Search results for '*Behavior' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Herbert Gintis (2007). A Framework for the Unification of the Behavioral Sciences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):1-16.score: 9.0
    The various behavioral disciplines model human behavior in distinct and incompatible ways. Yet, recent theoretical and empirical developments have created the conditions for rendering coherent the areas of overlap of the various behavioral disciplines. The analytical tools deployed in this task incorporate core principles from several behavioral disciplines. The proposed framework recognizes evolutionary theory, covering both genetic and cultural evolution, as the integrating principle of behavioral science. Moreover, if decision theory and game theory are broadened to encompass other-regarding preferences, they (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Michael Gurven (2004). To Give and to Give Not: The Behavioral Ecology of Human Food Transfers. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):543-559.score: 9.0
    The transfer of food among group members is a ubiquitous feature of small-scale forager and forager-agricultural populations. The uniqueness of pervasive sharing among humans, especially among unrelated individuals, has led researchers to evaluate numerous hypotheses about the adaptive functions and patterns of sharing in different ecologies. This article attempts to organize available cross-cultural evidence pertaining to several contentious evolutionary models: kin selection, reciprocal altruism, tolerated scrounging, and costly signaling. Debates about the relevance of these models focus primarily on the extent (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. John A. Nevin & Randolph C. Grace (2000). Behavioral Momentum and the Law of Effect. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):73-90.score: 9.0
    In the metaphor of behavioral momentum, the rate of a free operant in the presence of a discriminative stimulus is analogous to the velocity of a moving body, and resistance to change measures an aspect of behavior that is analogous to its inertial mass. An extension of the metaphor suggests that preference measures an analog to the gravitational mass of that body. The independent functions relating resistance to change and preference to the conditions of reinforcement may be construed as convergent (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Yuri I. Arshavsky (2003). When Did Mozart Become a Mozart? Neurophysiological Insight Into Behavioral Genetics. Brain and Mind 4 (3):327-339.score: 8.0
    The prevailing concept in modern cognitive neuroscience is that cognitive functions are performed predominantly at the network level, whereas the role of individual neurons is unlikely to extend beyond forming the simple basic elements of these networks. Within this conceptual framework, individuals of outstanding cognitive abilities appear as a result of a favorable configuration of the microarchitecture of the cognitive-implicated networks, whose final formation in ontogenesis may occur in a relatively random way. Here I suggest an alternative concept, which is (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Olivier Boiral (2009). Greening the Corporation Through Organizational Citizenship Behaviors. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):221 - 236.score: 8.0
    Organizational citizenship behaviors have been the topic of much research attempting to understand the motivations, manifestations, and impacts of these behaviors on organizational development. However, studies have been based essentially on an anthropocentric and intra-organizational perspective that tends to ignore broader environmental issues. Due to the complexity of environmental issues and their human, informal, and preventive aspects, consideration of these issues requires voluntary and decentralized initiatives that draw on organizational citizenship behaviors. The role of these behaviors has been neglected, or (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Anne L. Davis & Hannah R. Rothstein (2006). The Effects of the Perceived Behavioral Integrity of Managers on Employee Attitudes: A Meta-Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (4):407 - 419.score: 8.0
    Perceived behavioral integrity involves the employee’s perception of the alignment of the manager’s words and deeds. This meta-analysis examined the relationship between perceived behavioral integrity of managers and the employee attitudes of job satisfaction, organizational commitment, satisfaction with the leader and affect toward the organization. Results indicate a strong positive relationship overall (average r = 0.48, p<0.01). With only 12 studies included, exploration of moderators was limited, but preliminary analysis suggested that the gender of the employees and the number of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Arménio Rego, Neuza Ribeiro & Miguel P. Cunha (2010). Perceptions of Organizational Virtuousness and Happiness as Predictors of Organizational Citizenship Behaviors. Journal of Business Ethics 93 (2):215 - 235.score: 8.0
    Moral and financial scandals emerging in recent years around the world have created the momentum for reconsidering the role of virtuousness in organizational settings. This empirical study seeks to contribute toward maintaining this momentum. We answer to researchers’ suggestions that the exploratory study carried out by Cameron et al. (Am Behav Sci 47(6):766–790, 2004 ), which related organizational virtuousness (OV) and performance, must be pursued employing their measure of OV in other contexts and in relation to other outcomes (Wright (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. John J. Ryan (2001). Moral Reasoning as a Determinant of Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: A Study in the Public Accounting Profession. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 33 (3):233 - 244.score: 8.0
