Search results for 'incarnational theology, the Jungian Self, the Imago Dei, neuroscience,' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter B. Todd (ed.) (2012). The Individuation of God:Integrating Science and Religion. Chiron Publications.
    Todd argues for the integration of science and religion to form a new paradigm for the third millennium. He counters both the arguments made by fundamentalist Christians against science and the rejection of religion by the New Atheists, in particular Richard Dawkins and his followers. Drawing on the work of scientists, psychologists, philosophers, and theologians, Todd challenges the materialistic reductionism of our age and offers an alternative grounded in the visionary work taking place in a wide array of disciplines including (...)
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  2.  10
    Christopher Carter (2014). The Imago Dei as the Mind of Jesus Christ. Zygon 49 (3):752-760.
    In this essay I examine David Clough's interpretation of the imago Dei and his use of “creaturely” language in his book On Animals: Volume 1, Systematic Theology. Contrary to Clough, I argue that the imago Dei should be interpreted as being uniquely human. Using a neuroscientific approach, I elaborate on my claim that while Jesus is the image of God perfected, the imago Dei is best understood as having the mind of Christ. In regards to language, I (...)
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  3.  27
    David Fergusson (2013). Humans Created According to the Imago Dei: An Alternative Proposal. Zygon 48 (2):439-453.
    Classical approaches to the idea of the imago Dei in the theology of creation have tended to postulate a distinctive element of the human being not found in other creatures, with the possible exception of angels. This is often combined with attempts to use the imago concept as an organizing principle within Christian theology. Such approaches are now problematic not merely on account of their exegetical findings, but for methodological reasons. In light of recent exegesis, the imago (...)
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  4.  13
    Ivan Colagè (2015). The Human Being Shaping and Transcending Itself: Written Language, Brain, and Culture. Zygon 50 (4):1002-1021.
    Recent theological anthropology emphasizes a dynamic and integral understanding of the human being, which is also related to Karl Rahner's idea of active self-transcendence and to the imago Dei doctrine. The recent neuroscientific discovery of the “visual word form area” for reading, regarded in light of the concept of cultural neural reuse, will produce fresh implications for the interrelation of brain biology and human culture. The theological and neuroscientific parts are shown in their mutual connections thus articulating the notion (...)
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  5.  26
    Aku Visala (2014). Imago Dei, Dualism, and Evolution: A Philosophical Defense of the Structural Image of God. Zygon 49 (1):101-120.
    Most contemporary theologians have distanced themselves from views that identify the image of God with a capacity or a set of capacities that humans have. This article examines three arguments against the structural view and finds them wanting. The first argument is that the structural view entails mind/body dualism and dualism is no longer viable given neuroscience and contemporary philosophy. Against this, I argue that contemporary forms of dualism are able to circumvent such worries and are at least prima facie (...)
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  6. Taede A. Smedes (2014). Emil Brunner Revisited: On the Cognitive Science of Religion, the Imago Dei, and Revelation. Zygon 49 (1):190-207.
    This article aims at a constructive and argumentative engagement between the cognitive science of religion (CSR) and philosophical and theological reflection on the imago Dei. The Swiss theologian Emil Brunner argued that the theological notion that humans were created in the image of God entails that there is a “point of contact” for revelation to occur. This article argues that Brunner's notion resonates quite strongly with the findings of the CSR. The first part will give a short overview of (...)
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  7.  8
    Peter B. Todd, A Copernican Revolution in Science and Religion Towards a Third Millennium Spirituality:The Entangled State of God and Humanity. Symposium Conference Paper, C. G. Jung Society of Melbourne, May 21, 2016.
    As the title, The Entangled State of God and Humanity suggests, this lecture dispenses with the pre-Copernican, patriarchal, anthropomorphic image of God while presenting a case for a third millennium theology illuminated by insights from archetypal depth psychology, quantum physics, neuroscience and evolutionary biology. It attempts to smash the conceptual barriers between science and religion and in so doing, it may contribute to a Copernican revolution which reconciles both perspectives which have been apparently irreconcilable opposites since the sixteenth century. The (...)
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  8.  24
    Johan De Smedt & Helen De Cruz (2014). The Imago Dei as a Work in Progress: A Perspective From Paleoanthropology. Zygon 49 (1):135-156.
