditions and state, which it combined with the Russian and Soviet traditions. Based on the analysis of (...)
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  21. Lucy Allais (2003). Kant's Transcendental Idealism and Contemporary Anti-Realism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 11 (4):369 – 392.score: 24.0
    This paper compares Kant's transcendental idealism with three main groups of contemporary anti-realism, associated with Wittgenstein, Putnam, and Dummett, respectively. The kind of anti-realism associated with Wittgenstein has it that there is no deep sense in which our concepts are answerable to reality. Associated with Putnam is the rejection of four main ideas: theory-independent reality, the idea of a uniquely true theory, a correspondence theory of truth, and bivalence. While there are superficial similarities between both views and Kant's, (...)
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  22. Margaret P. Gilbert (1990). Walking Together: A Paradigmatic Social Phenomenon. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):1-14.score: 24.0
    The everyday concept of a social group is approached by examining the concept of going for a walk together, an example of doing something together, or "shared action". Two analyses requiring shared personal goals are rejected, since they fail to explain how people walking together have obligations and rights to appropriate behavior, and corresponding rights of rebuke. An alternative account is proposed: those who walk together must constitute the "plural subject" of a goal (roughly, their walking alongside each other). The (...)
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  23. David Sibley (1995). Geographies of Exclusion: Society and Difference in the West. Burns & Oates.score: 24.0
    Geographies of Exclusion identifies forms of social and spatial exclusion and subsequently examines the fate of knowledge of space and society which has been produced by members of excluded groups. Evaluating writing on urban society by women and black writers, David Sibley asks why such work is neglected by the academic establishment, suggesting that both the practices which result in the exclusion of minorities and those which result in the exclusion of knowledge have important implications for theory and method (...)
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  24. Richard Wollheim (1991). The Cabinet of Dr. Lacan. Topoi 10 (2):163--174.score: 24.0
    Obscurity is not the worst failing, and it is philistinism to pretend that it is. In a series of brilliant essays written over the last fifteen years Stanley Cavell has consistently argued that more important than the question whether obscurity could have been avoided is whether it affects our confidence in the author. Confidence raises the issue of intention, and I would have thought that the primary commitment of a psychoanalytic writer was to pass on, and (if he can) to (...)
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  25. Robert Bernasconi (2011). Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth as the Fulfillment of Sartre's Critique of Dialectical Reason. Sartre Studies International 16 (2):36-47.score: 24.0
    Frantz Fanon was an enthusiastic reader of Sartre's Critique of Dialectical Reason and in this essay I focus on what can be gleaned from The Wretched of the Earth about how he read it. I argue that the reputation among Sartre's critics of the Critique as a failure on the grounds that it was left incomplete should take into account its presence in Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth . Their shared perspectives on the systemic character of racism and colonialism, (...)
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  26. Martin Kusch (2002). Knowledge by Agreement: The Programme of Communitarian Epistemology. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Martin Kusch puts forth two controversial ideas: that knowledge is a social status (like money or marriage) and that knowledge is primarily the possession of groups rather than individuals. He defends the radical implications of his views: that knowledge is political, and that it varies with communities. This bold approach to epistemology is a challenge to philosophy and the wider academic world.
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  27. Linda Martin Alcoff, Latinos and the Categories of Race.score: 24.0
    Apparently, Latinos are “taking over.” 1 With news that Latinos have become the largest minority group in the United States, the public airwaves are filled with concerned voices about the impact that a non-English dominant, Catholic, non-white, largely poor population will have on “American” identity. Aside from the hysteria, Latino identity poses some authentically new questions for the standard way in which minority identities are conceptualized. Are Latinos a race, an ethnicity, or some combination? What does it mean to have (...)
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  28. Joseph Heath (2006). Business Ethics Without Stakeholders. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):533-558.score: 24.0
    One of the most influential ideas in the field of business ethics has been the suggestion that ethical conduct in a business context should be analyzed in terms of a set of fiduciary obligations toward various “stakeholder” groups. Moral problems, according to this view, involve reconciling such obligations in cases where stakeholder groups have conflicting interests. The question posed in this paper is whether the stakeholder paradigm represents the most fruitful way of articulating the moral problems that (...)
