Search results for '*Dream Content' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. William Dement & Edward A. Wolpert (1958). The Relation of Eye Movements, Body Motility, and External Stimuli to Dream Content. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (6):543.score: 210.0
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  2. G. William Domhoff (2007). Realistic Simulation and Bizarreness in Dream Content: Past Findings and Suggestions for Future Research. In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers. 1--28.score: 152.0
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  3. Kelly Bulkeley (2009). Seeking Patterns in Dream Content: A Systematic Approach to Word Searches. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):905-916.score: 150.0
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  4. G. Williamdomhoff & A. Schneider (2008). Similarities and Differences in Dream Content at the Cross-Cultural, Gender, and Individual Levels. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1257-1265.score: 150.0
  5. G. Domhoff & A. Schneider (2008). Studying Dream Content Using the Archive and Search Engine on DreamBank.Net. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1238-1247.score: 150.0
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  6. A. Hobson & D. Kahn (2007). Dream Content: Individual and Generic Aspects☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):850-858.score: 150.0
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  7. Kenneth E. Johnson (1978). Modernity and Dream Content: A Ugandan Example. Ethos 6 (4):212-220.score: 150.0
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  8. R. L. Punämaki (2007). Trauma and Dreaming: Trauma Impact on Dream Recall, Content, and Patterns, and the Mental Health Function of Dreams. In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers. 2--211.score: 122.0
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  9. Kira Lynn Casto, Stanley Krippner & Robert Tartz (1999). The Identification of Spiritual Content in Dream Reports. Anthropology of Consciousness 10 (1):43-53.score: 120.0
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  10. Antti Revonsuo (2000). The Reinterpretation of Dreams: An Evolutionary Hypothesis of the Function of Dreaming. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):877-901.score: 100.0
    Several theories claim that dreaming is a random by-product of REM sleep physiology and that it does not serve any natural function. Phenomenal dream content, however, is not as disorganized as such views imply. The form and content of dreams is not random but organized and selective: during dreaming, the brain constructs a complex model of the world in which certain types of elements, when compared to waking life, are underrepresented whereas others are over represented. Furthermore, dream (...) is consistently and powerfully modulated by certain types of waking experiences. On the basis of this evidence, I put forward the hypothesis that the biological function of dreaming is to simulate threatening events, and to rehearse threat perception and threat avoidance. To evaluate this hypothesis, we need to consider the original evolutionary context of dreaming and the possible traces it has left in the dream content of the present human population. In the ancestral environment human life was short and full of threats. Any behavioral advantage in dealing with highly dangerous events would have increased the probability of reproductive success. A dream-production mechanism that tends to select threatening waking events and simulate them over and over again in various combinations would have been valuable for the development and maintenance of threat-avoidance skills. Empirical evidence from normative dream content, children's dreams, recurrent dreams, nightmares, post traumatic dreams, and the dreams of hunter-gatherers indicates that our dream-production mechanisms are in fact specialized in the simulation of threatening events, and thus provides support to the threat simulation hypothesis of the function of dreaming. Key Words: dream content; dream function; evolution of consciousness; evolutionary psychology; fear; implicit learning; nightmares; rehearsal; REM; sleep; threat perception. (shrink)
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  11. Jennifer Michelle Windt & Thomas Metzinger (2007). The Philosophy of Dreaming and Self-Consciousness: What Happens to the Experiential Subject During the Dream State? In Deirdre Barrett & Patrick McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming Vol 3: Cultural and Theoretical Perspectives. Praeger Publishers/Greenwood Publishing Group. 193-247.score: 92.0
  12. Milton Kramer (2000). Dreaming has Content and Meaning Not Just Form. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):959-961.score: 90.0
    The biological theories of dreaming provide no explanation for the transduction from neuronal discharge to dreaming or waking consciousness. They cannot account for the variability in dream content between individuals or within individuals. Mind-brain isomorphism is poorly supported, as is dreaming's link to REM sleep. Biological theories of dreaming do not provide a function for dreaming nor a meaning for dreams. Evolutionary views of dreaming do not relate dream content to the current concerns of the dreamer and using (...)
