Search results for '*Electrical Activity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jirí Wackerman, Peter Pütz, Simone Büchi, Inge Strauch & Dietrich Lehmann (2002). Brain Electrical Activity and Subjective Experience During Altered States of Consciousness: Ganzfeld and Hypnagogic States. International Journal of Psychophysiology 46 (2):123-146.
  2. Sharee N. Light, James A. Coan, Corrina Frye & Richard J. Davidson, Empathy Is Associated With Dynamic Change in Prefrontal Brain Electrical Activity During Positive Emotion in Children.
    Empathy is the combined ability to interpret the emotional states of others and experience resultant, related emotions. The relation between prefrontal electroencephalographic asymmetry and emotion in children is well known. The association between positive emotion (assessed via parent report), empathy (measured via observation), and second-by-second brain electrical activity (recorded during a pleasurable task) was investigated using a sample of one hundred twenty-eight 6- to 10-year-old children. Contentment related to increasing left frontopolar activation (p < .05). Empathic concern and positive (...)
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  3.  24
    David LaBerge (2001). Attention, Consciousness, and Electrical Wave Activity Within the Cortical Column. International Journal of Psychophysiology 43 (1):5-24.
  4.  3
    J. M. Hadley (1941). Some Relationships Between Electrical Signs of Central and Peripheral Activity: II. During 'Mental Work.'. Journal of Experimental Psychology 28 (1):53.
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  5.  3
    J. M. Hadley (1940). Some Relationships Between Electrical Signs of Central and Peripheral Activity: I. During Rest. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):640.
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  6.  29
    Louis A. Schmidt & Laurel J. Trainor (2001). Frontal Brain Electrical Activity Distinguishes Valence and Intensity of Musical Emotions. Cognition and Emotion 15 (4):487-500.
  7.  16
    Joseph S. King, Mix Xie, Bibo Zheng & Karl H. Pribram (2000). Maps of Surface Distributions of Electrical Activity in Spectrally Derived Receptive Fields of the Rat's Somatosensory Cortex. Brain and Mind 1 (3):327-349.
    This study describes the results of experiments motivated by an attempt to understand spectral processing in the cerebral cortex (DeValois and DeValois, 1988; Pribram, 1971, 1991). This level of inquiry concerns processing within a restricted cortical area rather than that by which spatially separate circuits become synchronized during certain behavioral and experiential processes. We recorded neural responses for 55 locations in the somatosensory (barrel) cortex of the rat to various combinations of spatial frequency (texture) and temporal frequency stimulation of their (...)
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  8.  8
    S. King Joseph, Bibo Zheng Mix Xie & H. Pribram Karl (2000). Maps of Surface Distributions of Electrical Activity in Spectrally Derived Receptive Fields of the Rat's Somatosensory Cortex. Brain and Mind 1 (3).
    This study describes the results of experiments motivated by an attempt to understand spectral processing in the cerebral cortex (DeValois and DeValois, 1988; Pribram, 1971, 1991). This level of inquiry concerns processing within a restricted cortical area rather than that by which spatially separate circuits become synchronized during certain behavioral and experiential processes. We recorded neural responses for 55 locations in the somatosensory (barrel) cortex of the rat to various combinations of spatial frequency (texture) and temporal frequency stimulation of their (...)
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  9.  26
    Agnès Aubert, Robert Costalat & Romain Valabrègue (2001). Modelling of the Coupling Between Brain Electrical Activity and Metabolism. Acta Biotheoretica 49 (4):301-326.
    In order to make an attempt at grouping the various aspects of brain functional imaging (fMRI, MRS, EEG-MEG, ...) within a coherent frame, we implemented a model consisting of a system of differential equations, that includes: (1) sodium membrane transport, (2) Na/K ATPase, (3) neuronal energy metabolism (i.e. glycolysis, buffering effect of phosphocreatine, and mitochondrial respiration), (4) blood-brain barrier exchanges and (5) brain hemodynamics, all the processes which are involved in the activation of brain areas. We assumed that the correlation (...)
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  10. K. A. Paller, M. Kutas & H. K. McIsaac (1995). Monitoring Conscious Recollection Via the Electrical Activity of the Brain. Psychological Science 6:107-11.
     
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  11.  3
    C. H. Vanderwolf (1978). What Does Cortical Electrical Activity Have to Do with Sleep? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):507.
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  12.  1
    Thomas L. Bennett, Paula L. Hill & Jonathan French (1982). Biotelemetry Recording of the Electrical Activity of the Hippocampus and Amygdala During Sexual Behavior in the Cat. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20 (1):57-60.
