Search results for 'wave mechanics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeffrey Barrett (2011). Everett's Pure Wave Mechanics and the Notion of Worlds. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (2):277-302.
    Everett (1957a, b, 1973) relative-state formulation of quantum mechanics has often been taken to involve a metaphysical commitment to the existence of many splitting worlds each containing physical copies of observers and the objects they observe. While there was earlier talk of splitting worlds in connection with Everett, this is largely due to DeWitt’s (Phys Today 23:30–35, 1970) popular presentation of the theory. While the thought of splitting worlds or parallel universes has captured the popular imagination, Everett himself favored (...)
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  2.  24
    Jeffrey A. Barrett (2015). Pure Wave Mechanics and the Very Idea of Empirical Adequacy. Synthese 192 (10):3071-3104.
    Hugh Everett III proposed his relative-state formulation of pure wave mechanics as a solution to the quantum measurement problem. He sought to address the theory’s determinate record and probability problems by showing that, while counterintuitive, pure wave mechanics was nevertheless empirically faithful and hence empirical acceptable. We will consider what Everett meant by empirical faithfulness. The suggestion will be that empirical faithfulness is well understood as a weak variety of empirical adequacy. The thought is that the (...)
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  3.  29
    Slobodan Perovic (2008). Why Were Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics Considered Equivalent? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 39 (2):444-461.
    A recent rethinking of the early history of Quantum Mechanics deemed the late 1920s agreement on the equivalence of Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics, prompted by Schrödinger's 1926 proof, a myth. Schrödinger supposedly failed to prove isomorphism, or even a weaker equivalence (“Schrödinger-equivalence”) of the mathematical structures of the two theories; developments in the early 1930s, especially the work of mathematician von Neumann provided sound proof of mathematical equivalence. The alleged agreement about the Copenhagen Interpretation, predicated (...)
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  4.  43
    Slobodan Perovic (2008). Why Were Two Theories (Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics) Deemed Logically Distinct, and yet Equivalent, in Quantum Mechanics? In Christopher Lehrer (ed.), First Annual Conference in the Foundations and History of Quantum Physics. Max Planck Institute for History of Science
    A recent rethinking of the early history of Quantum Mechanics deemed the late 1920s agreement on the equivalence of Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics, prompted by Schrödinger’s 1926 proof, a myth. Schrödinger supposedly failed to achieve the goal of proving isomorphism of the mathematical structures of the two theories, while only later developments in the early 1930s, especially the work of mathematician John von Neumman (1932) provided sound proof of equivalence. The alleged agreement about the Copenhagen (...)
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  5.  19
    Louis de Broglie (1930). An Introduction to the Study of Wave Mechanics. London, Methuen & Co. Ltd..
    Now, this is precisely the experimental law of the photo-electric effect in the form which has been verified in succession for all the radiations from the ultra ...
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  6.  12
    Andrei P. Kirilyuk (1997). Universal Concept of Complexity by the Dynamic Redundance Paradigm: Causal Randomness, Complete Wave Mechanics, and the Ultimate Unification of Knowledge. Nauk. Dumka.
    Extended Abstract This book introduces and develops a new, universal method of the scientific comprehension of reality providing the objective, ...
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  7. Albert Sol? (2013). Bohmian Mechanics Without Wave Function Ontology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 44 (4):365-378.
    In this paper, I critically assess different interpretations of Bohmian mechanics that are not committed to an ontology based on the wave function being an actual physical object that inhabits configuration space. More specifically, my aim is to explore the connection between the denial of configuration space realism and another interpretive debate that is specific to Bohmian mechanics: the quantum potential versus guidance approaches. Whereas defenders of the quantum potential approach to the theory claim that Bohmian (...) is better formulated as quasi-Newtonian, via the postulation of forces proportional to acceleration; advocates of the guidance approach defend the notion that the theory is essentially first-order and incorporates some concepts akin to those of Aristotelian physics. Here I analyze whether the desideratum of an interpretation of Bohmian mechanics that is both explanatorily adequate and not committed to configuration space realism favors one of these two approaches to the theory over the other. Contrary to some recent claims in the literature, I argue that the quasi-Newtonian approach based on the idea of a quantum potential does not come out the winner. (shrink)
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  8. Jeffrey A. Barrett (2011). On the Faithful Interpretation of Pure Wave Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (4):693-709.
