Search results for '*Face Perception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. [deleted]Thomas Busigny Bruno Rossion, Laurence Dricot, Rainer Goebel (2010). Holistic Face Categorization in Higher Order Visual Areas of the Normal and Prosopagnosic Brain: Toward a Non-Hierarchical View of Face Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 240.0
    How a visual stimulus is initially categorized as a face in a network of human brain areas remains largely unclear. Hierarchical neuro-computational models of face perception assume that the visual stimulus is first decomposed in local parts in lower order visual areas. These parts would then be combined into a global representation in higher order face-sensitive areas of the occipito-temporal cortex. Here we tested this view in fMRI with visual stimuli that are categorized as faces based on their global (...)
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  2. Mark W. Greenlee, Gyula Kovács & Krisztina Nagy (2012). The Lateral Occipital Cortex in the Face Perception Network: An Effective Connectivity Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    The perception of faces involves a large network of cortical areas of the human brain. While several studies tested this network recently, its relationship to the lateral occipital (LO) cortex known to be involved in visual object perception remains largely unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to test the effective connectivity among the major areas of the face-processing core network and LO. Specifically, we tested how LO is connected to the fusiform face (...)
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  3. Michael A. Webster Carrie L. Paras (2013). Stimulus Requirements for Face Perception: An Analysis Based on “Totem Poles”. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    The stimulus requirements for perceiving a face are not well defined but are presumably simple, for vivid faces can often by seen in random or natural images such as cloud or rock formations. To characterize these requirements, we measured where observers reported the impression of faces in images defined by symmetric 1/f noise. This allowed us to examine the prominence and properties of different features and their necessary configurations. In these stimuli many faces can be perceived along the vertical midline, (...)
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  4. Simon van Rysewyk (2013). Age-Differences in Face Perception: A Review of N170 Event-Related Potential Studies. In A. Freitas-Magalhães (ed.), ‘Emotional Expression: The Brain and the Face’ (V. IV, Second Series). University of Fernando Pessoa Press.score: 216.0
  5. N. Davidenko & S. J. Flusberg (2012). Environmental Inversion Effects in Face Perception. Cognition 123 (3):442-447.score: 198.0
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  6. [deleted]Mischa de Rover Daan Scheepers, Belle Derks, Sander Nieuwenhuis, Gert-Jan Lelieveld, Félice Van Nunspeet, Serge A. R. B. Rombouts (2013). The Neural Correlates of in-Group and Self-Face Perception: Is There Overlap for High Identifiers? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 192.0
    Social identity, the part of the self-concept derived from group membership, is a key explanatory construct for a wide variety of behaviors, ranging from organizational commitment to discrimination towards out-groups. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined the neural basis of social identity through a comparison with the neural correlates of self-face perception. Participants viewed a series of pictures, one at a time, of themselves, a familiar other, in-group members, and out-group members. We created a contrast for self-face (...) by subtracting brain activation in response to the familiar other from brain activation in response to the self face, and a contrast for social identity by subtracting brain activation in response to out-group faces from brain activation in response to in-group faces. In line with previous research, for the self—familiar other contrast we found activation in several right-hemisphere regions (inferior frontal gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules). In addition, we found activation in closely-adjacent brain areas for the social identity contrast. Importantly, significant clusters of activation in this in-group—out-group contrast only emerged to the extent that participants reported high identification with the in-group. These results suggest that self-perception and social identity depend on partly similar neural processes. (shrink)
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  7. Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.) (2011). Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. OUP Oxford.score: 180.0
    The human face is unique among social stimuli in conveying such a variety of different characteristics. A person's identity, sex, race, age, emotional state, focus of attention, facial speech patterns, and attractiveness are all detected and interpreted with relative ease from the face. Humans also display a surprising degree of consistency in the extent to which personality traits, such as trustworthiness and likeability, are attributed to faces. In the past thirty years, face perception has become an area of major (...)
