Search results for '*Dissociation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  62
    Luis M. Augusto (2016). Lost in Dissociation: The Main Paradigms in Unconscious Cognition. Consciousness and Cognition 42:293-310.
    Contemporary studies in unconscious cognition are essentially founded on dissociation, i.e., on how it dissociates with respect to conscious mental processes and representations. This is claimed to be in so many and diverse ways that one is often lost in dissociation. In order to reduce this state of confusion we here carry out two major tasks: based on the central distinction between cognitive processes and representations, we identify and isolate the main dissociation paradigms; we then critically analyze their key tenets (...)
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  2.  30
    Yochai Ataria (2015). Dissociation During Trauma: The Ownership-Agency Tradeoff Model. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):1037-1053.
    Dissociation during trauma lacks an adequate definition. Using data obtained from interviews with 36 posttraumatic individuals conducted according to the phenomenological approach, this paper seeks to improve our understanding of this phenomenon. In particular, it suggesting a trade off model depicting the balance between the sense of agency and the sense of ownership : a reciprocal relationship appears to exist between these two, and in order to enable control of the body during trauma the sense of ownership must decrease. When (...)
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  3.  35
    Michael Snodgrass (2004). The Dissociation Paradigm and its Discontents: How Can Unconscious Perception or Memory Be Inferred? Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):107-116.
    Erdelyi does us all a great service by his customarily incisive discussion of the various ways in which our field tends to neglect, confuse, and misunderstand numerous critical issues in attempting to differentiate conscious from unconscious perception and memory. Although no single commentary could hope to comprehensively assess these issues, I will address Erdelyi’s three main points: How the dissociation paradigm can be used to validly infer unconscious perception; The implications of below-chance effects; and The role of time. I suggest (...)
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  4.  10
    M. A. Van Rees (2006). Strategic Maneuvering with Dissociation. Argumentation 20 (4):473-487.
    This paper explores the possibilities for strategic maneuvering of the argumentative technique that Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca (The New Rhetoric. A Treatise on Argumentation, University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame/London, 1969) called dissociation. After an exploration of the general possibilities that dissociation may have for enhancing critical reasonableness and rhetorical effectiveness, the use of dissociation in the successive stages of a critical discussion is examined. For each stage, first, the dialectical moves that dissociation can be employed in are specified, then, (...)
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  5.  23
    Joan Lesley (2006). Awareness is Relative: Dissociation as the Organisation of Meaning. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):593-604.
    This essay discusses how the organisation of mental material within the cognitive system can influence consciousness and awareness, and presents a theory of dissociation based on the premise that awareness is relative, contingent on the activated representation of the ongoing event being linked to the activated self-representation. It allows four possible variations of integration: non-integrated experience—perceptions about an object/event are either not perceived or they remain at the sensory level: traditional dissociative states, amnesia, depersonalisation etc; variably integrated experience—activation of information (...)
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  6.  10
    Chiara Degano (2007). Dissociation and Presupposition in Discourse: A Corpus Study. [REVIEW] Argumentation 21 (4):361-378.
    This paper aims at combining different theoretical and methodological approaches for the analysis of discourse, focusing in particular on argumentative structures. At a first level an attempt is made to include argumentation in critical discourse analysis in order to extend the analysis of interaction between “structures of discourse” and “structures of ideologies” (T. A. van Dijk, R. Wodak and M. Meyer (eds.), Methods of Critical Discourse Analysis. Sage, London, 1995) to higher levels of language description. At a second level the (...)
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  7. E. Ladavas, Anna Berti & A. Farne (2000). Dissociation Between Conscious and Non-Conscious Processing in Neglect. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins 175-193.
  8. Madan M. Bhalla & D. Proffitt (2000). Geographical Slant Perception: Dissociation and Coordination Between Explicit Awareness and Visually Guided Actions. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins
  9.  41
    Thomas Schmidt & Dirk Vorberg (2006). Criteria for Unconscious Cognition: Three Types of Dissociation. Perception and Psychophysics 68 (3):489-504.