    Given Hugh Everett III's understanding of the proper cognitive status of physical theories, his relative-state formulation of pure wave mechanics arguably qualifies as an empirically acceptable physical theory. The argument turns on the precise nature of the relationship that Everett requires between the empirical substructure of an empirically faithful physical theory and experience. On this view, Everett provides a weak resolution to both the determinate record and the probability problems encountered by pure wave mechanics, and does (...)
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  9.  13
    Jeffrey A. Barrett, Typicality in Pure Wave Mechanics.
    Hugh Everett III's pure wave mechanics is a deterministic physical theory with no probabilities. He nevertheless sought to show how his theory might be understood as making the same statistical predictions as the standard collapse formulation of quantum mechanics. We will consider Everett's argument for pure wave mechanics, how it depends on the notion of branch typicality, and the relationship between the predictions of pure wave mechanics and the standard quantum probabilities.
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  10.  65
    Hans-Jürgen Treder & Wilfried Schröder (1997). Magnetohydrodynamics Corresponding with Wave Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 27 (6):875-879.
    The gauge-invariant relativistic wave mechanics corresponds to relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics according to Planck's version of the correspondence principle.
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  11.  54
    Jagdish Mehra (1987). Erwin Schrödinger and the Rise of Wave Mechanics. I. Schrödinger's Scientific Work Before the Creation of Wave Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 17 (11):1051-1112.
    This article is in three parts. Part I gives an account of Erwin Schrödinger's growing up and studies in Vienna, his scientific work—first in Vienna from 1911 to 1920, then in Zurich from 1920 to 1925—on the dielectric properties of matter, atmospheric electricity and radioactivity, general relativity, color theory and physiological optics, and on kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. Part II deals with the creation of the theory of wave mechanics by Schrödinger in Zurich during the early (...)
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  12.  23
    Jagdish Mehra (1987). Erwin Schrödinger and the Rise of Wave Mechanics. II. The Creation of Wave Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 17 (12):1141-1188.
    This article (Part II) deals with the creation of the theory of wave mechanics by Erwin Schrödinger in Zurich during the early months of 1926; he laid the foundations of this theory in his first two communications toAnnalen der Physik. The background of Schrödinger's work on, and his actual creation of, wave mechanics are analyzed.
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  13.  23
    Jagdish Mehra (1988). Erwin Schrödinger and the Rise of Wave Mechanics. III. Early Response and Applications. Foundations of Physics 18 (2):107-184.
    This article (Part III) deals with the early applications of wave mechanics to atomic problems—including the demonstration of the formal mathematical equivalence of wave mechanics with the quantum mechanics of Born, Heisenberg, and Jordan, and that of Dirac—by Schrödinger himself and others. The new theory was immediately accepted by the scientific community.
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  14.  19
    Georges Lochak (1982). The Evolution of the Ideas of Louis de Broglie on the Interpretation of Wave Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 12 (10):931-953.
    This paper is devoted to an analysis of the intellectual itinerary of Louis de Broglie, from the discovery of wave mechanics, until today. Essential attention is paid to the fact that this itinerary is far from being linear, since after a first attempt to develop his own views on wave mechanics through the theory of singular waves, Louis de Broglie abandoned it for twenty five years, under the influence of the Copenhagen School (even embracing the conceptions (...)
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  15.  13
    Louis de Broglie (1970). The Reinterpretation of Wave Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 1 (1):5-15.
    The author begins by recalling how he was led in 1923–24 to the ideas of wave mechanics in generalizing the ideas of Einstein's theory of light quanta. He made himself at that time a concrete physical picture of the coexistence of waves and particles and, in 1927, attempted to give them precise form in his “theory of the double solution.” As other ideas prevailed at the time, he abandoned the development of his conception. But for the past twenty (...)
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  16.  14
    Georges Lochak (1987). Convergence and Divergence Between the Ideas of de Broglie and Schrödinger in Wave Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 17 (12):1189-1203.
    This article discusses the historical similarities and differences between Schroedinger's and de Broglie's ideas on wave mechanics and gives a biographical account of their scientific relationship. Their arguments over questions such as quantum jumps, the viability of particles within wave mechanics theory, and the inclusion of space, time, and relativity in quantum mechanics are analyzed. The final section of the paper considers the overall role of Schroedinger's ideas in modern quantum mechanics.
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  17.  7
    Dan Censor (1980). Nonlinear Wave Mechanics and Particulate Self-Focusing. Foundations of Physics 10 (7-8):555-566.
