Search results for 'incarnational theology, the Jungian Self, the Imago Dei, neuroscience,' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter B. Todd (ed.) (2012). The Individuation of God:Integrating Science and Religion. Chiron Publications.score: 3846.0
    Todd argues for the integration of science and religion to form a new paradigm for the third millennium. He counters both the arguments made by fundamentalist Christians against science and the rejection of religion by the New Atheists, in particular Richard Dawkins and his followers. Drawing on the work of scientists, psychologists, philosophers, and theologians, Todd challenges the materialistic reductionism of our age and offers an alternative grounded in the visionary work taking place in a wide array of disciplines including (...)
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  2. Christopher Carter (2014). The Imago Dei as the Mind of Jesus Christ. Zygon 49 (3):752-760.score: 1423.1
    In this essay I examine David Clough's interpretation of the imago Dei and his use of “creaturely” language in his book On Animals: Volume 1, Systematic Theology. Contrary to Clough, I argue that the imago Dei should be interpreted as being uniquely human. Using a neuroscientific approach, I elaborate on my claim that while Jesus is the image of God perfected, the imago Dei is best understood as having the mind of Christ. In regards to language, I (...)
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  3. Palmyre M. F. Oomen (2003). On Brain, Soul, Self, and Freedom: An Essay in Bridging Neuroscience and Faith. Zygon 38 (2):377-392.score: 531.0
    The article begins at the intellectual fissure between many statements coming from neuroscience and the language of faith and theology. First I show that some conclusions drawn from neuroscientific research are not as firm as they seem: neuroscientific data leave room for the interpretation that mind matters. I then take a philosophical-theological look at the notions of soul, self, and freedom, also in the light of modern scientific research (self-organization, neuronal networks), and present a view in which these theologically important (...)
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  4. Peter B. Todd, The Entangled State of God and Humanity. Asheville Jung Center Webinar Series, 22.score: 483.8
    As the title, The Entangled State of God and Humanity suggests, this webinar dispenses with the pre-Copernican, patriarchal, anthropomorphic image of God while presenting a case for a third millennium theology illuminated by insights from archetypal depth psychology, quantum physics, neuroscience and evolutionary biology. It attempts to smash the conceptual barriers between science and religion. The published work of C.G. Jung, Wolfgang Pauli, David Bohm and Teilhard de Chardin outline a process whereby matter evolves in increasing complexity from sub-atomic particles (...)
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  5. James A. Van Slyke (ed.) (2012). Theology and the Science of Moral Action: Virtue Ethics, Exemplarity, and Cognitive Neuroscience. Routledge.score: 443.3
    More particularly, the book evaluates the concept of moral exemplarity and its significance in philosophical and theological ethics as well as for ongoing research programs in the cognitive sciences.
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  6. Michael L. Spezio (2011). The Neuroscience of Emotion and Reasoning in Social Contexts: Implications for Moral Theology. Modern Theology 27 (2):339-356.score: 414.0
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  7. Aku Visala (2014). Imago Dei, Dualism, and Evolution: A Philosophical Defense of the Structural Image of God. Zygon 49 (1):101-120.score: 341.3
    Most contemporary theologians have distanced themselves from views that identify the image of God with a capacity or a set of capacities that humans have. This article examines three arguments against the structural view and finds them wanting. The first argument is that the structural view entails mind/body dualism and dualism is no longer viable given neuroscience and contemporary philosophy. Against this, I argue that contemporary forms of dualism are able to circumvent such worries and are at least prima facie (...)
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  8. Michael L. Spezio (2013). Social Neuroscience and Theistic Evolution: Intersubjectivity, Love, and the Social Sphere. Zygon 48 (2):428-438.score: 317.5
    After providing a brief overview of social neuroscience in the context of strong embodiment and the cognitive sciences, this paper addresses how perspectives from the field may inform how theological anthropology approaches the origins of human persons-in-community. An overview of the Social Brain Hypothesis and of simulation theory reveals a simultaneous potential for receptive/projective processes to facilitate social engagement and the need for intentional spontaneity in the form of a spiritual formation that moves beyond simulation to empathy and love. Finally, (...)
