Search results for '*Electrical Activity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jirí Wackerman, Peter Pütz, Simone Büchi, Inge Strauch & Dietrich Lehmann (2002). Brain Electrical Activity and Subjective Experience During Altered States of Consciousness: Ganzfeld and Hypnagogic States. International Journal of Psychophysiology 46 (2):123-146.score: 55.0
  2. David LaBerge (2001). Attention, Consciousness, and Electrical Wave Activity Within the Cortical Column. International Journal of Psychophysiology 43 (1):5-24.score: 49.0
  3. J. M. Hadley (1940). Some Relationships Between Electrical Signs of Central and Peripheral Activity: I. During Rest. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):640.score: 45.0
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  4. J. M. Hadley (1941). Some Relationships Between Electrical Signs of Central and Peripheral Activity: II. During 'Mental Work.'. Journal of Experimental Psychology 28 (1):53.score: 45.0
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  5. Sharee N. Light, James A. Coan, Corrina Frye & Richard J. Davidson, Empathy Is Associated With Dynamic Change in Prefrontal Brain Electrical Activity During Positive Emotion in Children.score: 44.0
    Empathy is the combined ability to interpret the emotional states of others and experience resultant, related emotions. The relation between prefrontal electroencephalographic asymmetry and emotion in children is well known. The association between positive emotion (assessed via parent report), empathy (measured via observation), and second-by-second brain electrical activity (recorded during a pleasurable task) was investigated using a sample of one hundred twenty-eight 6- to 10-year-old children. Contentment related to increasing left frontopolar activation (p < .05). Empathic concern and positive (...)
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  6. Agnès Aubert, Robert Costalat & Romain Valabrègue (2001). Modelling of the Coupling Between Brain Electrical Activity and Metabolism. Acta Biotheoretica 49 (4).score: 34.0
    In order to make an attempt at grouping the various aspects of brain functional imaging (fMRI, MRS, EEG-MEG, ...) within a coherent frame, we implemented a model consisting of a system of differential equations, that includes: (1) sodium membrane transport, (2) Na/K ATPase, (3) neuronal energy metabolism (i.e. glycolysis, buffering effect of phosphocreatine, and mitochondrial respiration), (4) blood-brain barrier exchanges and (5) brain hemodynamics, all the processes which are involved in the activation of brain areas. We assumed that the correlation (...)
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  7. Joseph S. King, Mix Xie, Bibo Zheng & Karl H. Pribram (2000). Maps of Surface Distributions of Electrical Activity in Spectrally Derived Receptive Fields of the Rat's Somatosensory Cortex. Brain and Mind 1 (3):327-349.score: 33.0
    This study describes the results of experiments motivated by an attempt to understand spectral processing in the cerebral cortex (DeValois and DeValois, 1988; Pribram, 1971, 1991). This level of inquiry concerns processing within a restricted cortical area rather than that by which spatially separate circuits become synchronized during certain behavioral and experiential processes. We recorded neural responses for 55 locations in the somatosensory (barrel) cortex of the rat to various combinations of spatial frequency (texture) and temporal frequency stimulation of their (...)
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  8. S. King Joseph, Bibo Zheng Mix Xie & H. Pribram Karl (2000). Maps of Surface Distributions of Electrical Activity in Spectrally Derived Receptive Fields of the Rat's Somatosensory Cortex. Brain and Mind 1 (3).score: 33.0
    This study describes the results of experiments motivated by an attempt to understand spectral processing in the cerebral cortex (DeValois and DeValois, 1988; Pribram, 1971, 1991). This level of inquiry concerns processing within a restricted cortical area rather than that by which spatially separate circuits become synchronized during certain behavioral and experiential processes. We recorded neural responses for 55 locations in the somatosensory (barrel) cortex of the rat to various combinations of spatial frequency (texture) and temporal frequency stimulation of their (...)
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  9. K. A. Paller, M. Kutas & H. K. McIsaac (1995). Monitoring Conscious Recollection Via the Electrical Activity of the Brain. Psychological Science 6:107-11.score: 33.0
     
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  10. Christopher Summerfield, Anthony Ian Jack & Adrian Philip Burgess (2002). Induced Gamma Activity is Associated with Conscious Awareness of Pattern Masked Nouns. International Journal of Psychophysiology 44 (2):93-100.score: 31.0
  11. Adrian P. Burgess & Lia Ali (2002). Functional Connectivity of Gamma EEG Activity is Modulated at Low Frequency During Conscious Recollection. International Journal of Psychophysiology 46 (2):91-100.score: 31.0
  12. Emrah Duzel (2000). What Brain Activity Tells Us About Conscious Awareness of Memory Retrieval. In Endel Tulving (ed.), Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Psychology Press. 173-187.score: 31.0
  13. Daniel A. Pollen (2006). Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience: Electrical Stimulation of the Cortical Surface at a Threshold Current Evokes Sustained Neuronal Activity Only After a Prolonged Latency. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):560-565.score: 30.0
    Libet demonstrated that a substantial duration (>0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of a sensory cortex at a threshold or liminal current is required before a subject can experience a percept. Libet and his co-workers originally proposed that the result could be due either to spatial and temporal facilitation of the underlying neurons or additionally to a prolonged central processing time. However, over the next four decades, Libet chose to attribute the prolonged latency for evoking conscious experience (...)
