Search results for '*Coma' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. R. Smythies (1999). The Biochemical Basis of Coma. Psycoloquy 10 (26).score: 12.0
    Current research on the neural basis of consciousness is based mainly on neuroimaging, physiology and psychophysics. This target article reviews what is known about biochemical factors that may contribute to the development of consciousness, based on loss of consciousness (i.e., coma). There are two theories of the biochemical mode of action of general anaesthetics. One is that anaesthesia is a direct (i.e., not receptor-mediated) effect of the anaesthetic on cellular neurophysiological function; the other is that some alteration of receptor function (...)
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  2. G. B. Young, A. H. Ropper & C. F. Bolton (1998). Coma and Impaired Consciousness: A Clinical Perspective. McGraw-Hill.score: 12.0
    All-encompassing text examines every aspect of coma from neurochemistry, monitoring, and treatments to prognostic factors.
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  3. Zoe Drayson (2014). Intentional Action and the Post-Coma Patient. Topoi 33 (1):23-31.score: 12.0
    Detecting conscious awareness in a patient emerging from a coma state is problematic, because our standard attributions of conscious awareness rely on interpreting bodily movement as intentional action. Where there is an absence of intentional bodily action, as in the vegetative state, can we reliably assume that there is an absence of conscious awareness? Recent neuroimaging work suggests that we can attribute conscious awareness to some patients in a vegetative state by interpreting their brain activity as intentional mental action. I (...)
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  4. Quentin Noirhomme, Neuroimaging After Coma.score: 12.0
    Following coma, some patients will recover wakefulness without signs of consciousness (only showing reflex movements, i.e., the vegetative state) or may show non-reflex movements but remain without functional communication (i.e., the minimally conscious state). Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state (Schnakers et. al. BMC Neurol, 9:35, 8) and the clinical and electrophysiological markers of outcome from the vegetative and minimally conscious states remain unsatisfactory. This should incite clinicians to use multimodal assessment to detect objective (...)
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  5. Michael Herbert (2005). Post-Coma Unresponsiveness. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (1):7.score: 12.0
    Herbert, Michael Clinicians are beginning to understand the varied outcomes following severe brain injury, one of which is post-coma unresponsiveness (PCU). However, much still needs to be done to fully comprehend this elusive state. Current clinical knowledge is outlined below.
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  6. Kevin McGovern (2007). NHMRC Statements on Post-Coma Unresponsiveness. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 13 (2):9.score: 12.0
    McGovern, Kevin This article reviews three statements from the National Health and Medical Research Council on post-coma unresponsiveness (PCU). One of the functions of the NHMRC is to propose standards and guidelines for health care in Australia. The paper explores the causes and neuropathology of PCU, imaging and other tests and prognosis from unresponsiveness.
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  7. Steven Laureys, Adrian M. Owen & Nicholas D. Schiff (2004). Brain Function in Coma, Vegetative State, and Related Disorders. Lancet Neurology 3:537-546.score: 9.0
  8. J. B. Posner (1978). Coma and Other States of Consciousness: The Differential Diagnosis of Brain Death. Annals of the New York Academy of Science 315:215-27.score: 9.0