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  9. Robert J. Russell (ed.) (2002). Neuroscience and the Person: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action. Center for Ttheology and the Natural Sciences.score: 252.0
  10. Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Andrew A. Fingelkurts (2009). Is Our Brain Hardwired to Produce God, or is Our Brain Hardwired to Perceive God? A Systematic Review on the Role of the Brain in Mediating Religious Experience. Cognitive Processing 10 (4):293-326.score: 209.3
    To figure out whether the main empirical question “Is our brain hardwired to believe in and produce God, or is our brain hardwired to perceive and experience God?” is answered, this paper presents systematic critical review of the positions, arguments and controversies of each side of the neuroscientific-theological debate and puts forward an integral view where the human is seen as a psycho-somatic entity consisting of the multiple levels and dimensions of human existence (physical, biological, psychological, and spiritual reality), allowing (...)
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  11. Dwayne A. Tunstall (2011). Prophetic Ethics: Rufus Burrow, Jr.'S, Personalist Contribution to Religious Ethics. The Pluralist 6 (1):14-29.score: 207.0
    Religious ethicists use a variety of conceptual tools from many disciplines—for example, psychology, sociology, anthropology, theology, philosophy, political science, cognitive science, and neuroscience—to study various religious traditions. They use these interdisciplinary tools to study how these traditions influence and are influenced by the cultural mores and societal norms of the societies in which these traditions are practiced. If William Schweiker's depiction of religious ethics in The Blackwell Companion to Religious Ethics is representative of the field's emerging self-conception, then religious ethics (...)
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  12. Ian G. Barbour (1999). Neuroscience, Artificial Intelligence, and Human Nature: Theological and Philosophical Reflections. In Neuroscience and the Person: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action. Notre Dame: University Notre Dame Press. 361-398.score: 198.0
  13. Wolfgang Achtner (2009). Time, Eternity, and Trinity. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 51 (3):268-288.score: 196.5
    This paper addresses three issues. In the first part the relation between consciousness and time is being discussed as it developed in the history of philosophy and theology. This covers Plato, Plotinus and St. Augustine. It continues in the second part to describe that time is being perceived in the mystical consciousness as eternity which means in this context timelessness. Examples from world religions are offered. The question is asked if this eternity in mystical experience can be understood as relating (...)
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  14. Carol Rausch Albright (2010). James B. Ashbrook and His Holistic World: Toward a "Unified Field Theory" of Mind, Brain, Self, World, and God. Zygon 45 (2):479-489.score: 171.0
    James B. Ashbrook's "new natural theology in an empirical mode" pursued an integrated understanding of the spiritual, psychological, and neurological dimensions of spiritual life. Knowledge of neuroscience and personality theory was central to his quest, and his understandings were necessarily revised and amplified as scientific findings emerged. As a result, Ashbrook's legacy may serve as a case example of how to do religion-and-science in a milieu of scientific change. The constant in the quest was Ashbrook's core belief in the basic (...)
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  15. W. Teed Rockwell (2013). Algorithms and Stories. Human Affairs 23 (4):633-644.score: 162.0
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  16. Terence A. McGoldrick (2012). The Spirituality of Human Consciousness: A Catholic Evaluation of Some Current Neuro-Scientific Interpretations. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):483-501.score: 128.3
    Catholic theology’s traditional understanding of the spiritual nature of the human person begins with the idea of a rational soul and human mind that is made manifest in free will—the spiritual experience of the act of consciousness and cause of all human arts. The rationale for this religion-based idea of personhood is key to understanding ethical dilemmas posed by modern research that applies a more empirical methodology in its interpretations about the cause of human consciousness. Applications of these beliefs about (...)
