Search results for '*Animal Models' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    Niall Shanks, Ray Greek & Jean Greek (2009). Are Animal Models Predictive for Humans? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 4 (1):2.
    It is one of the central aims of the philosophy of science to elucidate the meanings of scientific terms and also to think critically about their application. The focus of this essay is the scientific term predict and whether there is credible evidence that animal models, especially in toxicology and pathophysiology, can be used to predict human outcomes. Whether animals can be used to predict human response to drugs and other chemicals is apparently a contentious issue. However, when one (...)
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  2. C. Degeling & J. Johnson (2013). Evaluating Animal Models: Some Taxonomic Worries. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (2):91-106.
    The seminal 1993 article by LaFollette and Shanks “Animal Models in Biomedical Research: Some Epistemological Worries” introduced an influential taxonomy into the debate about the value of animal experimentation. The distinction they made between hypothetical and causal analog models served to highlight a concern regarding extrapolating results obtained in animal models to human subjects, which endures today. Although their taxonomy has made a significant contribution to the field, we maintain that it is flawed, and instead, we offer (...)
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  3.  7
    L. Wolpert (2009). Review of "Animal Models in the Light of Evolution" by Niall Shanks, Ph.D., and C. Ray Greek, M.D. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):12-12.
    Animal Models in the Light of Evolution provides persuasive evidence that animal models should be used with great caution when applying the results to human diseases. Mice and other model animals are both similar and different, in their biology, to humans.
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  4.  6
    Kathy Steece-Collier (1995). Neural Grafting in Human Disease Versus Animal Models: Cautionary Notes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):71-72.
    Over the past two decades, research on neural transplantation in animal models of neurodegeneration has provided provocative in sights into the therapeutic use of grafted tissue for various neurological diseases. Although great strides have been made and functional benefits gained in these animal models, much information is still needed with regard to transplantation in human patients. Several factors are unique to human disease, for example, age of the recipient, duration of disease, and drug interaction with grafted cells; these (...)
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  5.  3
    Michael Rollin & Bernard Rollin (2014). Crazy Like a Fox: Validity and Ethics of Animal Models of Human Psychiatric Disease. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (2):140-151.
    Animal models of human disease play a central role in modern biomedical science. Developing animal models for human mental illness presents unique practical and philosophical challenges. In this article we argue that existing animal models of psychiatric disease are not valid, attempts to model syndromes are undermined by current nosology, models of symptoms are rife with circular logic and anthropomorphism, any model must make unjustified assumptions about subjective experience, and any model deemed valid would be inherently (...)
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  6.  4
    Thomas H. J. Burne, Darryl W. Eyles & John J. McGrath (2008). Animal Models May Help Fractionate Shared and Discrete Pathways Underpinning Schizophrenia and Autism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):264-265.
    Crespi & Badcock (C&B) present an appealing and parsimonious synthesis arguing that schizophrenia and autism are differentially regulated by maternal versus paternal genomic imprinting, respectively. We argue that animal models related to schizophrenia and autism provide a useful platform to explore the mechanisms outlined by C&B. We also note that schizophrenia and autism share certain risk factors such as advanced paternal age. Apart from genomic imprinting, copy number variants related to advanced paternal age may also contribute to the differential (...)
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  7.  1
    Imke Tammen (2012). Animal Models for Human Disease–Reflections From an Animal Researcher's Perspective. Between the Species 15 (1):3.
    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses are a group of lethal inherited neurodegenerative disorders in humans and many animal species. Critical reflections on a range of ethical issues concerning NCL have been instigated by my research on sheep and cattle affected with NCL, the claim that these sheep and cattle are useful models for the disease in humans, and engagement with families and support groups. My reflections on moral status of animals and validity of animal models are outlined in this paper.
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  8.  1
    No Authorship Indicated (1999). Review of Animal Models of Human Psychology: Critique of Science, Ethics, and Policy. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):227-228.
    Reviews the book, Animal models of human psychology: Critique of science, ethics, and policy by Kenneth J. Shapiro . The principle focus of most of this text is on the present-day use of animals in psychological research. In particular, Shapiro examines contemporary animal models of eating disorders, showing how psychology came to rely so heavily on animal models in the first place and how prevalent scientific attitudes about the use of animals in the laboratory have taken shape (...)
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  9. Patricia Murphy (2010). Genetically Based Animal Models of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Journal of Mind and Behavior 31 (3):179.
    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder affects children, adolescents, and adults. Research suggests ADHD has a heritable component. The present article presents and assesses several genetic animal models of ADHD. The paper reviews the literature involving the following genetic animal models of ADHD: the spontaneously hypertensive rat ; the Wistar–Kyoto hyperactive rat; the coloboma mouse; the fast kindling rat; the acallosal mouse; the whirler mouse; and the genetically hypertensive rat. Research investigating animal models of ADHD has concentrated on hyperactivity, (...)
     
