Search results for '*Animal Ethology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marc Bekoff (1997). Deep Ethology, Animal Rights, and the Great Ape/Animal Project: Resisting Speciesism and Expanding the Community of Equals. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (3):269-296.score: 47.0
    In this essay I argue that the evolutionary and comparative study of nonhuman animal (hereafter animal) cognition in a wide range of taxa by cognitive ethologists can readily inform discussions about animal protection and animal rights. However, while it is clear that there is a link between animal cognitive abilities and animal pain and suffering, I agree with Jeremy Bentham who claimed long ago the real question does not deal with whether individuals can think or reason but rather with whether (...)
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  2. Marc Bekoff (2006). Animal Passions and Beastly Virtues: Cognitive Ethology as the Unifying Science for Understanding the Subjective, Emotional, Empathic, and Moral Lives of Animals. Zygon 41 (1):71-104.score: 45.0
  3. Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (1995). Cognitive Ethology and the Intentionality of Animal Behavior. Mind and Language 10 (4):313-328.score: 45.0
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  4. Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (2007). Animal Minds, Cognitive Ethology, and Ethics. Journal of Ethics 11 (3):299-317.score: 40.0
    Our goal in this paper is to provide enough of an account of the origins of cognitive ethology and the controversy surrounding it to help ethicists to gauge for themselves how to balance skepticism and credulity about animal minds when communicating with scientists. We believe that ethicists’ arguments would benefit from better understanding of the historical roots of ongoing controversies. It is not appropriate to treat some widely reported results in animal cognition as if their interpretations are a matter (...)
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  5. G. Thines & R. Zayan (1975). F. J. J. Buytendijk's Contribution to Animal Behaviour: Animal Psychology or Ethology? Acta Biotheoretica 24 (3-4).score: 36.0
    F. J. J.Buytendijk died on October 21st 1974 at the age of 87. His important contribution to the study of animal behaviour is analyzed here in relation to the historical development of animal psychology and ethology. The detailed study of his scientific production suggests, according to the authors, that some important findings, although largely not paid attention to in present-day literature, are akin to the conceptual and methodological evolution of comparative ethology.
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  6. J. van Rooijen (1981). Are Feelings Adaptations? The Basis of Modern Applied Animal Ethology. Applied Animal Ethoilogy 7:187-89.score: 35.0
     
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  7. Joshua M. Moritz (2014). Animal Suffering, Evolution, and the Origins of Evil: Toward a “Free Creatures” Defense. Zygon 49 (2):348-380.score: 33.0
    Does an affirmation of theistic evolution make the task of theodicy impossible? In this article, I will review a number of ancient and contemporary responses to the problem of evil as it concerns animal suffering and suggest a possible way forward which employs the ancient Jewish insight that evil—as resistance to God's will that results in suffering and alienation from God's purposes—precedes the arrival of human beings and already has a firm foothold in the nonhuman animal world long before humans (...)
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  8. Marion Thomas (2005). Are Animals Just Noisy Machines?: Louis Boutan and the Co-Invention of Animal and Child Psychology in the French Third Republic. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):425 - 460.score: 33.0
    Historians of science have only just begun to sample the wealth of different approaches to the study of animal behavior undertaken in the twentieth century. To date, more attention has been given to Lorenzian ethology and American behaviorism than to other work and traditions, but different approaches are equally worthy of the historian's attention, reflecting not only the broader range of questions that could be asked about animal behavior and the "animal mind" but also the different contexts in which (...)
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  9. Timo Maran (2010). Why Was Thomas A. Sebeok Not a Cognitive Ethologist? From “Animal Mind” to “Semiotic Self”. Biosemiotics 3 (3):315-329.score: 33.0
    In the current debates about zoosemiotics its relations with the neighbouring disciplines are a relevant topic. The present article aims to analyse the complex relations between zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology with special attention to their establishers: Thomas A. Sebeok and Donald R. Griffin. It is argued that zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology have common roots in comparative studies of animal communication in the early 1960s. For supporting this claim Sebeok’s works are analysed, the classical and philosophical periods of his (...)
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  10. Donald R. Griffin & G. B. Speck (2004). New Evidence of Animal Consciousness. Animal Cognition 7 (1):5-18.score: 30.0
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  11. Donald R. Griffin (2001). Animal Minds: Beyond Cognition to Consciousness. University of Chicago Press.score: 30.0
    Finally, in four chapters greatly expanded for this edition, Griffin considers the latest scientific research on animal consciousness, pro and con, and...
