Search results for '*Electroencephalography' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. [deleted]Vincent de Gardelle Christopher Summerfield, Valentin Wyart, Vanessa Mareike Johnen (2011). Human Scalp Electroencephalography Reveals That Repetition Suppression Varies with Expectation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 16.0
    Repetitions of a sensory event elicit lower levels of brain activity than its initial presentation (‘repetition suppression’). According to one view, repetition suppression depends on the biophysics of neuronal discharge, and is thus an automatic consequence of stimulus processing (‘fatigue’ model). Another account suggests that repetition suppression depends on the statistical structure of the environment, and occurs when repeated stimuli are less surprising than novel stimuli (‘surprise reduction’ model). In support of the latter view, functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have (...)
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  2. [deleted]Barbara G. Shinn-Cunningham Inyong Choi, Siddharth Rajaram, Lenny A. Varghese (2013). Quantifying Attentional Modulation of Auditory-Evoked Cortical Responses From Single-Trial Electroencephalography. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 12.0
    Selective auditory attention is essential for human listeners to be able to communicate in multi-source environments. Selective attention is known to modulate the neural representation of the auditory scene, boosting the representation of a target sound relative to the background, but the strength of this modulation, and the mechanisms contributing to it, are not well understood. Here, listeners performed a behavioral experiment demanding sustained, focused spatial auditory attention while we measured cortical responses using electroencephalography (EEG). We presented three concurrent melodic (...)
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  3. [deleted]Christopher Summerfield, Valentin Wyart, Vanessa Mareike Johnen & Vincent De Gardelle (2011). Human Scalp Electroencephalography Reveals That Repetition Suppression Varies with Expectation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 10.0
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  4. Jan Bennemann, Claudia Freigang, Erich Schröger, Rudolf Rübsamen & Nicole Richter (2013). Resolution of Lateral Acoustic Space Assessed by Electroencephalography and Psychoacoustics. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 10.0
    The encoding of auditory spatial acuity (measured as the precision to distinguish between two spatially distinct stimuli) by neural circuits in both auditory cortices is a matter of ongoing research. Here, the event-related potential mismatch negativity (MMN), a sensitive indicator of preattentive auditory change detection, was used to tap into the underlying mechanism of cortical representation of auditory spatial information. We characterized the MMN response affected by the degree of spatial deviance in lateral acoustic space using a passive oddball paradigm. (...)
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  5. Lesya Y. Ganushchak, Ingrid K. Christoffels & Niels O. Schiller (2011). The Use of Electroencephalography in Language Production Research: A Review. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 10.0
    Speech production long avoided electrophysiological experiments due to the suspicion that potential artifacts caused by muscle activity of overt speech may lead to a bad signal-to-noise ratio in the measurements. Therefore, researchers have sought to assess speech production by using indirect speech production tasks, such as tacit or implicit naming, delayed naming, or metalinguistic tasks, such as phoneme monitoring. Covert speech may, however, involve different processes than overt speech production. Recently, overt speech has been investigated using EEG. As the number (...)
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  6. Rhodri Hayward (2001). The Tortoise and the Love-Machine: Grey Walter and the Politics of Electroencephalography. Science in Context 14 (4).score: 10.0
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  7. [deleted]Mavratzakis Aimee, Herbert Cornelia & Walla Peter (2013). Biologically Relevant Emotion Processing Does Not Interfere with Self- Versus Other- Referenced Emotion Discrimination: An Electroencephalography Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 10.0
  8. [deleted]Mavratzakis Aimee (2012). Faces and Scenes Elicit Qualitatively Different Emotions: An Electroencephalography (EEG) Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 10.0
  9. [deleted]Young Park Jin (2011). The Relationship Between Risk-Taking Propensity and Theta-Phase Gamma-Power Coupling in Resting Electroencephalography. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 10.0
  10. [deleted]Fell Juergen (2011). Investigating the Neural Correlates of Metamemory Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Intracranial Electroencephalography (IEEG). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 10.0
  11. [deleted]George N. (2008). Is Amygdala Involved in Early Gaze Processing? An Electroencephalography Study in Epileptic Patients with Unilateral Amygdala Resection. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 10.0
  12. [deleted]Laureys Steven (2012). Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Combined with Electroencephalography in Severely Brain-Injured Patients: Methodological Aspects. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 10.0
  13. [deleted]Comi Giancarlo (2011). Comparison of Two Artifact Correction Methods for Simultaneously Recorded Electroencephalography-Functional Magnetic Resonance Data in a 3 Tesla Mr System. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 10.0
  14. Niels O. Schiller Lesya Y. Ganushchak, Ingrid K. Christoffels (2011). The Use of Electroencephalography in Language Production Research: A Review. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 10.0
    Speech production long avoided electrophysiological experiments due to the suspicion that potential artifacts caused by muscle activity of overt speech may lead to a bad signal-to-noise ratio in the measurements. Therefore, researchers have sought to assess speech production by using indirect speech production tasks, such as tacit or implicit naming, delayed naming, or metalinguistic tasks, such as phoneme monitoring. Covert speech may, however, involve different processes than overt speech production. Recently, overt speech has been investigated using EEG. As the number (...)
