Search results for '*Evoked Potentials' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Carlo Miniussi Domenica Veniero, Marta Bortoletto (2012). Cortical Modulation of Short-Latency TMS-Evoked Potentials. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 168.0
    Transcranial magnetic stimulation - electroencephalogram (TMS-EEG) co-registration offers the opportunity to test reactivity of brain areas across distinct conditions through TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs). Several TEPs have been described, their functional meaning being largely unknown. In particular, short-latency potentials peaking at 5 (P5) and 8 (N8) ms after the TMS pulse have been recently described, but because of their huge amplitude, the problem of whether their origin is cortical or not has been opened. To gain information about these components, (...)
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  2. Nina Kazanina George Stothart (2013). Oscillatory Characteristics of the Visual Mismatch Negativity: What Evoked Potentials Aren't Telling Us. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 168.0
    The visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) response is typically examined by subtracting the average response to a deviant stimulus from the response to the standard. This approach, however, can omit a critical element of the neural response, i.e. the non-phase-locked (‘induced’) oscillatory activity. Recent investigations of the oscillatory characteristics of the auditory mismatch negativity (aMMN) identified a crucial role for theta phase locking and power. Oscillatory characteristics of the vMMN from 39 healthy young adults were investigated in order to establish whether (...)
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  3. Andreas Keil L. Forest Gruss, Matthias J. Wieser, Stefan R. Schweinberger (2012). Face-Evoked Steady-State Visual Potentials: Effects of Presentation Rate and Face Inversion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 148.0
    Face processing can be explored using electrophysiological methods. Research with event-related potentials (ERPs) has demonstrated the so-called face inversion effect, in which the N170 component is enhanced in amplitude and latency to inverted, compared to upright, faces. The present study explored the extent to which repetitive lower-level visual cortical engagement, reflected in flicker steady-state visual evoked potentials (ssVEPs), shows similar amplitude enhancement to face inversion. We also asked if inversion related ssVEP modulation would be dependent on the stimulation (...)
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  4. L. Forest Gruss, Matthias J. Wieser, Stefan R. Schweinberger & Andreas Keil (2012). Face-Evoked Steady-State Visual Potentials: Effects of Presentation Rate and Face Inversion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 148.0
    Face processing can be explored using electrophysiological methods. Research with event-related potentials (ERPs) has demonstrated the so-called face inversion effect, in which the N170 component is enhanced in amplitude and latency to inverted, compared to upright, faces. The present study explored the extent to which repetitive lower-level visual cortical engagement, reflected in flicker steady-state visual evoked potentials (ssVEPs), shows similar amplitude enhancement to face inversion. We also asked if inversion related ssVEP modulation would be dependent on the stimulation (...)
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  5. Kentaro Yamanaka, Hiroshi Kadota & Daichi Nozaki (2013). Long-Latency TMS-Evoked Potentials During Motor Execution and Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 147.0
  6. Anling Rao, Anna C. Nobre & Alan Cowey (2001). Disruption of Visual Evoked Potentials Following a V1 Lesion: Implications for Blindsight. In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press. 69-86.score: 147.0
     
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  7. Nicholas Fallon Andrej Stancak (2013). Emotional Modulation of Experimental Pain: A Source Imaging Study of Laser Evoked Potentials. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 136.0
    Negative emotions have been shown to augment experimental pain. As induced emotions alter brain activity, it is not clear whether pain augmentation during noxious stimulation would be related to neural activation existing prior to onset of a noxious stimulus or alternatively, whether emotional stimuli would only alter neural activity during the period of nociceptive processing. We analysed the spatio-temporal patterns of laser evoked potentials (LEPs) occurring prior to and during the period of cortical processing of noxious laser stimuli during (...)