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  13. J. Allan Hobson (2002). Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First-Person Account. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):377-390.score: 90.0
  14. Mark W. Mahowald (2004). Commentary on Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First Person Account by J. Allan Hobson. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):134-137.score: 90.0
  15. Eric Klinger (2013). Goal Commitments and the Content of Thoughts and Dreams: Basic Principles. Frontiers in Psychology 4 (July).score: 88.0
    A few empirically supported principles can account for much of the thematic content of waking thought, including rumination, and dreams. (1) An individual's commitments to particular goals sensitize the individual to respond to cues associated with those goals. The cues may be external or internal in the person's own mental activity. The responses may take the form of noticing the cues, storing them in memory, having thoughts or dream segments related to them, and/or taking action. Noticing may be conscious (...)
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  16. Kieran C. Fox, Savannah Nijeboer, Elizaveta Solomonova, G. William Domhoff & Kalina Christoff (2013). Dreaming as Mind Wandering: Evidence From Functional Neuroimaging and First-Person Content Reports. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 88.0
    Isolated reports have long suggested a similarity in content and thought processes across mind wandering (MW) during waking, and dream mentation during sleep. This overlap has encouraged speculation that both ‘daydreaming’ and dreaming may engage similar brain mechanisms. To explore this possibility, we systematically examined published first-person experiential reports of MW and dreaming and found many similarities: in both states, content is largely audiovisual and emotional, follows loose narratives tinged with fantasy, is strongly related to current concerns, draws (...)
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  17. Kalina Christoff Kieran C. R. Fox, Savannah Nijeboer, Elizaveta Solomonova, G. William Domhoff (2013). Dreaming as Mind Wandering: Evidence From Functional Neuroimaging and First-Person Content Reports. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 88.0
    Isolated reports have long suggested a similarity in content and thought processes across mind wandering (MW) during waking, and dream mentation during sleep. This overlap has encouraged speculation that both ‘daydreaming’ and dreaming may engage similar brain mechanisms. To explore this possibility, we systematically examined published first-person experiential reports of MW and dreaming and found many similarities: in both states, content is largely audiovisual and emotional, follows loose narratives tinged with fantasy, is strongly related to current concerns, draws (...)
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  18. Antonio Zadra, Sophie Desjardins & Éric Marcotte (2006). Evolutionary Function of Dreams: A Test of the Threat Simulation Theory in Recurrent Dreams. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):450-463.score: 70.0
  19. Sophie Desjardins & Antonio Zadra (2006). Is the Threat Simulation Theory Threatened by Recurrent Dreams? Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):470-474.score: 70.0
  20. David Kahn & J. Allan Hobson (2003). State Dependence of Character Perception: Implausibility Differences in Dreaming and Waking Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):57-68.score: 70.0
  21. Imants Baruss (2003). Dreams. In , Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association. 79-106.score: 70.0
  22. Sérgio Arthuro Mota-Rolim, Zé Henrique Targino, Bryan C. Souza, Wilfredo Blanco, John F. Araujo & Sidarta Ribeiro (2013). Dream Characteristics in a Brazilian Sample: An Online Survey Focusing on Lucid Dreaming. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    During sleep, humans experience the offline images and sensations that we call dreams, which are typically emotional and lacking in rational judgment of their bizarreness. However, during lucid dreaming (LD), subjects know that they are dreaming, and may control oneiric content. Dreaming and LD features have been studied in North Americans, Europeans and Asians, but not among Brazilians, the largest population in Latin America. Here we investigated dreams and LD characteristics in a Brazilian sample (n=3,427; median age=25 years) through (...)
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  23. Michael Schredl (2000). Dream Research: Integration of Physiological and Psychological Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1001-1003.score: 60.0
    All five target articles are of high quality and very stimulating for the field. Several factors such as dream report length and NREM/REM differences, may be affected by the waking process (transition from sleep to wakefulness) and the recall process. It is helpful to distinguish between a model for REM sleep regulation and a physiological model for dreaming. A third model accounting for cognitive activity (thought-like dreaming) can also be of value. The postulated adaptive function of dreaming in avoidance learning (...)