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  15. [deleted]Corballis Paul (2012). Distinct Signatures of Visual Target Selection and Distractor Suppression Investigated Using High-Density Electroencephalography. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 10.0
  16. Henda Foreid, Carla Bentes & José Pimentel (2010). The Use of Placebo as a Provocative Test in the Diagnosis of Psychogenic Non Epileptic Seizures. Neuroethics 3 (2):95-98.score: 6.0
    Psychogenic non epileptic seizures (PNES) are clinical events of psychological nature. Video-electroencephalography monitoring (V-EEGM) is a valuable method for the diagnosis of PNES and may be combined with provocative tests to induce seizures. The use of placebo in provocative tests for the diagnosis of PNES is controversial because of associated deception, and contrasts with the use of truly decreasing epileptogenic threshold techniques such as hyperventilation and photo stimulation. We present a clinical case of a pregnant woman with a past history (...)
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  17. J. Matias Palva Satu Palva (2011). Functional Roles of Alpha-Band Phase Synchronization in Local and Large-Scale Cortical Networks. Frontiers in Psychology 2:204-204.score: 6.0
    Alpha-frequency band (8-14 Hz) oscillations are among the most salient phenomena in human electroencephalography (EEG) recordings and yet their functional roles have remained unclear. Much of research on alpha oscillations in human EEG has focused on peri-stimulus amplitude dynamics, which phenomenologically support an idea of alpha oscillations being negatively correlated with local cortical excitability and having a role in the suppression of task-irrelevant neuronal processing. This kind of an inhibitory role for alpha oscillations is also supported by several functional magnetic (...)
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  18. Charles Weijer, Andrew Peterson, Fiona Webster, Mackenzie Graham, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Teneille Gofton, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Andrea Lazosky, Lorina Naci, Loretta Norton, Kathy Speechley, Bryan Young & Adrian M. Owen (2014). Ethics of Neuroimaging After Serious Brain Injury. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):41.score: 6.0
    Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These techniques (...)
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  19. [deleted]Mark O. Cunningham William Sedley (2013). Do Cortical Gamma Oscillations Promote or Suppress Perception? An Under-Asked Question with an Over-Assumed Answer. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 6.0
    Cortical gamma oscillations occur alongside perceptual processes, and in proportion to perceptual salience. They have a number of properties that make them ideal candidates to explain perception, including incorporating synchronised discharges of neural assemblies, and their emergence over a fast timescale consistent with that of perception. These observations have led to widespread assumptions that gamma oscillations’ role is to cause or facilitate conscious perception (i.e. a ‘positive’ role). While the majority of the human literature on gamma oscillations is consistent with (...)
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  20. [deleted]Jari K. Hietanen Laura M. Pönkänen (2012). Eye Contact with Neutral and Smiling Faces: Effects on Autonomic Responses and Frontal EEG Asymmetry. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 6.0
    In our previous studies we have shown that seeing another person “live” with a direct vs. averted gaze results in greater relative left-sided frontal asymmetry in the electroencephalography (EEG), associated with approach motivation, and in enhanced skin conductance responses indicating autonomic arousal. In our studies, however, the stimulus persons had a neutral expression. In real-life social interaction, eye contact is often associated with a smile, which is another signal of the sender’s approach-related motivation. A smile could therefore enhance the affective-motivational (...)