    This study examines the relationship between an employee's level of moral reasoning and a form of work performance known as organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB). Prior research in the public accounting profession has found higher levels of moral reasoning to be positively related to various types of ethical behavior. This study extends the ethical domain of accounting behaviors to include OCB. Analysis of respondents from a public accounting firm in the northeast region of the United States (n = 107) support a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Dan S. Chiaburu & Audrey S. Lim (2008). Manager Trustworthiness or Interactional Justice? Predicting Organizational Citizenship Behaviors. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):453 - 467.score: 8.0
    Organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) are essential for effective organizational functioning. Decisions by employees to engage in these important discretionary behaviors are based on how they make sense of the organizational context. Using fairness heuristic theory, we tested two important OCB predictors: manager trustworthiness and interactional justice. In the process, we control for the effects of dispositional factors (propensity to trust) and for system-based organizational fairness (procedural and distributive justice). Results, based on surveys collected from 120 employee–supervisor dyads, indicate that manager (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Raj Agnihotri, Adam Rapp, Prabakar Kothandaraman & Rakesh K. Singh (2012). An Emotion-Based Model of Salesperson Ethical Behaviors. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):243-257.score: 8.0
    Academic research studies examining the ethical attitudes and behaviors of salespeople have produced several frameworks that explore the ethical decision-making processes to which salespeople adhere when faced with ethical dilemmas. Past literature enriches our understanding; however, a critical review of the relevant literature suggests that an emotional route to salesperson ethical decision-making has yet to be explored. Given the fact that individuals’ emotional capacities play an important role in decision-making when faced with an ethical dilemma, there is a need for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Carlos Caleiro, Ricardo Gonçalves & Manuel Martins (2009). Behavioral Algebraization of Logics. Studia Logica 91 (1):63 - 111.score: 8.0
    We introduce and study a new approach to the theory of abstract algebraic logic (AAL) that explores the use of many-sorted behavioral logic in the role traditionally played by unsorted equational logic. Our aim is to extend the range of applicability of AAL toward providing a meaningful algebraic counterpart also to logics with a many-sorted language, and possibly including non-truth-functional connectives. The proposed behavioral approach covers logics which are not algebraizable according to the standard approach, while also bringing a new (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Marcus Cunha & Fabio Caldieraro (2010). On the Observability of Purely Behavioral Sunk-Cost Effects: Theoretical and Empirical Support for the BISC Model. Cognitive Science 34 (8):1384-1387.score: 8.0
    There is growing interest in whether and how sunk-cost effects for purely behavioral investments occur. In this article, we further discuss Cunha and Caldieraro’s (2009) Behavioral Investment Sunk Cost (BISC) model and reconcile Otto’s (2010) results with the BISC model predictions. We also report new data from two unpublished experiments that are consistent with the BISC model, and we discuss the conditions under which purely behavioral sunk-cost effects are likely to be observed.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. David J. Prottas (2008). Perceived Behavioral Integrity: Relationships with Employee Attitudes, Well-Being, and Absenteeism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):313 - 322.score: 8.0
    Relationships between the behavioral integrity of managers as perceived by employees and employee attitudes (job satisfaction and life satisfaction), well-being (stress and health), and behaviors (absenteeism) were tested using data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 2,820). Using multivariate and univariate analysis, perceived behavioral integrity (PBI) was positively related to job and life satisfaction and negatively related to stress, poor health, and absenteeism. The effect size for the relationship with job satisfaction was medium-to-large while the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. J. S. Blumenthal-Barby (2011). On the Concept and Measure of Voluntariness: Insights From Behavioral Economics and Cognitive Science. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):25-26.score: 8.0