  9. C. M. de Giorgio & M. F. Lew (1991). Consciousness, Coma, and the Vegetative State: Physical Basis and Definitional Character. Issues in Law and Medicine 6:361-371.score: 9.0
  10. Graham Teasdale, R. Knill-Jones & J. van der Sande (1978). Observer Variability in Assessing Impaired Consciousness and Coma. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry 41:603-610.score: 9.0
  11. Grant Gillett (1992). Coma, Death and Moral Dues: A Response to Serafini. Bioethics 6 (4):375–377.score: 9.0
  12. David B. Hausman & A. Serge Kappler (1978). Death as Irreversible Coma: An Appraisal. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 12 (1):49-52.score: 9.0
  13. Anthony Serafini (1993). Is Coma Morally Equivalent to Anencephalia? Ethics and Behavior 3 (2):187 – 198.score: 9.0
  14. K. Sugiura, K. Muraoka, T. Chishiki & M. Baba (1983). The Edinburgh-2 Coma Scale: A New Scale for Assessing Impaired Consciousness. Neurosurgery 12:411-15.score: 9.0
  15. B. Towers (1982). Irreversible Coma and Withdrawal of Life Support: Is It Murder If the IV Line is Disconnected? Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (4):203-205.score: 9.0
  16. Giulio E. Lancioni, Andrea Bosco, Marta Olivetti Belardinelli, Nirbhay N. Singh, Mark F. O'Reilly, Jeff Sigafoos, Francesca Buonocunto, Jorge Navarro, Crocifissa Lanzilotti, Fiora D'Amico & Marina De Tommaso (2014). Assessing Learning as a Possible Sign of Consciousness in Post-Coma Persons with Minimal Responsiveness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 9.0
  17. Walter Koza (2013). El Inciso Delimitado Por Comas. Análisis Del Fenómeno Y Propuesta De Detección Automática. Logos: Revista de Lingüística, Filosofía y Literatura 23 (2):169-195.score: 9.0
    In this paper, the incidental clauses delimited by commas are inquired from a computational linguistic perspective. Some theoretical aspects based on grammatical criteria, and a discussion about its nature and definition are proposed. For this objective, we consider (i) the possibility that incidental clause has (or not) a syntactic function, (ii) the possibility that the incidental clauses interrupts (or not) the regular order of the sentence where it is inserted, and (iii) the different levels where the incidental clauses could be (...)
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  18. Giulio E. Lancioni, Andrea Bosco, Marta Olivetti Belardinelli, Nirbhay N. Singh, Mark F. O'Reilly, Jeff Sigafoos & Doretta Oliva (2014). Technology-Based Intervention Programs to Promote Stimulation Control and Communication in Post-Coma Persons with Different Levels of Disability. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 9.0
  19. Vanessa Charland-Verville, Jean-Pierre Jourdan, Marie Thonnard, Didier Ledoux, Anne-Francoise Donneau, Etienne Quertemont & Steven Laureys (2014). Near-Death Experiences in Non-Life-Threatening Events and Coma of Different Etiologies. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 9.0
  20. Lizette Heine, Andrea Soddu, Francisco Gómez, Audrey Vanhaudenhuyse, Luaba Tshibanda, Marie Thonnard, Vanessa Charland-Verville, Murielle Kirsch, Steven Laureys & Athena Demertzi (2012). Resting State Networks and Consciousness: Alterations of Multiple Resting State Network Connectivity in Physiological, Pharmacological, and Pathological Consciousness States. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 9.0
    In order to better understand the functional contribution of resting state activity to conscious cognition, we aimed to review increases and decreases in fMRI functional connectivity under physiological (sleep), pharmacological (anesthesia) and pathological altered states of consciousness, such as brain death, coma, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, and minimally conscious state. The reviewed RSNs were the DMN, left and right executive control, salience, sensorimotor, auditory and visual networks. We highlight some methodological issues concerning resting state analyses in severely injured brains mainly (...)