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  13. Michael S. Myslobodsky, Varda Ben-Mayor, Batia Yedid-Levy & Matti Minz (1976). Interhemispheric Asymmetry of Electrical Activity of the Brain in Sleep and “Cerebral Dominance”. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (5):465-467.
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  14.  24
    Daniel A. Pollen (2006). Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience: Electrical Stimulation of the Cortical Surface at a Threshold Current Evokes Sustained Neuronal Activity Only After a Prolonged Latency. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):560-565.
    Libet demonstrated that a substantial duration (>0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of a sensory cortex at a threshold or liminal current is required before a subject can experience a percept. Libet and his co-workers originally proposed that the result could be due either to spatial and temporal facilitation of the underlying neurons or additionally to a prolonged central processing time. However, over the next four decades, Libet chose to attribute the prolonged latency for evoking conscious experience (...)
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  15.  5
    Wolfgang Skrandies (1999). Early Effects of Semantic Meaning on Electrical Brain Activity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):301-302.
    When words are read, the visual cortex is activated, independent of whether visual or motor associations are elicited. This word-evoked brain activity is significantly influenced by semantic meaning. Such effects occur very early after stimulus presentation (at latencies between 80 and 130 msec), indicating that semantic meaning activates different neuronal assemblies in the human visual cortex when words are processed.
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  16. Kei Saito, Hideaki Onishi, Shota Miyaguchi, Shinichi Kotan & Shuhei Fujimoto (2015). Effect of Paired-Pulse Electrical Stimulation on the Activity of Cortical Circuits. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  17.  23
    Christopher Summerfield, Anthony Ian Jack & Adrian Philip Burgess (2002). Induced Gamma Activity is Associated with Conscious Awareness of Pattern Masked Nouns. International Journal of Psychophysiology 44 (2):93-100.
  18.  11
    Adrian P. Burgess & Lia Ali (2002). Functional Connectivity of Gamma EEG Activity is Modulated at Low Frequency During Conscious Recollection. International Journal of Psychophysiology 46 (2):91-100.
  19.  1
    H. H. Jasper, C. S. Bridgman & L. Carmichael (1937). An Ontogenetic Study of Cerebral Electrical Potentials in the Guinea Pig. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (1):63.
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  20. Emrah Duzel (2000). What Brain Activity Tells Us About Conscious Awareness of Memory Retrieval. In Endel Tulving (ed.), Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Psychology Press 173-187.
  21.  8
    C. H. Vanderwolf & T. E. Robinson (1981). Reticulo-Cortical Activity and Behavior: A Critique of the Arousal Theory and a New Synthesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):459-476.
    It is traditionally believed that cerebral activation (the presence of low voltage fast electrical activity in the neocortex and rhythmical slow activity in the hippocampus) is correlated with arousal, while deactivation (the presence of large amplitude irregular slow waves or spindles in both the neocortex and the hippocampus) is correlated with sleep or coma. However, since there are many exceptions, these generalizations have only limited validity. Activated patterns occur in normal sleep (active or paradoxical sleep) and during states (...)
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  22. Evan Thompson & Francisco J. Varela (2001). Radical Embodiment: Neural Dynamics and Consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (10):418-425.
  23.  18
    Terence V. Sewards & Mark A. Sewards (2000). Visual Awareness Due to Neuronal Activities in Subcortical Structures: A Proposal. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (1):86-116.
    It has been shown that visual awareness in the blind hemifield of hemianopic cats that have undergone unilateral ablations of visual cortex can be restored by sectioning the commissure of the superior colliculus or by destroying a portion of the substantia nigra contralateral to the cortical lesion (the Sprague effect). We propose that the visual awareness that is recovered is due to synchronized oscillatory activities in the superior colliculus ipsilateral to the cortical lesion. These oscillatory activities are normally partially suppressed (...)
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  24.  52
    Kai Vogeley, M. May, A. Ritzl, P. Falkai, K. Zilles & Gereon R. Fink (2004). Neural Correlates of First-Person Perspective as One Constituent of Human Self-Consciousness. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 16 (5):817-827.
  25.  34
    Markus Kiefer & Manfred Spitzer (2000). Time Course of Conscious and Unconscious Semantic Brain Activation. Neuroreport 11 (11):2401-2407.
  26.  36
    Ulrich Mayr (2004). Conflict, Consciousness, and Control. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):145-148.
  27. Herms Romijn (2002). Are Virtual Photons the Elementary Carriers of Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (1):61-81.