  10.  19
    Juha Silvanto, Nilli Lavie & Vincent Walsh (2005). Double Dissociation of V1 and V5/MT Activity in Visual Awareness. Cerebral Cortex 15 (11):1736-1741.
  11. Eyal M. Reingold (2004). Unconscious Perception and the Classic Dissociation Paradigm: A New Angle? Perception and Psychophysics 66 (5):882-887.
  12.  92
    Axel Cleeremans (ed.) (2003). The Unity of Consciousness: Binding, Integration, and Dissociation. Oxford University Press.
    Consciousness has many elements, from sensory experiences such as vision and bodily sensation, to nonsensory aspects such as memory and thought. All are presented as experiences of a single subject, and all seem to be contained within a unified field of experience. This unity raises many questions: How do diverse systems in the brain co-operate to produce a unified experience? Are there conditions under which this unity breaks down? Is conscious experience really unified at all? Such questions are addressed in (...)
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  13.  17
    Rebecca Seligman (2005). Distress, Dissociation, and Embodied Experience: Reconsidering the Pathways to Mediumship and Mental Health. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 33 (1):71-99.
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  14.  8
    Christopher Dana Lynn (2005). Adaptive and Maladaptive Dissociation: An Epidemiological and Anthropological Comparison and Proposition for an Expanded Dissociation Model. Anthropology of Consciousness 16 (2):16-49.
  15.  16
    Hamish J. McLeod, Mitchell K. Byrne & Rachel Aitken (2004). Automatism and Dissociation: Disturbances of Consciousness and Volition From a Psychological Perspective. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 27 (5):471-487.
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  16.  2
    L. E. Travis (1922). Studies in Dissociation. 1. Changes in the Auditory Threshold Induced by "Crystal Gazing.". Journal of Experimental Psychology 5 (5):338.
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  17. Jody M. Davies (2001). Back to the Future in Psychoanalysis: Trauma, Dissociation, and the Nature of Unconscious Processes. In Muriel Dimen & Adrienne Harris (eds.), Storms in Her Head: Freud and the Construction of Hysteria. Other Press 245-264.
     
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  18. Claire M. Karam (2003). Rethinking Dissociation As an Altered State of Consciousness: An Exploration of Altered State Encounters in Imaginal Space and Beyond. Dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute
     
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  19. Sue-Ellen Brown & Aaron Katcher (2001). Pet Attachment and Dissociation. Society and Animals 9 (1):25-41.
    This study replicated the co-existence of dissociation and pet attachment in 113 female veterinary technician students based on a bivariate correlation analysis and chi-square analysis of their responses to the 28-question Dissociative Experiences Scale and an eight-question "pet" attachment questionnaire.The study replicated the positive correlation between pet attachment and dissociation first reported by Brown & Katcher . Also replicated was the finding that significantly more with the highest pet attachment had clinical levels of dissociation than did those with lower attachment. (...)
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  20. Donnel B. Stern (2015). Unformulated Experience: From Dissociation to Imagination in Psychoanalysis. Routledge.
    In this powerful and wonderfully accessible meditation on psychoanalysis, hermeneutics, and social constructivism, Donnel Stern explores the relationship between two fundamental kinds of experience: explicit verbal reflection and "unformulated experience," or experience we have not yet reflected on and put into words. Stern is especially concerned with the process by which we come to formulate the unformulated. It is not an instrumental task, he holds, but one that requires openness and curiosity; the result of the process is not accuracy alone, (...)
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  21. Sue-Ellen Brown & Aaron H. Katcher (2001). Pet Attachment and Dissociation. Society and Animals 9 (1):25-41.
    This study replicated the co-existence of dissociation and pet attachment in 113 female veterinary technician students based on a bivariate correlation analysis and chi-square analysis of their responses to the 28-question Dissociative Experiences Scale and an eight-question "pet" attachment questionnaire.The study replicated the positive correlation between pet attachment and dissociation first reported by Brown & Katcher . Also replicated was the finding that significantly more with the highest pet attachment had clinical levels of dissociation than did those with lower attachment. (...)