    A previous model for treating electromagnetic nonlinear wave systems is examined in the context of wave mechanics. It is shown that nonlinear wave mechanics implies harmonic generation of new quasiparticle wave functions, which are absent in linear systems. The phenomenon is interpreted in terms of pair (and higher order ensembles) coherence of the interacting particles. The implications are far-reaching, and the present approach might contribute toward a common basis for diverse physical phenomena involving nonlinearity. (...)
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  18.  79
    Nathan Rosen (1984). A Semiclassical Interpretation of Wave Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 14 (7):579-605.
    The single-particle wave function ψ=ReiS/h has been interpreted classically: At a given point the particle momentum is ▽S, and the relative particle density in an ensemble is R 2 . It is first proposed to modify this interpretation by assuming that physical variables undergo rapid fluctuations, so that ▽S is the average of the momentum over a short time interval. However, it appears that this is not enough. It seems necessary to assume that the density also fluctuates. The fluctuations (...)
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  19. Alyssa Ney & David Z. Albert (eds.) (2013). The Wave Function: Essays in the Metaphysics of Quantum Mechanics. Oxford University Press.
    This is a new volume of original essays on the metaphysics of quantum mechanics. The essays address questions such as: What fundamental metaphysics is best motivated by quantum mechanics? What is the ontological status of the wave function? What is the nature of the fundamental space (or space-time manifold) of quantum mechanics?
     
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  20.  19
    L. Jánossy (1978). Wave Mechanics and the Tunnel Effect. Foundations of Physics 8 (1-2):119-122.
    It is shown that the nonconservation of energy to the extent given by the uncertainty relation can be interpreted also as the storing of inner energyQ by a wave mechanical system. The latter formalism is, apart from its terminology, identical with the accepted one.
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  21.  16
    Hans-Jürgen Treder & Horst-Heino von Borzeszkowski (1988). Interference and Interaction in Schrödinger's Wave Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 18 (1):77-93.
    Reminiscing on the fact that E. Schrödinger was rooted in the same physical tradition as M. Planck and A. Einstein, some aspects of his attitude to quantum mechanics are discussed. In particular, it is demonstrated that the quantum-mechanical paradoxes assumed by Einstein and Schrödinger should not exist, but that otherwise the epistemological problem of physical reality raised in this context by Einstein and Schrödinger is fundamental for our understanding of quantum theory. The nonexistence of such paradoxes just shows that (...)
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  22.  15
    L. Jánossy (1973). The Physical Interpretation of Wave Mechanics. I. Foundations of Physics 3 (2):185-202.
    Summarizing and extending the ideas of many authors and also of our own work, we try to show that the wave equation of the one-body problem can be transformed into a system of equations describing the motion of a deformable medium carrying charge and having permanent magnetic polarization. The wave equation and the system of transformed equations are connected by a strict one-to-one correspondence. The transformation which is not uniquely determined from a mathematical point of view can be (...)
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  23.  11
    Lev Vaidman (2005). The Reality in Bohmian Quantum Mechanics or Can You Kill with an Empty Wave Bullet? Foundations of Physics 35 (2):299-312.
    Several situations, in which an empty wave causes an observable effect, are reviewed. They include an experiment showing ‘‘surrealistic trajectories’’ proposed by Englert et al. and protective measurement of the density of the quantum state. Conditions for observable effects due to empty waves are derived. The possibility (in spite of the existence of these examples) of minimalistic interpretation of Bohmian quantum mechanics in which only Bohmian positions supervene on our experience is discussed.
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  24.  8
    L. Jánossy (1976). Wave Mechanics and Physical Reality. III. The Many-Body Problem. Foundations of Physics 6 (3):341-350.
    It is shown that the wave equation of anN-body problem can be transformed into a system of “hydrodynamical equations” in a3N-dimensional space. The projections of the hydrodynamical variables in three-dimensional space do not obey strict equations of motion. This is shown to be connected with the fact that the mathematically possible solutions of the wave equations are much more numerous than the states of the system that are usually realized in nature. It is pointed out that the many-body (...)
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  25. Jeffrey Barrett (2010). A Structural Interpretation Of Pure Wave Mechanics. Humana.Mente 13.
     
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  26.  78
    L. Jánossy (1974). The Physical Interpretation of Wave Mechanics. II. Foundations of Physics 4 (4):445-452.
    Continuing the considerations given in the first part of this series (I), we use the analysis of the Aharonov-Bohm effect to show that the hydrodynamical variables by which the quantum mechanical one-body problem can be represented are of direct physical significance. It is shown in a particular case that the final state of a system can be obtained from its initial state in a unique manner if both states are characterized by hydrodynamical variables.