    This article considers the imago Dei from the perspective of paleoanthropology. We identify structural, functional, and relational elements of the imago Dei that emerged mosaically during human evolution. Humans are unique in their ability to relate to each other and to God, and in their membership of cultural communities where shared attention, the transmission of moral norms, and symbolic behavior are important elements. We discuss similarities between our approach and the concept of theosis adopted in the Eastern Orthodox (...)
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  9.  19
    Helen De Cruz & Yves Maeseneer (2014). The Imago Dei: Evolutionary and Theological Perspectives. Zygon 49 (1):95-100.
    This short article provides an introduction to a special section, consisting of six papers on human evolution and the imago Dei. These papers are the result of dialogue between theologians and philosophers of religion at the University of Oxford and the Catholic University of Leuven. All contributors focus on the imago Dei, and consider how this theological notion can be understood from an evolutionary perspective, looking at a variety of disciplines, including the psychology of reasoning, cognitive science of (...)
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  10.  11
    Joseph Rivera (2013). Figuring the Porous Self: St. Augustine and the Phenomenology of Temporality. Modern Theology 29 (1):83-103.
    This article examines the phenomenological structures of the homo temporalis filtered through Augustine's illuminating, if unsystematic, insights on temporality and the imago Dei. It situates such a phenomenological interpretation of the Augustinian self in view of current interpretations that polarize or split the Augustinian self into an either/or scheme—either an “interior” self or an “exterior” self. Given this imbalance, the article suggests that a phenomenological evaluation of Augustine brings to light how interior and exterior spheres are deeply integrated. The (...)
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  11.  14
    Olli‐Pekka Vainio (2014). Imago Dei and Human Rationality. Zygon 49 (1):121-134.
    There is a pervasive trend in Western theology to identify imago Dei with human intellectual and cognitive capacities. However, several contemporary theologians have criticized this view because, according to the critics, it leads to a truncated view of humanity. In this article, I shall concentrate on the question of rationality, first, through theologies of Thomas Aquinas and contemporary Lutheran Robert Jenson, and second, in some branches of recent cognitive psychology. I will argue that there is a significant overlap between (...)
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  12.  26
    Michael L. Spezio (2013). Social Neuroscience and Theistic Evolution: Intersubjectivity, Love, and the Social Sphere. Zygon 48 (2):428-438.
    After providing a brief overview of social neuroscience in the context of strong embodiment and the cognitive sciences, this paper addresses how perspectives from the field may inform how theological anthropology approaches the origins of human persons-in-community. An overview of the Social Brain Hypothesis and of simulation theory reveals a simultaneous potential for receptive/projective processes to facilitate social engagement and the need for intentional spontaneity in the form of a spiritual formation that moves beyond simulation to empathy and love. Finally, (...)
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  13. Palmyre M. F. Oomen (2003). On Brain, Soul, Self, and Freedom: An Essay in Bridging Neuroscience and Faith. Zygon 38 (2):377-392.
    The article begins at the intellectual fissure between many statements coming from neuroscience and the language of faith and theology. First I show that some conclusions drawn from neuroscientific research are not as firm as they seem: neuroscientific data leave room for the interpretation that mind matters. I then take a philosophical-theological look at the notions of soul, self, and freedom, also in the light of modern scientific research (self-organization, neuronal networks), and present a view in which these theologically important (...)
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  14.  69
    J. Decety & T. Chaminade (2003). When the Self Represents the Other: A New Cognitive Neuroscience View on Psychological Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):577-596.
    There is converging evidence from developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as from neuroscience, to suggest that the self is both special and social, and that self-other interaction is the driving force behind self-development. We review experimental findings which demonstrate that human infants are motivated for social interactions and suggest that the development of an awareness of other minds is rooted in the implicit notion that others are like the self. We then marshal evidence from functional neuroimaging explorations of the (...)
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  15.  7
    Gavin Miller (2009). R. D. Laing and Theology: The Influence of Christian Existentialism on The Divided Self. History of the Human Sciences 22 (2):1-21.
    The radical psychiatrist R. D. Laing's first book, The Divided Self (1960), is informed by the work of Christian thinkers on scriptural interpretation — an intellectual genealogy apparent in Laing's comparison of Karl Jaspers's symptomatology with the theological tradition of `form criticism'. Rudolf Bultmann's theology, which was being enthusiastically promoted in 1950s Scotland, is particularly influential upon Laing. It furnishes him with the notion that schizophrenic speech expresses existential truths as if they were statements about the physical and organic world. (...)
