Search results for '*Causal Analysis' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. Marto & J. R. Croca (2002). Non-Local Interferometry: A Causal Explanation by Means of Local Wavelet Analysis. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 32 (7):1091-1109.score: 72.0
    In the following we consider the possibility of interpretating recent non-local interferometric experiments according to the De Broglie causal model. With the help of a simplified mathematical model based on wavelet analysis it is indeed possible to explain it in a causal way. Furthermore we show the distinctions between the two formalisms and discuss some experimental conditions that may make these differences evident.
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  2. David Wiens (2013). Demands of Justice, Feasible Alternatives, and the Need for Causal Analysis. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):325-338.score: 66.0
    Many political philosophers hold the Feasible Alternatives Principle (FAP): justice demands that we implement some reform of international institutions P only if P is feasible and P improves upon the status quo from the standpoint of justice. The FAP implies that any argument for a moral requirement to implement P must incorporate claims whose content pertains to the causal processes that explain the current state of affairs. Yet, philosophers routinely neglect the need to attend to actual causal processes. This undermines (...)
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  3. Julian Reiss (2009). Counterfactuals, Thought Experiments, and Singular Causal Analysis in History. Philosophy of Science 76 (5):712-723.score: 60.0
    Thought experiments are ubiquitous in science and especially prominent in domains in which experimental and observational evidence is scarce. One such domain is the causal analysis of singular events in history. A long‐standing tradition that goes back to Max Weber addresses the issue by means of ‘what‐if’ counterfactuals. In this paper I give a descriptive account of this widely used method and argue that historians following it examine difference makers rather than causes in the philosopher’s sense. While difference making (...)
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  4. Federica Russo (2010). Are Causal Analysis and System Analysis Compatible Approaches? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (1):67 – 90.score: 60.0
    In social science, one objection to causal analysis is that the assumption of the closure of the system makes the analysis too narrow in scope, that is, it considers only 'closed' and 'hermetic' systems thus neglecting many other external influences. On the contrary, system analysis deals with complex structures where every element is interrelated with everything else in the system. The question arises as to whether the two approaches can be compatible and whether causal analysis can (...)
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  5. Robert Northcott (2006). Causal Efficacy and the Analysis of Variance. Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):253-276.score: 54.0
    The causal impacts of genes and environment on any one biological trait are inextricably entangled, and consequently it is widely accepted that it makes no sense in singleton cases to privilege either factor for particular credit. On the other hand, at a population level it may well be the case that one of the factors is responsible for more variation than the other. Standard methodological practice in biology uses the statistical technique of analysis of variance to measure this latter (...)
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  6. Predrag Šustar (2007). Neo-Functional Analysis: Phylogenetical Restrictions on Causal Role Functions. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):601-615.score: 48.0
    The most recent resurgence of philosophical attention to the so-called ‘functional talk' in the sciences can be summarized in terms of the following questions: (Q1) What kind of restrictions, and in particular, what kind of evolutionary restrictions as well as to what extent, is involved in functional ascriptions? (Q2) How can we account for the explanatory import of function-ascribing statements? This paper addresses these questions through a modified version of Cummins' functional analysis. The modification in question is concerned with (...)
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  7. Tarja Knuuttila & Andrea Loettgers (2011). Causal Isolation Robustness Analysis: The Combinatorial Strategy of Circadian Clock Research. Biology and Philosophy 26 (5):773-791.score: 48.0
    This paper distinguishes between causal isolation robustness analysis and independent determination robustness analysis and suggests that the triangulation of the results of different epistemic means or activities serves different functions in them. Circadian clock research is presented as a case of causal isolation robustness analysis: in this field researchers made use of the notion of robustness to isolate the assumed mechanism behind the circadian rhythm. However, in contrast to the earlier philosophical case studies on causal isolation robustness (...)
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  8. Jig-Chuen Lee (1986). Causal Condition, Causal Asymmetry, and the Counterfactual Analysis of Causation. Synthese 67 (2):213 - 223.score: 48.0
    In a recent paper Causal Asymmetry, Douglas Ehring has proposed an intriguing solution to the vexing problem of causal asymmetry. The aim of this paper is to show that his theory is not satisfactory. Moreover, the examples that I use in showing the defect of Ehring's theory also indicate that the counterfactual analysis of causation has a problem that cannot be remedied by Marshall Swain's suggested refinement of the counterfactual analysis of causation in Causation and Distinct Events.
