Search results for '*Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Michael Murias & James M. Swanson (2000). Large-Scale Neocortical Dynamic Function and EEG: Use of Theory and Methods in Clinical Research on Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):411-411.
    We used Nunez's physiologically based dynamic theory of EEG to make predictions about a clinical population of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) known to have neuronanatomical abnormalities. Analysis of high-density EEG data (long-range coherence) showed expected age-related differences and surprising regional specificity that is consistent with some of the literature in this clinical area.
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  2.  7
    Avinash De Sousa & Gurvinder Kalra (2012). Drug Therapy of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Current Trends. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):45.
    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a developmental disorder with an age onset prior to 7 years. Children with ADHD have significantly lower ability to focus and sustain attention and also score higher on impulsivity and hyperactivity. Stimulants, such as methylphenidate, have remained the mainstay of ADHD treatment for decades with evidence supporting their use. However, recent years have seen emergence of newer drugs and drug delivery systems, like osmotic release oral systems and (...)
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  3. Richard J. Burch (2004). Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Disorder of Self-Awareness. In Bernard D. Beitman & Jyotsna Nair (eds.), Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Neurobiology, Assessment, and Treatment. W.W. Norton & Co 229-254.
  4.  6
    Paula Higginbotham & Carl Bartling (1993). The Effects of Sensory Distractions on Short-Term Recall of Children with Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder Versus Normally Achieving Children. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (6):507-510.
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  5.  4
    Janette Bennett (2007). (Dis) Ordering Motherhood: Mothering a Child with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Body and Society 13 (4):97-110.
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  6. Theodore P. Beauchaine (2002). Autonomic Substrates of Heart Rate Reactivity in Adolescent Males with Conduct Disorder and/or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. In Serge P. Shohov (ed.), Advances in Psychology Research. Nova Science Publishers 18--83.
     
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  7. R. Gomez & A. Gomez (2002). The Effects of Perceived Maternal Parenting Styles on the Disruptive Behaviors of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder/Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Mediation by Hostile Biased Social Cognitions. In Serge P. Shohov (ed.), Advances in Psychology Research. Nova Science Publishers 37--55.
     
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  8. H. N. Poissant, V. M. Bekou & C. Chalfoun (2000). What Happens When Metacognition Fails? Some Implications for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S80 - S80.
     
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  9.  30
    A. Charles Catania (2005). Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Delay-of-Reinforcement Gradients and Other Behavioral Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):419-424.
    Sagvolden, Johansen, Aase, and Russell (Sagvolden et al.) examine attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at levels of analysis ranging from neurotransmitters to behavior. At the behavioral level they attribute aspects of ADHD to anomalies of delay-of-reinforcement gradients. With a normal gradient, responses followed after a long delay by a reinforcer may share in the effects of that reinforcer; with a diminished or steepened gradient they may fail to do so. Steepened gradients differentially select rapidly emitted responses ( (...)), and they limit the effectiveness with which extended stimuli become conditioned reinforcers, so that observing behavior is less well maintained (attention deficit). Impulsiveness also follows from steepened gradients, which increase the effectiveness of smaller, more immediate consequences relative to larger, more delayed ones. Individuals who vary in the degree to which their delay gradients are steepened will show different balances between hyperactivity and attention deficit. Given the range of ADHD phenomena addressed, it may be unnecessary to appeal to additional behavioral processes such as extinction deficit. Extinction deficit is more likely a derivative of attention deficit, in that failure to attend to stimuli differentially correlated with extinction should slow its progress. The account suggests how relatively small differences in delay gradients early in development might engender behavioral interactions leading to very large differences later on. The steepened gradients presumably originate in properties of neurotransmitter function, but behavioral interventions that use consistently short delays of reinforcement to build higher-order behavioral units as a scaffolding to support complex cognitive and social skills may nonetheless be feasible. Key Words: ADHD; attention deficit; delay gradient; exponential decay; extinction deficit; hyperactivity; impulsiveness; intervention; observing responses; self-control. Footnotes1000 Jeffrey Gray was the BBS Editor for this treatment. When he accepted Sagvolden et al. for publication, he invited Catania, who was one of the reviewers of the original submission, to prepare a precommentary. Com-mentators were then invited to respond to the Sagvolden et al. article, to the Catania precommentary, or to both. (shrink)
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  10.  35
    Terje Sagvolden, Espen Borgå Johansen, Heidi Aase & Vivienne Ann Russell (2005). A Dynamic Developmental Theory of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Predominantly Hyperactive/Impulsive and Combined Subtypes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):397-419.