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  12. William S. Helton (2005). Animal Expertise, Conscious or Not. Animal Cognition 8 (2):67-74.score: 30.0
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  13. Dale Jamieson & Marc Bekoff (1992). On Aims and Methods of Cognitive Ethology. Philosophy of Science Association 1992:110-124.score: 30.0
    In 1963 Niko Tinbergen published a paper, "On Aims and Methods of Ethology," dedicated to his friend Konrad Lorenz. Here Tinbergen defines ethology as "the biological study of behavior," and seeks to demonstrate "the close affinity between Ethology and the rest of Biology." Tinbergen identifies four major areas of ethology: causation, survival value, evolution, and ontogeny. Our goal is to attempt for cognitive ethology what Tinbergen succeeded in doing for ethology: to clarify its aims (...)
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  14. H. A. (2002). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (2):235-262.score: 29.0
    It has been argued that if an animal is psychologically like us, there may be more scientific reason to experiment upon it, but less moral justification to do so. Some scientists deny the existence of this dilemma, claiming that although there are scientifically valuable similarities between humans and animals that make experimentation worthwhile, humans are at the same time unique and fundamentally different. This latter response is, ironically, typical of pre-Darwinian beliefs in the relationship between human and non-human animals. Another (...)
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  15. Daniel C. Dennett (1983). Intentional Systems in Cognitive Ethology: The 'Panglossian Paradigm' Defended. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):343-90.score: 29.0
    Ethologists and others studying animal behavior in a spirit are in need of a descriptive language and method that are neither anachronistically bound by behaviorist scruples nor prematurely committed to particular Just such an interim descriptive method can be found in intentional system theory. The use of intentional system theory is illustrated with the case of the apparently communicative behavior of vervet monkeys. A way of using the theory to generate data - including usable, testable data - is sketched. The (...)
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  16. Marc Bekoffis, Bob Bermond, Lynda Birke, Bernice Bovenkerk, Baruch A. Brody & Jeffrey Burkhardt (2008). RSPCA. Jonathan Balcombe has Been Associate Director for Education in the Animal Research Issues Section of the Humane Society of the United States Since 1993. He has Degrees From York University and Carleton University, Toronto, and a Doctoral Degree in Ethology From the University of Tennessee. [REVIEW] In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.score: 29.0
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  17. Michael W. Fox (1986). Laboratory Animal Husbandry: Ethology, Welfare, and Experimental Variables. State University of New York Press.score: 29.0
    The laboratory animal environment: room for concern.
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  18. Bruce MacLennan (2002). Synthetic Ethology: A New Tool for Investigating Animal Cognition. In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. Mit Press. 151--156.score: 29.0
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  19. Bjorn H. Merker (2005). The Liabilities of Mobility: A Selection Pressure for the Transition to Consciousness in Animal Evolution. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):89-114.score: 28.0
  20. Ruud van den Bos (2000). General Organizational Principles of the Brain as Key to the Study of Animal Consciousness. Psyche 6 (5).score: 28.0
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  21. Gary J. Purpura Jr (2006). In Search of Human Uniqueness. Philosophical Psychology 19 (4):443 – 461.score: 27.0
    Typically in the philosophical literature, kinds of minds are differentiated by the range of cognitive tasks animals accomplish as opposed to the means by which they accomplish the tasks. Drawing on progress in cognitive ethology (the study of animal cognition), I argue that such an approach provides bad directions for uncovering the mark of the human mind. If the goal is to determine what makes the human mind unique, philosophers should focus on the means by which animals interact with (...)