    In their article “The Concept of Voluntary Consent,” Robert Nelson and colleagues (2011) argue for two necessary and jointly sufficient conditions for voluntary action: intentionality, and substantial freedom from controlling influences. They propose an instrument to empirically measure voluntariness, the Decision Making Control Instrument. I argue that (1) their conceptual analysis of intentionality and controlling influences needs expansion in light of the growing use of behavioral economics principles to change individual and public health behaviors (growing in part by the designation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Hannes Leroy, Michael E. Palanski & Tony Simons (2012). Authentic Leadership and Behavioral Integrity as Drivers of Follower Commitment and Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (3):255-264.score: 8.0
    The literatures on both authentic leadership and behavioral integrity have argued that leader integrity drives follower performance. Yet, despite overlap in conceptualization and mechanisms, no research has investigated how authentic leadership and behavioral integrity relate to one another in driving follower performance. In this study, we propose and test the notion that authentic leadership behavior is an antecedent to perceptions of leader behavioral integrity, which in turn affects follower affective organizational commitment and follower work role performance. Analysis of a survey (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Alicia S. M. Leung (2008). Matching Ethical Work Climate to In-Role and Extra-Role Behaviors in a Collectivist Work Setting. Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1/2):43 - 55.score: 8.0
    This paper studies the relationship between organizational ethical climate and the forms of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), including in-role and extra-role behaviors, and examines the mediating effect of employee loyalty. A sample of employees from a traditional Hong Kong-based company was used as a study group. The purpose of this study was to examine the causes and implications of how various ethical work climates affect employee performance. Based on a model proposed by Victor and Cullen, ethical climate is arranged from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Rangapriya Kannan-Narasimhan & Barbara S. Lawrence (2012). Behavioral Integrity: How Leader Referents and Trust Matter to Workplace Outcomes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):165-178.score: 8.0
    Behavioral integrity (BI) is the alignment pattern between an actor’s words and deeds as perceived by another person. Employees’ perception that their leader’s actions and words are consistent leads to desirable workplace outcomes. Although BI is a powerful concept, the role of leader referents, the relationship between perceived BI of different referents, and the process by which BI affects outcomes are unclear. Our purpose is to elaborate upon this process and clarify the role of different leader referents in determining various (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Orly Shapira-Lishchinsky & Shmuel Even-Zohar (2011). Withdrawal Behaviors Syndrome: An Ethical Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (3):429-451.score: 8.0
    This study aimed to elucidate the withdrawal behaviors syndrome (lateness, absence, and intent to leave work) among nurses by examining interrelations between these behaviors and the mediating effect of organizational commitment upon ethical perceptions (caring climate, formal climate, and distributive justice) and withdrawal behaviors. Two-hundred and one nurses from one hospital in northern Israel participated. Data collection was based on questionnaires and hospital records using a two-phase design. The analyses are based on Hierarchical Multiple Regressions and on Structural Equation Modeling (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Allen Kaufman & Ernie Englander (2011). Behavioral Economics, Federalism, and the Triumph of Stakeholder Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):421-438.score: 8.0
    Stakeholder theorists distinguish between normative stakeholders, those who gain moral standing by making contributions to the firm, and derivative stakeholders, those who can constrain the corporate association even though they make no contribution. The board of directors has the legal authority to distinguish among these stakeholder groups and to distribute rights and obligations among these stakeholder groups. To be sure, this stakeholder formulation appropriately seizes on the firm’s voluntary, associative character. Yet, the firm’s constituents contribute assets and incur risks to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Elisaveta Gjorgji Sardžoska & Thomas Li-Ping Tang (2012). Work-Related Behavioral Intentions in Macedonia: Coping Strategies, Work Environment, Love of Money, Job Satisfaction, and Demographic Variables. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (3):373-391.score: 8.0
    Based on theory of planned behavior, we develop a theoretical model involving love of money (LOM), job satisfaction (attitude), coping strategies/responses (perceived behavioral control), work environment (subjective norm), and work-related behavioral intentions (behavioral intention). We tested this model using job satisfaction as a mediator and sector (public versus private), personal character (good apples versus bad apples), gender, and income as moderators in a sample of 515 employees and their managers in the Republic of Macedonia. For the whole sample, both coping (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Janie Harden Fritz, Naomi Bell O'Neil, Ann Marie Popp, Cory Williams & Ronald C. Arnett (2013). The Influence of Supervisory Behavioral Integrity on Intent to Comply with Organizational Ethical Standards and Organizational Commitment. Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):251-263.score: 8.0
