Search results for '*Distraction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  41
    Michael Marder (2011). Phenomenology of Distraction, or Attention in the Fissuring of Time and Space. Research in Phenomenology 41 (3):396-419.
    The goal of “Phenomenology of Distraction“ is to explore the imbrication of attention and distraction within existential spatiality and temporality. First, I juxtapose the Heideggerian dispersion of concern (which includes, among other things, the attentive comportment) in everyday life, conceived as a way to get distracted from one's impending mortality, to Fernando Pessoa's embracing of the inauthentic, superficial, and restless existence, where attention necessarily reverts into distraction. Second, I consider the philosophical confessions of St. Augustine and Jean-Jacques Rousseau as evidence (...)
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  2.  6
    Paul North (2011). The Problem of Distraction. Stanford University Press.
    The demand for a cause : not-always-thinking -- A face for distraction -- Kafka (diaspora) -- Heidegger (dissipation) -- Benjamin (entertainment) -- Epilogue : distraction and politics.
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  3.  27
    Jesper Aagaard (2015). Media Multitasking, Attention, and Distraction: A Critical Discussion. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):885-896.
    Students often multitask with technologies such as computers, laptops, tablets and smartphones during class. Unfortunately, numerous empirical studies firmly establish a significant drop in academic performance caused by this media multitasking. In this paper it is argued that cognitive studies may have clarified the negative consequences of this activity, yet they struggle to address the processes involved in it. A cognitive characterization of attention as a mental phenomenon neglects the interaction between bodies and technologies, and it is suggested that a (...)
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  4.  12
    D. G. Ryans (1935). A Preliminary Investigation of the Effects of Mental Distraction Upon Muscular Fatigue. Journal of Experimental Psychology 18 (1):148.
  5.  3
    Michael J. Watkins, Olga C. Watkins, Fergus I. Craik & Gregory Mazuryk (1973). Effect of Nonverbal Distraction on Short-Term Storage. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (2):296.
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  6.  10
    B. Kent Houston & Thomas M. Jones (1967). Distraction and Stroop Color-Word Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (1):54-56.
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  7.  6
    Robert E. Murphy (1959). Effects of Threat of Shock, Distraction, and Task Design on Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (2):134.
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  8.  3
    H. Cason (1938). The Influence of Attitude and Distraction. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (6):532.
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  9.  3
    James J. Keenan (1968). Some Effects of Rhythmic Distraction Upon Rhythmic Sensori-Motor Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):440.
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  10.  3
    Gary A. Davis, Alice J. Train & Mary E. Manske (1968). Trial and Error Versus "Insightful" Problem Solving: Effects of Distraction, Additional Response Alternatives, and Longer Response Chains. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (3p1):337.
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  11.  3
    W. M. Lepley (1936). The Effect of Distraction Upon Serial Position Values in Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (4):467.
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  12.  2
    Gary A. Davis (1967). Detrimental Effects of Distraction, Additional Response Alternatives, and Longer Response Chains in Solving Switch-Light Problems. Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (1):45.
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  13.  1
    F. Michael Rabinowitz & Mary L. Paynter (1969). Postreinforcement Interval, Intertrial Interval, and the Delay-Retention Effect Under Distraction Conditions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (1):177.
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  14.  12
    Philipp Koralus (2014). The Erotetic Theory of Attention: Questions, Focus and Distraction. Mind and Language 29 (1):26-50.
    Attention has a role in much of perception, thought, and action. On the erotetic theory, the functional role of attention is a matter of the relationship between questions and what counts as answers to those questions. Questions encode the completion conditions of tasks for cognitive control purposes, and degrees of attention are degrees of sensitivity to the occurrence of answers. Questions and answers are representational contents given precise characterizations using tools from formal semantics, though attention does not depend on language. (...)
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  15.  21
    Marco Hollenstein, Thomas Koenig, Matthias Kubat, Daniela Blaser & Walter J. Perrig (2012). Non-Conscious Word Processing in a Mirror-Masking Paradigm Causing Attentional Distraction: An ERP-Study. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):353-365.
    In this event-related potential study a masking technique that prevents conscious perception of words and non-words through attentional distraction was used to reveal the temporal dynamics of word processing under non-conscious and conscious conditions. In the non-conscious condition, ERP responses differed between masked words and non-words from 112 to 160 ms after stimulus-onset over posterior brain areas. The early onset of the word–non-word differences was compatible with previous studies that reported non-conscious access to orthographic information within this time period. Moreover, (...)
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  16.  22
    Jennifer D. Ryan, Modulation of Distraction in Ageing.
    A cueing paradigm was employed to examine modulation of distraction due to a visual singleton. Subjects were required to make a saccade to a shape-singleton target. A predictive location cue indicated the hemifield where a target would appear. Older adults made more anticipatory saccades than younger adults, and were less accurate for making an eye movement in the vicinity of a target. However, younger and older adults likewise benefited from the cue; distraction was reduced when the distractor singleton appeared in (...)
