Search results for '*Distraction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Marder (2012). Phenomenology of Distraction, or Attention in the Fissuring of Time and Space. Research in Phenomenology 41 (3):396-419.score: 16.0
    The goal of “Phenomenology of Distraction“ is to explore the imbrication of attention and distraction within existential spatiality and temporality. First, I juxtapose the Heideggerian dispersion of concern (which includes, among other things, the attentive comportment) in everyday life, conceived as a way to get distracted from one's impending mortality, to Fernando Pessoa's embracing of the inauthentic, superficial, and restless existence, where attention necessarily reverts into distraction. Second, I consider the philosophical confessions of St. Augustine and Jean-Jacques Rousseau as evidence (...)
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  2. Paul North (2011). The Problem of Distraction. Stanford University Press.score: 16.0
    The demand for a cause : not-always-thinking -- A face for distraction -- Kafka (diaspora) -- Heidegger (dissipation) -- Benjamin (entertainment) -- Epilogue : distraction and politics.
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  3. Sophie Forster (2013). Distraction and Mind-Wandering Under Load. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 16.0
    Attention research over the last several decades has provided rich insights into the determinants of distraction, including distractor characteristics, task features and individual differences. Load Theory represented a particularly important breakthrough, highlighting the critical role of the level and nature of task load in determining both the efficiency of distractor rejection and the stage of processing at which this occurs. However, until recently studies of distraction were restricted to those measuring rather specific forms of distraction by external stimuli which I (...)
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  4. Jesper Aagaard (forthcoming). Media Multitasking, Attention, and Distraction: A Critical Discussion. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-12.score: 14.0
    Students often multitask with technologies such as computers, laptops, tablets and smartphones during class. Unfortunately, numerous empirical studies firmly establish a significant drop in academic performance caused by this media multitasking. In this paper it is argued that cognitive studies may have clarified the negative consequences of this activity, yet they struggle to address the processes involved in it. A cognitive characterization of attention as a mental phenomenon neglects the interaction between bodies and technologies, and it is suggested that a (...)
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  5. Robert E. Murphy (1959). Effects of Threat of Shock, Distraction, and Task Design on Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (2):134.score: 14.0
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  6. S. Heim, A. A. Benasich & A. Keil (2012). Distraction by Emotion in Early Adolescence: Affective Facilitation and Interference During the Attentional Blink. Frontiers in Psychology 4:580-580.score: 14.0
    This study examined the extent to which early adolescents (aged 10 to 13 years) differ from adults in their sensitivity to attention capture by affective stimuli during rapid processing. A rapid serial visual presentation paradigm (RSVP) was implemented as a dual task, requiring the report of two green target stimuli embedded in a stream of distractors. Known as the “attentional blink” (AB), task performance is typically impaired when the first and second targets (T1 and T2, respectively) are separated by at (...)
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  7. W. M. Lepley (1936). The Effect of Distraction Upon Serial Position Values in Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (4):467.score: 14.0
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  8. D. G. Ryans (1935). A Preliminary Investigation of the Effects of Mental Distraction Upon Muscular Fatigue. Journal of Experimental Psychology 18 (1):148.score: 14.0
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  9. Michael J. Watkins, Olga C. Watkins, Fergus I. Craik & Gregory Mazuryk (1973). Effect of Nonverbal Distraction on Short-Term Storage. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (2):296.score: 14.0
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  10. Gary A. Davis (1967). Detrimental Effects of Distraction, Additional Response Alternatives, and Longer Response Chains in Solving Switch-Light Problems. Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (1):45.score: 14.0
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  11. Gary A. Davis, Alice J. Train & Mary E. Manske (1968). Trial and Error Versus "Insightful" Problem Solving: Effects of Distraction, Additional Response Alternatives, and Longer Response Chains. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (3p1):337.score: 14.0
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  12. James J. Keenan (1968). Some Effects of Rhythmic Distraction Upon Rhythmic Sensori-Motor Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):440.score: 14.0
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  13. [deleted]Stefan Berti (2013). The Role of Auditory Transient and Deviance Processing in Distraction of Task Performance: A Combined Behavioral and Event-Related Brain Potential Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 14.0
  14. H. Cason (1938). The Influence of Attitude and Distraction. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (6):532.score: 14.0
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  15. B. Kent Houston & Thomas M. Jones (1967). Distraction and Stroop Color-Word Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (1):54-56.score: 14.0
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  16. F. Michael Rabinowitz & Mary L. Paynter (1969). Postreinforcement Interval, Intertrial Interval, and the Delay-Retention Effect Under Distraction Conditions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (1):177.score: 14.0
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  17. Jennifer D. Ryan, Modulation of Distraction in Ageing.score: 12.0
    A cueing paradigm was employed to examine modulation of distraction due to a visual singleton. Subjects were required to make a saccade to a shape-singleton target. A predictive location cue indicated the hemifield where a target would appear. Older adults made more anticipatory saccades than younger adults, and were less accurate for making an eye movement in the vicinity of a target. However, younger and older adults likewise benefited from the cue; distraction was reduced when the distractor singleton appeared in (...)