    We examined cynicism as a mediator of the influence of managers’ mission-congruent communication and behavior about ethical standards (a form of supervisory behavioral integrity) on employee attitudes and intended behavior. Results indicated that cynicism partially mediates the relationship between supervisory behavioral integrity and organizational commitment, but not the relationship between supervisory behavioral integrity and intent to comply with organizational expectations for employee conduct.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Myeong-Seok Kim (2014). Respect in Mengzi as a Concern-Based Construal: How It Is Different From Desire and Behavioral Disposition. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):231-250.score: 8.0
    Previous scholars seem to assume that Mengzi’s 孟子 four sprouts are more or less homogeneous in nature, and the four sprouts are often viewed as some sort of desires for or instinctive inclinations toward virtues or virtuous acts. For example, Angus Graham interprets sìduān 四端 as “incipient moral impulses” to do what is morally good or right, or “spontaneous inclinations” toward virtues or moral good. However, this view is incompatible with the recently proposed more sound views that regard Mengzi’s four (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. A. Nordgren (2003). Metaphors in Behavioral Genetics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (1):59-77.score: 8.0
    Behavioral geneticists sometimes use metaphorsto describe the role of genes in humanbehavior. In this paper, five sample texts areanalyzed: a popular book, a textbook, ascientific review article, and two originalscientific articles representing differentapproaches in behavioral genetics. Metaphorsare found in all the different kinds of sampletexts, not only in the popular book and thetextbook. This suggests that metaphors are usednot only for rhetorical or pedagogical purposesbut play a more fundamental role in scientificunderstanding. In the sample texts, themetaphors tend to be antideterministic, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. David J. Prottas (2013). Relationships Among Employee Perception of Their Manager's Behavioral Integrity, Moral Distress, and Employee Attitudes and Well-Being. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):51-60.score: 8.0
    Hypothesized relationships among reports by employees of moral distress, their perceptions of their manager’s behavioral integrity (BI), and employee reports of job satisfaction, stress, job engagement, turnover likelihood, absenteeism, work-to-family conflict, health, and life satisfaction were tested using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 2,679). BI was positively related to job satisfaction, job engagement, health, and life satisfaction and negatively to stress, turnover likelihood, and work-to-family conflict, while moral distress was inversely related to those (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Nancy K. Keith, Charles E. Pettijohn & Melissa S. Burnett (2003). An Empirical Evaluation of the Effect of Peer and Managerial Ethical Behaviors and the Ethical Predispositions of Prospective Advertising Employees. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):251-265.score: 8.0
    An advertising firm''s ethical culture (as defined by the firm''s managerial and peer ethical behaviors) may affect the employees'' comfort levels and ethical behaviors. In this research, scenarios were used to describe advertising firms with various ethical cultures. Respondents'' perceived comfort levels in working for the firms described in the scenarios and the respondents'' behavioral intentions when faced with various advertising situations were assessed. Results of the study indicate that peer ethical behavior exerts a strong influence on the comfort or (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Allen Hall & Lisa Berardino (2006). Teaching Professional Behaviors: Differences in the Perceptions of Faculty, Students, and Employers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 63 (4):407 - 415.score: 8.0
    A review of the literature indicates that faculty, students, and employers recognize the importance of professional behaviors for a successful career. These professional behaviors were defined by business school faculty to include honesty and ethical decision making, regular attendance and punctuality, professional dress and appearance, participation in professional organizations, and appropriate behavior during meetings. This paper presents the results of a survey administered to managers, faculty, and students about how business school professors can teach these professional behaviors. A hypothesis was (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Stephen C. Fowler (2000). Behavioral Tolerance (Contingent Tolerance) Ismediated in Part by Variations in Regional Cerebral Blood Flow. Brain and Mind 1 (1):45-57.score: 8.0
    Concepts and experimental results taken frombehavioral pharmacology, functional brain imaging,brain physiology, and behavioral neuroscience, wereused to develop the hypothesis that behavioraltolerance can, in part, be attributed to cellulartolerance. It is argued that task specific activationof circumscribed neuronal populations gives rise tocorresponding increases in regional cerebral bloodflow such that neurons related to task performance areexposed to higher effective doses of blood-borne drugthan neuronal groups not highly activated by thebehavioral task. Through this cerebral hemodynamicregulatory mechanism cellular tolerance phenomena canat least partially account (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Francesca Garbarini & Lorenzo Pia (2013). Bimanual Coupling Paradigm as an Effective Tool to Investigate Productive Behaviors in Motor and Body Awareness Impairments. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 8.0