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  16. Y. Michael Barilan (2009). From Imago Dei in the Jewish-Christian Traditions to Human Dignity in Contemporary Jewish Law. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (3):pp. 231-259.
    The article surveys and analyzes the roles in Judaism of the value of imago Dei/human dignity, especially in bioethical contexts. Two main topics are discussed. The first is a comparative analysis of imago Dei as an anthropological and ethical concept in Jewish and Western thought (Christianity and secular European values). The Jewish tradition highlights the human body and especially its procreative function and external appearance as central to imago Dei. The second is the role of imago (...)
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  17.  23
    A. Pannese (2011). The 'I' of the Beholder: Studying the 'Self' Across the Humanities and Neuroscience. Medical Humanities 37 (2):115-122.
    Long debated within the humanistic tradition, the concept of ‘self’ has recently been embraced as a subject of investigation by cognitive neuroscience. Tracing parallels between ancient philosophical ideas and current-day scientific research on the ‘self’, the author proposes that contemporary knowledge based on empirical neuroscientific evidence may inform novel perspectives on—and draw inspiration from—notions grounded in ancient intuitions and traditionally falling within humanistic fields of enquiry. Further, the author suggests that the ‘self’, as a major object of philosophical and psychological (...)
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  18.  34
    C. Mesle (2011). J. P. Moreland: The Recalcitrant Imago Dei: Human Persons and the Failure of Naturalism. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (1):103-106.
    J. P. Moreland: The Recalcitrant Imago Dei : Human Persons and the Failure of Naturalism Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11153-010-9240-y Authors C. Robert Mesle, Graceland University 10003, 290th St. Lamoni IA 50140 USA Journal International Journal for Philosophy of Religion Online ISSN 1572-8684 Print ISSN 0020-7047.
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  19.  24
    Tilo Kircher & Anthony S. David (eds.) (2003). The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press.
  20. Jose Luis Bermudez (2000). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Primitive Self-Consciousness. Psycoloquy 11 (35).
    Myin, Erik (2000) Direct Self-Consciousness (2)Bermúdez, José Luis (2000) Concepts and the Priority Principle (10)Bermúdez, José Luis (2000) Circularity, "I"-Thoughts and the Linguistic Requirement for Concept Possession (11)Meeks, Roblin R. (2000) Withholding Immunity: Misidentification, Misrepresentation, and Autonomous Nonconceptual Proprioceptive First-Person Content (12)Newen, Albert (2001) Kinds of Self-Consciousness (13)Bermudez, Jose Luis (2000) Direct Self-Consciousness (4)Bermudez, Jose Luis (2000) Prelinguistic Self-Consciousness (5)Gallese, Vittorio (2000) The Brain and the Self: Reviewing the Neuroscientific Evidence (6)Bermudez, Jose Luis (2000) The Cognitive Neuroscience of Primitive Self-Consciousness (...)
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  21.  2
    Leroy T. Howe (1976). Self-Consciousness and the Normative in Christian Theology. Religious Studies 12 (3):319 - 330.
    If Christian theology is that enterprise whose essential purpose is to understand the faith of the Christian Church, then it must approach that faith from the perspective not only of its transcendent source, but also as a human achievement, a creative interpretation of those events in which transcendent reality discloses itself for appropriation. Few theologians would deny that theology has to do primarily with the ways in which ultimate reality becomes manifest in human beings' faithful responses, in belief and trust, (...)
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  22. Keith Wilson (2004). Chungyung and Jung: Self-Cultivation in the Confucian Chungyung and Jungian Individuation. Dissertation, California Institute of Integral Studies
    Many writers have commented on the striking similarities between Chinese philosophy and the depth psychology of Carl Jung following Jung's own interest in the topic. Although previous studies have focused almost exclusively on the Taoist classics, remarkably, the Confucian tradition is potentially even more affirmative of Jung's ideas. Confucian humanist philosophy is commonly perceived to be a rigid system of social morality, when it is really concerned with nurturing authentic individuality in order to influence the world and establish universal harmony. (...)