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  8. Elizabeth A. Hoffman, M. Ida Gobbini & James V. Haxby (2000). The Distributed Human Neural System for Face Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (6):223-233.score: 180.0
    Face perception, perhaps the most highly developed visual skill in humans, is mediated by a distributed neural system in humans that is comprised of multiple, bilateral regions. We propose a model for the organization of this system that emphasizes a distinction between the representation of invariant and changeable aspects of faces. The representation of invariant aspects of faces underlies the recognition of individuals, whereas the representation of changeable aspects of faces, such as eye gaze, expression, and lip movement, underlies (...)
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  9. A. Mike Burton & Rob Jenkins (2011). Unfamiliar Face Perception. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford. 287--306.score: 180.0
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  10. Andrew W. Young (2011). Disorders of Face Perception. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford. 77--91.score: 180.0
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  11. M. Behrmann, G. Avidan, C. Thomas & M. Nishimura (2011). Impairments in Face Perception. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  12. Mike Burton & Rob Jenkins (2011). Unfamiliar Face Perception. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  13. Michelle de Haan (2011). The Neuro-Development of Face Perception. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  14. James V. Haxby & M. Ida Gobbini (2011). Distributed Neural Systems for Face Perception. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford. 93--110.score: 180.0
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  15. Kurt Hugenberg, Steven G. Young, Donald F. Sacco & Michael J. Bernstein (2011). Social Categorization Influences Face Perception and Face Memory. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  16. Kurt Hugenberg, Don Sacco, Steven Young & Michael Bernstein (2011). Social Categorization Influences Face Perception and Face Memory. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  17. Mark H. Johnson (2011). Face Perception: A Developmental Perspective. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford. 1.score: 180.0
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  18. Keith Kendrick & Jianfeng Feng (2011). Neural Encoding Principles in Face Perception Revealed Using Non-Primate Models. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  19. R. C. L. Lindsay, J. K. Mansour, N. Kalmet, M. I. Bertrand & L. Whaley (2011). Face Perception and Recognition in Eyewitness Memory. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  20. Daphne Maurer & Cathy Mondloch (2011). Sensitive Periods in Face Perception. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  21. Mary Phillips (2011). Face Perception in Schizophrenia and Mood Disorders. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  22. Stefan Schweinberger (2011). Neurophysiological Correlates of Face Perception. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  23. Lisa S. Scott (2011). Face Perception and Perceptual Expertise in Adult and Developmental Populations. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford. 195.score: 180.0
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  24. Thomas Vetter & Mirella Walker (2011). Computer-Generated Images in Face Perception. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford. 387.score: 180.0
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  25. Leslie A. Zebrowitz (2011). Ecological and Social Approaches to Face Perception. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford. 31.score: 180.0
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  26. Vicki Bruce, Steve Langton & Harold Hill (1999). Complexities of Face Perception and Categorisation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):369-370.score: 174.0
    We amplify possible complications to the tidy division between early vision and later categorisation which arise when we consider the perception of human faces. Although a primitive face-detecting system, used for social attention, may indeed be integral to “early vision,” the relationship between this and diverse other uses made of information from faces is far from clear.
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  27. Simon van Rysewyk (2010). Towards the Developmental Pathway of Face Perception Abilities in the Human Brain. In A. Freitas-Magalhães (ed.), ‘Emotional Expression: The Brain and the Face’ (V. II, Second Series). University of Fernando Pessoa Press. 111-131.score: 168.0
  28. [deleted]Terry Blumenthal Cornelia Herbert, Anca Sfärlea (2013). Your Emotion or Mine: Labeling Feelings Alters Emotional Face Perception—an ERP Study on Automatic and Intentional Affect Labeling. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 168.0
    Empirical evidence suggests that words are powerful regulators of emotion processing. Although a number of studies have used words as contextual cues for emotion processing, the role of what is being labeled by the words (i.e. one’s own emotion as compared to the emotion expressed by the sender) is poorly understood. The present study reports results from two experiments which used ERP methodology to evaluate the impact of emotional faces and self- versus sender-related emotional pronoun-noun pairs (e.g. my fear vs. (...)