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  21. [deleted]Shane Lee & Stephanie R. Jones (2013). Distinguishing Mechanisms of Gamma Frequency Oscillations in Human Current Source Signals Using a Computational Model of a Laminar Neocortical Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:869.score: 6.0
    Gamma frequency rhythms have been implicated in numerous studies for their role in healthy and abnormal brain function. The frequency band has been described to encompass as broad a range as 30–150 Hz. Crucial to understanding the role of gamma in brain function is an identification of the underlying neural mechanisms, which is particularly difficult in the absence of invasive recordings in macroscopic human signals such as those from magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG). Here, we studied features of current dipole (...)
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  22. L. I. Aftanas & S. A. Golosheikin (2003). Changes in Cortical Activity in Altered States of Consciousness: The Study of Meditation by High-Resolution EEG. Human Physiology 29 (2):143-151.score: 4.0
  23. Boris Kotchoubey, Andrea Kübler, Ute Strehl, Herta Flor & Niels Birbaumer (2002). Can Humans Perceive Their Brain States? Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):98-113.score: 4.0
    Although the brain enables us to perceive the external world and our body, it remains unknown whether brain processes themselves can be perceived. Brain tissue does not have receptors for its own activity. However, the ability of humans to acquire self-control of brain processes indicates that the perception of these processes may also be achieved by learning. In this study patients learned to control low-frequency components of their EEG: the so-called slow cortical potentials (SCPs). In particular ''probe'' sessions, the patients (...)
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  24. Karim Jebari (2013). Brain Machine Interface and Human Enhancement – An Ethical Review. Neuroethics 6 (3):617-625.score: 4.0
    Brain machine interface (BMI) technology makes direct communication between the brain and a machine possible by means of electrodes. This paper reviews the existing and emerging technologies in this field and offers a systematic inquiry into the relevant ethical problems that are likely to emerge in the following decades.
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  25. M. N. Rusalova (2006). Frequency-Amplitude Characteristics of the EEG at Different Levels of Consciousness. Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology 36 (4):351-358.score: 4.0
  26. Claudio Babiloni, Fabrizio Vecchio, Alessandro Bultrini, Gian Luca Romani & Paolo Maria Rossini (2006). Pre- and Poststimulus Alpha Rhythms Are Related to Conscious Visual Perception: A High-Resolution EEC Study. Cerebral Cortex 16 (12):1690-1700.score: 4.0
  27. S. Makeig, T. Jung & Terrence J. Sejnowski (2000). Awareness During Drowsiness: Dynamics and Electrophysiological Correlates. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (4):266-273.score: 4.0
  28. Christopher Summerfield, Anthony Ian Jack & Adrian Philip Burgess (2002). Induced Gamma Activity is Associated with Conscious Awareness of Pattern Masked Nouns. International Journal of Psychophysiology 44 (2):93-100.score: 4.0
  29. Alexander Provost, Blake Johnson, Frini Karayanidis, Scott D. Brown & Andrew Heathcote (2013). Two Routes to Expertise in Mental Rotation. Cognitive Science 37 (7):1321-1342.score: 4.0
    The ability to imagine objects undergoing rotation (mental rotation) improves markedly with practice, but an explanation of this plasticity remains controversial. Some researchers propose that practice speeds up the rate of a general-purpose rotation algorithm. Others maintain that performance improvements arise through the adoption of a new cognitive strategy—repeated exposure leads to rapid retrieval from memory of the required response to familiar mental rotation stimuli. In two experiments we provide support for an integrated explanation of practice effects in mental rotation (...)
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  30. Jessica A. Grahn (2012). Neural Mechanisms of Rhythm Perception: Current Findings and Future Perspectives. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):585-606.score: 4.0
    Perception of temporal patterns is fundamental to normal hearing, speech, motor control, and music. Certain types of pattern understanding are unique to humans, such as musical rhythm. Although human responses to musical rhythm are universal, there is much we do not understand about how rhythm is processed in the brain. Here, I consider findings from research into basic timing mechanisms and models through to the neuroscience of rhythm and meter. A network of neural areas, including motor regions, is regularly implicated (...)