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  22.  31
    Zoltán Dienes, Elizabeth Brown, Sam Hutton, Irving Kirsch, Giuliana Mazzoni & Daniel B. Wright (2009). Hypnotic Suggestibility, Cognitive Inhibition, and Dissociation. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):837-847.
    We examined two potential correlates of hypnotic suggestibility: dissociation and cognitive inhibition. Dissociation is the foundation of two of the major theories of hypnosis and other theories commonly postulate that hypnotic responding is a result of attentional abilities . Participants were administered the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C. Under the guise of an unrelated study, 180 of these participants also completed: a version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale that is normally distributed in non-clinical populations; a latent inhibition (...)
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  23.  79
    Martin Davies (2010). Double Dissociation: Understanding its Role in Cognitive Neuropsychology. Mind and Language 25 (5):500-540.
    The paper makes three points about the role of double dissociation in cognitive neuropsychology. First, arguments from double dissociation to separate modules work by inference to the best, not the only possible, explanation. Second, in the development of computational cognitive neuropsychology, the contribution of connectionist cognitive science has been to broaden the range of potential explanations of double dissociation. As a result, the competition between explanations, and the characteristic features of the assessment of theories against the criteria of probability and (...)
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  24.  3
    Joshua Knox & Steven Jay Lynn (2014). Sleep Experiences, Dissociation, Imaginal Experiences, and Schizotypy: The Role of Context. Consciousness and Cognition 23 (4):22-31.
    Watson reported moderate correlations between the Iowa Sleep Experience Survey and self-report measures of dissociation and schizotypy. Subsequent investigations reported similar, although somewhat more modest, correlations between the ISES and measures of dissociation and schizotypy, as well as with measures of absorption and negative affect. The present study tested subjects in conditions in which the measures of sleep experiences were administered with other measures in either the same or a different test context. We determined that sleep experiences were associated with (...)
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  25.  50
    Petr Bob & George A. Mashour (2011). Schizophrenia, Dissociation, and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1042-1049.
    Current thinking suggests that dissociation could be a significant comorbid diagnosis in a proportion of schizophrenic patients with a history of trauma. This potentially may explain the term “schizophrenia” in its original definition by Bleuler, as influenced by his clinical experience and personal view. Additionally, recent findings suggest a partial overlap between dissociative symptoms and the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, which could be explained by inhibitory deficits. In this context, the process of dissociation could serve as an important conceptual framework (...)
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  26.  20
    David Marcusson-Clavertz, Devin B. Terhune & Etzel Cardeña (2012). Individual Differences and State Effects on Mind-Wandering: Hypnotizability, Dissociation, and Sensory Homogenization. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1097-1108.
    Consciousness alterations can be experienced during unstructured, monotonous stimuli. These effects have not been linked to particular cognitive operations; individual differences in response to such stimulation remain poorly understood. We examined the role of hypnotizability and dissociative tendencies in mind-wandering during a sensory homogenization procedure . We expected that the influence of ganzfeld on MW would be more pronounced among highly hypnotizable individuals , particularly those high in dissociative tendencies. High and low hypnotizables, also stratified by dissociation, completed the sustained (...)
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  27. Jeanette Kennett & Steve Matthews (2003). Delusion, Dissociation and Identity. Philosophical Explorations 6 (1):31-49.
    The condition known as Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) or Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is metaphysically strange. Can there really be several distinct persons operating in a single body? Our view is that DID sufferers are single persons with a severe mental disorder. In this paper we compare the phenomenology of dissociation between personality states in DID with certain delusional disorders. We argue both that the burden of proof must lie with those who defend the metaphysically extravagant Multiple Persons view and (...)
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  28.  9
    Steve Joordens, Daryl E. Wilson, Thomas M. Spalek & Dwayne E. Paré (2010). Turning the Process-Dissociation Procedure Inside-Out: A New Technique for Understanding the Relation Between Conscious and Unconscious Influences. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):270-280.