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  8. Catherine L. Reed, David S. Leland, Benjamin Brekke & Alan A. Hartley (2013). Attention's Grasp: Early and Late Hand Proximity Effects on Visual Evoked Potentials. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 115.0
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  9. Szanyi J. (2008). Aging Effect in Visual Evoked Potentials to Pattern, Motion and Cognitive Stimuli. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 105.0
  10. Mark Johnson & Mike Anderson (1991). What Can Evoked Potentials Tell Us About Cognition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):732-733.score: 105.0
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  11. Meyer M. (2008). Altered Hemispheric Asymmetries of Auditory Evoked Potentials After Cochlear Implantation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 105.0
  12. R. Spehlmann (1983). Blindness, Visual Cortex, and Visually Evoked Potentials. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):461.score: 105.0
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  13. Kahya Y. P. (2008). Reconstruction of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials by Using Discrete Wavelet Transforms. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 105.0
  14. A. Harvey Baker & Irene W. Kostin (1986). Kinesthetic Aftereffects and Evoked Potentials Constitute Parallel Measures of Augmenting-Reducing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):744.score: 105.0
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  15. Escera Carles (2011). Differential Effects of Frequency Adaptation and Sequential Predictability on Auditory Evoked Potentials. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 105.0
  16. Escera C. (2009). Preliminary Study of Auditory Brainstem and Middle Latency Evoked Potentials In a Passive Oddball Paradigm. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 105.0
  17. Walker Nicholas (2011). Sources of Experimental Error in Analysis of the Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 105.0
  18. Ramsden R. (2008). The Development and Characteristics of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials From Electrical Stimulation of the Cochlear Nucleus by an Auditory Brainstem Implant in 6 Children with Cochlear Nerve Aplasia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 105.0
  19. Marvin Zuckerman (1986). Sensation Seeking and Augmenting-Reducing: Evoked Potentials and/or Kinesthetic Figural Aftereffects? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):749.score: 105.0
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  20. Monte S. Buchsbaum & Elliot S. Gershon (1980). Genetic Factors in EEG, Sleep, and Evoked Potentials. In. In J. M. Davidson & Richard J. Davidson (eds.), The Psychobiology of Consciousness. Plenum. 147--168.score: 100.0
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  21. Reinhard Judith (2012). Early Visual Evoked Potentials Are Modulated by Matching Odorants: Evidence for Olfactory-Visual Interactions in Humans. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 100.0
  22. Hugrass Laila (2012). Spatio-Temporal Structure of Multi-Focal Magnetoencephalographic Visual Evoked Potentials (MVEP). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 100.0
  23. R. Ruseckaite, T. Maddess & A. C. James (2004). Comparing Multifocal Frequency-Doubling Illusion, Visual Evoked Potentials, and Automated Perimetry in Normal and Optic Neuritis Patients. In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell Publishing. 128-128.score: 100.0
  24. Enrico Facco & M. D. Calixto Machado (2004). Evoked Potentials in the Diagnosis of Brain Death. In. In C. Machado & D. E. Shewmon (eds.), Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness. Plenum. 175--187.score: 100.0
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  25. Sm Garnsey, Mk Tanenhaus & R. Chapman (1988). Evoked-Potentials and Parsing. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):492-492.score: 100.0
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  26. Kirk Ian (2012). The Influence of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val66met Polymorphism on the Degree of Long-Term Potentiation of Human Visual Evoked Potentials Predicts Memory Performance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 100.0
  27. Y. Matsumiya, M. Fuerstein, A. L. Lazarus & D. I. Mostofsky (1980). Amplitude Changes in Components of the Auditory Evoked Potentials During a Reward-Associated Counting Task. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 15 (4):257-259.score: 100.0
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  28. Carolina Murd, Kairi Kreegipuu, Nele Kuldkepp, Aire Raidvee, Maria Tamm & Jüri Allik (2014). Visual Evoked Potentials to Change in Coloration of a Moving Bar. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 100.0
  29. D. Schwender, A. Kaiser, S. Klasing, K. Peter & E. Pöppel (1993). Explicit and Implicit Memory and Mid-Latency Auditory Evoked Potentials During Cardiac Surgery. In P. S. Sebel, B. Bonke & E. Winograd (eds.), Memory and Awareness in Anesthesia. Prentice-Hall.score: 100.0
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  30. Joseph J. Tecce (1970). Attention and Evoked Potentials in Man. In D. Mostofsky (ed.), Attention: Contemporary Theory and Analysis. Appleton-Century-Crofts. 331--365.score: 100.0
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  31. C. Villemure, G. Plourde, I. Lussier & N. Normandin (1993). Auditory Processing During Isoflurane Anesthesia: A Study with an Implicit Memory Task and Auditory Evoked Potentials. In P. S. Sebel, B. Bonke & E. Winograd (eds.), Memory and Awareness in Anesthesia. Prentice-Hall.score: 100.0