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  9. Predrag Sustar (2007). Neo‐Functional Analysis: Phylogenetical Restrictions on Causal Role Functions. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):601-615.score: 48.0
    The most recent resurgence of philosophical attention to the so-called ‘functional talk’ in the sciences can be summarized in terms of the following questions: (Q1) What kind of restrictions, and in particular, what kind of evolutionary restrictions as well as to what extent, are involved in functional ascriptions? (Q2) How can we account for the explanatory import of function-ascribing statements? This paper addresses these questions on the basis of a modified version of Cummins’ functional analysis. The modification in question (...)
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  10. Robert H. Ennis, Analysis and Defense of Sole Singular Causal Claims.score: 48.0
    To claim that x was the cause of y (or x caused y) is 1) to assume that x was one of a number of things, each of which together with the others was sufficient to have brought about y, and 2) to deem x responsible for the occurrence of y. A best-explanation argument, including application to cases, is offered in defense of this analysis, which holds that claiming that something is the cause is, in part, a speech act (...)
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  11. C. G. Prado (1972). Intentionality and Causal Analysis. Noûs 6 (September):281-287.score: 47.0
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  12. Michael Tye (1982). A Causal Analysis of Seeing by Michael Tye. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (March):311-325.score: 47.0
     
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  13. Erik Weber (2007). Conceptual Tools for Causal Analysis in the Social Sciences. In Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (eds.), Causality and Probability in the Sciences. 197--213.score: 46.0
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  14. Part Vii (2007). General Frameworks for Causal Analysis. In Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (eds.), Causality and Probability in the Sciences. 5--413.score: 46.0
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  15. Scott Campbell (2002). Causal Analyses of Seeing. Erkenntnis 56 (2):169-180.score: 45.0
    I critically analyse two causal analyses of seeing, by Frank Jackson and Michael Tye. I show that both are unacceptable. I argue that Jackson's analysis fails because it does not rule out cases of non-seeing. Tye's analysis seems to be superior to Jackson's in this respect, but I show that it too lets in cases of non-seeing. I also show that Tye's proposed solution to a problem for his theory -- which involves a robot that mimics another (unseen) (...)
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  16. Michael Tye (1982). A Causal Analysis of Seeing. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (3):311-325.score: 45.0
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  17. Ahmet Ekici & Sule Onsel (2013). How Ethical Behavior of Firms is Influenced by the Legal and Political Environments: A Bayesian Causal Map Analysis Based on Stages of Development. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):271-290.score: 45.0
    Even though potential impacts of political and legal environments of business on ethical behavior of firms (EBOF) have been conceptually recognized, not much evidence (i.e., empirical work) has been produced to clarify their role. In this paper, using Bayesian causal maps (BCMs) methodology, relationships between legal and political environments of business and EBOF are investigated. The unique design of our study allows us to analyze these relationships based on the stages of development in 92 countries around the world. The EBOF (...)
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  18. Michael P. Hodges (1979). Armstrong's Causal Analysis and Direct Knowledge. Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):335-343.score: 45.0
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  19. Fritz Ringer (2002). Max Weber on Causal Analysis, Interpretation, and Comparison. History and Theory 41 (2):163–178.score: 45.0
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  20. D. A. Y. H. (1985). Illustrating Behavioral Principles with Examples From Demography: The Causal Analysis of Differences in Fertility. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 15 (2):189–201.score: 45.0
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  21. Ilya Shpitser (2013). Counterfactual Graphical Models for Longitudinal Mediation Analysis With Unobserved Confounding. Cognitive Science 37 (6):1011-1035.score: 45.0
    Questions concerning mediated causal effects are of great interest in psychology, cognitive science, medicine, social science, public health, and many other disciplines. For instance, about 60% of recent papers published in leading journals in social psychology contain at least one mediation test (Rucker, Preacher, Tormala, & Petty, 2011). Standard parametric approaches to mediation analysis employ regression models, and either the “difference method” (Judd & Kenny, 1981), more common in epidemiology, or the “product method” (Baron & Kenny, 1986), more common (...)
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  22. Lincoln H. Day (1985). Illustrating Behavioral Principles with Examples From Demography: The Causal Analysis of Differences in Fertility. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 15 (2):189-201.score: 45.0
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  23. Fritz K. Ringer (forthcoming). Causal Analysis in Historical Reasoning. History and Theory.score: 45.0
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  24. Patrick Suppes (1980). Causal Analysis of Hidden Variables. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:563 - 571.score: 45.0
    The retreat from the paradise of deterministic causation and the general principles involved in this retreat, which has been forced upon us by quantum mechanics, is described in more or less successive stages.