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  24. Michael Schredl (2011). Dream Research in Schizophrenia: Methodological Issues and a Dimensional Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1036-1041.score: 60.0
    Dreaming in patients with schizophrenia was and is of particular interest to researchers and clinicians due to the phenomenological similarities between the dreaming state and schizophrenic daytime symptomatology such as bizarre thoughts or hallucinations. Extensive literature reviews have shown that dream studies in the field of psychopathology often do not fulfill common scientific criteria. The present paper focuses on the methodological issues like sampling methods, the dream collection method, and dream content analysis that are crucial with regard to the (...)
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  25. M. Schredl, A. T. Funkhouser, C. M. Cornu, Hirsbrunner H.-P. & M. Bahro (2001). Reliability in Dream Research: A Methodological Note. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (4):496-502.score: 60.0
    The coefficients of internal consistency and retest reliability had been rarely investigated within the methodology of dream content analysis. Analyzing a dream series of elderly, healthy persons obtained from weekly telephone interviews, the internal consistency of a series of 20 dreams and retests after 4 or 22 weeks, respectively, had been computed. The findings indicate that dream recall and dream length are quite stable, but dream characteristics such as bizarreness and emotional tone underlie large intraindividual fluctuations. In order to (...)
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  26. Douglas F. Watt (2002). Commentary on Professor Hobson's First-Person Account of a Lateral Medullary Stroke (CVA): Affirmative Action for the Brainstem in Consciousness Studies? Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):391-395.score: 60.0
  27. Sara McClintock (2014). Kamalaśīla on the Nature of Phenomenal Content (Ākāra) in Cognition: A Close Reading of TSP Ad TS 3626 and Related Passages. Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (2-3):327-337.score: 54.0
    Traditional as well as contemporary interpreters of Indian Yogācāra divide that tradition into a variety of doxographical camps depending on whether awareness is understood tobe endowed with phenomenal content (ākāra) and, if so, whether that content is understood to be real or true. Kamalaśīla’s extensive commentary on his teacher Śāntarakṣita’s Tattvasaṃgraha contains passages that throw into question certain doxographical equivalencies, especially the equivalencies sometimes proposed betweenthe doctrine that awareness is endowed with phenomenal content (sākāravāda) and the doctrine (...)
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  28. Drew Morgan (2005). Awakening The Dream of Gerontius. Newman Studies Journal 2 (2):36-51.score: 54.0
    The publication of his Apologia pro Vita Sua (1864) brought Newman back into contact with many of his Anglican friends—two of whom gifted him with a violin. In his letter of appreciation, Newman mused: “Perhaps thought is music.” Such would seem to be the case with his poem, The Dream of Gerontius (1865), which was set to music by Sir Edward Elgar (1900). This essay explores the relationship between Newman’s Apologia and The Dream of Gerontius and then analyzes the latter’s (...)
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  29. Anjali Prabhu (2011). To Dream of Fanon: Reconstructing a Method for Thought by a Revolutionary Intellectual. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 19 (1):57-70.score: 54.0
    The half-century, which is the time that has elapsed since the publication of Wretched of the Earth , seems such a short period when one imagines its author in all his intellectual magnificence, his anguish, and the many details we all know of his short-lived reality. Dare one say, after the concept has long been declared “dead” that we imagine him as having been a live “author”? As I write this, the idea of various notable intellectuals and revolutionary movements could (...)
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  30. Christopher L. Edwards, Perrine Marie Ruby, Josie E. Malinowski, Paul D. Bennett & Mark T. Blagrove (2013). Dreaming and Insight. Frontiers in Psychology 4:979.score: 52.0
    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can (...)
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  31. Siamak Movahedi (2012). Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Reported Dreams and the Problem of Double Hermeneutics in Clinical Research. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M12.score: 52.0
    The aim of this article is to show that statistical analysis and hermeneutics are not mutually exclusive. Although statistical analysis may capture some patterns and regularities, statistical methods may themselves generate different types of interpretation and, in turn, give rise to even more interpretations. The discussion is lodged within the context of a quantitative analysis of dream content. I attempted to examine the dialogical texts of reported dreams monologically, but soon found myself returning to dialogic contexts to make sense (...)