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  17. Paul North (2012). The Problem of Distraction. Stanford University Press.
    We live in an age of distraction. Contemporary analyses of culture, politics, techno-science, and psychology insist on this. They often suggest remedies for it, or ways to capitalize on it. Yet they almost never investigate the meaning and history of distraction itself. This book corrects this lack of attention. It inquires into the effects of distraction, defined not as the opposite of attention, but as truly discontinuous intellect. Human being has to be reconceived, according to this argument, not as quintessentially (...)
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  18. Damon Young (2014). Distraction. Routledge.
    Most of us struggle with distraction every day: the familiar feeling that our attention is not quite where it should be. We feel it at work and at home and it can be frustrating and uncomfortable. But what is distraction? In his lucid, timely book, Damon Young shows that distraction is more than too many stimuli, or too little attention. It is actually a matter of value - to be distracted is to be torn away from what is worthwhile in (...)
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  19. Damon Young (2010). Distraction. Routledge.
    Most of us struggle with distraction every day: the familiar feeling that our attention is not quite where it should be. We feel it at work and at home and it can be frustrating and uncomfortable. But what is distraction? In his lucid, timely book, Damon Young shows that distraction is more than too many stimuli, or too little attention. It is actually a matter of value - to be distracted is to be torn away from what is worthwhile in (...)
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  20. Damon Young (2014). Distraction. Routledge.
    Most of us struggle with distraction every day: the familiar feeling that our attention is not quite where it should be. We feel it at work and at home and it can be frustrating and uncomfortable. But what is distraction? In his lucid, timely book, Damon Young shows that distraction is more than too many stimuli, or too little attention. It is actually a matter of value - to be distracted is to be torn away from what is worthwhile in (...)
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  21. Niklas Halin, John E. Marsh, Andreas Haga, Mattias Holmgren & Patrik Sörqvist (2014). Effects of Speech on Proofreading: Can Task-Engagement Manipulations Shield Against Distraction? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 20 (1):69-80.
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  22.  2
    Mireia Hernández, Albert Costa & Glyn W. Humphreys (2012). Escaping Capture: Bilingualism Modulates Distraction From Working Memory. Cognition 122 (1):37-50.
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  23.  9
    Aislinn O'Donnell (2015). Contemplative Pedagogy and Mindfulness: Developing Creative Attention in an Age of Distraction. Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (2):187-202.
    Over the last decade, there has been a considerable expansion of mindfulness programmes into a number of different domains of contemporary life, such as corporations, schools, hospitals and even the military. Understanding the reasons for this phenomenon involves, I argue, reflecting upon the nature of contemporary capitalism and mapping the complexity of navigating new digital technologies that make multiple and accelerated solicitations upon attention and our affective lives. Whilst acknowledging the benefits of mindfulness practice, this article argues that it is (...)
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  24. Pamela J. L. Rae & Timothy J. Perfect (2014). Visual Distraction During Word-List Retrieval Does Not Consistently Disrupt Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  25. Katharina Scheiter, Peter Gerjets & Elke Heise (2014). Distraction During Learning with Hypermedia: Difficult Tasks Help to Keep Task Goals on Track. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  26. A. D. Iordan, S. Dolcos & F. Dolcos (2013). Neural Signatures of the Response to Emotional Distraction: A Review of Evidence From Brain Imaging Investigations. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  27.  26
    Susan Nolen-Hoeksema & Jannay Morrow (1993). Effects of Rumination and Distraction on Naturally Occurring Depressed Mood. Cognition and Emotion 7 (6):561-570.
  28.  14
    Fabrice B. R. Parmentier (2008). Towards a Cognitive Model of Distraction by Auditory Novelty: The Role of Involuntary Attention Capture and Semantic Processing. Cognition 109 (3):345-362.
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  29.  26
    Linden J. Ball, John E. Marsh, Damien Litchfield, Rebecca L. Cook & Natalie Booth (2014). When Distraction Helps: Evidence That Concurrent Articulation and Irrelevant Speech Can Facilitate Insight Problem Solving. Thinking and Reasoning 21 (1):76-96.
    We report an experiment investigating the “special-process” theory of insight problem solving, which claims that insight arises from non-conscious, non-reportable processes that enable problem re-structuring. We predicted that reducing opportunities for speech-based processing during insight problem solving should permit special processes to function more effectively and gain conscious awareness, thereby facilitating insight. We distracted speech-based processing by using either articulatory suppression or irrelevant speech, with findings for these conditions supporting the predicted insight facilitation effect relative to silent working or thinking (...)
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  30.  57
    J. M. Wheeldon (1954). Report on Analysis "Problem" No. 4 "If a Distraction Makes Me Forget My Headache, Does It Make My Head Stop Aching, or Does It Only Stop Me Feeling It Aching?". Analysis 14 (3):55-56.
