Search results for '*Delayed Auditory Feedback' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Yasuki Hashimoto & Kuniyoshi L. Sakai (2003). Brain Activations During Conscious Self-Monitoring of Speech Production with Delayed Auditory Feedback: An fMRI Study. Human Brain Mapping 20 (1):22-28.
  2.  3
    John L. Bradshaw, Norman C. Nettleton & Gina Geffen (1972). Ear Asymmetry and Delayed Auditory Feedback: Effects of Task Requirements and Competitive Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (3):269.
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  3.  2
    Charles H. Williams & Gerald Frincke (1968). Effects of Delayed Auditory Feedback on Immediate and Delayed Recall and Recognition. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (2p1):267.
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  4.  3
    George M. Robinson (1972). The Delayed Auditory Feedback Effect is a Function of Speech Rate. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):1.
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  5.  1
    John L. Bradshaw, Norman C. Nettleton & Gina Geffen (1971). Ear Differences and Delayed Auditory Feedback: Effects on a Speech and a Music Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):85.
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  6. Aubrey J. Yates (1965). Effects of Delayed Auditory Feedback on Morse Transmission by Skilled Operators. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (5):467.
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  7.  3
    L. D. Roberts & A. H. Gregory (1973). Ear Differences and Delayed Auditory Feedback: Effect on a Simple Verbal Repetition Task and a Nonverbal Tapping Test. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (2):269.
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  8. I.-Fan Lin, Takemi Mochida, Kosuke Asada, Satsuki Ayaya, Shin-Ichiro Kumagaya & Masaharu Kato (2015). Atypical Delayed Auditory Feedback Effect and Lombard Effect on Speech Production in High-Functioning Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  9.  7
    Justin J. Couchman, Robertson Beasley & Peter Q. Pfordresher (2012). The Experience of Agency in Sequence Production with Altered Auditory Feedback. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):186-203.
    When speaking or producing music, people rely in part on auditory feedback – the sounds associated with the performed action. Three experiments investigated the degree to which alterations of auditory feedback during music performances influence the experience of agency and the possible link between agency and the disruptive effect of AAF on production. Participants performed short novel melodies from memory on a keyboard. Auditory feedback during performances was manipulated with respect to its pitch contents (...)
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  10.  8
    Richard Held, Aglaia Efstathiou & Martha Greene (1966). Adaptation to Displaced and Delayed Visual Feedback From the Hand. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (6):887.
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  11.  1
    Belkacem Abdelkader, Yoshimura Natsue, Shin Duk, Kambara Hiroyuki & Koike Yasuharu (2015). Real-Time Closed-Eye-Based Communication System Using EEG Sensors and Auditory Feedback. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  12.  4
    Robert G. Eason & Roberta Sadler (1977). Relationship Between Voluntary Control of Alpha Activity Level Through Auditory Feedback and Degree of Eye Convergence. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (1):21-24.
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  13. Felicia P.-H. Cheng, Michael Großbach & Eckart O. Altenmüller (2013). Altered Sensory Feedbacks in Pianist's Dystonia: The Altered Auditory Feedback Paradigm and the Glove Effect. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
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  14. Peter Q. Pfordresher & Robertson T. E. Beasley (2014). Making and Monitoring Errors Based on Altered Auditory Feedback. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  15.  1
    Mani Prakash & Pagavathigounder Balasubramaniam (forthcoming). Stability and Hopf Bifurcation Analysis of Novel Hyperchaotic System with Delayed Feedback Control. Complexity:n/a-n/a.
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  16.  8
    Lawrence Brancazio & Carol A. Fowler (2000). Merging Auditory and Visual Phonetic Information: A Critical Test for Feedback? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):327-328.
    The present description of the Merge model addresses only auditory, not audiovisual, speech perception. However, recent findings in the audiovisual domain are relevant to the model. We outline a test that we are conducting of the adequacy of Merge, modified to accept visual information about articulation.
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  17. Christian Kennel, Lukas Streese, Alexandra Pizzera, Christoph Justen, Tanja Hohmann & Markus Raab (2015). Auditory Reafferences: The Influence of Real-Time Feedback on Movement Control. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  18. Jing Wang, Hao Shen, Ju H. Park & Zheng-Guang Wu (2015). Finite-Timel2−L∞Synchronization for Discrete-Time Nonlinear Chaotic Systems Via Information-Constrained Delayed Feedback. Complexity 21 (1):138-146.