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  18. [deleted]F. Dolcos A. D. Iordan, S. Dolcos (2013). Neural Signatures of the Response to Emotional Distraction: A Review of Evidence From Brain Imaging Investigations. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 12.0
    Prompt responses to emotional, potentially threatening, stimuli are supported by neural mechanisms that allow for privileged access of emotional information to processing resources. The existence of these mechanisms can also make emotional stimuli potent distracters, particularly when task-irrelevant. The ability to deploy cognitive control in order to cope with emotional distraction is essential for adaptive behavior, while reduced control may lead to enhanced emotional distractibility, which is often a hallmark of affective disorders. Evidence suggests that increased susceptibility to emotional distraction (...)
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  19. Stefan Billinger (2012). Distraction of Symbolic Behavior in Regular Classrooms. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 12.0
    The purpose of the present study is to develop more precise methods to explore the interaction between contextual factors in teacher instructions in regular classroom settings and students’ abilities to use symbolic information in the instruction. The ability to easily show symbolic behavior could be expected to influence student’s capacity to be active and participate. The present study examines distraction in students’ shifts from the use of “non-symbolic” to “symbolic” behavior in regular classroom settings. The 53 students (29 boys and (...)
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  20. Philipp Koralus (2014). The Erotetic Theory of Attention: Questions, Focus and Distraction. Mind and Language 29 (1):26-50.score: 12.0
    Attention has a role in much of perception, thought, and action. On the erotetic theory, the functional role of attention is a matter of the relationship between questions and what counts as answers to those questions. Questions encode the completion conditions of tasks for cognitive control purposes, and degrees of attention are degrees of sensitivity to the occurrence of answers. Questions and answers are representational contents given precise characterizations using tools from formal semantics, though attention does not depend on language. (...)
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  21. [deleted]Andrew B. Leber Jennifer R. Lechak (2012). Individual Differences in Distraction by Motion Predicted by Neural Activity in MT/V5. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 12.0
    Individuals differ substantially in their susceptibility to distraction by irrelevant visual information. Previous research has uncovered how individual variability in the goal-driven component of attentional control influences distraction, yet it remains unknown whether other sources of variability between individuals also predict distraction. In this fMRI study, we showed that an individual’s inherent sensitivity to passively viewed visual motion predicts his/her susceptibility to distraction by motion. Bilateral MT/V5 was localized in participants during passive viewing of moving stimuli, affording a baseline measure (...)
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  22. Damon Young (2014). Distraction. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Most of us struggle with distraction every day: the familiar feeling that our attention is not quite where it should be. We feel it at work and at home and it can be frustrating and uncomfortable. But what is distraction? In his lucid, timely book, Damon Young shows that distraction is more than too many stimuli, or too little attention. It is actually a matter of value - to be distracted is to be torn away from what is worthwhile in (...)