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  25. David W. Gow & Jennifer A. Segawa (2009). Articulatory Mediation of Speech Perception: A Causal Analysis of Multi-Modal Imaging Data. Cognition 110 (2):222-236.score: 45.0
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  26. Pe Griffiths & Rd Gray (1994). Vision and Power, John Hyman the Causal Analysis of Perceiving Misrepresents the Senses as Natural Powers. Although the Senses Are Not Voluntary Powers, the Concept of an Opportunity to See, Hear, and so Forth, is an Essential Part of the Concept of a Sense.(Hence the Concept of an Opportunity is Not Coincident with the Con. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 91 (5).score: 45.0
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  27. Wr Carroll & A. Bandura (1987). Cognitive Determinants of Observational-Learning-a Causal-Analysis. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (5):352-352.score: 45.0
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  28. John T. Doby (1989). A Critique of Causal Analysis in the Social Sciences. In M. Maxwell & C. Wade Savage (eds.), Science, Mind, and Psychology: Essays in Honor of Grover Maxwell. University Press of America. 391.score: 45.0
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  29. Maurice Mandelbaum (1942). Causal Analysis in History. [N. P..score: 45.0
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  30. Stephen Morgan & Christopher Winship (2012). Bringing Context and Variability Back in to Causal Analysis. In Harold Kincaid (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Social Science. Oxford University Press.score: 45.0
  31. Stephen L. Morgan & Christopher Winship (2012). Variability Back Into Causal Analysis. In Harold Kincaid (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Social Science. Oxford University Press. 319.score: 45.0
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  32. Kazem Sadegh-Zadeh (1978). On the Limits of the Statistical-Causal Analysis as a Diagnostic Procedure. Theory and Decision 9 (1):93-107.score: 45.0
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  33. Hans Westmeyer (1975). The Diagnostic Process as a Statistical-Causal Analysis. Theory and Decision 6 (1):57-86.score: 45.0
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  34. Dieter Birnbacher (2006). Causal Interpretations of Correlations Between Neural and Conscious Events. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (1-2):115-128.score: 42.0
    The contribution argues that causal interpretations of empirical correlations between neural and conscious events are meaningful even if not fully verifiable and that there are reasons in favour of an epiphenomenalist construction of psychophysical causality. It is suggested that an account of causality can be given that makes interactionism, epiphenomenalism and Leibnizian parallelism semantically distinct interpretations of the phenomena. Though neuroscience cannot strictly prove or rule out any one of these interpretations it can be argued that methodological principles favour a (...)
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  35. Masasi Hattori & Mike Oaksford (2007). Adaptive Non‐Interventional Heuristics for Covariation Detection in Causal Induction: Model Comparison and Rational Analysis. Cognitive Science 31 (5):765-814.score: 42.0
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  36. AnneEllerup Nielsen (1996). The Argumentative Impact of Causal Relations ? An Exemplary Analysis of the Free Predicate in the Promotional Discourse. Argumentation 10 (3):329-345.score: 41.0
    The semantic relations between and within utterances are marked by the use of connectors and adverbials. One type of semantic relations is causal relations expressed by causal markers such as because, therefore, so, for, etc. Some of these markers cover different types of causal relations such as causality, explanation and justification. In certain types of discourse, causal relations also imply an intentional element. This paper describes the way in which the semantic and pragmatic functions of causal markers can be accounted (...)
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  37. Peter Gärdenfors (1990). An Epistemic Analysis of Explanations and Causal Beliefs. Topoi 9 (2):109-124.score: 39.0
    The analyses of explanation and causal beliefs are heavily dependent on using probability functions as models of epistemic states. There are, however, several aspects of beliefs that are not captured by such a representation and which affect the outcome of the analyses. One dimension that has been neglected in this article is the temporal aspect of the beliefs. The description of a single event naturally involves the time it occurred. Some analyses of causation postulate that the cause must not occur (...)
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  38. Gurol Irzik (1986). Causal Modeling and the Statistical Analysis of Causation. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:12 - 23.score: 39.0
    Recent philosophical studies of probabilistic causation and statistical explanation have opened up the possibility of unifying philosophical approaches with causal modeling as practiced in the social and biological sciences. This unification rests upon the statistical tools employed, the principle of common cause, the irreducibility of causation to statistics, and the idea of causal process as a suitable framework for understanding causal relationships. These four areas of contact are discussed with emphasis on the relevant aspects of causal modeling.
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  39. Gunnar K. A. Njálsson (2005). From Autonomous to Socially Conceived Technology: Toward a Causal, Intentional and Systematic Analysis of Interests and Elites in Public Technology Policy. Theoria 44 (108):56-81.score: 39.0
    I shall attempt in this article to identify the spectrum of major theoretical schools relating to the nature of technological development. These, I shall argue, range from the tech-deterministic on the one end to the socio-deterministic school of thought on the opposite end of the spectrum. The purpose of this article is also to place human subjects into the arena of technology development by way of the hypothesis that interests and elites are involved in the formulation of public IT policy. (...)