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  19.  5
    Andreas Thiel, Helmut Schwegler & Christian W. Eurich (2003). Complex Dynamics is Abolished in Delayed Recurrent Systems with Distributed Feedback Times. Complexity 8 (4):102-108.
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  20. Christin Kohrs, Nicole Angenstein, Henning Scheich & André Brechmann (2012). Human Striatum is Differentially Activated by Delayed, Omitted, and Immediate Registering Feedback. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
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  21.  13
    Jack A. Adams, Ernest T. Goetz & Phillip H. Marshall (1972). Response Feedback and Motor Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):391.
  22.  5
    Jack A. Adams, Philip H. Marshall & Ernest T. Goetz (1972). Response Feedback and Short-Term Motor Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (1):92.
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  23. John A. Dewey & Thomas H. Carr (2013). When Dyads Act in Parallel, a Sense of Agency for the Auditory Consequences Depends on the Order of the Actions. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):155-166.
    The sense of agency is the perception of willfully causing something to happen. Wegner and Wheatley proposed three prerequisites for SA: temporal contiguity between an action and its effect, congruence between predicted and observed effects, and exclusivity . We investigated how temporal contiguity, congruence, and the order of two human agents’ actions influenced SA on a task where participants rated feelings of self-agency for producing a tone. SA decreased when tone onsets were delayed, supporting contiguity as important, but the order (...)
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  24.  4
    Carlos Andres Trujillo (2007). Building Internal Strength, Sustainable Self-Esteem, and Inner Motivation as a Researcher. Journal of Research Practice 3 (1):Article M8.
    Having a “normal” professional job and doing research impose different social and personal connotations. These differences materialize at least in two clear ways. First, it is common that researchers in the making find it very difficult to communicate to their closest social network (e.g., family and old close friends) the content and the importance of their work, as they lose known sources of social comparison. Meanwhile, professional job titles (e.g., brand manager, auditor, lawyer) are self-explanatory, and they provide for the (...)
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  25.  7
    Giacomo Novembre & Peter E. Keller (2011). A Grammar of Action Generates Predictions in Skilled Musicians. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1232-1243.
    The present study investigates shared representations of syntactic knowledge in music and action. We examined whether expectancy violations in musical harmonic sequences are also perceived as violations of the movement sequences necessary to produce them. Pianists imitated silent videos showing one hand playing chord sequences on a muted keyboard. Results indicate that, despite the absence of auditory feedback, imitation of a chord is fastest when it is congruent with the preceding harmonic context. This suggests that the harmonic rules (...)
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  26. Wayne Wu & Raymond Cho (2013). Mechanisms of Auditory Verbal Hallucination in Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Schizophrenia 4.
    Recent work on the mechanisms underlying auditory verbal hallucination (AVH) has been heavily informed by self-monitoring accounts that postulate defects in an internal monitoring mechanism as the basis of AVH. A more neglected alternative is an account focusing on defects in auditory processing, namely a spontaneous activation account of auditory activity underlying AVH. Science is often aided by putting theories in competition. Accordingly, a discussion that systematically contrasts the two models of AVH can generate sharper questions that (...)
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  27.  24
    Sam Wilkinson (2014). Accounting for the Phenomenology and Varieties of Auditory Verbal Hallucination Within a Predictive Processing Framework. Consciousness and Cognition 30:142-155.
    Two challenges that face popular self-monitoring theories (SMTs) of auditory verbal hallucination (AVH) are that they cannot account for the auditory phenomenology of AVHs and that they cannot account for their variety. In this paper I show that both challenges can be met by adopting a predictive processing framework (PPF), and by viewing AVHs as arising from abnormalities in predictive processing. I show how, within the PPF, both the auditory phenomenology of AVHs, and three subtypes of AVH, (...)
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  28.  97
    Peter Langland-Hassan (2008). Fractured Phenomenologies: Thought Insertion, Inner Speech, and the Puzzle of Extraneity. Mind and Language 23 (4):369-401.
    Abstract: How it is that one's own thoughts can seem to be someone else's? After noting some common missteps of other approaches to this puzzle, I develop a novel cognitive solution, drawing on and critiquing theories that understand inserted thoughts and auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia as stemming from mismatches between predicted and actual sensory feedback. Considerable attention is paid to forging links between the first-person phenomenology of thought insertion and the posits (e.g. efference copy, corollary discharge) of (...)