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  29. Jonathan Wolff (2006). Making the World Safe for Utilitarianism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 81 (58):1-.score: 24.0
    Utilitarianism has a curious history. Its most celebrated founders – Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill – were radical progressives, straddling the worlds of academic philosophy, political science, economic theory and practical affairs. They made innumerable recommendations for legal, social, political and economic reform, often (especially in Bentham’s case) described in fine detail. Some of these recommendations were followed, sooner or later, and many of their radical ideas have become close to articles of faith of western liberalism. Furthermore many (...)
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  30. Allan Combs & S. Kripner (2008). Collective Consciousness and the Social Brain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):264-276.score: 24.0
    This paper discusses supportive neurological and social evidence for 'collective consciousness', here understood as a shared sense of being together with others in a single or unified experience. Mirror neurons in the premotor and posterior parietal cortices respond to the intentions as well as the actions of other individuals. There are also mirror neurons in the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortices which have been implicated in empathy. Many authors have considered the likely role of such mirror systems in the (...)
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  31. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  32. M. Arslan (2001). The Work Ethic Values of Protestant British, Catholic Irish and Muslim Turkish Managers. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):321 - 339.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the work ethic characteristics of particular practising Protestant, Catholic and Muslim managers in Britain, Ireland and Turkey. Max Weber, argued that Protestant societies had a particular work ethic which was quite distinct from non-Protestant societies. The Protestant work ethics (PWE) thesis of Weber was reviewed. Previous empirical and analytical research results showed that the number of research results which support Weberian ideas were more than those which did not support. Methodological issues were also discussed. Results revealed (...)
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  33. Vanessa Sage (2009). Encountering the Wilderness, Encountering the Mist: Nature, Romanticism, and Contemporary Paganism. Anthropology of Consciousness 20 (1):27-52.score: 24.0
    This article asks how ideas about nature in the 18th and 19th century Romantic movement have traveled in and been translated by the various religious groups that constitute contemporary Paganism. Drawing on the work of poets, philosophers, historians, social scientists, and contemporary Pagans themselves, the article argues that contemporary Paganism borrows freely from Romantic notions of inspiration and imagination to craft a vision of nature, that, for them, responds to the emotional and political needs of their own time (...)
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  34. Peter Adamson & Richard C. Taylor (eds.) (2005). The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Philosophy written in Arabic and in the Islamic world represents one of the great traditions of Western philosophy. Inspired by Greek philosophical works and the indigenous ideas of Islamic theology, Arabic philosophers from the ninth century onwards put forward ideas of great philosophical and historical importance. This collection of essays, by some of the leading scholars in Arabic philosophy, provides an introduction to the field by way of chapters devoted to individual thinkers (such as al-Farabi, Avicenna and Averroes) (...)
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  35. N. White (2012). Platonic and Fregean Numbers. Philosophia Mathematica 20 (2):224-244.score: 24.0
    Rather than reading Plato's philosophy of arithmetic ‘charitably’, it is better to try to explain its failure to generate any fruitful ideas. Prominent in the explanation is Plato's focus on predicates assigning cardinalities and on ‘groups’ falling under them. This focus left Plato unable to envisage the possibility, emerging in Dedekind and Frege but which arithmetic in Plato's time would not easily have suggested, of regarding numbers as objects essentially ranged in the structure of a progression.
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  36. Timothy H. Boyer (1989). Scaling Symmetry and Thermodynamic Equilibrium for Classical Electromagnetic Radiation. Foundations of Physics 19 (11):1371-1383.score: 24.0
    At present classical physics contains two contradictory groups of derivations of the equilibrium spectrum of random classical electromagnetic radiation. One group of derivations finds Planck's spectrum based upon the use of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation and fundamental ideas of thermodynamics. The other group of derivations finds the Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum from scattering equilibrium for non-linear mechanical systems in the limit of small charge coupling to radiation. Here we examine the scaling symmetries of classical thermal radiation. We find that, in (...)