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  31. Adrian P. Burgess & Lia Ali (2002). Functional Connectivity of Gamma EEG Activity is Modulated at Low Frequency During Conscious Recollection. International Journal of Psychophysiology 46 (2):91-100.score: 4.0
  32. Vaughn R. Steele & Staley (2013). Sexual Desire, Not Hypersexuality, is Related to Neurophysiological Responses Elicited by Sexual Images. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 3.score: 4.0
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  33. Glenn F. Wilson, George A. Reis & Lloyd D. Tripf (2005). EEG Correlates of G-Induced Loss of Consciousness. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine 76 (1):19-27.score: 4.0
  34. [deleted]Jacek P. Dmochowski, Paul Sajda, Joao Dias & Lucas C. Parra (2012). Correlated Components of Ongoing EEG Point to Emotionally Laden Attention – A Possible Marker of Engagement? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 4.0
    Recent evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging suggests that cortical hemodynamic responses coincide in different subjects experiencing a common naturalistic stimulus. Here we utilize neural responses in the electroencephalogram (EEG) evoked by multiple presentations of short film clips to index brain states marked by high levels of correlation within and across subjects. We formulate a novel signal decomposition method which extracts maximally correlated signal components from multiple EEG records. The resulting components capture correlations down to a one-second time resolution, thus (...)
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  35. [deleted]Andreas Keil L. Forest Gruss, Matthias J. Wieser, Stefan R. Schweinberger (2012). Face-Evoked Steady-State Visual Potentials: Effects of Presentation Rate and Face Inversion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 4.0
    Face processing can be explored using electrophysiological methods. Research with event-related potentials (ERPs) has demonstrated the so-called face inversion effect, in which the N170 component is enhanced in amplitude and latency to inverted, compared to upright, faces. The present study explored the extent to which repetitive lower-level visual cortical engagement, reflected in flicker steady-state visual evoked potentials (ssVEPs), shows similar amplitude enhancement to face inversion. We also asked if inversion related ssVEP modulation would be dependent on the stimulation rate at (...)
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  36. [deleted]Christian Mühl Fabien Lotte, Florian Larrue (2013). Flaws in Current Human Training Protocols for Spontaneous Brain-Computer Interfaces: Lessons Learned From Instructional Design. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 4.0
    While recent research on Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) has highlighted their potential for many applications, they remain barely used outside laboratories. The main reason is their lack of robustness. Indeed, with current BCI, mental state recognition is usually slow and often incorrect. Spontaneous BCI (i.e., mental imagery-based BCI) often rely on mutual learning efforts by the user and the machine, with BCI users learning to produce stable EEG patterns (spontaneous BCI control being widely acknowledged as a skill) while the computer learns (...)
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  37. Murray Glanzer, Robert M. Chapman, William H. Clark & Henry R. Bragdon (1964). Changes in Two EEG Rhythms During Mental Activity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (3):273.score: 4.0
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  38. [deleted]Urs Maurer, Bruno Rossion & Bruce D. McCandliss (2008). Category Specificity in Early Perception: Face and Word N170 Responses Differ in Both Lateralization and Habituation Properties. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:18.score: 4.0
    Enhanced N170 ERP responses to both faces and visual words raises questions about category specific processing mechanisms during early perception and their neural basis. Topographic differences across word and face N170s might suggest a form of category specific processing in early perception - the word N170 is consistently left lateralized, while less consistent evidence suggests a right lateralization for the face N170. Additionally, the face N170 shows a reduction in amplitude across consecutive unique faces, a form of habituation that might (...)
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  39. [deleted]Ali Mazaheri Ole Jensen (2010). Shaping Functional Architecture by Oscillatory Alpha Activity: Gating by Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:186-186.score: 4.0
    In order to understand the working brain as a network, it is essential to identify the mechanisms by which information is gated between regions. We here propose that information is gated by inhibiting task-irrelevant regions, thus routing information to task-relevant regions. The functional inhibition is reflected in oscillatory activity in the alpha band (8-13 Hz). From a physiological perspective the alpha activity provides pulsed inhibition reducing the processing capabilities of a given area. Active processing in the engaged areas is reflected (...)