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  29.  29
    Angela Woods, Nev Jones, Marco Bernini, Felicity Callard, Ben Alderson-Day, Johanna Badcock, Vaughn Bell, Chris Cook, Thomas Csordas, Clara Humpston, Joel Krueger, Frank Laroi, Simon McCarthy-Jones, Peter Moseley, Hilary Powell & Andrea Raballo (2014). Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Phenomenology of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations. Schizophrenia Bulletin 40:S246-S254.
    Despite the recent proliferation of scientific, clinical, and narrative accounts of auditory verbal hallucinations, the phenomenology of voice hearing remains opaque and undertheorized. In this article, we outline an interdisciplinary approach to understanding hallucinatory experiences which seeks to demonstrate the value of the humanities and social sciences to advancing knowledge in clinical research and practice. We argue that an interdisciplinary approach to the phenomenology of AVH utilizes rigorous and context-appropriate methodologies to analyze a wider range of first-person accounts of (...)
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  30. David Ellerman (2015). Why Delayed Choice Experiments Do NOT Imply Retrocausality. Quantum Studies: Mathematics and Foundations 2 (2):183-199.
    There is a fallacy that is often involved in the interpretation of quantum experiments involving a certain type of separation such as the: double-slit experiments, which-way interferometer experiments, polarization analyzer experiments, Stern-Gerlach experiments, and quantum eraser experiments. The fallacy leads not only to flawed textbook accounts of these experiments but to flawed inferences about retrocausality in the context of delayed choice versions of separation experiments.
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  31.  28
    Dennis Norris, James M. McQueen & Anne Cutler (2000). Merging Information in Speech Recognition: Feedback is Never Necessary. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):299-325.
    Top-down feedback does not benefit speech recognition; on the contrary, it can hinder it. No experimental data imply that feedback loops are required for speech recognition. Feedback is accordingly unnecessary and spoken word recognition is modular. To defend this thesis, we analyse lexical involvement in phonemic decision making. TRACE (McClelland & Elman 1986), a model with feedback from the lexicon to prelexical processes, is unable to account for all the available data on phonemic decision making. The (...)
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  32. R. H. Phaf & G. Wolters (1997). A Constructivist and Connectionist View on Conscious and Nonconscious Processes. Philosophical Psychology 10 (3):287-307.
    Recent experimental findings reveal dissociations of conscious and nonconscious performance in many fields of psychological research, suggesting that conscious and nonconscious effects result from qualitatively different processes. A connectionist view of these processes is put forward in which consciousness is the consequence of construction processes taking place in three types of working memory in a specific type of recurrent neural network. The recurrences arise by feeding back output to the input of a central (representational) network. They are assumed to be (...)
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  33.  43
    Dimitria Electra Gatzia & Berit Brogaard, Is the Auditory System Cognitively Penetrable? Multisensory Integration: Brain, Body, and the World.
    While much has been written about whether visual perception is cognitively penetrable, the analogous question with respect to auditory perception has received very little attention. Here we argue that instances of top-down modulation of auditory processing, although extensive, do not constitute cases of cognitive penetration of auditory perception since the changes in the phenomenology of auditory perception caused by top-down influences cannot plausibly be attributed to the listeners’ discursive thoughts.
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  34. Matthias Egg (2013). Delayed-Choice Experiments and the Metaphysics of Entanglement. Foundations of Physics 43 (9):1124-1135.
    Delayed-choice experiments in quantum mechanics are often taken to undermine a realistic interpretation of the quantum state. More specifically, Healey has recently argued that the phenomenon of delayed-choice entanglement swapping is incompatible with the view that entanglement is a physical relation between quantum systems. This paper argues against these claims. It first reviews two paradigmatic delayed-choice experiments and analyzes their metaphysical implications. It then applies the results of this analysis to the case of entanglement swapping, showing that such experiments pose (...)
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  35. F. Herbut (2010). On EPR-Type Entanglement in the Experiments of Scully Et Al. II. Insight in the Real Random Delayed-Choice Erasure Experiment. Foundations of Physics 40 (3):301-312.
    It was pointed out in the first part of this study (Herbut in Found. Phys. 38:1046–1064, 2008) that EPR-type entanglement is defined by the possibility of performing any of two mutually incompatible distant, i.e., direct-interaction-free, measurements. They go together under the term ‘EPR-type disentanglement’. In this second part, quantum-mechanical insight is gained in the real random delayed-choice erasure experiment of Kim et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 84:1–5, 2000) by a relative-reality-of-unitarily-evolving-state (RRUES) approach (explained in the first part). Finally, it is (...)