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  27.  29
    Linda Wessels (1979). Schrödinger's Route to Wave Mechanics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 10 (4):311-340.
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  28.  25
    Christian Joas & Christoph Lehner (2009). The Classical Roots of Wave Mechanics: Schrödinger's Transformations of the Optical-Mechanical Analogy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (4):338-351.
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  29.  50
    Wilfried Kuhn (1988). Analysis of the Development of Wave Mechanics: Aspects From the History of Physics and the Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 18 (3):379-399.
  30.  38
    Alwyn van der Merwe (1982). Editorial Postscript to “the Evolution of the Ideas of Louis de Broglie on the Interpretation of Wave Mechanics”. Foundations of Physics 12 (10):955-962.
  31. Christian Joas & Christoph Lehner (2009). The Classical Roots of Wave Mechanics: Schrödinger's Transformations of the Optical-Mechanical Analogy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 40 (4):338-351.
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  32.  12
    Ph Gueret & J. -P. Vigier (1982). De Broglie's Wave Particle Duality in the Stochastic Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics: A Testable Physical Assumption. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 12 (11):1057-1083.
    If one starts from de Broglie's basic relativistic assumptions, i.e., that all particles have an intrinsic real internal vibration in their rest frame, i.e., hv 0 =m 0 c 2 ; that when they are at any one point in space-time the phase of this vibration cannot depend on the choice of the reference frame, then, one can show (following Mackinnon (1) ) that there exists a nondispersive wave packet of de Broglie's waves which can be assimilated to the (...)
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  33.  20
    Oliver L. Reiser (1928). Light, Wave-Mechanics, and Consciousness. Journal of Philosophy 25 (12):309-317.
  34.  1
    John Hendry (1988). The Historical Development of Quantum Theory. Volume 5. Erwin Schrödinger and the Rise of Wave Mechanics. Part 1. Schrödinger in Vienna and Zurich, 1887–1925 and Part 2. The Creation of Wave Mechanics; Early Response and Applications, 1925–1926. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 21 (3):371-372.
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  35.  2
    Dorothy Wrinch (1928). Aspects of Scientific Method: With Special Reference to Schrödinger's Wave Mechanics. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 29:95 - 122.
  36. John Hendry (1988). Jagdish Mehra & Helmut Rechenberg. The Historical Development of Quantum Theory. Volume 5. Erwin Schrödinger and the Rise of Wave Mechanics. Part 1. Schrödinger in Vienna and Zurich, 1887–1925 and Part 2. The Creation of Wave Mechanics; Early Response and Applications, 1925–1926. Berlin, Heidelberg, New York: Springer-Verlag, 1987. Pp. Xix + 366 and Viii + 615. ISBN 3-540-96284-0 and 96377-4. DM 148.00 and 98.00. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 21 (3):371.
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  37. Slobodan Perovic (2008). Why Were Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics Considered Equivalent? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (2):444-461.
  38. E. Schrödinger (2009). Wave Mechanics. In Guido Bacciagaluppi (ed.), Quantum Theory at the Crossroads: Reconsidering the 1927 Solvay Conference. Cambridge University Press
     
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  39. Linda Wessels (1991). The Historical Development of Quantum Theory. Volume V: Erwin Schrödinger and the Rise of Wave Mechanics by Jagdish Mehra; Helmut Rechenberg. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 82:404-405.
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  40.  10
    David Albert & Alyssa Ney (eds.) (2013). The Wave Function: Essays in the Metaphysics of Quantum Mechanics. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This is a volume of original essays on the metaphysics of quantum mechanics. The essays address questions such as: What fundamental metaphysics is best motivated by quantum mechanics? What is the ontological status of the wave function? Does quantum mechanics support the existence of any other fundamental entities, e.g. particles? What is the nature of the fundamental space (or space-time manifold) of quantum mechanics? What is the relationship between the fundamental ontology of quantum mechanics (...)
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  41.  33
    Willem M. Muynck & Gidi P. Liempd (1986). On the Relation Between Indistinguishability of Identical Particles and (Anti)Symmetry of the Wave Function in Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 67 (3):477 - 496.
    Two different concepts of distinguishability are often mixed up in attempts to derive in quantum mechanics the (anti)symmetry of the wave function from indistinguishability of identical particles. Some of these attempts are analyzed and shown to be defective. It is argued that, although identical particles should be considered as observationally indistinguishable in (anti)symmetric states, they may be considered to be conceptually distinguishable. These two notions of (in)distinguishability have quite different physical origins, the former one being related to observations (...)