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  32. G. B. Arden, J. Wolf, T. Berninger & C. H. Hogg (1996). Differing Properties of Cortical Potentials Evoked by Patterns of Either Colour or Luminance Contrast. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. 101-101.score: 80.0
     
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  33. D. S. Ruchkin & S. Sutton (1973). Visual Evoked and Emitted Potentials and Stimulus Significance. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 2 (3):144-146.score: 80.0
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  34. Georg Stenberg, Magnus Lindgren, Mikael Johansson, Andreas Olsson & Ingmar Rosén (2000). Semantic Processing Without Conscious Identification: Evidence From Event-Related Potentials. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (4):973-1004.score: 67.0
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  35. Ville Ojanen, Antti Revonsuo & Mikko Sams (2003). Visual Awareness of Low-Contrast Stimuli is Reflected in Event-Related Brain Potentials. Psychophysiology 40 (2):192-197.score: 67.0
  36. Atsushi Matsumoto, Tetsuya Iidaka, Michio Nomura & Hideki Ohira (2005). Dissociation of Conscious and Unconscious Repetition Priming Effect on Event-Related Potentials. Neuropsychologia 43 (8):1168-1176.score: 67.0
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  37. Michela Balconi & Claudio Lucchiari (2005). Consciousness, Emotion and Face: An Event-Related Potentials (ERP) Study. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), Consciousness & Emotion: Agency, Conscious Choice, and Selective Perception. John Benjamins. 121.score: 67.0
  38. M. D. Rugg & T. Curran (2007). Event-Related Potentials and Recognition Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):251-257.score: 67.0
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  39. Marco Zanon, Piero Paolo Battaglini, Joanna Jarmolowska, Gilberto Pizzolato & Pierpaolo Busan (2013). Long-Range Neural Activity Evoked by Premotor Cortex Stimulation: A TMS/EEG Co-Registration Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 64.0
    The premotor cortex is one of the fundamental structures composing the neural networks of the human brain. It is implicated in many behaviors and cognitive tasks, ranging from movement to attention and eye-related activity. Therefore, neural circuits that are related to premotor cortex have been studied to clarify their connectivity and/or role in different tasks. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the propagation of the neural activity evoked in the dorsal premotor cortex using transcranial magnetic stimulation/electroencephalography (TMS/EEG). Towards (...)
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  40. Claudio Maioli Luca Falciati, Tiziana Gianesini (2013). Covert Oculo-Manual Coupling Induced by Visually Guided Saccades. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 60.0
    Hand pointing to objects under visual guidance is one of the most common motor behaviors in everyday life. In natural conditions, gaze and arm movements are commonly aimed at the same target and the accuracy of both systems is considerably enhanced if eye and hand move together. Evidence supports the viewpoint that gaze and limb control systems are not independent but at least partially share a common neural controller. The aim of the present study was to verify whether a saccade (...)
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  41. Hubert R. Dinse Jan-Christoph Kattenstroth, Tobias Kalisch, Sören Peters, Martin Tegenthoff (2012). Long-Term Sensory Stimulation Therapy Improves Hand Function and Restores Cortical Responsiveness in Patients with Chronic Cerebral Lesions. Three Single Case Studies. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 60.0
    Rehabilitation of sensorimotor impairment resulting from cerebral lesion (CL) utilizes task specific training and massed practice to drive reorganization and sensorimotor improvement due to induction of neuroplasticity mechanisms. Loss of sensory abilities often complicates recovery, and thus the individual’s ability to use the affected body part for functional tasks. Therefore, the development of additional and alternative approaches that supplement, enhance, or even replace conventional training procedures would be advantageous. Repetitive sensory stimulation protocols (rSS) have been shown to evoke sensorimotor improvements (...)
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  42. Jan-Christoph Kattenstroth, Tobias Kalisch, Sören Peters, Martin Tegenthoff & Hubert R. Dinse (2012). Long-Term Sensory Stimulation Therapy Improves Hand Function and Restores Cortical Responsiveness in Patients with Chronic Cerebral Lesions. Three Single Case Studies. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 60.0
    Rehabilitation of sensorimotor impairment resulting from cerebral lesion (CL) utilizes task specific training and massed practice to drive reorganization and sensorimotor improvement due to induction of neuroplasticity mechanisms. Loss of sensory abilities often complicates recovery, and thus the individual’s ability to use the affected body part for functional tasks. Therefore, the development of additional and alternative approaches that supplement, enhance, or even replace conventional training procedures would be advantageous. Repetitive sensory stimulation protocols (rSS) have been shown to evoke sensorimotor improvements (...)