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  22. D. A. H. Wilson (2003). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost [Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 33C/2 (2002), 235–261]. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):201-.score: 27.0
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  23. H. A. (2003). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost [Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 33c/2 (2002), 235-261]. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):201-201.score: 27.0
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  24. David A. H. Wilson (2002). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (2):235-262.score: 27.0
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  25. P. P. G. Bateson & P. H. Klopfer (1991). Perspectives in Ethology, Volume 9: Human Understanding and Animal Awareness. Plenum Press.score: 27.0
  26. Marc Bekoff (2002). Cognitive Ethology, Take Three: Fascinating and Frustrating Questions About Animal Minds. Bioscience 52 (9):847.score: 27.0
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  27. Robert Galombos (1967). Animal Behaviour: A Synthesis of Ethology and Comparative Psychology Robert A. Hinde. Bioscience 17 (1):52-53.score: 27.0
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  28. Donald R. Griffin (1978). Prospects for a Cognitive Ethology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):527.score: 27.0
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  29. Jack P. Hailman (1974). Ethology The Animal in Its World: Explorations of an Ethologist, 1932-1972, Volume I, Field Studies Niko Tinbergen. Bioscience 24 (10):592-592.score: 27.0
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  30. Jes Harfeld (2011). Philosophical Ethology: On the Extents of What It Is to Be a Pig. Society and Animals 19 (1):83-101.score: 27.0
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  31. S. Charles Kendeigh (1967). The History of Ethology An Introduction to Animal Behavior: Ethology's First Century Peter H. Klopfer Jack P. Hailman. Bioscience 17 (9):660-660.score: 27.0
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  32. Martino Doni (2013). La Verità Del Grido. Per Un'archeologia Della Soggettività. Nóema 4 (4-1).score: 25.0
    Obiettivo di questo intervento è indagare due soglie della soggettività: l’infanzia e l’animalità. Bambini e animali condividono il loro essere “assoggettati”: mentre l’adulto è soggetto tout court , il bambino lo deve ancora diventare e l’animale è trattato come polo opposto alla soggettività (oppure, ma non è molto diverso, come soggetto surrogato). Il punto di partenza è la domanda “che cosa è un bambino?”; apertamente socratica, questa domanda serve a incrinare i sedimenti di sapere depositatisi sul senso comune circa la (...)
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  33. Colin Allen (2006). Ethics and the Science of Animal Minds. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):375-394.score: 24.0
    Ethicists have commonly appealed to science to bolster their arguments for elevating the moral status of nonhuman animals. I describe a framework within which I take many ethicists to be making such appeals. I focus on an apparent gap in this framework between those properties of animals that are part of the scientific consensus, and those to which ethicists typically appeal in their arguments. I will describe two different ways of diminishing the appearance of the gap, and argue that both (...)
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  34. Bernd Heinrich (2002). Raven Consciousness. In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. Mit Press. 47-52.score: 24.0
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  35. Anil K. Seth, Bernard J. Baars & D. B. Edelman (2005). Criteria for Consciousness in Humans and Other Mammals. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):119-39.score: 22.0
    The standard behavioral index for human consciousness is the ability to report events with accuracy. While this method is routinely used for scientific and medical applications in humans, it is not easy to generalize to other species. Brain evidence may lend itself more easily to comparative testing. Human consciousness involves widespread, relatively fast low-amplitude interactions in the thalamocortical core of the brain, driven by current tasks and conditions. These features have also been found in other mammals, which suggests that consciousness (...)
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  36. Bernard J. Baars (2005). Subjective Experience is Probably Not Limited to Humans: The Evidence From Neurobiology and Behavior. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):7-21.score: 22.0
  37. D. B. Edelman, Bernard J. Baars & Anil K. Seth (2005). Identifying Hallmarks of Consciousness in Non-Mammalian Species. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):169-87.score: 22.0
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  38. Jaak Panksepp (2005). Toward a Science of Ultimate Concern. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):22-29.score: 22.0
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  39. Simine Vazire & Richard W. Robins (2004). Beyond the Justification Hypothesis: A Broader Theory of the Evolution of Self-Consciousness. Journal of Clinical Psychology. Special Issue 1 (12):1271-1273.score: 22.0
  40. Robert R. Hampton & Benjamin M. Hampstead (2006). Spontaneous Behavior of a Rhesus Monkey (Macaca Mulatta) During Memory Tests Suggests Memory Awareness. Behavioural Processes 72 (2):184-189.score: 22.0
  41. Ralph J. Greenspan & Bernard J. Baars (2005). Consciousness Eclipsed: Jacques Loeb, Ivan P. Pavlov, and the Rise of Reductionistic Biology After 1900. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):219-230.score: 22.0
  42. Sean Allen-Hermanson (2005). Morgan's Canon Revisited. Philosophy of Science 72 (4):608-31.score: 21.0
    The famous ethological maxim known as “Morgan’s Canon” continues to be the subject of interpretive controversy. I reconsider Morgan’s canon in light of two questions: First, what did Morgan intend? Second, is this, or perhaps some re-interpretation of the canon, useful within cognitive ethology? As for the first issue, Morgan’s distinction between higher and lower faculties is suggestive of an early supervenience concept. As for the second, both the canon in its original form, and various recent re-readings, offer nothing (...)
