Search results for '*Electroencephalography' (try it on Scholar)

67 found
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  1. Jesus G. Cruz-Garza, Zachery R. Hernandez, Sargoon Nepaul, Karen K. Bradley & Jose L. Contreras-Vidal (2014). Neural Decoding of Expressive Human Movement From Scalp Electroencephalography. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  2.  6
    Rhodri Hayward (2001). The Tortoise and the Love-Machine: Grey Walter and the Politics of Electroencephalography. Science in Context 14 (4).
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  3.  1
    Tjeerd W. Boonstra, Stevan Nikolin, Ann-Christin Meisener, Donel M. Martin & Colleen K. Loo (2016). Change in Mean Frequency of Resting-State Electroencephalography After Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
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  4.  1
    Kevin Nathan & Jose L. Contreras-Vidal (2016). Negligible Motion Artifacts in Scalp Electroencephalography During Treadmill Walking. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  5. Yun-Hsuan Chang, You-Yun Lee, Keng-Chen Liang, I.-Ping Chen, Chen-Gia Tsai & Shulan Hsieh (2015). Experiencing Affective Music in Eyes-Closed and Eyes-Open States: An Electroencephalography Study. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  6. Inyong Choi, Siddharth Rajaram, Lenny A. Varghese & Barbara G. Shinn-Cunningham (2013). Quantifying Attentional Modulation of Auditory-Evoked Cortical Responses From Single-Trial Electroencephalography. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
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  7. Satel Jason, Hilchey Matthew D., Wang Zhiguo & Klein Raymond M. (2015). Dissociating the Neural Mechanisms Underlying Spatiotopic and Retinotopic Inhibition of Return: An Investigation Using Eye Tracking and Electroencephalography. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  8. John L. Kennedy (1959). A Possible Artifact in Electroencephalography. Psychological Review 66 (6):347-352.
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  9. Victoria Lord & Jolanta Opacka-Juffry (2016). Electroencephalography Measures of Neural Connectivity in the Assessment of Brain Responses to Salient Auditory Stimuli in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  10. Sumire Sato, Til Ole Bergmann & Michael R. Borich (2015). Opportunities for Concurrent Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Electroencephalography to Characterize Cortical Activity in Stroke. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  11. W. G. Walter (1951). Electroencephalography. Scientia 45 (86):65.
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  12.  17
    Henda Foreid, Carla Bentes & José Pimentel (2010). The Use of Placebo as a Provocative Test in the Diagnosis of Psychogenic Non Epileptic Seizures. Neuroethics 3 (2):95-98.
    Psychogenic non epileptic seizures (PNES) are clinical events of psychological nature. Video-electroencephalography monitoring (V-EEGM) is a valuable method for the diagnosis of PNES and may be combined with provocative tests to induce seizures. The use of placebo in provocative tests for the diagnosis of PNES is controversial because of associated deception, and contrasts with the use of truly decreasing epileptogenic threshold techniques such as hyperventilation and photo stimulation. We present a clinical case of a pregnant woman with a past history (...)
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  13.  8
    Charles Weijer, Andrew Peterson, Fiona Webster, Mackenzie Graham, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Teneille Gofton, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Andrea Lazosky, Lorina Naci, Loretta Norton, Kathy Speechley, Bryan Young & Adrian M. Owen (2014). Ethics of Neuroimaging After Serious Brain Injury. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):41.
    Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These techniques (...)
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  14.  53
    Matthew M. Botvinick, Jonathan D. Cohen & Cameron S. Carter (2004). Conflict Monitoring and Anterior Cingulate Cortex: An Update. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (12):539-546.
    One hypothesis concerning the human dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is that it functions, in part, to signal the occurrence of conflicts in information processing, thereby triggering compensatory adjustments in cognitive control. Since this idea was first proposed, a great deal of relevant empirical evidence has accrued. This evidence has largely corroborated the conflict-monitoring hypothesis, and some very recent work has provided striking new support for the theory. At the same time, other findings have posed specific challenges, especially concerning the (...)
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  15.  67
    Jessica A. Grahn (2012). Neural Mechanisms of Rhythm Perception: Current Findings and Future Perspectives. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):585-606.
    Perception of temporal patterns is fundamental to normal hearing, speech, motor control, and music. Certain types of pattern understanding are unique to humans, such as musical rhythm. Although human responses to musical rhythm are universal, there is much we do not understand about how rhythm is processed in the brain. Here, I consider findings from research into basic timing mechanisms and models through to the neuroscience of rhythm and meter. A network of neural areas, including motor regions, is regularly implicated (...)
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  16.  45
    A. D. Wagner, B. J. Shannon, I. Kahn & R. L. Buckner (2005). Parietal Lobe Contributions to Episodic Memory Retrieval. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (9):445-453.
  17.  33
    M. D. Rugg & T. Curran (2007). Event-Related Potentials and Recognition Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):251-257.
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  18.  55
    Durk Talsma, Daniel Senkowski, Salvador Soto-Faraco & Marty G. Woldorff (2010). The Multifaceted Interplay Between Attention and Multisensory Integration. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (9):400.
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  19.  2
    T. Blackford, P. J. Holcomb, J. Grainger & G. R. Kuperberg (2012). A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Articulation: N400 Attenuation Despite Behavioral Interference in Picture Naming. Cognition 123 (1):84-99.
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  20.  56