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  40. Erasmo Recami (1987). Tachyon Kinematics and Causality: A Systematic Thorough Analysis of the Tachyon Causal Paradoxes. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 17 (3):239-296.score: 39.0
    The chronological order of the events along a spacelike path is not invariant under Lorentz transformations, as is well known. This led to an early conviction that tachyons would give rise to causal anomalies. A relativistic version of the Stückelberg-Feynman “switching procedure” (SWP) has been invoked as the suitable tool to eliminate those anomalies. The application of the SWP does eliminate the motions backwards in time, but interchanges the roles ofsource anddetector. This fact triggered the proposal of a host of (...)
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  41. Kevin D. Hoover (1990). The Logic of Causal Inference: Econometrics and the Conditional Analysis of Causation. Economics and Philosophy 6 (02):207-.score: 36.0
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  42. Steven Luper-Foy (1987). The Causal Indicator Analysis of Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (4):563-587.score: 36.0
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  43. Baojuan Li, Xiang Wang, Shuqiao Yao, Dewen Hu & Karl Friston (2012). Task-Dependent Modulation of Effective Connectivity Within the Default Mode Network. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 36.0
    The default mode network (DMN) has recently attracted widespread interest. Previous studies have found that task-related processing can induce deactivation and changes in the functional connectivity of this network. However, it remains unclear how tasks modulate the underlying effective connectivity within the DMN. Using recent advances in dynamic causal modeling (DCM), we investigated the modulatory effect of (gender judgment) task performance on directed connectivity within the DMN. Sixteen healthy subjects were scanned twice: at rest and while performing a gender judgment (...)
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  44. Ulla Räisänen, Marie-Jet Bekkers, Paula Boddington, Srikant Sarangi & Angus Clarke (2006). The Causation of Disease – The Practical and Ethical Consequences of Competing Explanations. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (3):293-306.score: 36.0
    The prevention, treatment and management of disease are closely linked to how the causes of a particular disease are explained. For multi-factorial conditions, the causal explanations are inevitably complex and competing models may exist to explain the same condition. Selecting one particular causal explanation over another will carry practical and ethical consequences that are acutely relevant for health policy. In this paper our focus is two-fold; (i) the different models of causal explanation that are put forward within current scientific literature (...)
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  45. Adrian C. Hayes (1985). Causal and Interpretive Analysis in Sociology. Sociological Theory 3 (2):1-10.score: 36.0
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  46. Karl Friston Baojuan Li, Xiang Wang, Shuqiao Yao, Dewen Hu (2012). Task-Dependent Modulation of Effective Connectivity Within the Default Mode Network. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 36.0
    The default mode network (DMN) has recently attracted widespread interest. Previous studies have found that task-related processing can induce deactivation and changes in the functional connectivity of this network. However, it remains unclear how tasks modulate the underlying effective connectivity within the DMN. Using recent advances in dynamic causal modeling (DCM), we investigated the modulatory effect of (gender judgment) task performance on directed connectivity within the DMN. Sixteen healthy subjects were scanned twice: at rest and while performing a gender judgment (...)
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  47. Marta Fehér (1986). The Method of Analysis‐Synthesis and the Structure of Causal Explanation in Newton. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 1 (1):60-84.score: 36.0
  48. Nicholas Rescher (1954). Some Remarks on an Analysis of the Causal Relation. Journal of Philosophy 51 (8):239-241.score: 36.0
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  49. Hubert Buch‐Hansen (2013). Social Network Analysis and Critical Realism. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (2).score: 36.0
    Social network analysis (SNA) is an increasingly popular approach that provides researchers with highly developed tools to map and analyze complexes of social relations. Although a number of network scholars have explicated the assumptions that underpin SNA, the approach has yet to be discussed in relation to established philosophies of science. This article argues that there is a tension between applied and methods-oriented SNA studies, on the one hand, and those addressing the social-theoretical nature and implications of networks, on (...)
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  50. Andrea A. diSessa (2014). The Construction of Causal Schemes: Learning Mechanisms at the Knowledge Level. Cognitive Science 38 (5):795-850.score: 36.0
    This work uses microgenetic study of classroom learning to illuminate (1) the role of pre-instructional student knowledge in the construction of normative scientific knowledge, and (2) the learning mechanisms that drive change. Three enactments of an instructional sequence designed to lead to a scientific understanding of thermal equilibration are used as data sources. Only data from a scaffolded student inquiry preceding introduction of a normative model were used. Hence, the study involves nearly autonomous student learning. In two classes, students developed (...)
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