Search results for 'literary' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tomas Georg Hellström (2011). Aesthetic Creativity: Insights From Classical Literary Theory on Creative Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (4):321-335.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses the subject of textual creativity by drawing on work done in classical literary theory and criticism, specifically new criticism, structuralism and early poststructuralism. The question of how readers and writers engage creatively with the text is closely related to educational concerns, though they are often thought of as separate disciplines. Modern literary theory in many ways collapses this distinction in its concern for how literariness is achieved and, specifically, how ‘literary quality’ is accomplished in (...)
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  2. Mika Hietanen (2011). The Gospel of Matthew as a Literary Argument. Argumentation 25 (1):63-86.score: 24.0
    Through an argumentation analysis can one show how it is feasible to view a narrative religious text such as the Gospel of Matthew as a literary argument. The Gospel is not just good news but an elaborate argument for the standpoint that Jesus is the Son of God, the Messiah. It is shown why an argumentation analysis needs to be supplemented with a pragmatic literary analysis in order to describe how the evangelist presents his story so as to (...)
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  3. Martin Paulsen (2008). Literary Critics in a New Era. Studies in East European Thought 60 (3):251 - 260.score: 24.0
    In this article I look at changes in the role of literary criticism in Russian literature since perestroika. The article draws on the research of Sergej Čuprinin and Birgit Menzel. Based on my readings of the debate among literary critics about what literary criticism is and should be, and focusing on the interrelationship in the triangle writer-critic-reader, I establish a typology of contemporary literary criticism: 1. the critic as a master of the “literary process”, 2. (...)
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  4. Martin Goffeney (2013). Memory, History, and Pluripotency: A Realist View of Literary Studies. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (2):44-59.score: 24.0
    Speculative realism has, over the course of its rapid and controversial emergence in the past decade, been frequently criticized from the perspective of historical materialism, for its putative reliance on abstraction and eschewal of a sufficiently rigorous ideological alignment. This paper takes such critiques as a starting point for an examination of the contributions recent thought in the area of speculative realism has to offer the study of the humanities – specifically, the study of literature and literary history. In (...)
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  5. Srilata Raman (2011). Tamil, Vaiṣṇava, Vaidika: Kiruṣṇacuvāmi Aiyaṅkār, Irāmānuja Tātācāriyār and Modern Tamil Literary History. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (6):647-676.score: 24.0
    The writing of literary histories of Tamil literature coincided with the practice of history itself as a discipline starting in the late nineteenth century. The historiographical practices conflated Tamil literary history, religious history, as well as notions of the Tamil nation, which led to such works becoming vitally important legitimising narratives that established the claim of self-defining groups within a new Tamil modernity. The absence of such a narrative also meant the erasure of a particular group, identifying itself (...)
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  6. Rolf Ahlzén (2002). The Doctor and the Literary Text €” Potentials and Pitfalls. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (2):147-155.score: 24.0
    Expectations are growing that literature may contribute to clinical skills. Narrative medicine is a quickly expanding area of research. However, many people remain sceptical to the idea of literature having a capacity to save the life of medicine . It is therefore urgent to scrutinize both the arguments in favour of and those against the potential of literature for increasing medical understanding. This article attempts to do this. It does in fact support the assertion that literature is important, but it (...)
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  7. Jens Herlth (2011). Around the Nation's Mystic Core: Interactions Between Political Concepts and the Literary Imagination in the Works of Stanisław Brzozowski. Studies in East European Thought 63 (4):267-278.score: 24.0
    The essay examines Stanisław Brzozowski’s ideas on mutual interactions between the sphere of culture and the realm of the political. It shows how Brzozowski made use of literary texts in order to elucidate social and political processes. In doing so, he insisted on a specific form of knowledge accessible through texts of literature and literary criticism, which are not limited by the mere “logic of notions.” Following Vico and Sorel Brzozowski detected an “irrational core” at the bases of (...)
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  8. Aurel Bumbas (2010). Aurel Codoban, Filosofia ca gen literar/ Philosophy as a literary genre. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (14):165-168.score: 24.0
    Aurel Codoban, Filosofia ca gen literar (Philosophy as a literary genre) Ed. Idea Design&Print, Cluj- Napoca, 2006.
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  9. Joseph Carroll (1995). Evolution and Literary Theory. Human Nature 6 (2):119-134.score: 24.0
    Presupposing that all knowledge is the study of a unitary order of nature, the author maintains that the study of literature should be included within the larger field of evolutionary theory. He outlines four elementary concepts in evolutionary theory, and he argues that these concepts should regulate our understanding of literature. On the basis of these concepts, he repudiates the antirealist and irrationalist views that, under the aegis of “poststructuralism,” have dominated academic literary studies for the past two decades. (...)