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  31.  5
    Fabrice B. R. Parmentier (2008). Towards a Cognitive Model of Distraction by Auditory Novelty: The Role of Involuntary Attention Capture and Semantic Processing. Cognition 109 (3):345-362.
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  32.  10
    Fabrice B. R. Parmentier, Gregory Elford, Carles Escera, Pilar Andrés & Iria San Miguel (2008). The Cognitive Locus of Distraction by Acoustic Novelty in the Cross-Modal Oddball Task. Cognition 106 (1):408-432.
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  33.  44
    J. Hartnack (1954). Report on Analysis "Problem" No. 4 "If a Distraction Makes Me Forget My Headache, Does It Make My Head Stop Aching, or Does It Only Stop Me Feeling It Aching?". Analysis 14 (3):52-53.
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  34.  17
    Paul J. Silvia & Jack W. Brehm (2001). Exploring Alternative Deterrents to Emotional Intensity: Anticipated Happiness, Distraction, and Sadness. Cognition and Emotion 15 (5):575-592.
  35. Fabrice B. R. Parmentier, Gregory Elford, Carles Escera, Pilar Andrés & Iria San Miguel (2008). The Cognitive Locus of Distraction by Acoustic Novelty in the Cross-Modal Oddball Task. Cognition 106 (1):408-432.
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  36.  2
    Fabrice B. R. Parmentier, Jane V. Elsley & Jessica K. Ljungberg (2010). Behavioral Distraction by Auditory Novelty is Not Only About Novelty: The Role of the Distracter’s Informational Value. Cognition 115 (3):504-511.
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  37.  56
    M. A. McCloskey (1954). Report on Analysis "Problem" No. 4 "If a Distraction Makes Me Forget My Headache, Does It Make My Head Stop Aching, or Does It Only Stop Me Feeling It Aching?". Analysis 14 (3):53-55.
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  38.  34
    Tom Campbell (2005). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Auditory Distraction. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):3-5.
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  39.  6
    John E. Marsh, Robert W. Hughes & Dylan M. Jones (2009). Interference by Process, Not Content, Determines Semantic Auditory Distraction. Cognition 110 (1):23-38.
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  40.  61
    G. Ryle (1954). Report on Analysis "Problem" No. 4 "If a Distraction Makes Me Forget My Headache, Does It Make My Head Stop Aching, or Does It Only Stop Me Feeling It Aching?". Analysis 14 (3):51-52.
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  41.  2
    Patrick Madigan (2016). The Gospel According to David Foster Wallace: Boredom and Addiction in an Age of Distraction. By Adam S. Miller. Pp. Xiii, 114, London/NY, Bloomsbury, 2016, $29.95. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 57 (5):875-876.
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  42.  5
    Tiffany Cheng Han Leung & Robin Stanley Snell (forthcoming). Attraction or Distraction? Corporate Social Responsibility in Macao’s Gambling Industry. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  43.  2
    Bellgrove Mark, Newman Daniel, Cummins Tarrant, Tong Janette, Johnson Beth, Wagner Joseph, Goodrich Jack, Hawi Ziarih & Chambers Chris (2015). Genetically Mediated Resistance to Distraction: Influence of Dopamine Transporter Genotype on Attentional Selection. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  44. Richard A. Young, Li Hsieh, Francis X. Graydon, I. I. Richard Genik, Mark D. Benton, Christopher C. Green, Susan M. Bowyer, John E. Moran & Norman Tepley (2005). Mind-on-the-Drive: Real-Time Functional Neuroimaging of Cognitive Brain Mechanisms Underlying Driver Performance and Distraction. Mind 5:263.
     
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  45.  12
    Jonathan D. Moreno (1996). Is Ethics Consultation an Elegant Distraction? HEC Forum 8 (1):12-21.
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  46.  3
    Roger Beard & Maureen McKay (1998). An Unfortunate Distraction: The Real Books Debate, 10 Years On. Educational Studies 24 (1):69-81.
    Summary This paper re?examines some aspects of the ?real books?reading scheme books? debate which erupted into the British literacy education field a decade ago. It argues that the debate was not only over?polarised but that it did not take appropriate account of a scholarly review of related research by Professor Jeanne Chall which had been published a few years earlier. Subsequent research has further supported Chall's arguments. The paper indicates how the use of reading scheme and real books can be (...)
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  47.  6
    Christopher Perricone (1983). Distraction and Santayana's Idea of Progress. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 19 (2):167 - 181.
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  48.  4
    Joyce Burgmann (1939). The Effect of Distraction, Both Manual and Mental, on the Ergograph Curve. Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 17 (3):273-276.
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  49.  1
    Patrik Sörqvist, Örjan Dahlström, Thomas Karlsson & Jerker Rönnberg (2016). Concentration: The Neural Underpinnings of How Cognitive Load Shields Against Distraction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
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  50.  1
    Fergus I. M. Craik (2014). Effects of Distraction on Memory and Cognition: A Commentary. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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