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  14. Kara I. (2008). Effects of L-Arginine on Electrical Activity in Rats Subjected to Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 30.0
  15. Wolfgang Skrandies (1999). Early Effects of Semantic Meaning on Electrical Brain Activity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):301-302.score: 30.0
    When words are read, the visual cortex is activated, independent of whether visual or motor associations are elicited. This word-evoked brain activity is significantly influenced by semantic meaning. Such effects occur very early after stimulus presentation (at latencies between 80 and 130 msec), indicating that semantic meaning activates different neuronal assemblies in the human visual cortex when words are processed.
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  16. Thomas L. Bennett, Paula L. Hill & Jonathan French (1982). Biotelemetry Recording of the Electrical Activity of the Hippocampus and Amygdala During Sexual Behavior in the Cat. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20 (1):57-60.score: 30.0
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  17. Kara I. (2008). The Electrical Activity of CA1 Areas in Acutely 7-Nitroindazole Treated Rats in Ischemia-Reperfusion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 30.0
  18. Michael S. Myslobodsky, Varda Ben-Mayor, Batia Yedid-Levy & Matti Minz (1976). Interhemispheric Asymmetry of Electrical Activity of the Brain in Sleep and “Cerebral Dominance”. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (5):465-467.score: 30.0
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  19. Louis A. Schmidt & Laurel J. Trainor (2001). Frontal Brain Electrical Activity (EEG) Distinguishes Valence and Intensity of Musical Emotions. Cognition and Emotion 15 (4):487-500.score: 30.0
  20. C. H. Vanderwolf (1978). What Does Cortical Electrical Activity Have to Do with Sleep? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):507.score: 30.0
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  21. Terence V. Sewards & Mark A. Sewards (2000). Visual Awareness Due to Neuronal Activities in Subcortical Structures: A Proposal. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (1):86-116.score: 28.0
    It has been shown that visual awareness in the blind hemifield of hemianopic cats that have undergone unilateral ablations of visual cortex can be restored by sectioning the commissure of the superior colliculus or by destroying a portion of the substantia nigra contralateral to the cortical lesion (the Sprague effect). We propose that the visual awareness that is recovered is due to synchronized oscillatory activities in the superior colliculus ipsilateral to the cortical lesion. These oscillatory activities are normally partially suppressed (...)
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  22. H. H. Jasper, C. S. Bridgman & L. Carmichael (1937). An Ontogenetic Study of Cerebral Electrical Potentials in the Guinea Pig. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (1):63.score: 26.0
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  23. C. H. Vanderwolf & T. E. Robinson (1981). Reticulo-Cortical Activity and Behavior: A Critique of the Arousal Theory and a New Synthesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):459-476.score: 26.0
    It is traditionally believed that cerebral activation (the presence of low voltage fast electrical activity in the neocortex and rhythmical slow activity in the hippocampus) is correlated with arousal, while deactivation (the presence of large amplitude irregular slow waves or spindles in both the neocortex and the hippocampus) is correlated with sleep or coma. However, since there are many exceptions, these generalizations have only limited validity. Activated patterns occur in normal sleep (active or paradoxical sleep) and during states (...)
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  24. Markus Kiefer & Manfred Spitzer (2000). Time Course of Conscious and Unconscious Semantic Brain Activation. Neuroreport 11 (11):2401-2407.score: 25.0
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  25. Buzsaki Gyorgy (2011). Perturbation of Neuronal Activity by Transcranial Electrical Stimulation (TES) and Optogenetic Tools in Animals. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 24.0
  26. Lucas Spierer Camille F. Chavan, Aurelie L. Manuel, Michael Mouthon (2013). Spontaneous Pre-Stimulus Fluctuations in the Activity of Right Fronto-Parietal Areas Influence Inhibitory Control Performance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 22.0
    Inhibitory control refers to the ability to suppress planned or ongoing cognitive or motor processes. Electrophysiological indices of inhibitory control failure have been found to manifest even before the presentation of the stimuli triggering the inhibition, suggesting that pre-stimulus brain-states modulate inhibition performance. However, previous electrophysiological investigations on the state-dependency of inhibitory control were based on averaged event-related potentials, a method eliminating the variability in the ongoing brain activity not time-locked to the event of interest. These studies thus left (...)