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  10. Joseph Carroll (1998). Literary Study and Evolutionary Theory. Human Nature 9 (3):273-292.score: 24.0
    Several recent books have claimed to integrate literary study with evolutionary biology. All of the books here considered, except Robert Storey’s, adopt conceptions of evolutionary theory that are in some way marginal to the Darwinian adaptationist program. All the works attempt to connect evolutionary study with various other disciplines or methodologies: for example, with cultural anthropology, cognitive psychology, the psychology of emotion, neurobiology, chaos theory, or structuralist linguistics. No empirical paradigm has yet been established for this field, but important (...)
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  11. Andy Mousley (ed.) (2011). Towards a New Literary Humanism. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- List of Contributors -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Towards a New Literary Humanism; A. Mousley -- PART I: LITERATURE_AS ERSATZ_THEOLOGY: DEEP SELVES -- Introduction; A. Mousley -- Faith, Feeling, Reality: Anne Brontë as an Existentialist Poet; R. Styler -- Virginia Woolf, Sympathy and Feeling for the Human; K. Martin -- Being Human and being Animal in Twentieth-Century Horse-Whispering Writings: 'Word-Bound Creatures' and 'the Breath of Horses'; E. Graham_ -- Judith Butler and the Catachretic Human; I. (...)
     
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  12. Deven M. Patel (2011). Shared Typologies of Kāmaśāstra, Alaṅkāraśāstra and Literary Criticism. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (1):101-122.score: 24.0
    This paper brings kāmaśāstra into conversation with poetics (alaṅkāraśāstra) and modes of literary criticism associated with Sanskrit literature (kāvya). It shows how historical intersections between kāvya, kāmaśāstra, and alaṅkāraśāstra have produced insightful cross-domain typologies to understand the nature and value of canonical works of Sanskrit literature. In addition to exploring kāmaśāstra typologies broadly as conceptual models and analytical categories useful in literary-critical contexts, this paper takes up a specific formulation from the kāmaśāstra (the padminī-citriṇī-śaṅkhinī-hastinī type-casting of females) used (...)
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  13. Ronald Primeau (ed.) (1977). Influx: Essays on Literary Influence. Kennikat Press.score: 24.0
    Introduction.--Literary history and tradition: Eliot, T. S. Tradition and the individual talent. Trilling, L. The sense of the past. Hassan, I. H. The problem of influence in literary history.--An aesthetics of origins and revisionism: Guillen, C. The aesthetics of literary influence. Block, H. M. The concept of influence in comparative literature. Bloom, H. Clinamen, or poetic misprision. Bate, W. J. The second temple.--Reader as participant: Rosenblatt, L. M. Towards a transactional theory of reading. Holland, N. N. Literature (...)
     
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  14. Kenneth Burke (1973/1974). The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action. University of California Press.score: 21.0
    Probes the nature of linguistic or symbolic action as it relates to specific novels, plays, and poems.
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  15. Dennis Sumara, Rebecca Luce-Kapler & Tammy Iftody (2008). Educating Consciousness Through Literary Experiences. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (1):228–241.score: 21.0
  16. Ira Newman (2008). Learning From Tolstoy: Forgetfulness and Recognition in Literary Edification. Philosophia 36 (1):43-54.score: 21.0
    Philosophers have often applied a distinctively epistemic framework to the question of how moral knowledge can be derived from fictional literature, by considering how true propositions, or their argumentative support, can be the cognitive fruits of reading works of fiction. I offer an alternative approach. I focus not on whether readers fail to assent to the truth of a proposition or fail to provide it rational support. Instead, I focus on how readers fail to accord a truth (which they already (...)
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  17. Kenneth Burke (1967). The Philosophy of Literary Form. Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University Press.score: 21.0
    Probes the nature of linguistic or symbolic action as it relates to specific novels, plays, and poems.
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  18. Vince Brewton, Literary Theory. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
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  19. Douglas Lane Patey (1984). Probability and Literary Form: Philosophic Theory and Literary Practice in the Augustan Age. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    By examining in particular Augustan notions of probability and the way they provided a framework for thinking about and organising experience, Dr Patey ...