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  43. Osamu Takai Anthony T. Herdman (2013). Paying Attention to Orthography: A Visual Evoked Potential Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 56.0
    In adult readers, letters and words are rapidly identified within visual networks to allow for efficient reading abilities. Neuroimaging studies of orthography have mostly used words and letter strings that recruit many hierarchical levels in reading. Understanding how single letters are processed could provide further insight into orthographic processing. The present study investigated orthographic processing using single letters and pseudoletters when adults were encouraged to pay attention to or away from orthographic features. We measured evoked potentials (EPs) to single (...)
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  44. Nathan A. Parks, Diane M. Beck & Arthur F. Kramer (2013). Enhancement and Suppression in the Visual Field Under Perceptual Load. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 52.0
    The perceptual load theory of attention proposes that the degree to which visual distractors are processed is a function of the attentional demands of a task – greater demands increase filtering of irrelevant distractors. The spatial configuration of such filtering is unknown. Here, we used steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) in conjunction with time-domain event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the distribution of load-induced distractor suppression and task-relevant enhancement in the visual field. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded while subjects performed (...)
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  45. Michela Balconi (2006). Exploring Consciousness in Emotional Face Decoding: An Event-Related Potential Analysis. Genetic, Social, and General Psychology Monographs 132 (2):129-150.score: 47.0
  46. Robert M. Chapman (1999). Function and Content Words Evoke Different Brain Potentials. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):282-284.score: 46.0
    Word class-specific differences in brain evoked potentials (EP) are discussed for connotative meaning and for function versus content words. A well-controlled experiment found matching lexical decision times for function and content words, but clear EP differences (component with maximum near 550 msec) among function words, content words, and nonwords that depended on brain site. Another EP component, with a 480 msec maximum, differentiated words (either function or content) from nonwords.
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  47. Dorothea Hämmerer, Guido Biele, Viktor Müller, Holger Thiele, Peter Nürnberg, Hauke R. Heekeren & Shu-Chen Li (2013). Effects of PPP1R1B (DARPP-32) Polymorphism on Feedback-Related Brain Potentials Across the Life Span. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 46.0
    Maximizing gains during probabilistic reinforcement learning requires the updating of choice–outcome expectations at the time when the feedback about a specific choice or action is given. Extant theories and evidence suggest that dopaminergic modulation plays a crucial role in reinforcement learning and the updating of choice–outcome expectations. Furthermore, recently a positive component of the event-related potential (ERP) about 200 msec (P2) after feedback has been suggested to reflect such updating. The efficacy of dopaminergic modulation changes across the life span. However, (...)
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  48. Dana L. Strait & Nina Kraus (2011). Can You Hear Me Now? Musical Training Shapes Functional Brain Networks for Selective Auditory Attention and Hearing Speech in Noise. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 44.0
    Even in the quietest of rooms, our senses are perpetually inundated by a barrage of sounds, requiring the auditory system to adapt to a variety of listening conditions in order to extract signals of interest (e.g., one speaker’s voice amidst others). Brain networks that promote selective attention are thought to sharpen the neural encoding of a target signal, suppressing competing sounds and enhancing perceptual performance. Here, we ask: does musical training benefit cortical mechanisms that underlie selective attention to speech? To (...)
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  49. Sydney S. Cash Andrew R. Dykstra, Eric Halgren, Thomas Thesen, Chad E. Carlson, Werner Doyle, Joseph R. Madsen, Emad N. Eskandar (2011). Widespread Brain Areas Engaged During a Classical Auditory Streaming Task Revealed by Intracranial EEG. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 44.0
    The auditory system must constantly decompose the complex mixture of sound arriving at the ear into perceptually-independent streams constituting accurate representations of individual sources in the acoustic environment. How the brain accomplishes this task is not well understood. The present study combined a classic behavioral paradigm with direct cortical recordings from neurosurgical patients with epilepsy in order to further describe the neural correlates of auditory streaming. Participants listened to sequences of pure tones alternating in frequency and indicated whether they heard (...)
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  50. Barbara G. Shinn-Cunningham Inyong Choi, Siddharth Rajaram, Lenny A. Varghese (2013). Quantifying Attentional Modulation of Auditory-Evoked Cortical Responses From Single-Trial Electroencephalography. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 44.0
    Selective auditory attention is essential for human listeners to be able to communicate in multi-source environments. Selective attention is known to modulate the neural representation of the auditory scene, boosting the representation of a target sound relative to the background, but the strength of this modulation, and the mechanisms contributing to it, are not well understood. Here, listeners performed a behavioral experiment demanding sustained, focused spatial auditory attention while we measured cortical responses using electroencephalography (EEG). We presented three concurrent melodic (...)
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