    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is currently defined as a cognitive/behavioral developmental disorder where all clinical criteria are behavioral. Inattentiveness, overactivity, and impulsiveness are presently regarded as the main clinical symptoms. The dynamic developmental behavioral theory is based on the hypothesis that altered dopaminergic function plays a pivotal role by failing to modulate nondopaminergic (primarily glutamate and GABA) signal transmission appropriately. A hypofunctioning mesolimbic dopamine branch produces altered reinforcement of behavior and deficient extinction of previously reinforced behavior. This (...)
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  11.  27
    Michelle Maiese (2012). Rethinking Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Philosophical Psychology 25 (6):893-916.
    This paper examines two influential theoretical frameworks, set forth by Russell Barkley (1997) and Thomas Brown (2005), and argues that important headway in understanding attention deficit hyperactivity disorder can be made if we acknowledge the way in which human cognition and action are essentially embodied and enactive. The way in which we actively make sense of the world is structured by our bodily dynamics and our sensorimotor engagement with our surroundings. These bodily dynamics are linked to (...)
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  12.  13
    David R. Coghill (2005). Delay of Reinforcement Gradients and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): The Challenges of Moving From Causal Theories to Causal Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):428-429.
    Notwithstanding the many strengths of the dynamic developmental theory, there remain challenges to be overcome before it can be incorporated into a true causal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These include the development of reliable measures of reinforcement delay gradients, the validation of shortened reinforcement delay as an endophenotype, and the integration of this pathway with other potential pathways.
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  13. H. Russell Searight (1996). Perceptions of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and its Treatment Among Children and Adolescents. Journal of Medical Humanities 17 (1):51-61.
    Little is known about how children and adolescents conceptualize psychiatric disorders and psychiatric treatment. In the current study, children and adolescents diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) were interviewed about their understanding of ADHD and the medication used to treat their disorder. The participants were all taking Ritalin and ranged in age from 5 to 16 years. With increasing age, children improved in their ability to name their condition and the medication. Latency-aged children (...)
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  14.  32
    Michiel van Lambalgen, Claudia van Kruistum & Esther Parigger (2008). Discourse Processing in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Adhd). Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (4):467-487.
    ADHD is a psychiatric disorder characterised by persistent and developmentally inappropriate levels of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity. It is known that children with ADHD tend to produce incoherent discourses, e.g. by narrating events out of sequence. Here the aetiology of ADHD becomes of interest. One prominent theory is that ADHD is an executive function disorder, showing deficiencies of planning. Given the close link between planning, verb tense and discourse coherence postulated in van Lambalgen and Hamm (The (...)
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  15.  34
    Espen Borgå Johansen, Terje Sagvolden, Heidi Aase & Vivienne Ann Russell (2005). The Dynamic Developmental Theory of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Present Status and Future Perspectives. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):451-454.
    The dynamic developmental theory (DDT) has benefited from the insights of the commentators, particularly in terms of the implications for the proposed steepened delay gradients in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The introduction of modified memory processes as a basis for the delay gradients improved the links to aspects of ADHD. However, it remains unclear whether the hyperactive-impulsive and inattentive subtypes are separate subgroups or may be explained as different outcomes of the same genetic factors and thus explicable by (...)
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  16.  22
    Jon A. Lindstrøm (2012). Why Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Is Not a True Medical Syndrome. Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry 14 (1):61-73.
    Critics of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have repeatedly argued that there is no proof for the condition being symptomatic of an organic brain disease and that the current "ADHD epidemic" is an expression of medicalization. To this, the supporters of ADHD can retort that the condition is only defined as a mental disorder and not a physical disease. As such, ADHD needs only be a harmful mental dysfunction, which, like other genuine disorders, can have a complex and (...)
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  17.  23
    A. Charles Catania (2005). Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): One Process or Many? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):446-450.
    Some commentaries suggest that the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) theory of this condition does not explain enough. Because the theory includes parameters of the delay gradient that vary across individuals and developmental modulation of behavioral outcomes by different environments, it accommodates a wide range of manifestations of ADHD symptoms. Thus, the argument could instead be made that the theory allows too many degrees of freedom. For many purposes, behavior is better defined in terms of function (e.g., consequences) than (...)
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  18.  17
    Edmund J. S. Sonuga-Barke & F. X. Castellanos (2005). A Common Core Dysfunction in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Scientific Red Herring? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):443-444.