    Based on neurobiological data, modern concepts of self-organization and a careful rationale, the hypothesis is put forward that the fleeting, highly ordered patterns of electric and/or magnetic fields, generated by assemblies of dendritic trees of specialized neuronal networks, should be thought of as the end-product of chaotic, dynamically governed self-organization. Such patterns encode for subjective experiences such as pain and pleasure, or perceiving colours. Because by quantum mechanical definition virtual photons are the theoretical constituents of electric and magnetic fields, the (...)
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  28.  17
    Justus V. Verhagen (2007). The Neurocognitive Bases of Human Multimodal Food Perception: Consciousness. Brain Research Reviews 53 (2):271-286.
  29.  36
    Kimford J. Meador, P. G. Ray, J. R. Echauz, D. W. Loring & G. J. Vachtsevanos (2002). Gamma Coherence and Conscious Perception. Neurology 59 (6):847-854.
  30.  23
    C. Vanderwolf (2000). Are Neocortical Gamma Waves Related to Consciousness? Brain Research 855 (2):217-224.
  31. Alarik T. Arenander & Frederick T. Travis (2004). Brain Patterns of Self-Awareness. In Bernard D. Beitman & Jyotsna Nair (eds.), Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Neurobiology, Assessment, and Treatment. W.W. Norton & Co 112-126.
  32.  78
    E. Roy John (2003). A Theory of Consciousness. Current Directions in Psychological Science 12 (6):244-250.
  33. William D. S. Killgore & Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd (2007). Unconscious Processing of Facial Affect in Children and Adolescents. Social Neuroscience 2 (1):28-47.
     
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  34.  4
    F. Varela (2002). Upwards and Downwards Causation in the Brain: Case Studies on the Emergence and Efficacy of Consciousness. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins 33--95.
  35. P. V. Bundzen, V. V. Zagrantsev, K. G. Korotkov, P. Leisner & L. -E. Unestahl (2000). Comprehsnive Bioelectrographic Analysis of Mechanisms of the Alternative State of Consciousness. Human Physiology 26 (5):558-566.
     
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  36. Dominic H. ffytche & Delphine Pins (2003). Are Neural Correlates of Visual Consciousness Retinotopic? Neuroreport 14 (16):2011-2014.
     
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  37. K. Konno, Y. Katayama & T. Yamamoto (2002). Consciousness and the Intercortical Correlation Function of Electroencephalograms. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins
     
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  38.  45
    C. D. Chambers & J. B. Mattingley (2005). Neurodisruption of Selective Attention: Insights and Implications. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):542-550.
    Mechanisms of selective attention are vital for coherent perception and action. Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience have yielded key insights into the relationship between neural mechanisms of attention and eye movements, and the role of frontal and parietal brain regions as sources of attentional control. Here we explore the growing contribution of reversible neurodisruption techniques, including transcranial magnetic stimulation and microelectrode stimulation, to the cognitive neuroscience of spatial attention. These approaches permit unique causal inferences concerning the relationship between neural processes (...)
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  39.  19
    Massimiliano Oliveri, Paolo Maria Rossini, Maria M. Filippi, Raimondo Traversa, Paola Cicinelli & Carlo Caltagirone (2002). Specific Forms of Neural Activity Associated with Tactile Space Awareness. Neuroreport 13 (8):997-1001.
  40.  15
    Agnès Aubert, Robert Costalat, Hugues Duffau & Habib Benali (2002). Modeling of Pathophysiological Coupling Between Brain Electrical Activation, Energy Metabolism and Hemodynamics: Insights for the Interpretation of Intracerebral Tumor Imaging. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (4):281-295.
    Gliomas can display marked changes in the concentrations of energy metabolism molecules such as creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and lactate, as measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Moreover, the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) contrast enhancement in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be reduced or missing within or near gliomas, while neural activity is not significantly reduced (so-called neurovascular decoupling), so that the location of functionally eloquent areas using fMRI can be erroneous. In this paper, we adapt a (...)
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  41. E. Roy John (2001). A Field Theory of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (2):184-213.
    This article summarizes a variety of current as well as previous research in support of a new theory of consciousness. Evidence has been steadily accumulating that information about a stimulus complex is distributed to many neuronal populations dispersed throughout the brain and is represented by the departure from randomness of the temporal pattern of neural discharges within these large ensembles. Zero phase lag synchronization occurs between discharges of neurons in different brain regions and is enhanced by presentation of stimuli. This (...)
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  42.  11
    E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdes-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino (2001). Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (2):165-183.