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  27. Herms Romijn (2002). Are Virtual Photons the Elementary Carriers of Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (1):61-81.score: 20.0
  28. Evan Thompson & Francisco J. Varela (2001). Radical Embodiment: Neural Dynamics and Consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (10):418-425.score: 20.0
  29. E. Roy John (2003). A Theory of Consciousness. Current Directions in Psychological Science 12 (6):244-250.score: 20.0
  30. Alarik T. Arenander & Frederick T. Travis (2004). Brain Patterns of Self-Awareness. In Bernard D. Beitman & Jyotsna Nair (eds.), Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Neurobiology, Assessment, and Treatment. W.W. Norton & Co. 112-126.score: 20.0
  31. Kai Vogeley, M. May, A. Ritzl, P. Falkai, K. Zilles & Gereon R. Fink (2004). Neural Correlates of First-Person Perspective as One Constituent of Human Self-Consciousness. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 16 (5):817-827.score: 20.0
  32. Kimford J. Meador, P. G. Ray, J. R. Echauz, D. W. Loring & G. J. Vachtsevanos (2002). Gamma Coherence and Conscious Perception. Neurology 59 (6):847-854.score: 20.0
  33. C. Vanderwolf (2000). Are Neocortical Gamma Waves Related to Consciousness? Brain Research 855 (2):217-224.score: 20.0
  34. Justus V. Verhagen (2007). The Neurocognitive Bases of Human Multimodal Food Perception: Consciousness. Brain Research Reviews 53 (2):271-286.score: 20.0
  35. Ulrich Mayr (2004). Conflict, Consciousness, and Control. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):145-148.score: 20.0
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  36. P. V. Bundzen, V. V. Zagrantsev, K. G. Korotkov, P. Leisner & L. -E. Unestahl (2000). Comprehsnive Bioelectrographic Analysis of Mechanisms of the Alternative State of Consciousness. Human Physiology 26 (5):558-566.score: 20.0
  37. Dominic H. ffytche & Delphine Pins (2003). Are Neural Correlates of Visual Consciousness Retinotopic? Neuroreport 14 (16):2011-2014.score: 20.0
  38. William D. S. Killgore & Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd (2007). Unconscious Processing of Facial Affect in Children and Adolescents. Social Neuroscience 2 (1):28-47.score: 20.0
  39. K. Konno, Y. Katayama & T. Yamamoto (2002). Consciousness and the Intercortical Correlation Function of Electroencephalograms. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins.score: 20.0
     
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  40. Andrew Francis Leuchter, Ian A. Cook, Yi Jin & Bill Phillips (2013). The Relationship Between Brain Oscillatory Activity and Therapeutic Effectiveness of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 20.0
    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is marked by disturbances in brain functional connectivity. This connectivity is modulated by rhythmic oscillations of brain electrical activity, which enable coordinated functions across brain regions. Oscillatory activity plays a central role in regulating thinking and memory, mood, cerebral blood flow, and neurotransmitter levels, and restoration of normal oscillatory patterns is associated with effective treatment of MDD. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) is a robust treatment for MDD, but the mechanism of action (MOA) of (...)
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  41. F. Varela (2002). Upwards and Downwards Causation in the Brain: Case Studies on the Emergence and Efficacy of Consciousness. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins. 33--95.score: 20.0
  42. Matthew Boyle (2011). 'Making Up Your Mind' and the Activity of Reason. Philosophers' Imprint 11 (17).score: 18.0
    A venerable philosophical tradition holds that we rational creatures are distinguished by our capacity for a special sort of mental agency or self-determination: we can “make up” our minds about whether to accept a given proposition. But what sort of activity is this? Many contemporary philosophers accept a Process Theory of this activity, according to which a rational subject exercises her capacity for doxastic self-determination only on certain discrete occasions, when she goes through a process of consciously deliberating (...)
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  43. Richard Alterman (2008). Activity and Convention. Topoi 27 (1-2):127-138.score: 18.0
    This paper develops Lewis’ notion of convention within a framework that mixes cognitive science with some more social theories of activity like distributed cognition and activity theory. The close examination of everyday situations of convention-based activity will produce some interesting issues for a cognitive theory of behavior. Uncertainty, dynamics, and the complexities of the performance of convention-based activities that are distributed over time and/or place, are driving factors in the analysis that is presented. How the actors reason (...)