    When humans move simultaneously both hands strong coupling effects arise and neither of the two hands is able to perform independent actions. It has been suggested that such motor constraints are tightly linked to action representation rather than to movement execution. Hence, bimanual tasks can represent an ideal experimental tool to investigate internal motor representations in those neurological conditions in which the movement of one hand is impaired. Indeed, any effect on the ‘moving’ (healthy) hand would be caused by the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Keith A. Markus (2014). An Incremental Approach to Causal Inference in the Behavioral Sciences. Synthese 191 (10):2089-2113.score: 8.0
    Causal inference plays a central role in behavioral science. Historically, behavioral science methodologies have typically sought to infer a single causal relation. Each of the major approaches to causal inference in the behavioral sciences follows this pattern. Nonetheless, such approaches sometimes differ in the causal relation that they infer. Incremental causal inference offers an alternative to this conceptualization of causal inference that divides the inference into a series of incremental steps. Different steps infer different causal relations. Incremental causal inference is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. R. Rende (2011). Behavioral Resilience in the Post-Genomic Era: Emerging Models Linking Genes with Environment. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:50-50.score: 8.0
    One of the most important deliverables of the post-genomic era has been a new and nuanced appreciation of how the environment shapes – and holds potential to alter – the expression of susceptibility genes for behavioral dimensions and disorders. This paper will consider three themes that have emerged from cutting-edge research studies that utilize newer molecular genetic approaches as well as tried-and-true genetic epidemiological methodologies, with particular reference to evolving perspectives on resilience and plasticity. These themes are: 1) evidence for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Martha C. Andrews, K. Michele Kacmar & Charles Kacmar (2013). The Interactive Effects of Behavioral Integrity and Procedural Justice on Employee Job Tension. Journal of Business Ethics:1-9.score: 8.0
    Using data collected from 280 full-time employees from a variety of organizations, this study examined the effects of employee perceptions of the behavioral integrity (BI) of their supervisors on job tension. The moderating effect of procedural justice (PJ) on this relationship also was examined. Substitutes for leadership theory (Kerr and Jermier, 1978) and psychological contract theory (Rousseau, Empl Responsib Rights J 2:121–139, 1989) were used as the theoretical foundations for the hypothesized relationships. Results indicated a negative relationship between BI and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Virginia Bodolica & Martin Spraggon (2011). Behavioral Governance and Self-Conscious Emotions: Unveiling Governance Implications of Authentic and Hubristic Pride. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (3):535 - 550.score: 8.0
    The main purpose of this article is to elucidate the bright connotation of the self-conscious emotion of pride, namely authentic pride, in the broader context of behavioral governance literature. Scholars in the field of psychology suggest that authentic and hubristic pride represent two facets of the same emotional construct. Yet, our review indicates that in the extant governance research pride has been treated as an exclusively dark leadership trait or self-attribution bias, thereby placing hubris among the main causes of managerial (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Gian Mauro Manzoni, Giada Pietrabissa & Gianluca Castelnuovo (2012). Psychological and Behavioral Approaches to Cardiac Patients Facing Specific Adjustment Challenges. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 8.0
    Psychological and behavioral approaches to cardiac patients facing specific adjustment challenges.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Colin W. Clark (1991). Modeling Behavioral Adaptations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (1):85-93.score: 8.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Elyès Jouini & Clotilde Napp (2012). Behavioral Biases and the Representative Agent. Theory and Decision 73 (1):97-123.score: 8.0
    In this article, we show that behavioral features can be obtained at a group level even if they do not appear at the individual level. Starting from a standard model of Pareto optimal allocations, with expected utility maximizers but allowing for heterogeneity among individual beliefs, we show in particular that the representative agent has an inverse S-shaped probability distortion function as in Cumulative prospect theory.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Bram Tucker & Lisa Rende Taylor (2007). The Human Behavioral Ecology of Contemporary World Issues. Human Nature 18 (3):181-189.score: 8.0