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  37. Mariale Hardiman, Luke Rinne, Emma Gregory & Julia Yarmolinskaya (2012). Neuroethics, Neuroeducation, and Classroom Teaching: Where the Brain Sciences Meet Pedagogy. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (2):135-143.score: 24.0
    The popularization of neuroscientific ideas about learning—sometimes legitimate, sometimes merely commercial—poses a real challenge for classroom teachers who want to understand how children learn. Until teacher preparation programs are reconceived to incorporate relevant research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences, teachers need translation and guidance to effectively use information about the brain and cognition. Absent such guidance, teachers, schools, and school districts may waste time and money pursuing so called brain-based interventions that lack a firm basis in research. Meanwhile, (...)
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  38. Andrew Altman (2009). A Liberal Theory of International Justice. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This book advances a novel theory of international justice that combines the orthodox liberal notion that the lives of individuals are what ultimately matter morally with the putatively antiliberal idea of an irreducibly collective right of self-governance. The individual and her rights are placed at center stage insofar as political states are judged legitimate if they adequately protect the human rights of their constituents and respect the rights of all others. Yet, the book argues that legitimate states have a moral (...)
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  39. Robert C. Solomon (2003). Living with Nietzsche: What the Great "Immoralist" has to Teach Us. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Friedrich Nietzsche is one of the most popular and controversial philosophers of the last 150 years. Narcissistic, idiosyncratic, hyperbolic, irreverent--never has a philosopher been appropriated, deconstructed, and scrutinized by such a disparate array of groups, movements, and schools of thought. Adored by many for his passionate ideas and iconoclastic style, he is also vilified for his lack of rigor, apparent cruelty, and disdain for moral decency. In Living with Nietzsche, Solomon suggests that we read Nietzsche from a very (...)
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  40. Joel Velasco (2013). Phylogeny as Population History. Philosophy and Theory in Biology 5 (20130604).score: 24.0
    The project of this paper is to understand what a phylogenetic tree represents and to discuss some of the implications that this has for the practice of systematics. At least the first part of this task, if not both parts, might appear trivial—or perhaps better suited for a single page in a textbook rather than a scholarly research paper. But this would be a mistake. While the task of interpreting phylogenetic trees is often treated in a trivial way, their interpretation (...)
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  41. Timothy H. Boyer (2007). Connecting Blackbody Radiation, Relativity, and Discrete Charge in Classical Electrodynamics. Foundations of Physics 37 (7):999-1026.score: 24.0
    It is suggested that an understanding of blackbody radiation within classical physics requires the presence of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, the restriction to relativistic (Coulomb) scattering systems, and the use of discrete charge. The contrasting scaling properties of nonrelativistic classical mechanics and classical electrodynamics are noted, and it is emphasized that the solutions of classical electrodynamics found in nature involve constants which connect together the scales of length, time, and energy. Indeed, there are analogies between the electrostatic forces for (...) of particles of discrete charge and the van der Waals forces in equilibrium thermal radiation. The differing Lorentz- or Galilean-transformation properties of the zero-point radiation spectrum and the Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum are noted in connection with their scaling properties. Also, the thermal effects of acceleration within classical electromagnetism are related to the existence of thermal equilibrium within a gravitational field. The unique scaling and phase-space properties of a discrete charge in the Coulomb potential suggest the possibility of an equilibrium between the zero-point radiation spectrum and matter which is universal (independent of the particle mass), and an equilibrium between a universal thermal radiation spectrum and matter where the matter phase space depends only upon the ratio mc 2/k B T. The observations and qualitative suggestions made here run counter to the ideas of currently accepted quantum physics. (shrink)
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  42. Ingrid Creppell (2001). Montaigne: The Embodiment of Identity as Grounds for Toleration. Res Publica 7 (3):247-271.score: 24.0
    One of the most important issues today is the conflict between identity groups. Can the concept of toleration provide resources for thinking about this? The standard definition of toleration – rejection or disapproval of a practice or belief followed by a constraint of oneself from repressing it –has limits. If we seek to make political and social conditions of toleration among diverse people a stable reality, we need to flesh out more deeply and widely what that depends upon. The (...)
