Search results for '*Emotional States' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Bill Wringe (2003). Simulation, Co-Cognition, and the Attribution of Emotional States. European Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):353-374.score: 105.0
  2. William A. Cunningham, Kristen A. Dunfield & Paul E. Stillman (2013). Emotional States From Affective Dynamics. Emotion Review 5 (4):344-355.score: 80.0
    Psychological constructivist models of emotion propose that emotions arise from the combinations of multiple processes, many of which are not emotion specific. These models attempt to describe both the homogeneity of instances of an emotional “kind” (why are fears similar?) and the heterogeneity of instances (why are different fears quite different?). In this article, we review the iterative reprocessing model of affect, and suggest that emotions, at least in part, arise from the processing of dynamical unfolding representations of valence across (...)
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  3. Michael Lewis (2011). Inside and Outside: The Relation Between Emotional States and Expressions. Emotion Review 3 (2):189-196.score: 80.0
    The association between emotional expression and physiological emotional states is at best, modest. Using data from the autonomic nervous system (ANS), central nervous system (CNS), and hormonal systems there appears to be an association which accounts for approximately 10—20% of the variance between them. Excluding measurement error, it is proposed that the need for action and regulation accounts for the low levels of synchrony. Understanding system responses allows for the study of individual differences as a way of understanding both (...)
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  4. Hillel Braude & Jonathan Kimmelman (2012). The Ethics of Managing Affective and Emotional States to Improve Informed Consent: Autonomy, Comprehension, and Voluntariness. Bioethics 26 (3):149-156.score: 68.0
    Over the past several decades the ‘affective revolution’ in cognitive psychology has emphasized the critical role affect and emotion play in human decision-making. Drawing on this affective literature, various commentators have recently proposed strategies for managing therapeutic expectation that use contextual, symbolic, or emotive interventions in the consent process to convey information or enhance comprehension. In this paper, we examine whether affective consent interventions that target affect and emotion can be reconciled with widely accepted standards for autonomous action. More specifically, (...)
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  5. Edmund T. Rolls (2013). What Are Emotional States, and Why Do We Have Them? Emotion Review 5 (3):241-247.score: 64.0
    An approach to emotion is described in which emotions are defined as states elicited by instrumental reinforcers, that is, by stimuli that are the goals for action. This leads to a theory of the evolutionary adaptive value of emotions, which is that different genes specify different goals in their own self-interest, and any actions can then be learned and performed by instrumental learning to obtain the goals. The brain mechanisms for emotion in brain regions such as the orbitofrontal and (...)
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  6. Thomas Natsoulas (2000). On the Intrinsic Nature of States of Consciousness: Further Considerations in the Light of James's Conception. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):139-166.score: 62.0
    How are the states of consciousness intrinsically so that they all qualify as ?feelings? in William James?s generic sense? Only a small, propaedeutic part of what is required to address the intrinsic nature of such states can be accomplished here. I restrict my topic mainly to a certain characteristic that belongs to each of those pulses of mentality that successively make up James?s stream of consciousness. Certain statements of James?s are intended to pick out the variable ?width? belonging (...)
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  7. Savas L. Tsohatzidis (1993). Emotional States and Linguistic Events: A Study of Conceptual Misconnections. Pragmatics and Cognition 1 (2):229-243.score: 60.0
  8. Gerrit J. Dimmendaal (2002). Colourful Psi¿s Sleep Furiously: Depicting Emotional States in Some African Languages. Pragmatics and Cognition 10 (1):57-84.score: 60.0
    This study sets out to investigate the ¿poetry of grammar¿, more specifically the role of the body in figurative speech, in African languages mainly belonging to Nilotic and Bantu. Apprehending the semantics and pragmatics of metaphorical and metonymic expressions in these languages presupposes an interaction between a number of cognitive processes, as argued below. Interestingly, these languages seem to use these strategies involving figurative speech in tandem with alternative strategies involving on-record statements. This multivocality only makes sense if we place (...)