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  23. John L. Orrock (2006). Useful Distraction: Ritualized Behavior as an Opportunity for Recalibration. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):625-626.score: 10.0
    Responding to potential hazards is likely to require precaution-related recalibration, the extensive integration of complex variables related to inferred risk and fitness. By swamping working memory with goal-demoted actions and focusing recalibration on the inferred threat, ritualized behaviors may serve to increase the efficacy of precaution-related recalibration. This benefit may be an important mechanism maintaining non-pathological ritualized behavior. (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  24. [deleted]Kean J. Hsu, Kalina N. Babeva, Michelle C. Feng, Justin F. Hummer & Gerald C. Davison (2014). Experimentally Induced Distraction Impacts Cognitive but Not Emotional Processes in Think-Aloud Cognitive Assessment. Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 10.0
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  25. P. R. Meudell (1972). Short-Term Visual Memory: Comparative Effects of Two Types of Distraction on the Recall of Visually Presented Verbal and Nonverbal Material. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (3):244.score: 10.0
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  26. Jonathan D. Moreno (1996). Is Ethics Consultation an Elegant Distraction? HEC Forum 8 (1):12-21.score: 10.0
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  27. Fabrice B. R. Parmentier (2008). Towards a Cognitive Model of Distraction by Auditory Novelty: The Role of Involuntary Attention Capture and Semantic Processing. Cognition 109 (3):345-362.score: 10.0
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  28. G. Ryle (1954). Report on Analysis "Problem" No. 4 "If a Distraction Makes Me Forget My Headache, Does It Make My Head Stop Aching, or Does It Only Stop Me Feeling It Aching?". Analysis 14 (3):51-52.score: 10.0
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  29. [deleted]Escera Carles (2008). Novelty-P3: An Index of Involuntary Orienting, but Not Distraction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 10.0
  30. Susan Nolen-Hoeksema & Jannay Morrow (1993). Effects of Rumination and Distraction on Naturally Occurring Depressed Mood. Cognition and Emotion 7 (6):561-570.score: 10.0
  31. [deleted]Tom A. Schweizer, Karen Kan, Yuwen Hung, Fred Tam, Gary Naglie & Simon J. Graham (2013). Brain Activity During Driving with Distraction: An Immersive fMRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 10.0
    Introduction: Non-invasive measurements of brain activity have an important role to play in understanding driving ability. The current study aimed to identify the neural underpinnings of human driving behavior by visualizing the areas of the brain involved in driving under different levels of demand, such as driving while distracted or making left turns at busy intersections. Methods: To capture brain activity during driving, we placed a driving simulator with a fully functional steering wheel and pedals in a 3.0 Tesla functional (...)
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  32. Linden J. Ball, John E. Marsh, Damien Litchfield, Rebecca L. Cook & Natalie Booth (2014). When Distraction Helps: Evidence That Concurrent Articulation and Irrelevant Speech Can Facilitate Insight Problem Solving. Thinking and Reasoning 21 (1):76-96.score: 10.0
    We report an experiment investigating the ?special-process? theory of insight problem solving, which claims that insight arises from non-conscious, non-reportable processes that enable problem re-structuring. We predicted that reducing opportunities for speech-based processing during insight problem solving should permit special processes to function more effectively and gain conscious awareness, thereby facilitating insight. We distracted speech-based processing by using either articulatory suppression or irrelevant speech, with findings for these conditions supporting the predicted insight facilitation effect relative to silent working or thinking (...)
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  33. Roger Beard & Maureen McKay (1998). An Unfortunate Distraction: The Real Books Debate, 10 Years On. Educational Studies 24 (1):69-81.score: 10.0
    Summary This paper re?examines some aspects of the ?real books?reading scheme books? debate which erupted into the British literacy education field a decade ago. It argues that the debate was not only over?polarised but that it did not take appropriate account of a scholarly review of related research by Professor Jeanne Chall which had been published a few years earlier. Subsequent research has further supported Chall's arguments. The paper indicates how the use of reading scheme and real books can be (...)