    Karim Jebari (2013). Brain Machine Interface and Human Enhancement – An Ethical Review. Neuroethics 6 (3):617-625.
    Brain machine interface (BMI) technology makes direct communication between the brain and a machine possible by means of electrodes. This paper reviews the existing and emerging technologies in this field and offers a systematic inquiry into the relevant ethical problems that are likely to emerge in the following decades.
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  21.  67
    Boris Kotchoubey, Andrea Kübler, Ute Strehl, Herta Flor & Niels Birbaumer (2002). Can Humans Perceive Their Brain States? Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):98-113.
    Although the brain enables us to perceive the external world and our body, it remains unknown whether brain processes themselves can be perceived. Brain tissue does not have receptors for its own activity. However, the ability of humans to acquire self-control of brain processes indicates that the perception of these processes may also be achieved by learning. In this study patients learned to control low-frequency components of their EEG: the so-called slow cortical potentials (SCPs). In particular ''probe'' sessions, the patients (...)
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  22. S. Makeig, T. Jung & Terrence J. Sejnowski (2000). Awareness During Drowsiness: Dynamics and Electrophysiological Correlates. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (4):266-273.
  23.  8
    Vaughn R. Steele & Staley (2013). Sexual Desire, Not Hypersexuality, is Related to Neurophysiological Responses Elicited by Sexual Images. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 3.
  24.  68
    M. N. Rusalova (2006). Frequency-Amplitude Characteristics of the EEG at Different Levels of Consciousness. Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology 36 (4):351-358.
  25. L. I. Aftanas & S. A. Golosheikin (2003). Changes in Cortical Activity in Altered States of Consciousness: The Study of Meditation by High-Resolution EEG. Human Physiology 29 (2):143-151.
  26.  23
    Christopher Summerfield, Anthony Ian Jack & Adrian Philip Burgess (2002). Induced Gamma Activity is Associated with Conscious Awareness of Pattern Masked Nouns. International Journal of Psychophysiology 44 (2):93-100.
  27.  11
    Adrian P. Burgess & Lia Ali (2002). Functional Connectivity of Gamma EEG Activity is Modulated at Low Frequency During Conscious Recollection. International Journal of Psychophysiology 46 (2):91-100.
  28.  35
    Alexander Provost, Blake Johnson, Frini Karayanidis, Scott D. Brown & Andrew Heathcote (2013). Two Routes to Expertise in Mental Rotation. Cognitive Science 37 (7):1321-1342.
    The ability to imagine objects undergoing rotation (mental rotation) improves markedly with practice, but an explanation of this plasticity remains controversial. Some researchers propose that practice speeds up the rate of a general-purpose rotation algorithm. Others maintain that performance improvements arise through the adoption of a new cognitive strategy—repeated exposure leads to rapid retrieval from memory of the required response to familiar mental rotation stimuli. In two experiments we provide support for an integrated explanation of practice effects in mental rotation (...)
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  29.  4
    Clémence Isaac & Dominique Januel (2016). Neural Correlates of Cognitive Improvements Following Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
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  30.  25
    Claudio Babiloni, Fabrizio Vecchio, Alessandro Bultrini, Gian Luca Romani & Paolo Maria Rossini (2006). Pre- and Poststimulus Alpha Rhythms Are Related to Conscious Visual Perception: A High-Resolution EEC Study. Cerebral Cortex 16 (12):1690-1700.
  31.  7
    Gary E. Schwartz (2000). Individual Differences in Subtle Awareness and Levels of Awareness: Olfaction as a Model System. In Robert G. Kunzendorf & B. Alan Wallace (eds.), Individual Differences in Conscious Experience. John Benjamins 209.
  32.  6
    Murray Glanzer, Robert M. Chapman, William H. Clark & Henry R. Bragdon (1964). Changes in Two EEG Rhythms During Mental Activity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (3):273.
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  33.  4
    C. E. Henry (1941). Electroencephalographic Individual Differences and Their Constancy: I. During Sleep. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (2):117.
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  34.  4
    C. Shagass & E. P. Johnson (1943). The Course of Acquisition of a Conditioned Response of the Occipital Alpha Rhythm. Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (3):201.
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  35.  2
    C. E. Henry (1941). Electroencephalographic Individual Differences and Their Constancy: II. During Waking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (3):236.
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  36.  4
    Eun-Ju Lee, Gusang Kwon, Hyun Jun Shin, Seungeun Yang, Sukhan Lee & Minah Suh (2013). The Spell of Green: Can Frontal EEG Activations Identify Green Consumers? Journal of Business Ethics 122 (3):1-11.
    Green consumers are those who seek to fulfill economic responsibility with their choices of environment-friendly products. Previous research found that it is not easy to identify green consumers by using traditional demographic or psychographic measurements due to the instability of moral attitude and actual behavior. The frontal theta brain waves of 19 right-handed respondents were recorded and analyzed in a choice task between an environment-friendly (green) product and a conventional product. Product information, which was provided to the respondents, included written (...)
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  37.  2
    Robert W. Lansing, Edward Schwartz & Donald B. Lindsley (1959). Reaction Time and EEG Activation Under Alerted and Nonalerted Conditions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (1):1.
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  38.  2
    L. Leshan & A. Farber (1946). The Bentonite Electrode. Journal of Experimental Psychology 36 (4):371.
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  39.  5
    Glenn F. Wilson, George A. Reis & Lloyd D. Tripf (2005). EEG Correlates of G-Induced Loss of Consciousness. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine 76 (1):19-27.
  40. P. V. Bundzen, V. V. Zagrantsev, K. G. Korotkov, P. Leisner & L. -E. Unestahl (2000). Comprehsnive Bioelectrographic Analysis of Mechanisms of the Alternative State of Consciousness. Human Physiology 26 (5):558-566.
     