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  20. Barry Smith (1979). Roman Ingarden: Ontological Foundations for Literary Theory. In John Odmark (ed.), Language, Literature and Meaning I: Problems of Literary Theory. Benjamins. 373-390.score: 21.0
    The paper seeks to apply the work of the Polish phenomenologist Roman Ingarden to certain problems in literary theory; contrasts the notions of ontological and epistemological incompleteness of the represented objects of a literary work and considers the question of the nature of such objects. The paper concludes by analyzing some of the degrees of freedom possessed by the readings of literary work in relation to the work itself.
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  21. Melanie Ramdarshan Bold (2013). Can Literary Agents Be Based Outside London and Still Be Successful? Logos 24 (1):7-18.score: 21.0
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  22. Berel Lang (1990). The Anatomy of Philosophical Style: Literary Philosophy and the Philosophy of Literature. B. Blackwell.score: 21.0
     
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  23. H. M. Paull (1928/1968). Literary Ethics. Port Washington, N.Y.,Kennikat Press.score: 21.0
     
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  24. Kari Rødnes (2009). Making Connections: Categorisations and Particularisations in Students' Literary Argument. [REVIEW] Argumentation 23 (4):531-546.score: 21.0
    This article investigates how students reason and argue to make sense of fictional literature. Excerpts from students’ talk are analysed using the concepts categorisation, particularisation and recontextualisation, and interpreted from a socio-cultural, dialogical perspective. The analyses show that the students’ arguments oscillate between personal experience and the novel, and between categorising and particularising perspectives. The subject relevance of talk that lies between everyday and scientific talk, and between personal and analytic readings, is revealed. The bridging of different readings, different language (...)
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  25. Catherine Rowett (2013). Literary Genres and Judgements of Taste: Some Remarks on Aristotle's Remarks About the Poetry of Empedocles. In Erler Michael (ed.), Argument und literarische Form in antiker Philosophie. De Gruyter. 305-314.score: 21.0
    In this paper I review four texts in which Aristotle comments on Empedocles' writing style. I show that Aristotle thought that Empedocles was a fine poet. That is fine, if a poet is what you want.
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  26. Peter Royle (1982). The Sartre-Camus Controversy: A Literary and Philosophical Critique. University of Ottawa Press.score: 21.0
  27. Herbert Spencer (1951/1970). Literary Style and Music. Port Washington, N.Y.,Kennikat Press.score: 21.0
  28. Gilbert Plumer (2012). Cognition and Literary Ethical Criticism. In Frank Zenker (ed.), Argumentation: Cognition & Community. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation [CD-ROM]. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation.score: 18.0
    “Ethical criticism” is an approach to literary studies that holds that reading certain carefully selected novels can make us ethically better people, e.g., by stimulating our sympathetic imagination (Nussbaum). I try to show that this nonargumentative approach cheapens the persuasive force of novels and that its inherent bias and censorship undercuts what is perhaps the principal value and defense of the novel—that reading novels can be critical to one’s learning how to think.
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  29. Seamus Bradley (2011). A Literary Approach to Scientific Practice. Metascience 20 (2):363--367.score: 18.0
    A literary approach to scientific practice: Essay Review of R.I.G. Hughes' _The Theoretical Practices of Physics_.
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  30. Richard Harland (1999). Literary Theory From Plato to Barthes: An Introductory History. St. Martin's Press.score: 18.0
    Richard Harland provides a lucid account of all the major movements in literary theory up to the late 1960s. In a lucid and accessible style, he unfolds a comprehensive "story" of literary theory in all its manifestations. Because contemporary literary theory depends heavily upon European thinkers, the book has an international focus, and its coverage extends from philosophers to social theorists to linguists. Harland explains the essential principles of each theoretical position, looking behind particular critical judgments and (...)
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  31. Michael Ryan (2007). Literary Theory: A Practical Introduction. Blackwell Pub..score: 18.0
    Michael Ryan's Literary Theory: A Practical Introduction, Second Edition introduces students to the full range of contemporary approaches to the study of literature and culture, from Formalism, Structuralism, and Historicism to Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies, and Global English. Introduces readings from a variety of theoretical perspectives, on classic literary texts. Demonstrates how the varying perspectives on texts can lead to different interpretations of the same work. Contains an accessible account of different theoretical approaches An ideal resource for use (...)
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  32. Peter Byrne (1979). Leavis, Literary Criticism and Philosophy. British Journal of Aesthetics 19 (3):263-273.score: 18.0
    This article explores and defends some of f r leavis's ideas about the nature of reasoning in literary criticism. In particular, It examines leavis's contention that the validity of literary criticism does not wait upon a theoretical defence of its canons of judgments of standards. It aims to show that this eschewal of theoretical thought is rationally justifiable and that the form of reasoning leavis advocates for literary criticism has respectable parallels elsewhere, Not least in philosophy itself. (...)
