Search results for 'india' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Domenic Marbaniang (2009). Secularism in India: Historical Outline. Google Books.score: 18.0
    Secularism in India SECULARISM IN PRE-COLONIAL PERIOD Secularism in India is not something totally new. Its roots can be found in a history that traces back ...
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  2. Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta (2007). Private and Public Eugenics: Genetic Testing and Screening in India. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (3):217-228.score: 18.0
    Epidemiologists and geneticists claim that genetics has an increasing role to play in public health policies and programs in the future. Within this perspective, genetic testing and screening are instrumental in avoiding the birth of children with serious, costly or untreatable disorders. This paper discusses genetic testing and screening within the framework of eugenics in the health care context of India. Observations are based on literature review and empirical research using qualitative methods. I distinguish ‘private’ from ‘public’ eugenics. I (...)
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  3. Renuka M. Sharma (2007). The Ethics of Birth and Death: Gender Infanticide in India. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (3):181-192.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses the persistent devaluation of the girl child in India and the link between the entrenched perception of female valuelessness and the actual practice of infanticide of girl babies or foetuses. It seeks to place female infanticide, or ‘gendercide,’ within the context of Western-derived conceptions of ethics, justice and rights. To date, current ethical theories and internationally purveyed moral frameworks, as well as legal and political declarations, have fallen short of an adequate moral appraisal of infanticide. This (...)
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  4. Alexandre Ardichvili, Douglas Jondle, Brenda Kowske, Edgard Cornachione, Jessica Li & Thomas Thakadipuram (2012). Ethical Cultures in Large Business Organizations in Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):415-428.score: 18.0
    This study focuses on comparison of perceptions of ethical business cultures in large business organizations from four largest emerging economies, commonly referred to as the BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), and from the US. The data were collected from more than 13,000 managers and employees of business organizations in five countries. The study found significant differences among BRIC countries, with respondents from India and Brazil providing more favorable assessments of ethical cultures of their organizations than respondents from (...)
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  5. Debasmita Patra, E. Haribabu & Katherine A. McComas (2010). Perceptions of Nano Ethics Among Practitioners in a Developing Country: A Case of India. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 4 (1):67-75.score: 18.0
    Many developing countries have allocated significant amounts of funding for nanoscience and nanotechnology research, yet compared to developed countries, there has been little study, discussion, or debate over social and ethical issues. Using in-depth interviews, this study focuses on the perceptions of practitioners, that is, scientists and engineers, in one developing country: India. The disciplinary background, departmental affiliation, types of institutions, age, and sex of the practitioners varied but did not appear to affect their responses. The results show (...)
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  6. Desh Raj Sirswal (2013). MENTAL HEALTH IN INDIA: POLICIES AND ISSUES. Milestone Education Review 4 (02):35-54.score: 18.0
    Mental health generally refers to an individual’s thoughts, feelings and actions, particularly when he faced with life challenges and stresses. A good mental health isn’t just the absence of mental health problems. It is the achievement and the maintenance of psychological well-being. Mental Health is the state of one’s peace of mind, happiness and harmony brought out by one’s level of adjustment with himself and his environment. In describing mental health, Anwar said, “…mental health is the health of one’s mind (...)
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  7. Nicola Berg & Dirk Holtbrügge (2001). Public Affairs Management Activities of German Multinational Corporations in India. Journal of Business Ethics 30 (1):105 - 119.score: 18.0
    In this paper the importance of public affairs management in multinational corporations in India will be examined. After briefly discussing the state of the art in international business and society literature, a conceptual framework for public affairs management in multinational corporations will be developed. This framework serves as the theoretical basis for an empirical study among German multinational corporations in India. In the main part of this paper the results of this study will be presented and (...)
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  8. Nandini Kumar, G. D. Ravindran, A. Bhan, J. S. Srivastava & V. M. Nair (2008). The India Experience. Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (4):295-303.score: 18.0
    This article featuring India constitutes one of five articles in a collection of essays on local capacity-building in research ethics by graduates from the University of Toronto’s Joint Centre for Bioethics MHSc in Bioethics, International Stream program funded by the Fogarty International Center for Advanced Study in the Health Sciences. Research ethics is a growing area of work and interest in India. Ethics review remains the weakest component in the mechanism of good clinical practice, and there is a (...)