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  34. [deleted]C. Philip Beaman, Maciej Hanczakowski & Dylan M. Jones (2014). The Effects of Distraction on Metacognition and Metacognition on Distraction: Evidence From Recognition Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 10.0
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  35. Tom Campbell (2005). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Auditory Distraction. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):3-5.score: 10.0
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  36. [deleted]Escera Carles (2008). The Fate of Unexpected Novel Sounds:Distraction or Facilitation Depending on the Attentional Set. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 10.0
  37. John Duncan, Phyllis Williams, Ian Nimmo-Smith & Ivan Brown (1993). The Control of Skilled Behavior: Learning, Intelligence, and Distraction. In David E. Meyer & Sylvan Kornblum (eds.), Attention and Performance Xiv. The Mit Press.score: 10.0
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  38. John E. Marsh, Robert W. Hughes & Dylan M. Jones (2009). Interference by Process, Not Content, Determines Semantic Auditory Distraction. Cognition 110 (1):23-38.score: 10.0
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  39. M. A. McCloskey (1954). Report on Analysis "Problem" No. 4 "If a Distraction Makes Me Forget My Headache, Does It Make My Head Stop Aching, or Does It Only Stop Me Feeling It Aching?". Analysis 14 (3):53-55.score: 10.0
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  40. Robert Smith (1998). Distraction. Angelaki 3 (2):133 – 146.score: 10.0
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  41. Geoffrey Winthrop‐Young (2002). Drill and Distraction in the Yellow Submarine: On the Dominance of War in Friedrich Kittler's Media Theory. Critical Inquiry 28 (4):825-854.score: 10.0
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  42. George M. Woodwell (2011). Biodiversity: Not Wrong, Just an Unfortunate Distraction. BioScience 61 (4):254-255.score: 10.0
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  43. Richard A. Young, Li Hsieh, Francis X. Graydon, I. I. Richard Genik, Mark D. Benton, Christopher C. Green, Susan M. Bowyer, John E. Moran & Norman Tepley (2005). Mind-on-the-Drive: Real-Time Functional Neuroimaging of Cognitive Brain Mechanisms Underlying Driver Performance and Distraction. Mind 5:263.score: 10.0
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  44. Michael Bray (2008). Laughter Between Distraction and Awakening : Marxist Themes in The Office (US). In Jeremy Wisnewski (ed.), The Office and Philosophy: Scenes From the Unexamined Life. Blackwell Pub..score: 10.0
     
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  45. Joyce Burgmann (1939). The Effect of Distraction, Both Manual and Mental, on the Ergograph Curve. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):273 – 276.score: 10.0
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  46. [deleted]Van-Thriel Christoph (2009). Examining Chemosensory Distraction on Brain Level. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 10.0
  47. Florin Dolcos, Alexandru D. Iordan, James Kragel, Jared Stokes, Ryan Campbell, Gregory McCarthy & Roberto Cabeza (2013). Neural Correlates of Opposing Effects of Emotional Distraction on Working Memory and Episodic Memory: An Event-Related fMRI Investigation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 10.0
    A fundamental question in the emotional memory literature is why emotion enhances memory in some conditions but disrupts memory in other conditions. For example, separate studies have shown that emotional stimuli tend to be better remembered in long-term episodic memory (EM), whereas emotional distracters tend to impair working memory (WM) maintenance. The first goal of this study was to directly compare the neural correlates of EM enhancement (EME) and WM impairing (WMI) effects, and the second goal was to explore individual (...)
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  48. [deleted]Duzel Emrah (2011). Alleviating Memory Impairment Through Distraction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 10.0
  49. Charles L. Folk & Bradley S. Gibson (eds.) (2001). Attraction, Distraction and Action: Multiple Perspectives on Attentional Capture. Advances in Psychology. Elsevier.score: 10.0
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  50. J. Hartnack (1954). Report on Analysis "Problem" No. 4 "If a Distraction Makes Me Forget My Headache, Does It Make My Head Stop Aching, or Does It Only Stop Me Feeling It Aching?". Analysis 14 (3):52-53.score: 10.0
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