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  32. Tamara Fischmann, Michael O. Russ & Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber (2013). Trauma, Dream and Psychic Change in Psychoanalyses: A Dialogue Between Psychoanalysis and the Neurosciences. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:877.score: 46.0
    How can a fruitful dialogue with neuroscientists add knowledge to the unconscious – the specific research object of psychoanalysis? Apparently a growing number of worldwide research groups have begun to realize that the neurosciences and psychoanalysis can benefit from each other in interesting ways. Sometimes empirical studies evoke challenging research questions for both research fields. In the on-going LAC-Depressionstudy, for example, one interesting and unexpected finding for both research fields is that a large majority of chronically depressed in long-term psychoanalytic (...)
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  33. Melanie G. Rosen (2013). What I Make Up When I Wake Up: Anti-Experience Views and Narrative Fabrication of Dreams. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 44.0
    I propose a narrative fabrication thesis of dream reports, according to which dream reports are often not accurate representations of experiences that occur during sleep. I begin with an overview of anti-experience theses of Norman Malcolm and Daniel Dennett who reject the received view of dreams, that dreams are experiences we have during sleep which are reported upon waking. Although rejection of the first claim of the received view, that dreams are experiences that occur during sleep, is implausible, I evaluate (...)
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  34. Linda Mealey (2000). The Illusory Function of Dreams: Another Example of Cognitive Bias. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):971-972.score: 40.0
    Patterns of dream content indicating a predominance of themes relating to threat are likely to reflect biases in dream recall and dream scoring techniques. Even if this pattern is not artifactual, it is yet reflective of threat-related biases in our conscious and nonconscious waking cognition, and is not special to dreams. [Revonsuo].
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  35. Thomas Gregor (1981). A Content Analysis of Mehinaku Dreams. Ethos 9 (4):353-390.score: 40.0
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  36. Armando D'Agostino, Giacomo Aletti, Martina Carboni, Simone Cavallotti, Ivan Limosani, Marialaura Manzone & Silvio Scarone (2013). Are Delusional Contents Replayed During Dreams? Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):708-715.score: 40.0
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  37. Peter P. Kirschenmann (1991). Local and Normative Rationality of Science: The 'Content of Discovery' Rehabilitated. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 22 (1):61-72.score: 36.0
    Summary The recent turn to the ‘context of discovery’ and other ‘postmodernist’ developments in the philosophy of science have undermined the idea of a universal rationality of science. This parallels the fate of the classical dream of a logic of discovery. Still, justificational questions have remained as a distinct perspective, though comprising both consequential and generative justification — an insight delayed by certain confusions about the (original) context distinction. An examination of one particular heuristic strategy shows its local rationality; even (...)
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  38. Jack DuVall (2014). Dream Things True: Nonviolent Movements as Applied Consciousness. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):106-117.score: 36.0
    Nonviolent movements have become a new form of human agency. Between 1900 and 2006, more than 100 such movements appeared, and more than half were successful in dissolving oppression or achieving people's rights. Movements self-organize to summon mass participation, develop cognitive unity in the midst of dissension, and build resilient force on the content of shared beliefs. Some movements may even be a new venue for consciousness that "grows to something of great constancy" as Shakespeare said about "minds transfigured (...)
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  39. David Hills (2008). Problems of Paraphrase: Bottom's Dream. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 3 (1):9.score: 36.0
    Philosophers and critics alike often contend that metaphors cannot or should not be paraphrased, ever. Yet a simple and decisive empirical argument — The Horse’s Mouth Argument—suffices to show that many metaphors can be paraphrased without violating the spirit in which they were put forward in the first place. This argument leaves us with urgent unanswered questions about the role of paraphrase in a more inclusive division of exegetical labor, about the tension between its notorious openendedness and its claim to (...)
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  40. Owen Flanagan (2001). Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind. OUP USA.score: 34.0
    What, if anything do dreams tell us about ourselves? What is the relationship between types of sleep and types of dreams? Does dreaming serve any purpose? Or are dreams simply meaningless mental noise--'unmusical fingers wandering over the piano keys'? With expertise in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, Owen Flanagan is uniquely qualified to answer those questions. And in Dreaming Souls he provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the nature (...)