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  23.  22
    Georg Northoff & Alexander Heinzel (2003). The Self in Philosophy, Neuroscience and Psychiatry: An Epistemic Approach. In Tilo Kircher & Anthony S. David (eds.), The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press 40.
  24. Mario Jacoby (1993). Shame and the Origins of Self-Esteem: A Jungian Approach. Routledge.
    Shame is one of our most central feelings and a universal human characteristic. Why do we experience it? For what purpose? How can we cope with excessive feelings of shame? In an elegant exposition informed by many years of helping people to understand feelings of shame, leading Jungian analyst Mario Jacoby provides a timely and comprehensive exploration of the many aspects of shame and shows how it occupies a central place in our emotional experience. Jacoby shows a lack of (...)
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  25.  10
    Peter B. Todd, The Entangled State of God and Humanity. Asheville Jung Center Webinar Series, 22.
    As the title, The Entangled State of God and Humanity suggests, this webinar dispenses with the pre-Copernican, patriarchal, anthropomorphic image of God while presenting a case for a third millennium theology illuminated by insights from archetypal depth psychology, quantum physics, neuroscience and evolutionary biology. It attempts to smash the conceptual barriers between science and religion. The published work of C.G. Jung, Wolfgang Pauli, David Bohm and Teilhard de Chardin outline a process whereby matter evolves in increasing complexity from sub-atomic particles (...)
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  26.  4
    Leslie A. Muray (2007). Human Uniqueness Vs. Human Distinctiveness: The "Imago Dei" in the Kinship of All Creatures. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 28 (3):299 - 310.
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  27.  97
    Stephen Mulhall (2011). Theology and Narrative: The Self, the Novel, the Bible. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (1):29-43.
    This paper critically evaluates the work of Charles Taylor and Alasdair MacIntyre by comparing their understanding of the narrative structure of selfhood with paradigms derived from three other sources: Heidegger’s conception of human being as Dasein; Rowan Williams’ interpretation of Dostoevsky’s theology of narrative; and Kierkegaard’s project of reading the Old Testament narrative of Abraham and Isaac as part of the Christian God’s autobiography. These comparisons suggest that Taylor and MacIntyre’s own narratives of Western culture lack a certain, theologically required (...)
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  28.  2
    Seth J. Gillihan & Martha J. Farah (2005). The Cognitive Neuroscience of the Self: Insights From Functional Neuroimaging of the Normal Brain. In Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan (eds.), The Lost Self: Pathologies of the Brain and Identity. Oxford University Press 20--32.
  29.  27
    Maureen Junker-Kenny & Peter P. Kenny (eds.) (2004). Memory, Narrativity, Self and the Challenge to Think God: The Reception Within Theology of the Recent Work of Paul Ricoeur. Lit.
    This book explores the usefulness of major categories of Paul Ricoeur's work, such as "memory, " "narrativity, " and his conception of self, within different ...
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  30. Gerald P. Boersma (2016). Augustine's Early Theology of Image: A Study in the Development of Pro-Nicene Theology. Oxford University Press Usa.
    What does it mean for Christ to be the "image of God"? And, if Christ is the "image of God," can the human person also unequivocally be understood to be the "image of God"? Augustine's Early Theology of Image examines Augustine's conception of the imago dei and makes the case that it represents a significant departure from the Latin pro-Nicene theologies of Hilary of Poitiers, Marius Victorinus, and Ambrose of Milan only a generation earlier. Augustine's predecessors understood the (...) dei principally as a Christological term designating the unity of divine substance. But, Gerald P. Boersma argues, Augustine affirms that Christ is an image of equal likeness, while the human person is an image of unequal likeness. Boersma's careful study thus argues that a Platonic and participatory evaluation of the nature of "image" enables Augustine's early theology of the image of God to move beyond that of his Latin predecessors and affirm the imago dei both of Christ and of the human person. (shrink)
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  31.  9
    James A. Van Slyke (ed.) (2012). Theology and the Science of Moral Action: Virtue Ethics, Exemplarity, and Cognitive Neuroscience. Routledge.
    More particularly, the book evaluates the concept of moral exemplarity and its significance in philosophical and theological ethics as well as for ongoing research programs in the cognitive sciences.
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  32.  5
    David H. Calhoun (2012). Human Exceptionalism and the Imago Dei. In Stephen Dilley & Nathan J. Palpant (eds.), Human Dignity in Bioethics: From Worldviews to the Public Square. Routledge 13--19.