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  43. Sune lægaard (2005). On the Prospects for a Liberal Theory of Recognition. Res Publica 11 (4):325-348.score: 24.0
    Multiculturalist theories of recognition consist of explanatory-descriptive social theoretical accounts of the position of the minorities whose predicaments the theories seek to address, together with normative principles generating political implications. Although theories of recognition are often based on illiberal principles or couched in illiberal-sounding language, it is possible to combine proper liberal principles with the kind of social theoretical accounts of minority groups highlighted in multiculturalism. The importance of ‘the social bases of self-respect’ in Rawls’s political liberalism (...)
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  44. Bert Schroer (2010). A Critical Look at 50 Years Particle Theory From the Perspective of the Crossing Property. Foundations of Physics 40 (12):1800-1857.score: 24.0
    The crossing property is perhaps the most subtle aspect of the particle-field relation. Although it is not difficult to state its content in terms of certain analytic properties relating different matrixelements of the S-matrix or formfactors, its relation to the localization- and positive energy spectral principles requires a level of insight into the inner workings of QFT which goes beyond anything which can be found in typical textbooks on QFT. This paper presents a recent account based on new ideas (...)
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  45. Mark J. Sedgwick (2004). Against the Modern World: Traditionalism and the Secret Intellectual History of the Twentieth Century. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Against the Modern World is the first history of Traditionalism, an important yet surprisingly little-known twentieth-century anti-modern movement. Comprising a number of often secret but sometimes very influential religious groups in the West and in the Islamic world, it affected mainstream and radical politics in Europe and the development of the field of religious studies in the United States, touching the lives of many individuals. French writer Rene Guenon rejected modernity as a dark age and sought to reconstruct the (...)
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  46. Jonathan I. Israel (2011). Democratic Enlightenment: Philosophy, Revolution, and Human Rights 1750-1790. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    That the Enlightenment shaped modernity is uncontested. Yet remarkably few historians or philosophers have attempted to trace the process of ideas from the political and social turmoil of the late eighteenth century to the present day. This is precisely what Jonathan Israel now does. In Democratic Enlightenment , Israel demonstrates that the Enlightenment was an essentially revolutionary process, driven by philosophical debate. The American Revolution and its concerns certainly acted as a major factor in the intellectual ferment that shaped (...)
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  47. Marion Hersh (forthcoming). Science, Technology and Values: Promoting Ethics and Social Responsibility. AI and Society:1-17.score: 24.0
    The paper discusses the limitations of engineering ethics as implemented in practice, with a focus on the fact that engineering and other activities are carried out without any consideration of whether the activities are themselves ethical, and on the gap between legality and ethics. This leads to the following three central ideas of the paper. The first is the need for engineers to both be aware of and critique their own values and be able to widen their perspective to (...)
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  48. Neil Burtonwood (2006). Cultural Diversity, Liberal Pluralism and Schools: Isaiah Berlin and Education. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Culturally diverse liberal democracies on both sides of the Atlantic are currently faced with serious questions about the education of their future citizens. What is the balance between the need for social cohesion, and at the same time dealing justly with the demands for exemptions and accommodations from cultural and religious minorities? In contemporary Britain, the importance of this question has been recently highlighted by the concern to develop political and educational strategies capable of countering the influence of extremist voices, (...)
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  49. José Cegarra (2012). Social Imaginary Theoretical-epistemological Basis. Cinta de Moebio 43 (43):01-13.score: 24.0
    This paper aims to analyze social imaginary theoretical-epistemological basis. First, it defined the term social imaginary in relation to other similar or derivative, imagination, social representation and others. They settled their differences and finally developed the ideas of the most important authors on the subject, Moscovici, Abric, Castoriadis, Durand, Carter, Baeza, Pintos. It was concluded that the social imaginary are 1) interpretations in reality, 2) socially legitimized, 3) material manifestation as speech, symbols, attitudes, affective appraisals, knowledge legitimated 4) historically (...)
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