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  21. Brian Lewis (2005). Reflections on Caring for Patients in a Vegetative State (Post-Coma-Unresponsive Patients). Australasian Catholic Record, The 82 (2):202.score: 9.0
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  22. A. O. P. Fisher (2005). The Ethics of Care for Those with Post-Coma Unresponsiveness and Related Conditions. Bioethics Outlook 16 (2).score: 9.0
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  23. Norman Ford (2004). The Pope on the Moral Obligation to Continue Tube Feeding for Patients in Post-Coma Unresponsiveness. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 9 (4):1.score: 9.0
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  24. National Health & Medical Research Council (2009). Ethical Guidelines for the Care of People in Post-Coma Unresponsiveness (Vegetative State) or a Minimally Responsive State. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).score: 9.0
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  25. A. A. Howsepian (1994). Philosophical Reflections on Coma. Review of Metaphysics 47 (4):735 - 755.score: 9.0
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  26. M. Jouvet (1969). Coma and Other Disorders of Consciousness. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland.score: 9.0
     
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  27. Steven Laureys, Marie-Elisabeth E. Faymonville & M. Ferring (2003). Differences in Brain Metabolism Between Patients in Coma, Vegetative State, Minimally Conscious State and Locked-in Syndrome. European Journal of Neurology 10.score: 9.0
  28. Je Ortega (1997). El retorno de Mnemosyne o la filosofía coma aplicación. Ciencia Tomista 124 (2):347-362.score: 9.0
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  29. George G. Somjen (1981). Reticular Formation, Brain Waves, and Coma. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):489.score: 9.0
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  30. D. E. Stanczak, J. G. White & W. D. Gouview (1984). Assessment of Level of Consciousness Following Severe Neurological Insult: A Comparison of the Psychometric Qualities of the Glasgow Coma Scale and the Comprehensive Level of Consciousness Scale. Journal of Neurosurgery 60:955-60.score: 9.0
  31. Laureys Steven (2012). Nociception Coma Scale-Revised Total Scores Correlate with Anterior Cingulate Cortex as Measured by FDG-PET in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 9.0
  32. Graham Teasdale & Bryan Jennett (1974). Assessment of Coma and Impaired Consciousness. Lancet 2:81-84.score: 9.0
     
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  33. Segnarbieux F. van de Kelft E., Couchet P. Candon E. & Daures J. P. Frerebeau P. (1994). Clinical Recovery of Consciousness After Traumatic Coma. Critical Care Medicine 22:1108-13.score: 9.0
     
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  34. István Aranyosi (2012). Should We Fear Quantum Torment? Ratio 25 (3):249-259.score: 6.0
    The prospect, in terms of subjective expectations, of immortality under the no-collapse interpretation of quantum mechanics is certain, as pointed out by several authors, both physicists and, more recently, philosophers. The argument, known as quantum suicide, or quantum immortality, has received some critical discussion, but there hasn't been any questioning of David Lewis's point that there is a terrifying corollary to the argument, namely, that we should expect to live forever in a crippled, more and more damaged state, that barely (...)
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  35. Joseph T. Giacino & J. T. Whyte (2005). The Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States: Current Knowledge and Remaining Questions. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilation 20 (1):30-50.score: 6.0
  36. Joseph J. Fins & F. Plum (2004). Neurological Diagnosis is More Than a State of Mind: Diagnostic Clarity and Impaired Consciousness. Archives of Neurology 61 (9):1354-1355.score: 6.0
  37. J. Graham Beaumont & Pamela M. Kenealy (2005). Incidence and Prevalence of the Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 15 (3):184-189.score: 6.0
  38. Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, Melanie Boly, Matthew H. Davis, Steven Laureys & John D. Pickard (2007). Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Covert Awareness in the Vegetative State. Archives of Neurology 64 (8):1098-1102.score: 6.0
  39. Joseph T. Giacino & Childs N. Ashwal S. (2002). The Minimally Conscious State: Definition and Diagnostic Criteria. Neurology 58 (3):349-353.score: 6.0
  40. Tristan Bekinschtein, Cecilia Tiberti, Jorge Niklison, Mercedes Tamashiro, Melania Ron, Silvina Carpintiero, Mirta Villarreal, Cecilia Forcato, Ramon Leiguarda & Facundo Manes (2005). Assessing Level of Consciousness and Cognitive Changes From Vegetative State to Full Recovery. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):307-322.score: 6.0
  41. Caroline Schnakers, Joseph Giacino, Kathleen Kalmar, Sonia Piret, Eduardo Lopez, Mélanie Boly, Richard Malone & Steven Laureys (2006). Does the FOUR Score Correctly Diagnose the Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States? Annals of Neurology 60 (6):744-745.score: 6.0
  42. Erik J. Kobylarz & Nicholas D. Schiff (2005). Neurophysiological Correlates of Persistent Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):323-332.score: 6.0
  43. Catherine Rodrigue, Richard J. Riopelle, James L. Bernat & Eric Racine (2013). Perspectives and Experience of Healthcare Professionals on Diagnosis, Prognosis, and End-of-Life Decision Making in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness. Neuroethics 6 (1):25-36.score: 6.0
    In the care of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC), some ethical difficulties stem from the challenges of accurate diagnosis and the uncertainty of prognosis. Current neuroimaging research on these disorders could eventually improve the accuracy of diagnoses and prognoses and therefore change the context of end-of-life decision making. However, the perspective of healthcare professionals on these disorders remains poorly understood and may constitute an obstacle to the integration of research. We conducted a qualitative study involving healthcare professionals from an (...)