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  42.  6
    M. Cini, M. De Maria, G. Mattioli & F. Nicolò (1979). Wave Packet Reduction in Quantum Mechanics: A Model of a Measuring Apparatus. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 9 (7-8):479-500.
    We investigate the problem of “wave packet reduction” in quantum mechanics by solving the Schrödinger equation for a system composed of a model measuring apparatusM interacting with a microscopic objects. The “instrument” is intended to be somewhat more realistic than others previously proposed, but at the same time still simple enough to lead to an explicit solution for the time-dependent density matrix. It turns out that,practically, everything happens as if the wave packet reduction had occurred. This is (...)
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  43.  5
    V. K. Ignatovich (1978). Nonspreading Wave Packets in Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 8 (7-8):565-571.
    In this paper a nonspreading, unnormalizable wave packet satisfying the Schrödinger equation is constructed. A modification of the Schrödinger equation is considered which allows the normalization of the wave packet. The case is generalized for relativistic mechanics.
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  44.  4
    Lipo Wang & R. F. O'Connell (1988). Quantum Mechanics Without Wave Functions. Foundations of Physics 18 (10):1023-1033.
    The phase space formulation of quantum mechanics is based on the use of quasidistribution functions. This technique was pioneered by Wigner, whose distribution function is perhaps the most commonly used of the large variety that we find discussed in the literature. Here we address the question of how one can obtain distribution functions and hence do quantum mechanics without the use of wave functions.
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  45. Alyssa Ney & David Z. Albert (eds.) (2013). The Wave Function: Essays on the Metaphysics of Quantum Mechanics. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This is a new volume of original essays on the metaphysics of quantum mechanics. The essays address questions such as: What fundamental metaphysics is best motivated by quantum mechanics? What is the ontological status of the wave function? Does quantum mechanics support the existence of any other fundamental entities, e.g. particles? What is the nature of the fundamental space of quantum mechanics? What is the relationship between the fundamental ontology of quantum mechanics and ordinary, (...)
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  46.  11
    Claudio Calosi, Vincenzo Fano, Pierluigi Graziani & Gino Tarozzi, Statistical VS Wave Realism in the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics.
    Different realistic attitudes towards wavefunctions and quantum states are as old as quantum theory itself. Recently Pusey, Barret and Rudolph on the one hand, and Auletta and Tarozzi on the other, have proposed new interesting arguments in favor of a broad realistic interpretation of quantum mechanics that can be considered the modern heir to some views held by the fathers of quantum theory. In this paper we give a new and detailed presentation of such arguments, propose a new taxonomy (...)
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  47.  21
    S. Kamefuchi (1998). Some Considerations on Quantum Mechanics—Matter Wave and Probability Wave. Foundations of Physics 28 (1):31-43.
    It is argued that the distinction between matter wave and probability wave is made clear when the problem is considered from the field-theory viewpoint. Interference can take place for each of these waves, and the similarity as well as dissimilarity between the two cases is discussed.
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  48.  10
    C. Dewdney, G. Horton, M. M. Lam, Z. Malik & M. Schmidt (1992). Wave-Particle Dualism and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 22 (10):1217-1265.
    The realist interpretations of quantum theory, proposed by de Broglie and by Bohm, are re-examined and their differences, especially concerning many-particle systems and the relativistic regime, are explored. The impact of the recently proposed experiments of Vigier et al. and of Ghose et al. on the debate about the interpretation of quantum mechanics is discussed. An indication of how de Broglie and Bohm would account for these experimental results is given.
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  49.  4
    Craig Callender (2015). Alyssa Ney and David Z. Albert the Wave Function: Essays on the Metaphysics of Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 66 (4):1025-1028.
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  50.  4
    Jan C. A. Boeyens (2015). Wave-Mechanical Model for Chemistry. Foundations of Chemistry 17 (3):247-262.
    The strength and defects of wave mechanics as a theory of chemistry are critically examined. Without the secondary assumption of wave–particle duality, the seminal equation describes matter waves and leaves the concept of point particles undefined. To bring the formalism into line with the theory of special relativity, it is shown to require reformulation in hypercomplex algebra that imparts a new meaning to electron spin as a holistic spinor, eliminating serious current misconceptions in the process. Reformulation in (...)
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