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  40. C. Shagass & E. P. Johnson (1943). The Course of Acquisition of a Conditioned Response of the Occipital Alpha Rhythm. Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (3):201.score: 4.0
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  41. [deleted]Pouya Ahmadian, Stefano Cagnoni & Luca Ascari (2013). How Capable is Non-Invasive EEG Data of Predicting the Next Movement? A Mini Review. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 4.0
  42. Eun-Ju Lee, Gusang Kwon, Hyun Jun Shin, Seungeun Yang, Sukhan Lee & Minah Suh (2013). The Spell of Green: Can Frontal EEG Activations Identify Green Consumers? Journal of Business Ethics 122 (3):1-11.score: 4.0
    Green consumers are those who seek to fulfill economic responsibility with their choices of environment-friendly products. Previous research found that it is not easy to identify green consumers by using traditional demographic or psychographic measurements due to the instability of moral attitude and actual behavior. The frontal theta brain waves of 19 right-handed respondents were recorded and analyzed in a choice task between an environment-friendly (green) product and a conventional product. Product information, which was provided to the respondents, included written (...)
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  43. [deleted]Y. Li, B. Lou, X. Gao & P. Sajda (2012). Post-Stimulus Endogenous and Exogenous Oscillations Are Differentially Modulated by Task Difficulty. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:9-9.score: 4.0
    We investigate the modulation of post-stimulus endogenous and exogenous oscillations when a perceptual decision is made more difficult. We use exogenous frequency tagging to induce steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) while subjects perform a face-car discrimination task, the difficulty of which varies on a trial-to-trial basis by varying the noise (phase coherence) in the image. We simultaneously analyze amplitude modulations of the SSVEP and endogenous alpha activity as a function of task difficulty. SSVEP modulation can be viewed as a neural (...)
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  44. [deleted]An Luo & Paul Sajda (2009). Comparing Neural Correlates of Visual Target Detection in Serial Visual Presentations Having Different Temporal Correlations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:5.score: 4.0
    Most visual stimuli we experience on a day-to-day basis are continuous sequences, with spatial structure highly correlated in time. During rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), this correlation is absent. Here we study how subjects' target detection responses, both behavioral and electrophysiological, differ between continuous serial visual sequences (CSVP), flashed serial visual presentation (FSVP) and RSVP. Behavioral results show longer reaction times for CSVP compared to the FSVP and RSVP conditions, as well as a difference in miss-rate between RSVP and the (...)
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  45. [deleted]Suresh D. Muthukumaraswamy (2013). High-Frequency Brain Activity and Muscle Artifacts in MEG/EEG: A Review and Recommendations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 4.0
    In recent years high-frequency brain activity in the gamma-frequency band (30 to 80 Hz) and above has become the focus of a growing body of work in MEG/EEG research. Unfortunately, high-frequency neural activity overlaps entirely with the spectral bandwidth of muscle activity (~20-300 Hz). It is becoming appreciated that artifacts of muscle activity may contaminate a number of non-invasive reports of high frequency activity. In this review, the spectral, spatial and temporal characteristics of muscle artifacts are compared with those described (...)
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  46. Gary E. Schwartz (2000). Individual Differences in Subtle Awareness and Levels of Awareness: Olfaction as a Model System. In Robert G. Kunzendorf & B. Alan Wallace (eds.), Individual Differences in Conscious Experience. John Benjamins. 209.score: 4.0
  47. Yury Shtyrov (2011). Fast Mapping of Novel Word Forms Traced Neurophysiologically. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 4.0
    Human capacity to quickly learn new words, critical for our ability to communicate using language, is well-known from behavioural studies and observations, but its neural underpinnings remain unclear. In this study, we have used event-related potentials to record brain activity to novel spoken word forms as they are being learnt by the human nervous system through passive auditory exposure. We found that the brain response dynamics change dramatically within the short (20 min) exposure session: as the subjects become familiarised with (...)
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  48. Durk Talsma, Daniel Senkowski, Salvador Soto-Faraco & Marty G. Woldorff (2010). The Multifaceted Interplay Between Attention and Multisensory Integration. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (9):400.score: 4.0
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  49. [deleted]Wan X. Yao, Vinoth K. Ranganathan, Didier Allexandre, Vlodek Siemionow & Guang H. Yue (2013). Kinesthetic Imagery Training of Forceful Muscle Contractions Increases Brain Signal and Muscle Strength. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 4.0
  50. [deleted]Lucia Billeci, Federico Sicca, Koushik Maharatna, Fabio Apicella, Antonio Narzisi, Giulia Campatelli, Sara Calderoni, Giovanni Pioggia & Filippo Muratori (2013). On the Application of Quantitative EEG for Characterizing Autistic Brain: A Systematic Review. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 4.0
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