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  44. Michele Farisco, Enrico Alleva, Flavia Chiarotti, Simone Macri & Carlo Petrini (2014). Clinicians' Attitudes Toward Patients with Disorders of Consciousness: A Survey. Neuroethics 7 (1):93-104.score: 6.0
    Notwithstanding fundamental methodological advancements, scientific information about disorders of consciousness (DOCs)—e.g. Vegetative State/Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (VS/UWS) and Minimally Conscious State (MCS)—is incomplete. The possibility to discriminate between different levels of consciousness in DOC states entails treatment strategies and ethical concerns. Here we attempted to investigate Italian clinicians’ and basic scientists’ opinions regarding some issues emerging from the care and the research on patients with DOCs. From our survey emerged that Italian physicians working with patients with DOCs give a central role (...)
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  45. Thomas Zoega Ramsoy Bernard J. Baars, Stan Franklin (2013). Global Workspace Dynamics: Cortical “Binding and Propagation” Enables Conscious Contents. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 6.0
    A global workspace is a hub of binding and propagation in a population of loosely coupled signaling elements. Global workspace (GW) architectures recruit many distributed, specialized agents to help resolve focal ambiguities. In the brain, conscious experiences may reflect a global workspace function. For animals the natural world is full of fitness-related ambiguities, suggesting a general adaptive pressure for brains to resolve focal ambiguities quickly and accurately. In humans and related species the cortico-thalamic (C-T) core is believed to underlie conscious (...)
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  46. Sabine Müller (2010). Revival der Hirntod-Debatte: Funktionelle Bildgebung für die Hirntod-Diagnostik. [REVIEW] Ethik in der Medizin 22 (1):5-17.score: 6.0
    Zum Hirntod werden zwei Fragen erneut kontrovers diskutiert: erstens, ob der Hirntod mit dem Tod gleichzusetzen ist, zweitens, wie man den Hirntod sicher diagnostiziert. Neue empirische Erkenntnisse erfordern eine neue Auseinandersetzung mit diesen Fragen: Erstens haben zahlreiche Studien ein längeres Überleben und die Integration von Körperfunktionen von hirntoten Patienten nachgewiesen. Der President's Council on Bioethics hat im Dezember 2008 eingestanden, dass die bisher vertretene Begründung für das Hirntodkriterium, nämlich die Annahme des engen zeitlichen und kausalen Zusammenhangs des Hirntodes und der (...)
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  47. Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.) (2010). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    The case of Terri Schiavo, a young woman who spent 15 years in a persistent vegetative state, has emerged as a watershed in debates over end-of-life care. While many observers had thought the right to refuse medical treatment was well established, this case split a family, divided a nation, and counfounded physicians, legislators, and many of the people they treated or represented. In renewing debates over the importance of advance directives, the appropriate role of artificial hydration and nutrition, and the (...)
     
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  48. Claudio Bassetti (2001). Disturbances of Consciousness and Sleep-Wake Functions. In Julien Bogousslavsky & Louis R. Caplan (eds.), Stroke Syndromes. Cambridge University Press. 192-210.score: 6.0
  49. Melanie Boly, Marie-Elisabeth E. Faymonville & Philippe Peigneux (2004). Auditory Processing in Severely Brain Injured Patients: Differences Between the Minimally Conscious State and the Persistent Vegetative State. Archives of Neurology 61 (2):233-238.score: 6.0
  50. Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) (2006). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.score: 6.0
     
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