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  17. G. E. Vaillant (2008). Positive Emotions, Spirituality and the Practice of Psychiatry. Mens Sana Monographs 6 (1):48.score: 126.0
    _This paper proposes that eight positive emotions: awe, love (attachment), trust (faith), compassion, gratitude, forgiveness, joy and hope constitute what we mean by spirituality. These emotions have been grossly ignored by psychiatry. The two sciences that I shall employ to demonstrate this definition of spirituality will be ethology and neuroscience. They are both very new. I will argue that spirituality is not about ideas, sacred texts and theology; rather, spirituality is all about emotion and social connection. Specific religions, for all (...)
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  18. K. Helmut Reich (2007). Enlarging the Interdisciplinary Circle: Joan Koss-Chioino's and Philip Hefner's Approach to Spiritual Transformation and Healing. Zygon 42 (2):553-560.score: 117.0
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  19. Peter B. Todd (2013). Teilhard and Other Modern Thinkers on Evolution, Mind, and Matter. Teilhard Studies (66):1-22.score: 108.0
    In his The Phenomenon of Man, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin develops concepts of consciousness, the noosphere, and psychosocial evolution. This paper explores Teilhard’s evolutionary concepts as resonant with thinking in psychology and physics. It explores contributions from archetypal depth psychology, quantum physics, and neuroscience to elucidate relationships between mind and matter. Teilhard’s work can be seen as advancing this psychological lineage or psychogenesis. That is, the evolutionary emergence of matter in increasing complexity from sub-atomic particles to the human brain and (...)
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  20. Robert S. Corrington (2011). The Biology of Religious Behavior: The Evolutionary Origin of Faith and Religion. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (2):189-193.score: 90.0
    The fifteen essays in this volume are taken from a symposium held in July 2008 at the University of Bologna, with contributions coming from ethology, evolutionary psychology, neuroscience, and anthropology, and with some sophisticated psychology of religion. The essays are of such high caliber and so free of wooden materialism that they are well positioned to invoke or provoke ongoing query.If one simply grows weary of the creationism vs. neo-Darwinian battles, it comes as a liberating moment when you can cast (...)
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  21. Andrew Tallon (2005). The Criterion of Love and the Accusing Heart in 1 John. Philosophy and Theology 17 (1/2):177-228.score: 90.0
    The criterion of 1 John for preferring John’s community over the secessionists is that the former love one another: John’s heart does not accuse him. Expressions in 1 John and Brown’s commentary suggest that knowledge by affective connaturality and recent neuroscience furnish exegetical access to this text. John’s appeal to the accusing heart is to social praxis as access to doxa. John’s community can know they love and are God’s children only intersubjectively, in the social. John’s heart should accuse him. (...)
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  22. Clare Carlisle (2014). On Habit. Routledge.score: 83.3
    For Aristotle, excellence is not an act but a habit, and Hume regards habit as ‘the great guide of life’. However, for Proust habit is problematic: ‘if habit is a second nature, it prevents us from knowing our first.’ What is habit? Do habits turn us into machines or free us to do more creative things? Should religious faith be habitual? Does habit help or hinder the practice of philosophy? Why do Luther, Spinoza, Kant, Kierkegaard and Bergson all criticise habit? (...)
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  23. Lawrence A. Shapiro (2004). The Mind Incarnate. MIT Press.score: 72.0
    Shapiro tests these hypotheses against two rivals, the mental constraint thesis and the embodied mind thesis. Collecting evidence from a variety of sources (e.g., neuroscience, evolutionary theory, and embodied cognition) he concludes that the multiple realizability thesis, accepted by most philosophers as a virtual truism, is much less obvious than commonly assumed, and that there is even stronger reason to give up the separability thesis. In contrast to views of mind that tempt us to see the mind as simply being (...)
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  24. Nathaniel F. Barrett (2011). Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (2):197-200.score: 65.3
    I imagine that many readers of AJTP will find it hard to get excited about a new collection of essays about consciousness from the process perspective, no matter how good it is purported to be, because they are bored with the so-called "problem of consciousness" and uninterested in playing the role of the choir for what looks like a lot of old-fashioned Whiteheadian preaching. But in fact this book was conceived with the intention to do much more than preach to (...)