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  9. Nazanin Derakshan & Michael W. Eysenck (2010). Introduction to the Special Issue: Emotional States, Attention, and Working Memory. Cognition and Emotion 24 (2):189-199.score: 60.0
  10. Morton Ann Gernsbacher, H. Hill Goldsmith & Rachel R. W. Robertson (1992). Do Readers Mentally Represent Characters' Emotional States? Cognition and Emotion 6 (2):89-111.score: 60.0
  11. Arthur C. Graesser & G. Tanner Jackson (2008). Body and Symbol in AutoTutor: Conversations That Are Responsive to the Learners' Cognitive and Emotional States. In Manuel de Vega, Arthur M. Glenberg & Arthur C. Graesser (eds.), Symbols and Embodiment: Debates on Meaning and Cognition. Oxford University Press. 33.score: 60.0
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  12. Juraj Hvorecký (2010). Embodied Appraisals and Non-Emotional States. Human Affairs 20 (3).score: 60.0
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  13. Arthur C. Graesser & Jackson & G. Tanner (2008). Body and Symbol in AutoTutor: Conversations That Are Responsive to the Learners' Cognitive and Emotional States. In Manuel de Vega, Arthur Glenberg & Arthur Graesser (eds.), Symbols and Embodiment: Debates on Meaning and Cognition. Oup Oxford.score: 60.0
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  14. Domingo Castelo Joaquin (1987). The Fundamental Uncertainty Principle and the Principle of Non-Additive Emotional States. Theory and Decision 22 (1):49-69.score: 60.0
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  15. Viveros Maria-Paz (2013). Homeostatic Role of the Endocannabinoid System and Consequences of its Disregulation on Emotional States. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 60.0
  16. Niewiadomski, R., Mancini, M., Hyniewska, S., Pelachaud & C. (2010). Communicating Emotional States with the Greta Agent. In Klaus R. Scherer, Tanja Bänziger & Etienne Roesch (eds.), A Blueprint for Affective Computing: A Sourcebook and Manual. Oup Oxford.score: 60.0
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  17. Jaak Panksepp (2000). The Neuro-Evolutionary Cusp Between Emotions and Cognitions: Implications for Understanding Consciousness and the Emergence of a Unified Mind Science. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):15-54.score: 56.0
    The neurobiological systems that mediate the basic emotions are beginning to be understood. They appear to be constituted of genetically coded, but experientially refined executive circuits situated in subcortical areas of the brain which can coordinate the behavioral, physiological and psychological processes that need to be recruited to cope with a variety of primal survival needs (i.e., they signal evolutionary fitness issues). These birthrights allow newborn organisms to begin navigating the complexities of the world and to learn about the values (...)
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  18. Thomas C. Dalton (2000). The Developmental Roots of Consciousness and Emotional Experience. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):55-89.score: 56.0
    Charles Darwin is generally credited with having formulated the first systematic attempt to explain the evolutionary origins and function of the expression of emotions in animals and humans. His ingenious theory, however, was burdened with popular misconceptions about human phylogenetic heritage and bore the philosophical and theoretical deficiencies of the brain science of his era that his successors strove to overcome. In their attempts to rectify Darwin?s errors, William James, James Mark Baldwin and John Dewey each made important contributions to (...)
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  19. Richard D. R. Lane (2000). Levels of Emotional Awareness: Neurological, Psychological, and Social Perspectives. In Reuven Bar-On & James D. A. Parker (eds.), The Handbook of Emotional Intelligence: Theory, Development, Assessment, and Application at Home, School, and in the Workplace. Jossey-Bass. 171-191.score: 56.0
     
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  20. Beatrice de Gelder & Nouchine Hadjikhani (2006). Non-Conscious Recognition of Emotional Body Language. Neuroreport 17 (6):583-586.score: 52.0
  21. Bernard J. Baars (2000). Conscious Emotional Feelings--Beyond the Four Taboos: An Introductory Comment. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):11-14.score: 52.0
  22. Marc D. Lewis & Rebecca M. Todd (2005). Getting Emotional - a Neural Perspective on Emotion, Intention, and Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):210-235.score: 52.0
  23. Paul J. Silvia (2002). Self-Awareness and Emotional Intensity. Cognition and Emotion 16 (2):195-216.score: 52.0
  24. Francesco Monaco, Marco Mula & Andrea E. Cavanna (2005). Consciousness, Epilepsy, and Emotional Qualia. Epilepsy and Behavior 7 (2):150-160.score: 52.0
  25. Thomas Suslow, Patricia Ohrmann, Jochen Bauer, Astrid V. Rauch, Wolfram Schwindt, Volker Arolt, Walter Heindel & Harald Kugel (2006). Amygdala Activation During Masked Presentation of Emotional Faces Predicts Conscious Detection of Threat-Related Faces. Brain and Cognition 61 (3):243-248.score: 52.0
  26. Elizabeth K. Taitano, Individual Differences in Emotional Awareness and the Lateralized Processing of Emotion.score: 52.0
  27. R. W. Simon (2014). Sociological Scholarship on Gender Differences in Emotion and Emotional Well-Being in the United States: A Snapshot of the Field. Emotion Review 6 (3):196-201.score: 48.0
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  28. Scott C. Roesch (1999). Modelling the Direct and Indirect Effects of Positive Emotional and Cognitive Traits and States on Social Judgements. Cognition and Emotion 13 (4):387-418.score: 48.0
  29. Jeremy R. Gray (2001). Emotional Modulation of Cognitive Control: Approach–Withdrawal States Double-Dissociate Spatial From Verbal Two-Back Task Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (3):436.score: 48.0
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  30. Brian P. Bailey & Joseph A. Konstan (2006). On the Need for Attention-Aware Systems: Measuring Effects of Interruption on Task Performance, Error Rate, and Affective State. Computers in Human Behavior 22 (4):685-708.score: 45.0
  31. Luc Ciompi (2003). Reflections on the Role of Emotions in Consciousness and Subjectivity, From the Perspective of Affect-Logic. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):181-196.score: 44.0
    The phenomena of human consciousness and subjectivity are explored from the perspective of affect-logic, a comprehensive meta-theory of the interactions between emotion and cognition based mainly on cognitive and social psychology, psychopathology, neurobiology Piaget?s genetic epistemology, psychoanalysis, and evolutionary science. According to this theory, overt or covert affective-cognitive interactions are obligatorily present in all mental activity, seemingly ?neutral? thinking included. Emotions continually exert numerous so-called operator-effects, both linear and nonlinear, on attention, on memory and on comprehensive thought, or logic in (...)