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  9. Domenic Marbaniang, Historical Account of Christian Conversions in India.score: 18.0
    Tradition holds that many Brahmin families were converted through the ministry of St. Thomas and seven churches were established in Palur, Muziri, Parur, Gokkamangalam, Chayal, Niranam, and Quilon. After forming several more congregations out of Jews as well as of Dravidi people, Apostle Thomas went to Meliapur where even the Raja was converted with many of his subjects. This infuriated the Brahmins (of Aryan origin). According to tradition, St. Thomas was speared to death by Brahmins near Mylapore. According to many (...)
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  10. Giorgio Grappi (2013). Stato e costituzionalismo (post)coloniali in India. Differenze e attraversamenti. Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 25 (48).score: 18.0
    The article argues that the end of the formal division of the world between a colonizing metropolis and a colonized periphery requires a different reading of the State’s history. The essay deals with the relation between the formation of British India and the development of Indian nationalist movement through the events related to the ‘tiger of Mysore’, Tipu Sultan, and the swadeshi movement as portrayed in Tagore’s The Home and the World. The essay shows how colonial constitutionalism developed through (...)
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  11. Lakshmi Arya (2006). The Uniform Civil Code: The Politics of the Universal in Postcolonial India. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 14 (3):293-328.score: 18.0
    This article speaks of a debate in contemporary India: that surrounding the validity of enacting a civil code that applies uniformly to all communities and religions in the state. In certain feminist arguments, such a code is seen as possibly providing a sphere of rights to Indian women that is alternative to the rights – or wrongs – given to them by the plural religious laws, which form the basis of the civil law in India. India, however, (...)
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  12. Ananya Mukherjee Reed (2002). Corporate Governance Reforms in India. Journal of Business Ethics 37 (3):249 - 268.score: 18.0
    In recent years India has been moving further in the direction of adopting an Anglo-American model of corporate governance. This decision, the result more of international economic and political pressures than public debate, in effect represents a new development strategy for the world's most populous democracy. In light of this situation, it is important to ask two basic questions: 1) why has the Anglo-American model of corporate governance been adopted? and; 2) can it be justified? This paper addresses the (...)
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  13. Carmen Dragonetti & Fernando Tola (2005). Unidad en la diversidad: Las tradiciones filosóficas de la India y de Occidente. 'Ilu. Revista de Ciencias de Las Religiones 10:211-224.score: 18.0
    El artículo desarrolla las cuatro tesis siguientes: por lo menos hasta el fin del siglo XVII en la India y en Occidente se reflexionó sobre temas filosóficos similares y de la misma manera; en el pensamiento de la India y de Occidente se encuentran manifestaciones de irracionalidad, falta de libertad de pensamiento y sumisión de los pensadores a intereses ajenos a la filosofía en igual número y bajo formas similares; existió una filosofía de la India, y la (...)
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  14. Elizabeth Finnis (2007). The Political Ecology of Dietary Transitions: Changing Production and Consumption Patterns in the Kolli Hills, India. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 24 (3):343-353.score: 18.0
    Using a case study from the Kolli Hills, India, I suggest that political ecology provides a useful theoretical basis for considering localized dietary transitions in rural, agricultural communities in developing countries. By examining the reasons for the near-disappearance of local minor millets as staple foods in three small-farmer communities, I argue that an explicit, actor-oriented analysis allows for an integration of food issues with considerations of environmental circumstances, local aspirations, and labor concerns. That is, an agricultural shift that abandons (...)
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  15. Meenakshi Handa, Anupama Vohra & Vinita Srivastava (2012). Ethics: The Physician–Pharma Dyad in India. [REVIEW] Asian Journal of Business Ethics:1-10.score: 18.0
    The study examines the attitudes among physicians regarding acceptance of gifts, sponsorships, and drug samples in response to marketing efforts of pharmaceutical companies in India. The research also attempts to study physicians’ perceptions of the Medical Council of India (MCI) guidelines on the code of conduct for pharmaceutical marketing practices and the influence of these guidelines on physicians’ actions. A structured questionnaire was developed for collecting primary data regarding exposure of physicians to promotional tools and physicians’ attitudes and (...)
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  16. Munmun Jha (2009). Child Workers in India: Context and Complexities. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (2):205-218.score: 18.0
    This paper portrays the nature of child workers in India and seeks to understand its many complexities. It looks at the definition of child labour, the extent of its prevalence, the reasons why children work, and the occupations they are engaged in. It outlines India’s position on international obligations, its expanding domestic laws, and the tardy implementation of these laws. It examines some of the inherent cultural constraints and the role of values and beliefs in perpetuating child labour. (...)