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  36.  70
    F. Herbut (2008). On EPR-Type Entanglement in the Experiments of Scully Et Al. I. The Micromaser Case and Delayed-Choice Quantum Erasure. Foundations of Physics 38 (11):1046-1064.
    Delayed-choice erasure is investigated in two-photon two-slit experiments that are generalizations of the micromaser experiment of Scully et al. (Nature 351:111–116, 1991). Applying quantum mechanics to the localization detector, it is shown that erasure with delayed choice in the sense of Scully, has an analogous structure as simple erasure. The description goes beyond probabilities. The EPR-type disentanglement, consisting in two mutually incompatible distant measurements, is used as a general framework in both parts of this study. Two simple coherence cases are (...)
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  37.  6
    Jana Speth, Trevor A. Harley & Clemens Speth (2016). Auditory Verbal Experience and Agency in Waking, Sleep Onset, REM, and Non‐REM Sleep. Cognitive Science 40 (6).
    We present one of the first quantitative studies on auditory verbal experiences and auditory verbal agency voices or characters”) in healthy participants across states of consciousness. Tools of quantitative linguistic analysis were used to measure participants’ implicit knowledge of auditory verbal experiences and auditory verbal agencies, displayed in mentation reports from four different states. Analysis was conducted on a total of 569 mentation reports from rapid eye movement sleep, non-REM sleep, sleep onset, and waking. Physiology was (...)
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  38.  12
    Simon McCarthy-Jones, Joel Krueger, Matthew Broome & Charles Fernyhough (2013). Stop, Look, Listen: The Need for Philosophical Phenomenological Perspectives on Auditory Verbal Hallucinations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7 (127):1-9.
    One of the leading cognitive models of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) proposes such experiences result from a disturbance in the process by which inner speech is attributed to the self. Research in this area has, however, proceeded in the absence of thorough cognitive and phenomenological investigations of the nature of inner speech, against which AVHs are implicitly or explicitly defined. In this paper we begin by introducing philosophical phenomenology and highlighting its relevance to AVHs, before briefly examining the evolving (...)
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  39.  32
    Simon R. Jones, Charles Fernyhough & Frank Larøi (2010). A Phenomenological Survey of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in the Hypnagogic and Hypnopompic States. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):213-224.
    The phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations occurring in hypnagogic and hypnopompic states has received little attention. In a sample of healthy participants, 108 participants reported H&H AVHs and answered subsequent questions on their phenomenology. AVHs in the H&H state were found to be more likely to only feature the occasional clear word than to be clear, to be more likely to be one-off voices than to be recurrent voices, to be more likely to be voices of people known to (...)
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  40.  21
    J. P. Maxwell, R. S. W. Masters & F. F. Eves (2003). The Role of Working Memory in Motor Learning and Performance. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):376-402.
    Three experiments explore the role of working memory in motor skill acquisition and performance. Traditional theories postulate that skill acquisition proceeds through stages of knowing, which are initially declarative but later procedural. The reported experiments challenge that view and support an independent, parallel processing model, which predicts that procedural and declarative knowledge can be acquired separately and that the former does not depend on the availability of working memory, whereas, the latter does. The behaviour of these two processes was manipulated (...)
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  41.  31
    George Wu (1999). Anxiety and Decision Making with Delayed Resolution of Uncertainty. Theory and Decision 46 (2):159-199.
    In many real-world gambles, a non-trivial amount of time passes before the uncertainty is resolved but after a choice is made. An individual may have a preference between gambles with identical probability distributions over final outcomes if they differ in the timing of resolution of uncertainty. In this domain, utility consists not only of the consumption of outcomes, but also the psychological utility induced by an unresolved gamble. We term this utility anxiety. Since a reflective decision maker may want to (...)
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  42.  7
    Andy Lamey (2015). Video Feedback in Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 46 (4-5):691-702.
    Marginal comments on student essays are a near-universal method of providing feedback in philosophy. Widespread as the practice is, however, it has well-known drawbacks. Commenting on students' work in the form of a video has the potential to improve the feedback experience for both instructors and students. The advantages of video feedback can be seen by examining it from both the professor's and the student's perspective. In discussing the professor's perspective, this article shares observations based on the (...)
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  43.  14
    Sarah C. Creel (2016). Ups and Downs in Auditory Development: Preschoolers’ Sensitivity to Pitch Contour and Timbre. Cognitive Science 40 (2):373-403.