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  32. Douglas F. Watt (2004). Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain: Review Article. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (9):77-82.score: 44.0
  33. Uriah Kriegel (2002). Emotional Content. Consciousness and Emotion 3 (2):213-230.score: 44.0
  34. Michela Balconi (2006). Exploring Consciousness in Emotional Face Decoding: An Event-Related Potential Analysis. Genetic, Social, and General Psychology Monographs 132 (2):129-150.score: 44.0
  35. John F. Kihlstrom, Shelagh Mulvaney, Betsy A. Tobias & Irene P. Tobis (2000). The Emotional Unconscious. In Eric Eich, John F. Kihlstrom, Gordon H. Bower, Joseph P. Forgas & Paula M. Niedenthal (eds.), Cognition and Emotion. Oxford University Press. 30-86.score: 44.0
  36. Jaak Panksepp (2005). Commentary on "Becoming Aware of Feelings": On the Primal Nature of Affective Consciousness: What Are the Relations Between Emotional Awareness and Affective Experience? Neuro-Psychoanalysis 7 (1):40-55.score: 44.0
  37. Jesse J. Prinz (2002). Consciousness, Computation, and Emotion. In Simon C. Moore & Mike Oaksford (eds.), Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins.score: 44.0
     
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  38. Merold Westphal & Giacomo A. Bonanno (2004). Emotion Self-Regulation. In Simon C. Moore & Mike Oaksford (eds.), Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins.score: 44.0
     
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  39. Kent C. Berridge & Piotr Winkielman (2003). What is an Unconscious Emotion? (The Case for Unconscious "Liking"). Cognition and Emotion 17 (2):181-211.score: 40.0
  40. Jason L. Megill (2003). What Role Do the Emotions Play in Cognition? Towards a New Alternative to Cognitive Theories of Emotion. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):81-100.score: 40.0
    This paper has two aims: (1) to point the way towards a novel alternative to cognitive theories of emotion, and (2) to delineate a number of different functions that the emotions play in cognition, functions that become visible from outside the framework of cognitive theories. First, I hold that the Higher Order Representational (HOR) theories of consciousness ? as generally formulated ? are inadequate insofar as they fail to account for selective attention. After posing this dilemma, I resolve it in (...)
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  41. Alfred R. Mele (2000). Self-Deception and Emotion. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):115-137.score: 40.0
    Drawing on recent empirical work, this philosophical paper explores some possible contributions of emotion to self-deception. Three hypotheses are considered: (1) the anxiety reduction hypothesis: the function of self-deception is to reduce present anxiety; (2) the solo emotion hypothesis: emotions sometimes contribute to instances of self-deception that have no desires among their significant causes; (3) the direct emotion hypothesis: emotions sometimes contribute directly to self-deception, in the sense that they make contributions that, at the time, are neither made by desires (...)
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  42. Timothy D. Wilson (2002). Strangers to Ourselves: Discovering the Adaptive Unconscious. Harvard University Press.score: 40.0
    This is not your psychoanalyst's unconscious.
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  43. James A. Russell (2005). Emotion in Human Consciousness is Built on Core Affect. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):26-42.score: 40.0
  44. Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.) (2005). Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press.score: 40.0
    Presenting state-of-the-art work on the conscious and unconscious processes involved in emotion, this integrative volume brings together leading psychologists, ...
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  45. Dan J. Stein, Mark Solms & Jack van Honk (2006). The Cognitive-Affective Neuroscience of the Unconscious. CNS Spectrums 11 (8):580-583.score: 40.0
  46. Hugo D. Critchley, Stefan Wiens, Pia Rotshtein, Arne Öhman & Raymond J. Dolan (2004). Neural Systems Supporting Interoceptive Awareness. Nature Neuroscience 7 (2):189-195.score: 40.0
  47. Silke Anders, Niels Birbaumer, Bettina Sadowski, Michael Erb, Irina Mader, Wolfgang Grodd & Martin Lotze (2004). Parietal Somatosensory Association Cortex Mediates Affective Blindsight. Nature Neuroscience 7 (4):339-340.score: 40.0
  48. Jaak Panksepp (2002). On the Animalian Values of the Human Spirit: The Foundational Role of Affect in Psychotherapy and the Evolution of Consciousness. European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling and Health 5 (3):225-245.score: 40.0
  49. A. Craig (2004). Human Feelings: Why Are Some More Aware Than Others? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (6):239-241.score: 40.0
  50. Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (2000). The Interdependence of Consciousness and Emotion. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):1-10.score: 40.0
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