    The reinforcement/extinction disorder hypothesis (Sagvolden et al.) is an important counterweight to the executive dysfunction model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, like that model, it conceptualises ADHD as pathophysiologically homogeneous, resulting from a common core dysfunction. Recent studies reporting neuropsychological heterogeneity suggest that this common core dysfunction may be the scientific equivalent of a red herring.
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  19. Patricia Murphy (2010). Genetically Based Animal Models of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Journal of Mind and Behavior 31 (3):179.
    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder affects children, adolescents, and adults. Research suggests ADHD has a heritable component. The present article presents and assesses several genetic animal models of ADHD. The paper reviews the literature involving the following genetic animal models of ADHD: the spontaneously hypertensive rat ; the Wistar–Kyoto hyperactive rat; the coloboma mouse; the fast kindling rat; the acallosal mouse; the whirler mouse; and the genetically hypertensive rat. Research investigating animal models of ADHD has concentrated on (...), but impulsiveness, learning, and attention are also being examined. The use of animal models allows for the control of possibly confounding variables and has proven very useful in the screening of new therapies. These models have not been shown to be the equivalent of the human disorder, and no model encompasses all of the symptoms of the human disorder, but they are useful nevertheless. (shrink)
     
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  20.  29
    Bonnie J. Kaplan (1999). The Neurobiology of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) as a Model of the Neurobiology of Personality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):526-527.
  21.  5
    H. Aase T. Sagvolden (2005). The Dynamic Developmental Theory of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Present Status and Future Perspectives. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3).
  22.  3
    David A. Hay (1999). Understanding ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and the Feeling Brain. By S. K. Woods & W. H. Ploof. Pp. 208. (Sage, Thousand Oaks, California, 1997.) £35.00, Hardback; £15.50, Paperback, ISBN 0-8039-7423-X. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 31 (3):425-432.
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  23.  1
    Coghill Dr (2005). Delay of Reinforcement Gradients and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): The Challenges of Moving From Causal Theories to Causal Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3).
  24. Booth, Charlton, Hughes & Happé (2004). Disentangling Weak Coherence and Executive Dysfunction: Planning Drawing in Autism and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. In Uta Frith & Elisabeth Hill (eds.), Autism: Mind and Brain. OUP Oxford
     
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  25. J. M. Swanson, T. Wigal, K. Lakes & N. D. Volkow (2011). Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Defining a Spectrum Disorder and Considering Neuroethical Implications. In Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics. Oxford University Press
     
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  26.  29
    Toby Miller & Marie Claire Leger (2003). A Very Childish Moral Panic: Ritalin. Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (1/2):9-33.
    This paper examines some of the moral panics around hyperactive children, the construction of Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder, and the lure of Ritalin in turning kids identified as at risk into successful, productive individuals. Through a historicization of the child as a psychiatric subject, we try to demonstrate Ritalin's part in the uneven development of modern trends towards the pathologization of everyday life, a developing continuum between normality and abnormality, and an emphasis on the malleability of children and (...)
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  27.  7
    Glaucia Gabriela Bagattini de Souza, Adriana Nobre de Paula Simão, Ricardo Franco de Lima & Sylvia Maria Ciasca (2011). Desempenho cognitivo de crianças e jovens com Transtorno do Déficit de Atenção e Hiperatividade. Aletheia 35:69-78.
    O presente artigo teve como objetivo comparar os resultados do desempenho cognitivo de crianças e jovens diagnosticados com os diferentes subtipos do Transtorno do Déficit de Atenção e Hiperatividade (TDAH) na Escala de Inteligência Wechsler para Crianças (WISC-III). Foram analisados dados dos regis..
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  28.  60
    Melanie A. George, Veronika B. Dobler, Elaine Nicholls & Tom Manly (2005). Spatial Awareness, Alertness, and ADHD: The Re-Emergence of Unilateral Neglect with Time-on-Task. Brain and Cognition 57 (3):264-275.
  29.  31
    F. Xavier Castellanos & Erika Proal (2012). Large-Scale Brain Systems in ADHD: Beyond the Prefrontal–Striatal Model. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):17-26.
  30.  24
    F. Xavier Castellanos, Edmund J. S. Sonuga-Barke, Michael P. Milham & Rosemary Tannock (2006). Characterizing Cognition in ADHD: Beyond Executive Dysfunction. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):117-123.
  31.  27
    Stephen Ashwal (2003). Medical Aspects of the Minimally Conscious State in Children. Brain and Development 25 (8):535-545.