    Much research has explored developing sound representations in language, but less work addresses developing representations of other sound patterns. This study examined preschool children's musical representations using two different tasks: discrimination and sound–picture association. Melodic contour—a musically relevant property—and instrumental timbre, which is less musically relevant, were tested. In Experiment 1, children failed to associate cartoon characters to melodies with maximally different pitch contours, with no advantage for melody preexposure. Experiment 2 also used different-contour melodies and found good discrimination, whereas (...)
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  44.  6
    H. Fearn (2016). A Delayed Choice Quantum Eraser Explained by the Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 46 (1):44-69.
    This paper explains the delayed choice quantum eraser of Kim et al. in terms of the transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics by Cramer. It is kept deliberately mathematically simple to help explain the transactional technique. The emphasis is on a clear understanding of how the instantaneous “collapse” of the wave function due to a measurement at a specific time and place may be reinterpreted as a relativistically well-defined collapse over the entire path of the photon and over the entire transit (...)
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  45.  11
    Brenda R. J. Jansen, Maartje E. J. Raijmakers & Ingmar Visser (2007). Rule Transition on the Balance Scale Task: A Case Study in Belief Change. Synthese 155 (2):211 - 236.
    For various domains in proportional reasoning cognitive development is characterized as a progression through a series of increasingly complex rules. A multiplicative relationship between two task features, such as weight and distance information of blocks placed at both sides of the fulcrum of a balance scale, appears difficult to discover. During development, children change their beliefs about the balance scale several times: from a focus on the weight dimension (Rule I) to occasionally considering the distance dimension (Rule II), guessing (Rule (...)
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  46.  56
    Helge Malmgren, Why the Past is Sometimes Perceived, and Not Only Remembered. Philosophical Communications.
    This paper first advances and discusses the hypothesis that so-called “iconic” or (for the auditory sphere) “echoic” memory is actually a form of perception of the past. Such perception is made possible by parallel inputs with differential delays which feed independently into the sensorium. This hypothesis goes well together with a set of related psychological and phenomenological facts, as for example: Sperling’s results about the visual sensory buffer, the facts that we seem to see movement and hear temporal Gestalts, (...)
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  47.  36
    Elise Springer (2008). Moral Feedback and Motivation: Revisiting the Undermining Effect. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (4):407 - 423.
    Social psychologists have evidence that evaluative feedback on others’ choices sometimes has unwelcome negative effects on hearers’ motivation. Holroyd’s article (Holroyd J. Ethical Theory Moral Pract 10:267–278, 2007) draws attention to one such result, the undermining effect, that should help to challenge moral philosophers’ complacency about blame and praise. The cause for concern is actually greater than she indicates, both because there are multiple kinds of negative effect on hearer motivation, and because these are not, as she hopes, reliably (...)
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  48.  14
    M. Bahrami & A. Shafiee (2010). Postponing the Past: An Operational Analysis of Delayed-Choice Experiments. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 40 (1):55-92.
    The prominent characteristic of a delayed-choice effect is to make the choice between complementary types of phenomena after the relevant interaction between the system and measuring instrument has already come to an end. In this paper, we first represent a detailed comparative analysis of some early delayed-choice propositions and also most of the experimentally performed delayed-choice proposals in a coherent and unified quantum mechanical formulation. Taking into the account the represented quantum mechanical descriptions and also the rules of probability theory, (...)
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  49.  3
    Umberto Viaro (2016). Feedback Models of Two Classical Philosophical Positions and a Semantic Problem. Foundations of Science 21 (3):533-542.
    The notion of feedback has been exploited with considerable success in scientific and technological fields as well as in the sciences of man and society. Its use in philosophical, cultural and educational contexts, however, is still rather meagre, even if some notable attempts can be found in the literature. This paper shows that the feedback concept can help learn and understand some classical philosophical theories. In particular, attention focuses on Fichte’s doctrine of science, usually presented in obscure terms (...)
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  50. P. J., W. S. & F. F. (2003). The Role of Working Memory in Motor Learning and Performance. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):376-402.
    Three experiments explore the role of working memory in motor skill acquisition and performance. Traditional theories postulate that skill acquisition proceeds through stages of knowing, which are initially declarative but later procedural. The reported experiments challenge that view and support an independent, parallel processing model, which predicts that procedural and declarative knowledge can be acquired separately and that the former does not depend on the availability of working memory, whereas, the latter does. The behaviour of these two processes was manipulated (...)
     
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