    While there is now general agreement that memory gives rise to both conscious and unconscious influences, there remains disagreement concerning the process architecture underlying these distinct influences. Do they arise from independent underlying systems or from systems that are interactive ? In the current paper we present a novel “inside-out” technique that can be used with the process-dissociation paradigm to arrive at more concrete conclusions concerning this central question and demonstrate this technique via a meta-analysis of currently published findings. Our (...)
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  29.  2
    Chris R. Brewin, Belinda Yt Ma & Jessica Colson (2013). Effects of Experimentally Induced Dissociation on Attention and Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):315-323.
    Dissociation is an important aspect of responses to traumatic events. According to a number of influential theories, it negatively impacts cognitive performance including encoding of the trauma memories, leading to an increased risk of later conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder . We tested this hypothesis experimentally in two studies by inducing dissociation in the laboratory and investigating the effects on several aspects of cognition, including time estimation, digit and spatial span, and story recall. Dissociation was related to decrements in (...)
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  30.  26
    P. Bob (2008). Pain, Dissociation and Subliminal Self-Representations. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):355-369.
    According to recent evidence, neurophysiological processes coupled to pain are closely related to the mechanisms of consciousness. This evidence is in accordance with findings that changes in states of consciousness during hypnosis or traumatic dissociation strongly affect conscious perception and experience of pain, and markedly influence brain functions. Past research indicates that painful experience may induce dissociated state and information about the experience may be stored or processed unconsciously. Reported findings suggest common neurophysiological mechanisms of pain and dissociation and point (...)
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  31.  39
    Ernest R. Hilgard (1992). Divided Consciousness and Dissociation. Consciousness and Cognition 1 (1):16-31.
    The well-known behaviorist revolt against consciousness is largely in the past, although that does not mean that the new interest in consciousness is without many unsolved problems. Cognitive psychology, as an alternative, is not necessarily a consciousness psychology, and humanistic psychology, friendly to consciousness, has difficulty in maintaining scientific status. One approach to consciousness is by way of dissociation, the phenomena of which can be found in everyday experience but can be studied in more detail through hypnosis. One aspect of (...)
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  32.  5
    Bernard Baars (2003). The Double Life of BF Skinner: Inner Conflict, Dissociation and the Scientific Taboo Against Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (1):5-25.
    B.F. Skinner was the voice of radical behaviourism for some five decades, fighting relentlessly against consciousness as a scientific question. While in public he always argued the case for behaviourism, in fact Skinner was deeply at odds with himself, as he reveals in several books. Surprisingly, as a college student he was deeply interested in becoming a stream-of-consciousness novelist. When that ambition failed, he reacted with a radical rejection of the conscious life. Decades later Skinner's inner struggle still continued, as (...)
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  33.  5
    Kieron OConnor & Frederick Aardema (2012). Living in a Bubble Dissociation, Relational Consciousness, and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (7-8):7-8.
    Obsessive compulsive disorder is a debilitating psychiatric condition where people become obsessed by remotely possible harm, error, bad luck, and compulsively repeat mental or behavioural rituals to neutralize these possibilities. This tendency to draw inferences on the basis of remote rather than more likely possibilities is termed 'inferential confusion' and can lead to immersion in possible worlds accompanied by feelings of dissociation between: knowing and doing, imagination and reality, and authentic and inauthentic self. These dissociation experiences in OCD may inform (...)
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  34.  10
    Shaun Gallagher & Jonathan Cole (2011). Dissociation in Self-Narrative. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):149-155.
    We review different analytic approaches to narratives by those with psychopathological conditions, and we suggest that the interpretation of such narratives are complicated by a variety of phenomenological and hermeneutical considerations. We summarize an empirical study of narrative distance in narratives by non-pathological subjects, and discuss how the results can be interpreted in two different ways with regard to the issue of dissociation.
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  35.  11
    S. LO & S. YEH (2008). Dissociation of Processing Time and Awareness by the Inattentional Blindness Paradigm☆. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1169-1180.