  32.  40
    Bernard D. Beitman & Jyotsna Nair (2004). Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Neurobiology, Assessment, and Treatment. W.W.Norton.
  33.  8
    Susan Hawthorne (2007). ADHD Drugs: Values That Drive the Debates and Decisions. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (2):129-140.
    Use of medication for treatment of ADHD (or its historical precursors) has been debated for more than forty years. Reasons for the ongoing differences of opinion are analyzed by exploring some of the arguments for and against considering ADHD a mental disorder. Relative to two important DSM criteria — that a mental disorder causes some sort of harm to the individual and that a mental disorder is the manifestation of a dysfunction in the individual — ADHD’s classification (...)
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  34.  30
    Ilina Singh (2005). Will the "Real Boy" Please Behave: Dosing Dilemmas for Parents of Boys with ADHD. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):34 – 47.
    The use of Ritalin and other stimulant drug treatments for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) raises distinctive moral dilemmas for parents; these moral dilemmas have not been adequately addressed in the bioethics literature. This paper draws upon data from a qualitative empirical study to investigate parents' use of the moral ideal of authenticity as part of their narrative justifications for dosing decisions and actions. I show that therapeutic decisions and actions are embedded in valued cultural ideals about masculinity, (...)
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  35.  13
    Anke de Boer, Sip Jan Pijl, Wendy Post & Alexander Minnaert (2011). Which Variables Relate to the Attitudes of Teachers, Parents and Peers Towards Students with Special Educational Needs in Regular Education? Educational Studies 38 (4):433-448.
    While there is an increased interest in describing attitudes of teachers, parents and peers towards students with special educational needs in regular education, there is a lack of knowledge about various variables relating to the attitudes of these three groups. The aims of this study are: (1) to examine which variables relate to the attitudes of teachers (N?=?44), parents (N?=?508) and peers (N?=?1113) towards students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Autistic Spectrum Syndrome or a (...)
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  36.  15
    Jeffery R. Wickens & E. Gail Tripp (2005). Altered Sensitivity to Reward in Children with ADHD: Dopamine Timing is Off. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):445-446.
    Despite general agreement that altered reward sensitivity is involved in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a wide range of different alterations has been proposed. We cite work showing abnormal sensitivity to delay of reward, together with abnormal sensitivity to individual instances of reward. We argue that at the cellular level these behavioural characteristics might indicate that dopamine timing is off in children with ADHD.
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  37.  11
    J. Panksepp, J. Burgdorf, N. Gordon & C. Turner (2002). Treatment of ADHD with Methylphenidate May Sensitize Brain Substrates of Desire: Implications for Changes in Drug Abuse Potential From an Animal Model. Consciousness and Emotion 3 (1):7-19.
    Aims. Currently, methylphenidate (MPH, trade name Ritalin) is the most widely prescribed medication for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We examined the ability of repeated MPH administration to produce a sensitized appetitive eagerness type response in laboratory rats, as indexed by 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (50-kHz USVs). We also examined the ability of MPH to reduce play behavior in rats which may be partially implicated in the clinical efficacy of MPH in ADHD. Design. 56 adolescent rats received injections of (...)
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  38.  1
    Xiao‐lei Wang *, Ronan Bernas & Philippe Eberhard (2004). Engaging ADHD Students in Tasks with Hand Gestures: A Pedagogical Possibility for Teachers. Educational Studies 30 (3):217-229.
    This study examines the effects of teachers' speech and hand gestures on the task performances of students with Attention‐Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder . Forty‐five 7½‐year‐old students clinically diagnosed with ADHD participated in the study. The students were asked to solve three sets of puzzles. The teachers supported the students in the tasks by using three different scaffolding modalities: speech‐only, gesture‐only and speech in conjunction with gestures. The results indicate that when the teachers used the scaffolding that (...)
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  39.  3
    Matthew J. King, Lori-Anne Williams, Arlene G. MacDougall, Shelley Ferris, Julia R. V. Smith, Natalia Ziolkowski & Margaret C. McKinnon (2011). Patients with Bipolar Disorder Show a Selective Deficit in the Episodic Simulation of Future Events. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1801-1807.
    A substantial body of evidence suggests that autobiographical recollection and simulation of future happenings activate a shared neural network. Many of the neural regions implicated in this network are affected in patients with bipolar disorder , showing altered metabolic functioning and/or structural volume abnormalities. Studies of autobiographical recall in BD reveal overgeneralization, where autobiographical memory comprises primarily factual or repeated information as opposed to details specific in time and in place and definitive of re-experiencing. To date, no study (...)