    Human behavioral ecology (HBE) began as an attempt to explain human economic, reproductive, and social behavior using neodarwinian theory in concert with theory from ecology and economics, and ethnographic methods. HBE has addressed subsistence decision-making, cooperation, life history trade-offs, parental investment, mate choice, and marriage strategies among hunter-gatherers, herders, peasants, and wage earners in rural and urban settings throughout the world. Despite our rich insights into human behavior, HBE has very rarely been used as a tool to help the people (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Maobin Wang, Chun Qiu & Dongmin Kong (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility, Investor Behaviors, and Stock Market Returns: Evidence From a Natural Experiment in China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (1):127 - 141.score: 8.0
    This article studies how financial investors respond to firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance in terms of their investing behaviors, and how such behaviors change contingent on an event that provokes their attention and concerns to CSR. Using the melamine contamination incident in China as a natural experiment, it is found that neither the individual investors' nor the institutional investors' behaviors are influenced by firms' CSR performance before the incident. Nevertheless, in the post-event period, institutional investors' behaviors are significantly influenced (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Bram Tucker (2007). Applying Behavioral Ecology and Behavioral Economics to Conservation and Development Planning: An Example From the Mikea Forest, Madagascar. [REVIEW] Human Nature 18 (3):190-208.score: 8.0
    Governments and non-govermental organizations (NGOs) that plan projects to conserve the environment and alleviate poverty often attempt to modify rural livelihoods by halting activities they judge to be destructive or inefficient and encouraging alternatives. Project planners typically do so without understanding how rural people themselves judge the value of their activities. When the alternatives planners recommend do not replace the value of banned activities, alternatives are unlikely to be adopted, and local people will refuse to participate. Human behavioral ecology and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Qinqin Zheng & Zhiqiang Li (2010). The Influence of Accounting Firms on Clients' Immoral Behaviors in China. Journal of Business Ethics 91 (1):137 - 149.score: 8.0
    In this article, we introduce important others, accounting firms, in the ethical decision making system. The rational economic person assumption does not always provide the best choice for accounting firms in the influence mode selection on the clients' immoral behaviors. It still leaves many arguments. From the perspective of virtue ethics, we take a step forward for the literature and propose the ethical obligations and active influence of accounting firms on clients' immoral behaviors. We then empirically investigate the influence of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Ronald G. Barr (2004). Early Infant Crying as a Behavioral State Rather Than a Signal. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):460-460.score: 7.0
    I argue that in the first three months, crying is primarily a behavioral state rather than a signal and that its properties include prolonged and unsoothable crying bouts as part of normal development. However, these normal properties trigger Shaken Baby Syndrome, a form of child abuse that does not easily fit an adaptive infanticide analysis.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Don Ross & David Spurrett (2004). What to Say to a Skeptical Metaphysician? A Defense Manual for Cognitive and Behavioral Scientists. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):603-627.score: 7.0
    A wave of recent work in metaphysics seeks to undermine the anti-reductionist, functionalist consensus of the past few decades in cognitive science and philosophy of mind. That consensus apparently legitimated a focus on what systems do, without necessarily and always requiring attention to the details of how systems are constituted. The new metaphysical challenge contends that many states and processes referred to by functionalist cognitive scientists are epiphenomenal. It further contends that the problem lies in functionalism itself, and that, to (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Peter Danielson (2007). The Place of Ethics in a Unified Behavioral Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):23-24.score: 7.0
    Behavioral science, unified in the way Gintis proposes, should affect ethics, which also finds itself in “disarray,” in three ways. First, it raises the standards. Second, it removes the easy targets of economic and sociobiological selfishness. Third, it provides methods, in particular the close coupling of theory and experiments, to construct a better ethics. (Published Online April 27 2007).
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. John Tooby & Leda Cosmides (2007). Evolutionary Psychology, Ecological Rationality, and the Unification of the Behavioral Sciences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):42-43.score: 7.0
    For two decades, the integrated causal model of evolutionary psychology (EP) has constituted an interdisciplinary nucleus around which a single unified theoretical and empirical behavioral science has been crystallizing – while progressively resolving problems (such as defective logical and statistical reasoning) that bedevil Gintis's beliefs, preferences, and constraints (BPC) framework. Although both frameworks are similar, EP is empirically better supported, theoretically richer, and offers deeper unification. (Published Online April 27 2007).