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  33. Sherri Irvin (2009). Teaching and Learning Guide For: Authors, Intentions and Literary Meaning. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):287-291.score: 18.0
    The relationship of the author's intention to the meaning of a literary work has been a persistently controversial topic in aesthetics. Anti-intentionalists Wimsatt and Beardsley, in the 1946 paper that launched the debate, accused critics who fueled their interpretative activity by poring over the author's private diaries and life story of committing the 'fallacy' of equating the work's meaning, properly determined by context and linguistic convention, with the meaning intended by the author. Hirsch responded that context and convention are (...)
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  34. Edward Harcourt (2010). Truth and the 'Work' of Literary Fiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):93-97.score: 18.0
    As Lamarque agrees, to read philosophy is to read for truth, so if literary fiction non-accidentally conveys philosophical claims, Lamarque's anti-cognitivist position on it must be flawed. Deploying Iris Murdoch's notion of the ‘work’ an author does in a text, I try to expand what should be understood by an argument in this context, and thus address Lamarque's argument that literary fiction cannot non-accidentally convey philosophical claims because it typically contains no arguments. The main literary example is (...)
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  35. Graham Harman (2012). The Well-Wrought Broken Hammer: Object-Oriented Literary Criticism. New Literary History 43 (2):183-203.score: 18.0
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  36. G. R. F. Ferrari (1999). Aristotle's Literary Aesthetics. Phronesis 44 (3):181 - 198.score: 18.0
    Against the consensus that Aristotle in the "Poetics" sets out to give tragedy a role in exercising or improving the mature citizen's moral sensibilities, I argue that his aim is rather to analyse what makes a work of literature successful in its own terms, and in particular how a tragic drama can achieve the effect of suspense. The proper pleasure of tragedy is produced by the plotting and eventual dispelling of the play's suspense. Aristotle claims that poetry 'says what is (...)
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  37. Susan B. Levin (2001). The Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry Revisited: Plato and the Greek Literary Tradition. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    In this study, Levin explores Plato's engagement with the Greek literary tradition in his treatment of key linguistic issues. This investigation, conjoined with a new interpretation of the Republic's familiar critique of poets, supports the view that Plato's work represents a valuable precedent for contemporary reflections on ways in which philosophy might benefit from appeals to literature.
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  38. Mark Silcox & Jon Cogburn (2006). Computability Theory and Literary Competence. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (4):369-386.score: 18.0
    criticism defend the idea that an individual reader's understanding of a text can be a factor in determining the meaning of what is written in that text, and hence must play a part in determining the very identity conditions of works of literary art. We examine some accounts that have been given of the type of readerly ‘competence’ that a reader must have in order for her responses to a text to play this sort of constitutive role. We argue (...)
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  39. Jukka Mikkonen (2010). Literary Fictions as Utterances and Artworks. Theoria 46 (1):68-80.score: 18.0
    During the last decades, there has been a debate on the question whether literary works are utterances, or have utterance meaning, and whether it is reasonable to approach them as such. Proponents of the utterance model in literary interpretation, whom I will refer to as ‘utterance theorists,’ such as Noël Carroll and especially Robert Stecker, suggest that because of their nature as linguistic products of intentional human action, literary works are utterances similar to those used in everyday (...)
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  40. Andrew Bowie (1997). From Romanticism to Critical Theory: The Philosophy of German Literary Theory. Routledge.score: 18.0
    From Romanticism to Critical Theory explores the philosophical origins of literary theory via the tradition of German philosophy that began with the Romantic reaction to Kant. It traces the continuation of the Romantic tradition of Novalis, Friedrich Schlegel and Schleiermacher, in Heidegger's approaches to art and thruth, and in the Critical Theory of Benjamin and Adorno. Andrew Bowie argues, against many current assumptions, that the key aspect of literary theory is not the demonstration of how meaning can be (...)
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  41. Mary Klages (2006). Literary Theory: A Guide for the Perplexed. Continuum.score: 18.0
    Sample quotes from emails sent by visitors to Mary Klages's successful literary theory web pages on which this book is based: 'Finding your course was a godsend ...
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  42. Paisley Livingston (2008). Authorship Redux: On Some Recent and Not-so-Recent Work in Literary Theory. Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):pp. 191-197.score: 18.0
    Did Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, or other "poststructuralist" theorists writing in the wake of May '68 come up with any good ideas about authorship and related topics in the philosophy of literature? The three volumes under review have a common point of departure in that broad question, but offer a number of contrasting responses to it. In what follows I describe and assess some of the various perspectives on offer in these 700 or so pages. The short answer (...)