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  25. James B. Miller (2012). Haunted by the Ghost in the Machine. Commentary on “The Spirituality of Human Consciousness: A Catholic Evaluation of Some Current Neuro-Scientific Interpretations”. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):503-507.score: 45.8
    Metaphysical and epistemological dualism informs much contemporary discussion of the relationships of science and religion, in particular in relation to the neurosciences and the religious understanding of the human person. This dualism is a foundational artifact of modern culture; however, contemporary scientific research and historical theological scholarship encourage a more holistic view wherein human personhood is most fittingly understood as an emergent phenomenon of, but not simply reducible to, evolutionary and developmental neurobiology.
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  26. Jean-Luc Petit (2003). On the Relation Between Recent Neurobiological Data on Perception (and Action) and the Husserlian Theory of Constitution. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (4):281-298.score: 45.0
    The phenomenological theory of constitution promises a solution for the problem of consciousness insofar as it changes the traditional terms of this problem by systematically correlating subject and object in the unifying context of intentional acts. I argue that embodied constitution must depend upon the role of kinesthesia as a constitutive operator. In pursuing the path of intentionality in its descent from an idealistic level of pure constitution to this fully embodied kinesthetic constitution, we are able to gain access to (...)
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  27. [deleted]Enrico Facco & Christian Agrillo (2012). Near-Death Experiences Between Science and Prejudice. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 45.0
    Science exists to refute dogmas; nevertheless, dogmas may be introduced when undemonstrated scientific axioms lead us to reject facts incompatible with them. Several studies have proposed psychobiological interpretations of near-death experiences (NDEs), claiming that NDEs are a byproduct of brain functions gone awry; however, relevant facts incompatible with the ruling physicalist and reductionist stance have been often neglected. The awkward transcendent look of NDEs has deep epistemological implications, which call for: a) keeping a rigorously neutral position, neither accepting nor refusing (...)
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  28. Ron Cole‐Turner (2014). Entheogens, Mysticism, and Neuroscience. Zygon 49 (3):642-651.score: 33.8
    Entheogens or psychedelic drugs such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and psilocybin are associated with mystical states of experience. Drug laws currently limit research, but important new work is under way at major biomedical research facilities showing that entheogens reliably occasion mystical experiences and thereby allow research into brain states during these experiences. Are drug-occasioned mystical experiences neurologically the same as more traditional mystical states? Are there phenomenological and theological differences? As this research goes forward and the public becomes more (...)
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  29. Davide Rigoni & Marcel Brass (2014). From Intentions to Neurons: Social and Neural Consequences of Disbelieving in Free Will. Topoi 33 (1):5-12.score: 27.8
    The problem of free will is among the most fascinating and disputed questions throughout the history of philosophy and psychology. Traditionally limited to philosophical and theological debate, in the last decades it has become a matter of scientific investigation. The theoretical and methodological advances in neuroscience allowed very complex psychological functions related to free will (conscious intentions, decision-making, and agency) to be investigated. In parallel, neuroscience is gaining momentum in the media, and various scientific findings are claimed to provide evidence (...)
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  30. Carlos Eduardo Brandão Calvani (2014). Espiritualidades não religiosas: desafios conceituais. Horizonte 12 (35):658-687.score: 27.8
    The article presupposes that the term “spirituality”, originally proper to the theological literature, no longer belongs only to this field, and is now widely used in different areas of knowledge. The essay also says that, even within the theological and religious studies, there has never been clarity as to the meaning of “spirituality”, which eventually became a vague and imprecise term, invoked in different situations and in need of a deeper theoretical reflection able to point its history, its development and (...)
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  31. William R. Stoeger, SJ (2007). Evolution and Emergence: Systems, Organisms, Persons. OUP Oxford.score: 27.8
    A collection of essays by experts in the field, exploring how nature works at every level to produce more complex and highly organized objects, systems, and organisms from much simpler components, and how our increasing understanding of this universal phenomenon of emergence can lead us to a deeper and richer appreciation of who we are as human beings and of our relationship to God. Several chapters introduce the key philosophical ideas about reductionism and emergence, while others explore the fascinating world (...)
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