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  17. Chhanda Chakraborti (2006). Ethics of Care and Hiv: A Case for Rural Women in India. Developing World Bioethics 6 (2):89–94.score: 15.0
    Recent literature shows that ethics of care can be used as a theoretical basis to add a new, important dimension to social issues. Th.
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  18. Rahul Mitra (2012). “My Country's Future”: A Culture-Centered Interrogation of Corporate Social Responsibility in India. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (2):131-147.score: 15.0
    Companies operating and located in emerging economy nations routinely couch their corporate social responsibility (CSR) work in nation-building terms. In this article, I focus on the Indian context and critically examine mainstream CSR discourse from the perspective of the culture-centered approach (CCA). Accordingly, five main themes of CSR stand out: nation-building facade, underlying neoliberal logics, CSR as voluntary, CSR as synergetic, and a clear urban bias. Next, I outline a CCA-inspired CSR framework that allows corporate responsibility to be re-claimed and (...)
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  19. Parminder Parmar & Ronald P. Rohner (2005). Relations Among Perceived Intimate Partner Acceptance, Remembered Parental Acceptance, and Psychological Adjustment Among Young Adults in India. Ethos 33 (3):402-413.score: 15.0
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  20. Peter Borschberg (2007). Grotius, Maritime Intra-Asian Trade and the Portuguese Estado da Índia: Problems, Perspectives and Insights From De Iure Praedae. Grotiana 26 (1):31-60.score: 15.0
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  21. Deepthi Elizabeth Kolady & William Lesser (2012). Genetically-Engineered Crops and Their Effects on Varietal Diversity: A Case of Bt Eggplant in India. Agriculture and Human Values 29 (1):3-15.score: 15.0
    Building on the evidence from the impact of hybrid technology on varietal diversity loss, this paper explores ex ante the possible effects of introduction of Bt eggplant on on-farm varietal diversity of eggplant. The public–private partnership involved in the development and introduction of Bt eggplant provides a great opportunity to develop locally-adapted Bt open-pollinated varieties (OPVs) instead of having a limited number of generic hybrid varieties. The study shows that introduction of multiple Bt OPVs by public institutions will reduce the (...)
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  22. Javed Majeed (2009). British Colonialism in India as a Pedagogical Enterprise. History and Theory 48 (3):276-282.score: 15.0
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  23. Mary K. Shenk (2007). Dowry and Public Policy in Contemporary India. Human Nature 18 (3):242-263.score: 15.0
    In modern Indian political discourse the custom of dowry is often represented as the cause of serious social problems, including the neglect of daughters, sex-selective abortion, female infanticide, and the harassment, abuse, and murder of brides. Attempts to deal with these problems through legislative prohibition of dowry, however, have resulted in virtually no diminution of either dowry or violence against women. In contrast, radically different interpretations of dowry can be found in the literatures of structural-functionalist anthropology, economics, and human behavioral (...)
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  24. Rakesh Biswas, Ankur Joshi, Rajeev Joshi, Terry Kaufman, Chris Peterson, Joachim P. Sturmberg, Arjun Maitra & Carmel M. Martin (2009). Revitalizing Primary Health Care and Family Medicine/Primary Care in India – Disruptive Innovation? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (5):873-880.score: 15.0
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  25. Fathulah Mudztabai (2011). Bīrūnī and India: The First Attempt to Understand. Filozofija I Drustvo 22 (1):53-86.score: 15.0
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  26. V. Srinivasan (2009). CSR and Ethics in MSMEs in India. African Journal of Business Ethics 4 (2):32.score: 15.0
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  27. S. K. Chakraborty (1997). Business Ethics in India. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (14):1529-1538.score: 12.0
    Unethical business in India became a recognized phenomenon during the second World War. Academic/journalistic/legal concern with ethics has become visible only during the nineties. Corruption-of-the-poor and corruption-of-the-rich need to be distinguished - especially in the context of globalization. The danger of attributing unethical practices to system failure is recognized. It is also important to bring to bear on intellectual property rights the more fundamental principle of natural property rights. Consciousness ethics will be more crucial than just intellectual ethics.