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  10.  3
    Cory D. Wright, Animal Models of Depression in Neuropsychopharmacology Qua Feyerabendian Philosophy of Science.
    The neuropsychopharmacological methods and theories used to investigate the nature of depression have been viewed as suspect for a variety of philosophical and scientific reasons. Much of this criticism aims to demonstrate that biochemical- and neurological-based theories of this mental illness are defective, due in part because the methods used in their service are consistently invalidated, failing to induce depression in pre-clinical animal <span class='Hi'>models</span>. Neuropsychopharmacologists have been able to stave off such criticism by showing that their methods are (...)
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  11. Endel Tulving & Hans J. Markowitsch (1994). What Do Animal Models of Memory Model? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):498-499.
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  12. Cameron Shelley (2010). Why Test Animals to Treat Humans? On the Validity of Animal Models. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (3):292-299.
    Critics of animal modeling have advanced a variety of arguments against the validity of the practice. The point of one such form of argument is to establish that animal modeling is pointless and therefore immoral. In this article, critical arguments of this form are divided into three types, the pseudoscience argument, the disanalogy argument, and the predictive validity argument. I contend that none of these criticisms currently succeed, nor are they likely to. However, the connection between validity and morality is (...)
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  13.  13
    Nikos Logothetis, Myocardial and Cerebral Perfusion Studies in Animal Models.
    In-vivo phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is established by combining BT-MRI and CASL G. Vanhoutte1, E. Storkebaum2, P. Carmeliet2, A. Van der Linden1.
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  14.  5
    Hugh LaFollette & Niall Shanks (1993). Animal Models in Biomedical Research: Some Epistemological Worries. Public Affairs Quarterly 7 (2):113-130.
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  15. Richard G. M. Morris (2002). Episodic-Like Memory in Animals: Psychological Criteria, Neural Mechanisms and the Value of Episodic-Like Tasks to Investigate Animal Models of Neurodegenerative Disease. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. OUP Oxford
     