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  43. J. Bennett (1991). How Is Cognitive Ethology Possible. In C. Ristau (ed.), Cognitive Ethology. The Minds of Other Animals. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers. 35-49.score: 21.0
    Cognitive ethology cannot be done well unless its proximate philosophical underpinnings are got straight; this paper tries to help with that. Cognitive attributions are essentially explanatory—if they did not explain behavior, there would be no justification for them—but it doesn’t follow that they explain by providing causes for events that don’t have physical causes. To understand how mentalistic attributions do work, we need to focus on the quartet: sensory input, belief, desire, and behavioral output. We also need to be (...)
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  44. Ádám Miklósi & Márta Gácsi (2012). On the Utilization of Social Animals as a Model for Social Robotics. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 21.0
    Social robotics is becoming a driving field in building artificial agents. The possibility to construct agents that can engage in meaningful social interaction with humans presents new challenges for the engineers. In general social robotics has been inspired dominantly by human psychology and aimed for building human-like robots. Only a small subcategory of “companion robots” (also referred to as robotic pets) was build to mimic animals. In the opinion essay we argue that all social robots should be seen as companions (...)
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  45. Celia Deane-Drummond (2009). Are Animals Moral? A Theological Appraisal of the Evolution of Vice and Virtue. Zygon 44 (4):932-950.score: 20.0
    I discuss controversial claims about the status of non-human animals as moral beings in relation to philosophical claims to the contrary. I address questions about the ontology of animals rather than ethical approaches as to how humans need to treat other animals through notions of, for example, animal rights. I explore the evolutionary origins of behavior that can be considered vices or virtues and suggest that Thomas Aquinas is closer to Darwin's view on nonhuman animals than we might suppose. An (...)
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  46. Gregory Radick (2005). Primate Language and the Playback Experiment, in 1890 and 1980. Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):461 - 493.score: 20.0
    The playback experiment -- the playing back of recorded animal sounds to the animals in order to observe their responses -- has twice become central to celebrated researches on non-human primates. First, in the years around 1890, Richard Garner, an amateur scientist and evolutionary enthusiast, used the new wax cylinder phonograph to record and reproduce monkey utterances with the aim of translating them. Second, in the years around 1980, the ethologists Peter Marler, Robert Seyfarth, and Dorothy Cheney used tape (...)
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  47. Manuel Bremer (2007). Methodologische Überlegungen Zu Tierischen Überzeugungen. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 38 (2):347-355.score: 20.0
    A theory of the beliefs of non-human animals is not closed to us, only because we do not have beliefs of their kind. Starting from a theory of human beliefs and working on a building block model of propositional attitudes a theory of animal beliefs is viable. Such a theory is an example of the broader conception of a heterophenomenological approach to animal cognition. The theory aims at outlining the crucial differences between human and animal beliefs as well as the (...)
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  48. Paul Edmund Griffiths, Ethology, Sociobiology and Evolutionary Psychology.score: 18.0
    In the years leading up to the Second World War the ethologists Konrad Lorenz and Nikolaas Tinbergen, created the tradition of rigorous, Darwinian research on animal behavior that developed into modern behavioral ecology. At first glance, research on specifically human behavior seems to exhibit greater discontinuity that research on animal behavior in general. The 'human ethology' of the 1960s appears to have been replaced in the early 1970s by a new approach called ‘sociobiology’. Sociobiology in its turn appears to (...)
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  49. G. G. Gallup (1970). Chimpanzees: Self-Recognition. Science 167:86-87.score: 18.0
  50. Ingo Brigandt (2003). Gestalt Experiments and Inductive Observations: Konrad Lorenz's Early Epistemological Writings and the Methods of Classical Ethology. Evolution and Cognition 9:157–170.score: 18.0
    Ethology brought some crucial insights and perspectives to the study of behavior, in particular the idea that behavior can be studied within a comparative-evolutionary framework by means of homologizing components of behavioral patterns and by causal analysis of behavior components and their integration. Early ethology is well-known for its extensive use of qualitative observations of animals under their natural conditions. These observations are combined with experiments that try to analyze behavioral patterns and establish specific claims about animal behavior. (...)
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