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  28. P. Maria Joseph Christie, Ik-Whan G. Kwon, Philipp A. Stoeberl & Raymond Baumhart (2003). A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Ethical Attitudes of Business Managers: India Korea and the United States. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (3):263 - 287.score: 12.0
    Culture has been identified as a significant determinant of ethical attitudes of business managers. This research studies the impact of culture on the ethical attitudes of business managers in India, Korea and the United States using multivariate statistical analysis. Employing Geert Hofstede''s cultural typology, this study examines the relationship between his five cultural dimensions (individualism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity, and long-term orientation) and business managers'' ethical attitudes. The study uses primary data collected from 345 business manager participants of (...)
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  29. Jonardon Ganeri (2001). Philosophy in Classical India: Proper Work of Reason. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Original in content and approach, Philosophy in Classical India focuses on the rational principles of Indian philosophical theory, rather than the mysticism usually associated with it. Ganeri explores the philosophical projects of a number of major Indian philosophers and looks into the methods of rational inquiry deployed within these projects. In so doing, he illuminates a network of mutual reference and criticism, influence and response, in which reason is simultaneously used constructively and to call itself into question.
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  30. Mark Tunick (2006). Tolerant Imperialism: J.S. Mill's Defense of British Rule in India. Review of Politics 68 (4):586-611.score: 12.0
    Some critics of Mill understand him to advocate the forced assimilation of people he regards as uncivilized, and to defend toleration and the principle of liberty only for civilized people of the West. Examination of Mill’s social and political writings and practice while serving the British East India Company shows, instead, that Mill is a ‘tolerant imperialist’: Mill defends interference in India to promote the protection of legal rights, respect and toleration for conflicting viewpoints, and a commercial society (...)
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  31. Brian Pennington (2011). Review of Arvind-Pal S. Mandair, Religion and the Specter of the West: Sikhism, India, Postcoloniality, and the Politics of Translation. [REVIEW] Sophia 50 (3):499-501.score: 12.0
    Review of Arvind-Pal S. Mandair, Religion and the Specter of the West: Sikhism, India, Postcoloniality, and the Politics of Translation Content Type Journal Article Pages 499-501 DOI 10.1007/s11841-011-0250-8 Authors Brian K. Pennington, Division of Humanities, Maryville College, 502 E. Lamar Alexander Pkwy, Maryville, TN 37804, USA Journal Sophia Online ISSN 1873-930X Print ISSN 0038-1527 Journal Volume Volume 50 Journal Issue Volume 50, Number 3.
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  32. Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (2011). Against a Hindu God: Buddhist Philosophy of Religion in India (Review). Philosophy East and West 61 (3):560-564.score: 12.0
    The dramatic title Against a Hindu God: Buddhist Philosophy of Religion in India, while accurate enough in some respects, does not do justice to this subtle, densely argued, technically demanding, and often astonishingly wide-ranging book by Parimal Patil. The traces of the doctoral thesis that it was in a previous life are still there, evident in the concern to explain methodology to inquisitorial examiners and the reluctance to let any footnote go by if it can possibly be included. That (...)
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  33. Chockalingam Viswesvaran & Satish P. Deshpande (1996). Ethics, Success, and Job Satisfaction: A Test of Dissonance Theory in India. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (10):1065 - 1069.score: 12.0
    A survey of middle level managers in India (n=150) showed that when respondents perceived that successful managers in their organization behaved unethically their levels of job satisfaction were reduced. Reduction in satisfaction with the facet of supervision was the most pronounced (than with pay or promotion or co-worker or work). Results are interpreted within the framework of cognitive dissonance theory. Implications for ethics training programs (behavioral and cognitive) as well as international management are discussed.
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  34. Silke Machold & Ajit Kumar Vasudevan (2004). Corporate Governance Models in Emerging Markets: The Case of India. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 1 (1):56-77.score: 12.0
    Corporate governance has come to be recognised as a cornerstone of economic reforms seeking to promote stability and growth in developing countries. The Asian crisis of the 1997 was viewed as having roots in poor governance and hence national governments as well as international organisations have sought to promote a strengthening of governance mechanisms. This article investigates governance reforms in India over the last decade. The paper reviews changes in Indian governance codes that indicate a preference of adoption of (...)
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  35. Joseph S. Alter (2004). Yoga in Modern India: The Body Between Science and Philosophy. Princeton University Press.score: 12.0
    Yoga has come to be an icon of Indian culture and civilization, and it is widely regarded as being timeless and unchanging. Based on extensive ethnographic research and an analysis of both ancient and modern texts, Yoga in Modern India challenges this popular view by examining the history of yoga, focusing on its emergence in modern India and its dramatically changing form and significance in the twentieth century. Joseph Alter argues that yoga's transformation into a popular activity idolized (...)