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  43. Stein Haugom Olsen (1987). The End of Literary Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    The essays in this collection are concerned with the philosophical problems that arise in connection with the understanding and evaluation of literature - such problems as the relationship between the work and the author (authorial intention), between the work and the world (reference and truth), the definition of a literary work, and the nature of literary theory itself. Professor Olsen attacks many of the orthodoxies of modern literary theory, in particular the enterprise to build a comprehensive systematic (...)
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  44. Søren Kierkegaard (2001). A Literary Review: Two Ages, a Novel by the Author of a Story of Everyday Life, Published by J.L. Heiberg, Copenhagen, Reitzel, 1845. Penguin.score: 18.0
    Ostensibly, A Literary Review is a straightforward commentary by Søren Kierkegaard on the work of a contemporary novelist. On deeper levels, however, it becomes the existential philosopher's far-reaching critique of his society and age, and its apocalyptic final sections inspired the central ideas in Martin Heiddeger's influential work Being and Time . Embraced by many readers as prophetic, A Literary Review and its concepts remain relevant to our current debates on identity, addiction, and social conformity.
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  45. Joshua Kates (2008). Fielding Derrida: Philosophy, Literary Criticism, History, and the Work of Deconstruction. Fordham University Press.score: 18.0
    Introduction: Fielding Derrida -- Jacques Derrida's early writings : alongside skepticism, phenomenology -- Analytic philosophy, and literary criticism -- Deconstruction as skepticism -- Derrida, Husserl, and the commentators : a developmental approach -- A transcendental sense of death : Derrida and the philosophy of language -- Literary theory's languages : the deconstruction of sense vs. the deconstruction of reference -- Jacques Derrida and the problem of philosophical and political modernity -- Jacob Klein and Jacques Derrida : the problem (...)
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  46. Jukka Mikkonen (2009). The Realistic Fallacy, Or: The Conception of Literary Narrative Fiction in Analytic Aesthetics. Studia Philosophica Estonica 2 (1):1-18.score: 18.0
    In this paper, my aim is to show that in Anglo-American analytic aesthetics, the conception of narrative fiction is in general realistic and that it derives from philosophical theories of fiction-making, the act of producing works of literary narrative fiction. I shall firstly broadly show the origins of the problem and illustrate how the so-called realistic fallacy – the view which maintains that fictions consist of propositions which represent the fictional world “as it is” – is committed through the (...)
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  47. Jukka Mikkonen (2010). On the Body of Literary Persuasion. Estetika 47 (1):51-71.score: 18.0
    In the analytic philosophy of literature, a common objection to the cognitive value of literary narrative fiction has been that literary works do not argue for the genuine truths they may contain. The argument maintains that although literary works could make or imply humanly interesting truth-claims, the works do not reason or justify the claims and thus they do not make significant contributions to knowledge. In this paper, I shall argue that literary works have distinct cognitive (...)
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  48. Katherine Thomson-Jones (2007). The Literary Origins of the Cinematic Narrator. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):76-94.score: 18.0
    This paper reveals an ulterior motive for insisting on the necessary presence of narrators in film: the desire to fit film into a literary paradigm. Despite important theoretical links between film and literature, the assumption that films must be like novels in always having narrators is unsound. By moving beyond literature in the comparison of narrative media, and focusing specifically on cases of ‘breaking the fourth wall’ in film and theatre, we find that the presence and function of a (...)
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  49. T. J. Diffey (1975). Morality and Literary Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (4):443-454.score: 18.0
    If the idea of morality is approached by way both of common sense views about morality and common philosophical accounts of it, then the meaning of the term "moral" as this is sometimes used in literary criticism must seem puzzling. the puzzle is illustrated rather than solved, but some tentative suggestions are made. for instance common notions about what morality is may be too narrow.
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  50. Vasil Gluchman (2011). MARTIN RÁZUS: Literary and Philosophical Reflections on Morality1. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (1):151-172.score: 18.0
    Martin Rázus (1888—1937) was one of the most important personalities of Slovak Lutheran social, political, cultural, literary, and intellectual life during the first half of the twentieth century. First, I examine the picture of Slovak rural morality portrayed in the works of Rázus, particularly his 1929 novel Svety [Worlds], in which Rázus presents the morality of the people in the Slovak countryside from the beginning of the twentieth century until the end of the 1920s. Second, as the ethical and (...)
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