    Consciousness researchers are interested in distinguishing between mental activity that occurs with and without awareness . The inattentional blindness paradigm is an excellent tool for this question because it permits the independent manipulation of processing time and awareness. In the present study, we show that implicit texture segregation can occur during inattentional blindness, provided that the texture is exposed for a sufficient duration. In contrast, a Simon effect does not occur during inattentional blindness, even with similar exposure duration of the (...)
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  36.  8
    S. LO & S. YEH (2008). Dissociation of Processing Time and Awareness by the Inattentional Blindness Paradigm☆. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1169-1180.
    Consciousness researchers are interested in distinguishing between mental activity that occurs with and without awareness . The inattentional blindness paradigm is an excellent tool for this question because it permits the independent manipulation of processing time and awareness. In the present study, we show that implicit texture segregation can occur during inattentional blindness, provided that the texture is exposed for a sufficient duration. In contrast, a Simon effect does not occur during inattentional blindness, even with similar exposure duration of the (...)
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  37.  5
    Eyal M. Reingold (1995). Facilitation and Interference in Indirect/Implicit Memory Tests and in the Process Dissociation Paradigm: The Letter Insertion and the Letter Deletion Tasks. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (4):459-482.
    This paper introduced the letter insertion and letter deletion tasks. In these tasks participants are presented with letter strings and are instructed to insert or delete a letter to create a word. Experiment 1 demonstrated facilitation priming and established these tasks as sensitive indirect measures of memory. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrated interference priming effects. In Experiment 4 the process dissociation paradigm was applied to investigate the contributions of automatic and consciously controlled processes to performance on the letter insertion task. (...)
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  38.  29
    Eyal Reingold (1996). Response Bias Correction in the Process Dissociation Procedure: A Reevaluation? Consciousness and Cognition 5 (4):595-603.
    A Buchner and E. Erdfelder (this volume) provide a commentary on our analysis of response bias correction in the process dissociation procedure. Unfortunately, this commentary fails to address the substantive issues that were raised in M. J. Wainwright and E. M. Reingold (1996). In the present article, we attempt to clarify some of their misrepresentations and the inconsistency inherent in their position. ©1996 Academic Press..
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  39.  72
    Louis Tinnin (1990). Mental Unity, Altered States of Consciousness, and Dissociation. Dissociation 3:154-59.
  40.  3
    Axel Buchner & Edgar Erdfelder (1996). On Assumptions of, Relations Between, and Evaluations of Some Process Dissociation Measurement Models. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (4):581-594.
    In this article, we analyze both M. J. Wainwright and E. M. Reingold's view of the process dissociation measurement models presented by A. Buchner, E. Erdfelder, and B. Vaterrodt-Plunnecke and their suggestions on that topic. This analysis reveals a number of problems in Wainwright and Reingold's approach. Some of these problems are more subtle than others, but they are nevertheless consequential. Thus, researchers working with the process dissociation procedure should be aware of these problems.
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  41.  16
    Sean J. Mcgrath (2014). The Psychology of Productive Dissociation, or What Would Schellingian Psychotherapy Look Like? Comparative and Continental Philosophy 6 (1):35-48.
    Schelling has been exploited for a variety of psychoanalytical projects, from Marquard’s revision of Freud, to various readings of Jung, to Žižek’s interpretation of Lacan. What we have not seen is an elaboration of the psycho-therapeutical implications of Schelling’s metaphysics on its own terms. What we find when we read Schelling as metapsychologist is a nonpathologizing theory of dissociation. Like anything that lives, the psyche dissociates for the sake of growth. The law of productive dissociation is the source of psyche’s (...)
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  42.  9
    P. Jaskowski & R. Verleger (2000). Attentional Bias Toward Low-Intensity Stimuli: An Explanation for the Intensity Dissociation Between Reaction Time and Temporal Order Judgment? Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):435-456.
    If two stimuli need different times to be processed, this difference should in principle be reflected both by response times (RT) and by judgments of their temporal order (TOJ). However, several dissociations have been reported between RT and TOJ, e.g., RT is more affected than TOJ when stimulus intensity decreases. One account for these dissociations is to assume differences in the allocation of attention induced by the two tasks. To test this hypothesis, different distributions of attention were induced in the (...)