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  44. Lorraine Besser-Jones (2012). Drawn to the Good? Brewer on Dialectical Activity. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):621-631.score: 18.0
    In The Retrieval of Ethics, Talbot Brewer defends an Aristotelian-inspired understanding of the good life, in which living the good life is conceived of in terms of engaging in a unified dialectical activity. In this essay, I explore the assumptions at work in Brewer's understanding of dialectical activity and raise some concerns about whether or not we have reason to embrace them. I argue that his conception of human nature and that towards which we are drawn stands in (...)
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  45. Alexandre Muzy, Franck Varenne, Bernard P. Zeigler, Jonathan Caux, Patrick Coquillard, Luc Touraille, Dominique Prunetti, Philippe Caillou, Olivier Michel & David R. C. Hill (2013). Refounding of the Activity Concept? Towards a Federative Paradigm for Modeling and Simulation. Simulation - Transactions of the Society for Modeling and Simulation International 89 (2):156-177.score: 18.0
    Currently, the widely used notion of activity is increasingly present in computer science. However, because this notion is used in specific contexts, it becomes vague. Here, the notion of activity is scrutinized in various contexts and, accordingly, put in perspective. It is discussed through four scientific disciplines: computer science, biology, economics, and epistemology. The definition of activity usually used in simulation is extended to new qualitative and quantitative definitions. In computer science, biology and economics disciplines, the new (...)
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  46. M. Joseph Sirgy, Grace B. Yu, Dong-Jin Lee, Shuqin Wei & Ming-Wei Huang (2012). Does Marketing Activity Contribute to a Society's Well-Being? The Role of Economic Efficiency. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):91-102.score: 18.0
    Does the level of marketing activity in a country contribute to societal well-being or quality of life? Does economic efficiency also play a positive role in societal well-being? Does economic efficiency also moderate or mediate the marketing activity effect on societal well-being? Marketing activity refers to the pervasiveness of promotion expenditures and number of retail outlets per capita in a country. Economic efficiency refers to the extent to which the economy is unhampered by corruption, burdensome government regulation, (...)
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  47. Pavel Prudkov (2010). A View on Human Goal-Directed Activity and the Construction of Artificial Intelligence. Minds and Machines 20 (3):363-383.score: 18.0
    Although activity aimed at the construction of artificial intelligence started about 60 years ago however, contemporary intelligent systems are effective in very narrow domains only. One of the reasons for this situation appears to be serious problems in the theory of intelligence. Intelligence is a characteristic of goal-directed systems and two classes of goal-directed systems can be derived from observations on animals and humans, one class is systems with innately and jointly determined goals and means. The other class contains (...)
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  48. Ines Langemeyer & Wolf-Michael Roth (2006). Is Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Threatened to Fall Short of its Own Principles and Possibilities as a Dialectical Social Science? Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 8 (2):20-42.score: 18.0
    In recent years, many researchers engaged in diverse areas and approaches of “cultural-historical activity theory” (CHAT) realized an increasing international interest in Lev S. Vygotsky’s, A. N. Leont’ev’s, and A. Luria’s work and its continuations. Not so long ago, Yrjö Engeström noted that the activity approach was still “the best-held secret of academia” (p. 64) and highlighted the “impressive dimension of theorizing behind” it. Certainly, this remark reflects a time when CHAT was off the beaten tracks. But if (...)
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  49. Nils O. Larsson (2000). Decision Settings Analysis €“ a Tool for Analysis and Design of Human Activity Systems. Theory and Decision 49 (4):339-360.score: 18.0
    The paper describes a methodology to be used for analysis and design of human activity systems. The methodology is based on an analysis of the decision settings whereas most other decision analysis methodologies are analysing the process. The decision concept is analysed and discussed. A distinction between programmed and programmable as well as non-programmed and non-programmable decisions is proposed. A classification of different information types for decision making is presented. A methodology based on a systemic and systematic analysis of (...)
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  50. Pengmin Qin, Simone Grimm, Niall W. Duncan, Giles Holland, Jia Shen Guo, Yan Fan, Anne Weigand, Juergen Baudewig, Malek Bajbouj & Georg Northoff (2013). Self-Specific Stimuli Interact Differently Than Non-Self-Specific Stimuli with Eyes-Open Versus Eyes-Closed Spontaneous Activity in Auditory Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Previous studies suggest that there may be a distinct relationship between spontaneous neural activity and subsequent or concurrent self-specific stimulus-induced activity. This study aims to test the impact of spontaneous activity as recorded in an eyes-open (EO) resting state as opposed to eyes-closed (EC) on self-specific versus non-self-specific auditory stimulus-induced activity in fMRI. In our first experiment we used self-specific stimuli comprised of the subject's own name and non-self-specific stimuli comprised of a friend's name and an (...)
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