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Paul W. Andrews, Steven W. Gangestad & Dan Matthews (2002). Adaptationism, Exaptationism, and Evolutionary Behavioral Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):534-547.score: 7.0
    In our target article, we discussed the standards of evidence that could be used to identify adaptations, and argued that building an empirical case that certain features of a trait are best explained by exaptation, spandrel, or constraint requires the consideration, testing, and rejection of adaptationist hypotheses. We are grateful to the 31 commentators for their thoughtful insights. They raised important issues, including the meaning of “exaptation”; whether Gould and Lewontin's critique of adaptationism was primarily epistemological or ontological; the necessity, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Joseph Henrich, Robert Boyd, Samuel Bowles, Colin Camerer, Ernst Fehr, Herbert Gintis, Richard McElreath, Michael Alvard, Abigail Barr, Jean Ensminger, Natalie Smith Henrich, Kim Hill, Francisco Gil-White, Michael Gurven, Frank W. Marlowe & John Q. Patton (2005). “Economic Man” in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small-Scale Societies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):795-815.score: 7.0
    Researchers from across the social sciences have found consistent deviations from the predictions of the canonical model of self-interest in hundreds of experiments from around the world. This research, however, cannot determine whether the uniformity results from universal patterns of human behavior or from the limited cultural variation available among the university students used in virtually all prior experimental work. To address this, we undertook a cross-cultural study of behavior in ultimatum, public goods, and dictator games in a range of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Richard A. Depue & Jeannine V. Morrone-Strupinsky (2005). Modeling Human Behavioral Traits and Clarifying the Construct of Affiliation and its Disorders. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):371-378.score: 7.0
    Commentary on our target article centers around six main topics: (1) strategies in modeling the neurobehavioral foundation of human behavioral traits; (2) clarification of the construct of affiliation; (3) developmental aspects of affiliative bonding; (4) modeling disorders of affiliative reward; (5) serotonin and affiliative behavior; and (6) neural considerations. After an initial important research update in section R1, our Response is organized around these topics in the following six sections, R2 to R7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Keith E. Stanovich (2007). The Psychology of Decision Making in a Unified Behavioral Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):41-42.score: 7.0
    The cognitive psychology of judgment and decision making helps to elaborate Gintis's unified view of the behavioral sciences by highlighting the fact that decisions result from multiple systems in the mind. It also adds to the unified view the idea that the potential to self-critique preference structures is a unique feature of human cognition. (Published Online April 27 2007).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. A. Charles Catania (2005). Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Delay-of-Reinforcement Gradients and Other Behavioral Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):419-424.score: 7.0
    Sagvolden, Johansen, Aase, and Russell (Sagvolden et al.) examine attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at levels of analysis ranging from neurotransmitters to behavior. At the behavioral level they attribute aspects of ADHD to anomalies of delay-of-reinforcement gradients. With a normal gradient, responses followed after a long delay by a reinforcer may share in the effects of that reinforcer; with a diminished or steepened gradient they may fail to do so. Steepened gradients differentially select rapidly emitted responses (hyperactivity), and they limit the effectiveness (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Stephen T. Higgins & Stacey C. Sigmon (2000). Implications of Behavioral Momentum for Understanding the Behavioral Pharmacology of Abused Drugs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):101-101.score: 7.0
    We briefly discuss some potential contributions of behavioral momentum research to the study of the behavioral effects of abused drugs. Contributions to the study of the direct effects of drugs on operant responding and to the study of drugs as reinforcers are addressed. Too little empirical evidence is available to thoroughly evaluate the relevance of behavioral momentum concepts to the study of drugs and behavior, but we note several reasons for optimism regarding its potential to make positive contributions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. John A. Nevin & Randolph C. Grace (2000). Behavioral Momentum: Empirical, Theoretical, and Metaphorical Issues. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):117-125.score: 7.0
    In reply to the comments on our target article, we address a variety of issues concerning the generality of our major findings, their relation to other theoretical formulations, and the metaphor of behavioral momentum that inspired much of our work. Most of these issues can be resolved by empirical studies, and we hope that the ideas advanced here will promote the analysis of resistance to change and preference in new areas of research and application.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000