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  36. Purushottama Bilimoria (1995). Legal Rulings on Suicide in India and Implications for the Right to Die. Asian Philosophy 5 (2):159 – 180.score: 12.0
    Abstract In this paper I am concerned to address the question of voluntary or self?willed death from two distinct positions?a particular community's socio?religious practice (viz. Jaina sallekhan?) and as the matter stands in law (penal code, constitution, judicial wisdom, etc.) in India?in the light of the recent move by a bench of its apex court striking down the penal code section proscribing suicide. I also wish to draw out some implications of these deliberations for the beneficence of medical practice (...)
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  37. R. Clayton Trotter, Susan G. Day & Amy E. Love (1989). Bhopal, India and Union Carbide: The Second Tragedy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (6):439 - 454.score: 12.0
    The paper examines the legal, ethical, and public policy issues involved in the Union Carbide gas leak in India which caused the deaths of over 3000 people and injury to thousands of people. The paper begins with a historical perspective on the operating environment in Bhopal, the events surrounding the accident, then discusses an international situation audit examining internal strengths and weaknesses, and external opportunities and threats faced by Union Carbide at the time of the accident. There is (...)
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  38. A. Whitney Sanford (2013). Anand Pandian: Crooked Stalks Cultivating Virtue in South India. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):721-722.score: 12.0
    Anand Pandian: Crooked Stalks Cultivating Virtue in South India Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10806-011-9308-4 Authors A. Whitney Sanford, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  39. Rajiv K. Sinha (1997). Embarking on the Second Green Revolution for Sustainable Agriculture in India: A Judicious Mix of Traditional Wisdom and Modern Knowledge in Ecological Farming. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (2):183-197.score: 12.0
    The Green Revolution in India which was heralded in the 1960‘s was a mixed blessing. Ambitious use of agro-chemicals boosted food production but also destroyed the agricultural ecosystem. Of late Indian farmers and agricultural scientists have realized this and are anxious to find alternatives – perhaps a non-chemical agriculture – and have even revived their age-old traditional techniques of natural farming. Scientists are working to find economically cheaper and ecologically safer alternatives to agro-chemicals. Blue-Green Algae Biofertilizers, Earthworm Vermicomposts (...)
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  40. A. Farooq Khan & Adrian Atkinson (1987). Managerial Attitudes to Social Responsibility: A Comparative Study in India and Britain. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 6 (6):419 - 432.score: 12.0
    Changes in the understanding of the relationship between business and society have led to increased interest in and discussion of the notion of corporate social responsibility.This paper offers an empirical analysis of the perceptions of top executives in the West Midlands, U.K., and in Delhi, District Ghaziabad, <span class='Hi'>India</span>, of the notion of corporate social responsibility. Organisational changes and involvement in social action programmes, and problems of implementing and monitoring Social Responsibility in two cultures, <span class='Hi'>India</span> and Britain, (...)
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  41. Allen Mendenhall, 44. “The Oft-Ignored Mr. Turton: The Role of District Collector in A Passage to India“.score: 12.0
    E.M. Forster’s A Passage to India presents Brahman Hindu jurisprudence as an alternative to British rule of law, a utilitarian jurisprudence that hinges on mercantilism, central planning, and imperialism. Building on John Hasnas’s critiques of rule of law and Murray Rothbard’s critiques of Benthamite utilitarianism, this essay argues that Forster’s depictions [...].
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  42. Christine Keating (2007). Framing the Postcolonial Sexual Contract: Democracy, Fraternalism, and State Authority in India. Hypatia 22 (4):130-145.score: 12.0
    : This essay examines the reconfiguration of the racial and sexual contracts underpinning democratic theory and practice in the transition to independence in India. Drawing upon the work of Carole Pateman and Charles Mills, Keating argues that the racialized fraternal democratic order that they describe was importantly challenged by nationalist and feminist struggles against colonialism in India, but was reshaped into what she calls a postcolonial sexual contract by the framers of the Indian Constitution.