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  43.  23
    Judy S. DeLoache (2004). Scale Errors by Very Young Children: A Dissociation Between Action Planning and Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):32-33.
    Very young children occasionally commit scale errors, which involve a dramatic dissociation between planning and control: A child's visual representation of the size of a miniature object is not used in planning an action on it, but is used in the control of the action. Glover's planning–control model offers a very useful framework for analyzing this newly documented phenomenon.
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  44.  7
    Jeffrey P. Toth, Brian Levine, Donald T. Stuss, Alfred Oh, Gordon Winocur & Nachshon Meiran (1995). Dissociation of Processes Underlying Spatial S-R Compatibility: Evidence for the Independent Influence of What and Where. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (4):483-501.
    The process-dissociation procedure was used to estimate the influence of spatial and form-based processing in the Simon task. Subjects made manual responses to the direction of arrows . The results provide evidence that the form and spatial location of a single stimulus can have functionally independent effects on performance. They also indicate the existence of two kinds of automaticity—an associative component that reflects prior S-R mappings and a nonassociative component that reflects the correspondence between stimulus and response codes.
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  45.  27
    Giordana Grossi (1999). Which Phonology? Evidence for a Dissociation Between Articulatory and Auditory Phonology From Word-Form Deafness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):290-291.
    Pulvermüller's Hebbian model implies that an impairment in the word form system will affect phonological articulation and phonological comprehension, because there is only a single representation. Clinical evidence from patients with word-form deafness demonstrates a dissociation between input and output phonologies. These data suggest that auditory comprehension and articulatory production depend on discrete phonological representations localized in different cortical networks.
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  46.  2
    Nelson Cowan (1996). Can We Resolve Contradictions Between Process Dissociation Models? Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):255-259.
    Wainwright and Reingold presented equations for various versions of the process dissociation procedure that has been used to separate conscious and unconscious memory processes. In the present reply it is suggested that these equations, though helpful, may not capture some of the key theoretical possibilities that could help to resolve apparent contradictions and paradoxes in the empirical literature. Specifically, there could be an independence ofprocessesthat might be estimated to a sufficient degree of accuracy for some theoretical purposes despite a violation (...)
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  47.  23
    John Morton (2004). Differentiating Dissociation and Repression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):670-671.
    Now that consciousness is thoroughly out of the way, we can focus more precisely on the kinds of things that can happen underneath. A contrast can be made between dissociation and repression. Dissociation is where a memory record or set of autobiographical memory records cannot be retrieved; repression is where there is retrieval of a record but, because of the current task specification, the contents of the record, though entering into current processing, are not allowed into consciousness. I look at (...)
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  48.  22
    Rosemary Varley (2007). Plasticity in High-Order Cognition: Evidence of Dissociation in Aphasia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):171-172.
    High-order constructs such as intelligence result from the interaction of numerous processing systems, one of which is language. However, in determining the role of language in intelligence, attention must be paid to evidence from lesion studies and, in particular, evidence of dissociation of functions where high-order cognition can be demonstrated in face of profound aphasia.
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  49.  3
    John F. Kihlstrom & Irene P. Hoyt (1990). Repression, Dissociation, and Hypnosis. In Jerome L. Singer (ed.), Repression and Dissociation. University of Chicago Press 181--208.
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  50.  8
    Carlos S. Alvarado & Stanley Krippner (2010). Nineteenth Century Pioneers in the Study of Dissociation: William James and Psychical Research. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (11-12):11-12.
    Following recent trends in the historiography of psychology and psychiatry we argue that psychical research was an important influence in the development of concepts about dissociation. To illustrate this point, we discuss American psychologist and philosopher William James's writings about mediumship, secondary personalities, and hypnosis. Some of James's work on the topic took place in the context of research conducted by the American Society for Psychical Research, such as his early work with the medium Leonora E. Piper . James Following (...)
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