    Continuous recordings of brain electrical activity were obtained from a group of 176 patients throughout surgical procedures using general anesthesia. Artifact-free data from the 19 electrodes of the International 10/20 System were subjected to quantitative analysis of the electroencephalogram (QEEG). Induction was variously accomplished with etomidate, propofol or thiopental. Anesthesia was maintained throughout the procedures by isoflurane, desflurane or sevoflurane (N = 68), total intravenous anesthesia using propofol (N = 49), or nitrous oxide plus narcotics (N = 59). A (...)
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  43.  2
    John A. Burgess & S. A. Tawia (1996). When Did You First Begin to Feel It? Locating the Beginnings of Human Consciousness? Bioethics 10 (1):1-26.
    In this paper we attempt to sharpen and to provide an answer to the question of when human beings first become conscious. Since it is relatively uncontentious that a capacity for raw sensation precedes and underpins all more sophisticated mental capacities, our question is tantamount to asking when human beings first have experiences with sensational content. Two interconnected features of our argument are crucial. First, we argue that experiences with sensational content are supervenient on facts about electrical activity in (...)
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  44.  18
    J. A. Burgess & S. A. Tawia (1996). When Did You First Begin to Feel It? — Locating the Beginning of Human Consciousness. Bioethics 10 (1):1-26.
    In this paper we attempt to sharpen and to provide an answer to the question of when human beings first become conscious. Since it is relatively uncontentious that a capacity for raw sensation precedes and underpins all more sophisticated mental capacities, our question is tantamount to asking when human beings first have experiences with sensational content. Two interconnected features of our argument are crucial. First, we argue that experiences with sensational content are supervenient on facts about electrical activity in (...)
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  45.  22
    S. A. Helekar (1999). On the Possibility of Universal Neural Coding of Subjective Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (4):423-446.
    Various neurophysiological experiments have revealed remarkable correlations between cortical neuronal activity and subjective experiences. However, the mere presence of neuronal electrical activity does not appear to be sufficient to produce these experiences. It has been suggested that the explanation for the neural basis of consciousness might lie in understanding the reason that some types of neuronal activity possess subjective correlates and others do not. Here I propose and develop the idea that this difference may be caused by (...)
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  46.  16
    K. E. Himma (2005). A Dualist Analysis of Abortion: Personhood and the Concept of Self Qua Experiential Subject. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (1):48-55.
    There is no issue more central to the abortion debate than the controversial issue of whether the fetus is a moral person. Abortion-rights opponents almost universally claim that abortion is murder and should be legally prohibited because the fetus is a moral person at the moment of conception. Abortion-rights proponents almost universally deny the crucial assumption that the fetus is a person; on their view, whatever moral disvalue abortion involves does not rise to the level of murder and hence does (...)
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  47.  21
    Kenneth Einar Himma (2003). What Philosophy of Mind Can Tell Us About the Morality of Abortion. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):89-109.
    I attempt to show that, under materialist assumptions about the nature of mind, it is a necessary condition for fetal personhood that electrical activity has begun in the brain. First, I argue that it is a necessary condition for a thing to be a moral person that it is (or has) a self—understood as something that is capable of serving as the subject of a mental experience. Second, I argue that it is a necessary condition for a fetus to (...)
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  48.  16
    J. Wackermann (2004). Dyadic Correlations Between Brain Functional States: Present Facts and Future Perspectives. Mind and Matter 2 (1):105-122.
    For about four decades data suggestive of correlations between functional states of two separated brains, not mediated by sensory or other known mechanisms, were reported, but the experimental evidence is still scarce and controversial. In this paper we briefly review studies in which one member of a pair of human subjects was physically stimulated and synchronous correlates were searched for in the brain electrical activity of the other, non-stimulated subject. We give a comprehensive account of our study of dyadic (...)
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  49.  6
    Karen Spaceinvaders (2011). Please Mind the Gap: How To Podcast Your Brain. Continent 1 (2):76-77.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 76-77. Please click to listen to the mp3 files of deep brain recordings of individual brain cells, the smallest unit of the brain, in a whole, intact living brain. Each brain region’s cells possess an electrical signature. During recordings electrical signals are transformed into sound to facilitate auditory identification of cells during a process called “mapping.” Subthalamic nucleus by continent Cortex by continent Mapping is an important step in successfully identifying and localizing the appropriate target site in (...)
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  50.  6
    Allan Combs (2010). Neurology the Mind at the Turn of the Century. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (11-12):11-12.
    Trends in thought about consciousness, the mind, and the brain at the turn of the century were surprisingly similar to major trends in thinking about these topics today. For instance, some psychiatrists as well as physiologists considered all actions of the human mind, as well as all behaviours, entirely the product of the electrochemical actions of nerve cells, while others emphasized the importance of consciousness, free will, and even the soul. The action of nerve cells, and thus the brain itself, (...)
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