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  16.  10
    Kenneth F. Schaffner (2001). Extrapolation From Animal Models. In MachamerPeter (ed.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. 200.
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  17.  10
    Scott M. Williams, Jonathan L. Haines & Jason H. Moore (2004). The Use of Animal Models in the Study of Complex Disease: All Else is Never Equal or Why Do so Many Human Studies Fail to Replicate Animal Findings? Bioessays 26 (2):170-179.
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  18.  7
    Cameron Shelley (2006). Analogical Reasoning with Animal Models in Biomedical Research. In L. Magnani (ed.), Model-Based Reasoning in Science and Engineering. College Publications 203--213.
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  19. Cameron Shelley (2010). Why Test Animals to Treat Humans? On the Validity of Animal Models. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (3):292-299.
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  20.  1
    Nina Atanasova (2015). Validating Animal Models. Theoria. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science 30 (2):163.
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  21.  10
    Ranjita Betarbet, Todd B. Sherer & J. Timothy Greenamyre (2002). Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease. Bioessays 24 (4):308-318.
  22.  7
    Eugene Nattie (2009). Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Serotonin: Animal Models. Bioessays 31 (2):130-133.
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  23.  30
    Ray Greek & Niall Shanks (2011). Complex Systems, Evolution, and Animal Models. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (4):542-544.
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  24. Xos� R. Bustelo (2002). Understanding Rho/Rac Biology in T-Cells Using Animal Models. Bioessays 24 (7):602-612.
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  25.  7
    Rebecca D. Burwell & Howard Eichenbaum (1999). What's New in Animal Models of Amnesia? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):446-447.
    In general, we endorse Aggleton & Brown's thesis that the neuroanatomy of amnesia comprises two functionally distinct systems, but we are disappointed in the lack of detail regarding the critical functional contribution of the hippocampus. We also take issue with the characterization of the cortical areas surrounding the hippocampus, particularly the decreased emphasis on the cortical input to the hippocampus.
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  26.  4
    Stephanie Brewer & Trevor Williams (2004). Finally, a Sense of Closure? Animal Models of Human Ventral Body Wall Defects. Bioessays 26 (12):1307-1321.
  27.  6
    Ray Greek & Jean Greek (2002). Animal Models of Human Disease in Light of Darwin and DNA. Human Rights Review 4 (1):74-85.
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  28.  2
    S. Ahlenius (1991). ""The" Clever Hans" Phenomenon in Animal Models of Schizophrenia, or Homology as an Important Factor in Comparing Behavioral Functions Across Species. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 34 (2):219.
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  29.  2
    David Ingle (1980). Animal Models for Lateralized Sex Differences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):240.
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  30.  2
    A. David Milner (1987). Animal Models for the Syndrome of Spatial Neglect. In M. Jeannerod (ed.), Neurophysiological and Neuropsychological Aspects of Spatial Neglect. Elsevier Science Ltd 259--288.
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  31.  5
    Jonathon D. Crystal (2012). Validating Animal Models of Metacognition. In Michael Beran, Johannes Brandl, Josef Perner & Joëlle Proust (eds.), The Foundations of Metacognition. Oxford University Press 36.
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  32.  5
    Nazneen Aziz (1995). Animal Models of Polycystic Kidney Disease. Bioessays 17 (8):703-712.
  33.  5
    David Lubinski & Travis Thompson (1993). Animal Models: Nature Made Us, but Was the Mold Broken? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):664.
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  34.  1
    John H. Rust (1982). Animal Models for Human Diseases. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 25 (4):662-672.
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  35.  1
    S. Plous (1993). Animal Models of Human Communication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):660.
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  36.  1
    Thomas M. Zollner, Harald Renz, Frederik H. Igney & Khusru Asadullah (2004). Animal Models of T‐Cell‐Mediated Skin Diseases. Bioessays 26 (6):693-696.
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  37.  3
    Peter N. Steinmetz & Stephen I. Helms Tillery (1994). Animal Models: Some Empirical Worries. Public Affairs Quarterly 8 (3):287-298.
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  38.  1
    Xavier Cousin, Uwe Strähle & Arnaud Chatonnet (2005). Are There Non-Catalytic Functions of Acetylcholinesterases? Lessons From Mutant Animal Models. Bioessays 27 (2):189-200.
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  39. R. Betabert, T. B. Sherer & J. T. Greenamyre (2002). Animal Models of Parkinson's Diseases. Bioessays 24:308-318.
     
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  40. Edwin E. Gantt (2000). Animal Models of Human Psychology: Critique of Science, Ethics, and Policy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):227-228.
     
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  41. Ray Greek & Niall Shanks (2011). Complex Systems, Evolution, and Animal Models. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (4):542-544.
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  42. Charles L. Jobe (1968). Selection and Development of Animal Models of Myocardial Infarction. In Peter Koestenbaum (ed.), Proceedings. [San Jose? Calif. 101.
     
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  43. P. J. Langlais (1992). Role of Diencephalic Lesions and Thiamine Deficiency in Korsakoff's Amnesia: Insights From Animal Models. In L. R. Squire & N. Butters (eds.), Neuropsychology of Memory. Guilford Press 440--450.
     
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  44. William T. Mc Kinney (1974). Animal Models in Psychiatry. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 17 (4):529-542.
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  45. James Lindemann Nelson (1989). Animal Models in'Exemplary'Medical Research: Diabetes as a Case Study. Between the Species 5 (4):4.
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  46. B. Ranjita, B. S. Todd & J. T. Greenamyre (2002). Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease. Bioessays 24:308-18.
     
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  47. A. E. Renold (1985). Planned Integration of International Visiting Fellows and Scientists: Enhancement of Morale, Productivity, and Impact in a Laboratory Concerned with Human Diabetes and its Animal Models. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 29 (3 Pt 2):S214 - 7.
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  48. Daniel Steel & Megan Delehanty, Models and Mechanisms: On the Methodology of Animal Extrapolation.
    Any account of extrapolation from animal models to humans must confront two basic challenges: explain how extrapolation can be justified even when there are causally relevant differences between model and target, and explain how the suitability of a model can be established given only limited information about the target. We argue that existing approaches to extrapolation—either in terms of capacities or mechanisms—do not adequately address these challenges. However, we propose a further elaboration of the mechanisms approach that provides a (...)
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  49. Lynn R. Willis & Martin G. Hulsey (1994). Worries About Animal Models in Biomedical Research a Response to Lafollette and Shanks. Public Affairs Quarterly 8 (2):205-218.
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  50.  7
    Elliott Sober (2009). Parsimony and Models of Animal Minds. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press 237.
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