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  40.  5
    Lawrence H. Diller (1996). The Run on Ritalin: Attention Deficit Disorder and Stimulant Treatment in the 1990s. Hastings Center Report 26 (2):12-18.
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  41.  4
    Geraldine A. Shaw & Geoffrey Brown (1991). Laterality, Implicit Memory and Attention Disorder. Educational Studies 17 (1):15-23.
    Children who presented behaviours characteristic of attention disorder/hyper‐activity deficit , but who were functioning adequately in ordinary schools, were assessed on a range of tests including some focused particularly on cognitive abilities, including verbal and figural aspects of problem solving and creativity. An attempt was made to replicate an earlier study, incorporating refinements to the manner in which pupils were selected from the schools. In spite of cultural differences, the pattern of results substantially duplicated the earlier findings, suggesting (...)
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  42. Arnold Tukker, Maurie J. Cohen, Klaus Hubacek & Oksana Mont (forthcoming). Parental Attention Deficit Disorder. Journal of Applied Philosophy.
     
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  43.  19
    Dov Fox (2008). Parental Attention Deficit Disorder. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (3):246-261.
    This essay considers the moral status of certain practices that aim to enhance offspring traits. I develop an objection to offspring enhancement that draws on an account of the role morality of parents. I work out an account of parental ethics by reference to premises about child development and to observations about parenting culture in the United States. I argue that excellence in parenthood consists in a dual responsibility both to guide children toward the good life and to accept them (...)
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  44.  9
    F. O. X. Dov (2008). Parental Attention Deficit Disorder. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (3):246-261.
    abstract This essay considers the moral status of certain practices that aim to enhance offspring traits. I develop an objection to offspring enhancement that draws on an account of the role morality of parents. I work out an account of parental ethics by reference to premises about child development and to observations about parenting culture in the United States. I argue that excellence in parenthood consists in a dual responsibility both to guide children toward the good life and to accept (...)
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  45.  2
    Karen Anijar & David Gabbard (2005). Authentic Faux Diamonds and Attention Deficit Disorder. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):67-70.
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  46. Robin Pope (2015). Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders, Panic Attacks, Epileptic Fits, Depressions and Dementias From Missing Out on Appropriate Fears and Hopes. Mind and Society 14 (1):107-127.
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  47. G. Herrera-Narváez (2005). Prevalence of Attention Deficit/Hiperactivity Disorder in 3 to 5 Years-Old Children From Chillan, Chile. Theoria 14 (2):45-55.
     
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  48.  13
    Elfriede Walcher-Andris (2006). Ethische Aspekte des pharmakologischen „cognition enhancement“ am Beispiel des Gebrauchs von Psychostimulanzien durch Kinder und Jugendliche. Ethik in der Medizin 18 (1):27-36.
    Pharmakologisches „cognition enhancement“ zielt auf die Verbesserung der geistigen Leistungsfähigkeit mithilfe von Präparaten, die primär als Medikamente eingesetzt werden. Der Beitrag befasst sich mit der ethischen Bewertung des Gebrauchs von Stimulanzien als „enhancer“ durch Kinder und Jugendliche. Am Beispiel von Diagnose und Behandlung der Aufmerksamkeitsdefizit-Hyperaktivitätsstörung (ADHS) werden die Schwierigkeiten der Abgrenzung von Therapie und Enhancement beschrieben und daraus auf verschiedenen Ebenen ethisch relevante Fragen bezüglich Cognition enhancement entwickelt. Diese betreffen z. B. die Wirkungen von Stimulanzien auf ein sich entwickelndes System (...)
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  49.  11
    I. Singh (2013). Not Robots: Children's Perspectives on Authenticity, Moral Agency and Stimulant Drug Treatments. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):359-366.
    In this article, I examine children's reported experiences with stimulant drug treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in light of bioethical arguments about the potential threats of psychotropic drugs to authenticity and moral agency. Drawing on a study that involved over 150 families in the USA and the UK, I show that children are able to report threats to authenticity, but that the majority of children are not concerned with such threats. On balance, children report (...)
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  50. John R. Leo & D. Cohen (2003). Broken Brains or Flawed Studies? A Critical Review of ADHD Neuroimaging Research. Journal of Mind and Behavior 24 (1):29-55.
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