     
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  41. G. William Domhoff (2000). Needed: A New Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):928-930.score: 30.0
    Dream content is more coherent, consistent over time, and continuous with waking emotional concerns than most brainstem-driven theories of dreaming allow, but dreaming probably has no adaptive function. A new neurocognitive perspective focusing on the forebrain system of dream generation should begin with the findings on dream content in adults and the developmental nature of dreaming in children. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Revonsuo; Solms; Vertes & Eastman].
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  42. Mohan Matthen (2014). Image Content. In Berit Brogaard (ed.), Does Perception Have Content? Oxford University Press. 265-290.score: 27.0
    The senses present their content in the form of images, three-dimensional arrays of located sense features. Peacocke’s “scenario content” is one attempt to capture image content; here, a richer notion is presented, sensory images include located objects and features predicated of them. It is argued that our grasp of the meaning of these images implies that they have propositional content. Two problems concerning image content are explored. The first is that even on an enriched conception, (...)
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  43. Daniel C. Dennett (1976). Are Dreams Experiences? Philosophical Review 73 (April):151-71.score: 26.0
  44. Richard Schweickert & Zhuangzhuang Xi (2010). Metamorphosed Characters in Dreams: Constraints of Conceptual Structure and Amount of Theory of Mind. Cognitive Science 34 (4):665-684.score: 26.0
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  45. Tim Crane (1992). The Nonconceptual Content of Experience. In , The Contents of Experience. Cambridge University Press.score: 25.0
    Some have claimed that people with very different beliefs literally see the world differently. Thus Thomas Kuhn: ‘what a man sees depends both upon what he looks at and also upon what his previous visual—conceptual experience has taught him to see’ (Kuhn 1970, p. ll3). This view — call it ‘Perceptual Relativism’ — entails that a scientist and a child may look at a cathode ray tube and, in a sense, the first will see it while the second won’t. The (...)
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  46. Susanna Schellenberg (2011). Perceptual Content Defended. Noûs 45 (4):714 - 750.score: 24.0
    Recently, the thesis that experience is fundamentally a matter of representing the world as being a certain way has been questioned by austere relationalists. I defend this thesis by developing a view of perceptual content that avoids their objections. I will argue that on a relational understanding of perceptual content, the fundamental insights of austere relationalism do not compete with perceptual experience being representational. As it will show that most objections to the thesis that experience has content (...)
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  47. Bill Brewer (2006). Perception and Content. European Journal of Philosophy 14 (2):165-181.score: 24.0
    It is close to current orthodoxy that perceptual experience is to be characterized, at least in part, by its representational content, roughly, by the way it represents things as being in the world around the perceiver. Call this basic idea the content view (CV).
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  48. Mark Greenberg (2005). A New Map of Theories of Mental Content: Constitutive Accounts and Normative Theories. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):299-320.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I propose a new way of understanding the space of possibilities in the field of mental content. The resulting map assigns separate locations to theories of content that have generally been lumped together on the more traditional map. Conversely, it clusters together some theories of content that have typically been regarded as occupying opposite poles. I make my points concrete by developing a taxonomy of theories of mental content, but the main points of (...)
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  49. Anders Nes (2006). Content in Thought and Perception. Dissertation, Oxford Universityscore: 24.0
    The dissertation addresses a debate in the philosophy of perception between conceptualists and nonconceptualists. Its principal thesis is that the intentional content of a perceptual experience is the content of a thought that a reflective subject is in a position to think if she has the experience. I call this claim, endorsed by conceptualists, the thesis of content congruence. Two principal lines of argument are put forward for it. The first, ‘simple’ argument contends that a perceptual experience (...)
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  50. Mark Jago (2012). The Content of Deduction. Journal of Philosophical Logic 42 (2):317-334.score: 24.0
    For deductive reasoning to be justified, it must be guaranteed to preserve truth from premises to conclusion; and for it to be useful to us, it must be capable of informing us of something. How can we capture this notion of information content, whilst respecting the fact that the content of the premises, if true, already secures the truth of the conclusion? This is the problem I address here. I begin by considering and rejecting several accounts of informational (...)
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