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  43. Roy W. Perrett (1997). Religion and Politics in India: Some Philosophical Perspectives. Religious Studies 33 (1):1-14.score: 12.0
    What is the traditional relation of religion to politics in India? Recent scholarly debate has generated at least two divergent answers. According to one view there is a long standing traditional opposition between religion and politics in India. According to another view a separation of religion from politics is contrary to Indian ways of thinking. I argue that from the perspective of classical Indian philosophy there is no single tradition on the issue of religion and politics. To be (...)
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  44. Bernard D'Mello (2002). Transnational Pharmaceutical Corporations and Neo-Liberal Business Ethics in India. Journal of Business Ethics 36 (1-2):165 - 185.score: 12.0
    The author critiques the expedient application of market valuation principles by the transnational corporations and other large firms in the Indian pharmaceutical industry on a number of issues like patents, pricing, irrational drugs, clinical trials, etc. He contends that ethics in business is chiseled and etched within the confines of particular social structures of accumulation. An ascendant neo-liberal social structure of accumulation has basically shaped these firms' sharp opposition to the Indian Patents Act, 1970, government administered pricing, etc. The author (...)
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  45. Beverly Kracher, Abha Chatterjee & Arlene R. Lundquist (2002). Factors Related to the Cognitive Moral Development of Business Students and Business Professionals in India and the United States: Nationality, Education, Sex and Gender. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 35 (4):255 - 268.score: 12.0
    This research focuses on the similarities and differences in the cognitive moral development of business professionals and graduate business students in two countries, India and the United States. Factors that potentially influence cognitive moral development, namely, culture, education, sex and gender are analyzed and discussed. Implications for ethics education in graduate business schools and professional associations are considered. Future research on the cognitive moral development of graduate business students and business professionals is recommended.
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  46. David Brick (2010). The Court of Public Opinion and the Practice of Restorative Ordeals in Pre-Modern India. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (1):25-38.score: 12.0
    According to their standardized treatment within the Indian legal tradition (Dharmaśāstra), ordeals (Sanskrit: divya ) are supposed to occur, under certain circumstances, when one person formally accused another of some crime in a court of law. While not disputing the general accuracy of this standardized treatment of ordeals, this article argues for the widespread practice in pre-modern India of another—hitherto unrecognized—type of ordeal that fails to fit this basic scenario, for such ordeals would occur when someone was widely (...)
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  47. Dhruv Raina (1997). Evolving Perspectives on Science and History: A Chronicle of Modern India's Scientific Enchantment and Disenchantment (1850-1980). [REVIEW] Social Epistemology 11 (1):3 – 24.score: 12.0
    This paper chronicles the cycles of scientism and romanticism that structure the discourse on science and technology in India since 1850. However, it does not promise a detailed review of this enormous archive. On the contrary, it aspires to identify the principle concerns, the important interlocutors, the prevalent frameworks and contextualizes them socio-politically, in both their local and global embodiments. In historical time, as has been suggested elsewhere, the scientism-romanticism dialectic acquires diversified formulations. This review suggests that in post-colonial (...)
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  48. R. V. Ravikrishna (2011). Sustainable Energy for Rural India. Zygon 46 (4):942-956.score: 12.0
    Abstract This paper begins with an introduction to the ancient spiritual tradition of India. The focus is upon aspects of ancient Indian philosophy relevant to modern society. In the Indian context, science and spirituality are complementary. The application of ethical and religious motivations derived from these ideas is delineated with respect to the practical implementation of energy projects. The efforts of religious and social groups in promoting renewable energy in India are included. A few bioenergy technologies relevant to (...)
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  49. AnanyaMukherjee Reed (2002). Corporate Governance Reforms in India. Journal of Business Ethics 37 (3):249 - 268.score: 12.0
    In recent years India has been moving further in the direction of adopting an Anglo-American model of corporate governance. This decision, the result more of international economic and political pressures than public debate, in effect represents a new development strategy for the world's most populous democracy. In light of this situation, it is important to ask two basic questions: 1) why has the Anglo-American model of corporate governance been adopted? and; 2) can it be justified? This paper addresses the (...)
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  50. Mithu Alur (2001). Some Cultural and Moral Implications of Inclusive Education in India—a Personal View. Journal of Moral Education 30 (3):287-292.score: 12.0
    This article provides a personal viewpoint on and outline of the author's contribution to learning disability in India. It refers to her doctoral research on policy and the status of people with disability in India. It puts forth the view that although India addresses diversity in many ways it tends to exclude people with disability from national programmes. It argues that inclusive education should be context- and culture-specific and that inclusive programmes can develop, albeit incrementally, despite the (...)
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