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  41. Jean-Michel Guérit (2005). Neurophysiological Patterns of Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):357-371.
  42. K. Konno, Y. Katayama & T. Yamamoto (2002). Consciousness and the Intercortical Correlation Function of Electroencephalograms. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins
     
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  43. Paul L. Nunez & Ramesh Srinivasan (2006). A Theoretical Basis for Standing and Traveling Brain Waves Measured with Human EEG with Implications for an Integrated Consciousness. Clinical Neurophysiology 117 (11):2424-2435.
     
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  44. M. A. Richards, S. A. Koren & M. A. Persinger (2002). Circumcerebral Application of Weak Complex Magnetic Fields with Derivatives and Changes in Electroencephalographic Power Spectra Within the Theta Range: Implications for States of Consciousness. Perceptual and Motor Skills 95 (2):671-686.
     
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  45. Rolf Verleger & Piotr Jaskowski (2006). Effects of Masked Stimuli on Attention and Response Tendencies as Revealed by Event-Related EEG Potentials: Possible Application to Understanding Neglect. In Haluk Ögmen & Bruno G. Breitmeyer (eds.), The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. MIT Press 225-241.
  46. Yu Bai, Timothy Lane, Georg Northoff & et al (2015). Resting State Glutamate Predicts Elevated Pre-Stimulus Alpha During Self-Relatedness: A Combined EEG-MRS Study on 'Rest-Self' Overlap. Social Neuroscience:DOI:10.1080/17470919.2015.107258.
    Recent studies have demonstrated neural overlap between resting state activity and self-referential processing. This “rest-self” overlap occurs especially in anterior cortical midline structures like the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC). However, the exact neurotemporal and biochemical mechanisms remain to be identified. Therefore, we conducted a combined electroencephalography (EEG)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study. EEG focused on pre-stimulus (e.g., prior to stimulus presentation or perception) power changes to assess the degree to which those changes can predict subjects’ perception (and judgment) of subsequent (...)
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  47.  28
    Antoine Lutz, Mental Training Enhances Attentional Stability: Neural and Behavioral Evidence.
    The capacity to stabilize the content of attention over time varies among individuals, and its impairment is a hallmark of several mental illnesses. Impairments in sustained attention in patients with attention disorders have been associated with increased trial-to-trial variability in reaction time and event-related potential deficits during attention tasks. At present, it is unclear whether the ability to sustain attention and its underlying brain circuitry are transformable through training. Here, we show, with dichotic listening task performance and electroencephalography, that training (...)
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  48.  8
    Dimitria Electra Gatzia & Brit Brogaard (2016). What Can Neuroscience Tell Us About 64 65 the Hard Problem of Consciousness? Frontiers in Neuroscience 10:395.
    Rapid advances in the field of neuroimaging techniques including magnetoencephalography (MEG), electroencephalography (EEG), functional MRI (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), voxel based morphomentry (VBM), and optical imaging, have allowed neuroscientists to investigate neural processes in ways that have not been possible until recently. Combining these techniques with advanced analysis procedures during different conditions such as hypnosis, psychiatric and neurological conditions, subliminal stimulation, and psychotropic drugs began transforming the study of neuroscience, ushering a new paradigm that may allow neuroscientists to tackle (...)
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  49.  8
    UnCheol Lee, George A. Mashour, Seunghwan Kim, Gyu-Jeong Noh & Byung-Moon Choi (2009). Propofol Induction Reduces the Capacity for Neural Information Integration: Implications for the Mechanism of Consciousness and General Anesthesia. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):56-64.
    The cognitive unbinding paradigm suggests that the synthesis of neural information is attenuated by general anesthesia. Here, we analyzed the functional organization of brain activities in the conscious and anesthetized states, based on functional segregation and integration. Electroencephalography recordings were obtained from 14 subjects undergoing induction of general anesthesia with propofol. We quantified changes in mean information integration capacity in each band of the EEG. After induction with propofol, mean information integration capacity was reduced most prominently in the γ band (...)
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  50.  36
    B. Libet, E. Wright & C. Gleason (1982). Readiness Potentials Preceding Unrestricted Spontaneous Pre-Planned Voluntary Acts. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 54:322-325.
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