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  33.  10
    Fred Lawrence (2009). Lonergan's Retrieval of Thomas Aquinas's Conception of the Imago Dei. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (3):363-388.
    This paper sets forth and advocates Bernard Lonergan’s understanding of Aquinas’s use of “intelligible emanations” as an analogy for processions in the Trinity. It argues that some of Lonergan’s views on consciousness, understanding, phronesis, and judgement are similar to views expressed in Hans-Georg Gadamer’s Truth and Method and John Henry Newman’s An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent.
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  34. J. Andrew Dearman (2002). Theophany, Anthropomorphism, and the Imago Dei: Some Observations About the Incarnation in the Light of the Old Testament. In Stephen T. Davis, Daniel Kendall & Gerald O'Collins (eds.), The Incarnation. Oxford Up 31--46.
     
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  35. Michael A. Dauphinais (1999). Loving the Lord Your God: The Imago Dei in Saint Thomas Aquinas. The Thomist 63 (2):241-267.
     
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  36. Matthew Levering (2008). The Imago Dei in David Novak and Thomas Aquinas: A Jewish-Christian Dialogue. The Thomist 72 (2):259-311.
     
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  37.  10
    W. Sibley Towner (forthcoming). Book Review: The Liberating Image: The Imago Dei in Genesis 1. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (4):408-410.
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  38.  3
    F. LeRon Shults (1997). Constitutive Relationality in Anthropology and Trinity: The Shaping of the Imago Dei Doctrine in Barth and Pannenberg. Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 39 (3):304-322.
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  39.  8
    Michel René Barnes (2002). Divine Unity and the Divided Self: Gregory of Nyssa's Trinitarian Theology in its Psychological Context. Modern Theology 18 (4):475-496.
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  40.  3
    Ann W. Astell (2005). Biblical Images of God and the Reader's “I” as Imago Dei The Contribution of Edith Stein. Interpretation 59 (4):382-391.
    Amidst Nazi persecution, Edith Stein discovered in the biblical images of God a mystical path of identity formation leading to a transformative union with Christ.
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  41.  11
    Michael S. Jones, Imago Dei and the Appreciation of Beauty.
    "Man does not live by bread alone ... " Human life embraces more than just 'living' (material survival); the human soul thrives on many ambiguous metaphysical elements. One of these elements is beauty. The question motivating this article is the ubiquitous 'why'; why do people find beauty in various elements of their environment? Put another way, what is it that enables one to appreciate beauty? The thesis of this article is that a person's ability to appreciate beauty is a result (...)
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  42.  2
    Wolfhart Pannenberg (1993). The Religions From the Perspective of Christian Theology and the Self‐Interpretation of Christianity in Relation to the Non‐Christian Religions. Modern Theology 9 (3):285-297.
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  43. M. Martínez Mateo, M. Cabanis, J. Stenmanns & S. Krach (2013). Essentializing the Binary Self: Individualism and Collectivism in Cultural Neuroscience. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
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  44.  7
    David Vincent Meconi (2000). Grata Sacris Angelis: Gender and the Imago Dei in Augustine's De Trinitate XII. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 74 (1):47-62.
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  45.  3
    Thomas G. Weinandy (2003). 2. St. Irenaeus and the Imago Dei: The Importance of Being Human. Logos 6 (4).
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  46. Craig A. Boyd (2007). Participation Metaphysics, The Imago Dei, and the Natural Law in Aquinas' Ethics. New Blackfriars 88 (1015):274-287.
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  47. Joel Green (2010). Theological Accounts of Human Distinctiveness : The Imago Dei. Humanity : Created, Restored, Transformed, Embodied. In Malcolm A. Jeeves (ed.), Rethinking Human Nature: A Multidisciplinary Approach. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Company
     
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  48. Ian Hislop (1944). Victorinus and the Imago Dei. New Blackfriars 25 (296):429-434.
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  49.  13
    Janusz A. Polanowski (2012). “The “Imago” of the Self Within Whitehead's Metaphysics”. Process Studies 39 (2):381-382.
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  50.  20
    Andrew J. Jaeger (2011). The Recalcitrant Imago Dei, By: J.P. Moreland. [REVIEW] American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):507-510.
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