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  29. Adrian Schwaninger, Janek S. Lobmaier, Christian Wallraven & Stephan Collishaw (2009). Two Routes to Face Perception: Evidence From Psychophysics and Computational Modeling. Cognitive Science 33 (8):1413-1440.score: 162.0
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  30. Rachel A. Robbins Daniel W. Piepers (2012). A Review and Clarification of the Terms “Holistic,” “Configural,” and “Relational” in the Face Perception Literature. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 160.0
    It is widely agreed that the human face is processed differently from other objects. However there is a lack of consensus on what is meant by a wide array of terms used to describe this “special” face processing (e.g. holistic and configural) and the perceptually relevant information within a face (e.g. relational properties and configuration). This paper will review existing models of holistic/configural processing, discuss how they differ from one another conceptually and review the wide variety of measures used to (...)
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  31. Daniel W. Piepers & Rachel A. Robbins (2012). A Review and Clarification of the Terms “Holistic,”“Configural,” and “Relational” in the Face Perception Literature. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 160.0
    It is widely agreed that the human face is processed differently from other objects. However there is a lack of consensus on what is meant by a wide array of terms used to describe this “special” face processing (e.g. holistic and configural) and the perceptually relevant information within a face (e.g. relational properties and configuration). This paper will review existing models of holistic/configural processing, discuss how they differ from one another conceptually and review the wide variety of measures used to (...)
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  32. Orsola Rosa Salva, Simona Normando, Antonio Mollo & Lucia Regolin (2014). Novelty Preference in Face Perception by Week-Old Lambs (Ovis Aries). Interaction Studies 15 (1):113-128.score: 156.0
    An extensive literature has been accumulating, in recent years, on face-processing in sheep and on the relevance of faces for social interaction in this species. In spite of this, spontaneous preferences for face or non-face stimuli in lambs have not been reported. In this study we tested the spontaneous preference of 8-day-old lambs (N = 9) for three pairs of stimuli. In each pair, one stimulus was a face-like display, whereas the other presented the same inner features displaced in unnatural (...)
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  33. [deleted]Urs Maurer, Bruno Rossion & Bruce D. McCandliss (2008). Category Specificity in Early Perception: Face and Word N170 Responses Differ in Both Lateralization and Habituation Properties. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:18.score: 156.0
    Enhanced N170 ERP responses to both faces and visual words raises questions about category specific processing mechanisms during early perception and their neural basis. Topographic differences across word and face N170s might suggest a form of category specific processing in early perception - the word N170 is consistently left lateralized, while less consistent evidence suggests a right lateralization for the face N170. Additionally, the face N170 shows a reduction in amplitude across consecutive unique faces, a form of habituation (...)
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  34. Justine Sergent (1986). Microgenesis of Face Perception. In H. Ellis, M. Jeeves, F. Newcombe & Andrew W. Young (eds.), Aspects of Face Processing. Martinus Nijhoff. 17--33.score: 156.0
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  35. C. Umiltà (1986). Models of Laterality Effects in Face Perception. In H. Ellis, M. Jeeves, F. Newcombe & Andrew W. Young (eds.), Aspects of Face Processing. Martinus Nijhoff. 210--214.score: 156.0
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  36. Benedict C. Jones Anthony C. Little, Peter J. B. Hancock, Lisa M. DeBruine (2012). Adaptation to Antifaces and the Perception of Correct Famous Identity in an Average Face. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 156.0
    Previous experiments have examined exposure to anti-identities (faces that possess traits opposite to an identity through a population average), finding that exposure to antifaces enhances recognition of the plus-identity images. Here we examine adaptation to antifaces using famous female celebrities. We demonstrate: that exposure to a color and shape transformed antiface of a celebrity increases the likelihood of perceiving the identity from which the antiface was manufactured in a composite face and that the effect shows size invariance (Experiment 1), equivalent (...)
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  37. Gillian Rhodes, Rachel Robbins, Emma Jaquet, Elinor McKone, Linda Jeffery & Colin Wg Clifford (2005). Adaptation and Face Perception: How Aftereffects Implicate Norm-Based Coding of Faces. In Colin W. G. Clifford & Gillian Rhodes (eds.), Fitting the Mind to the World: Adaptation and After-Effects in High-Level Vision. Oup Oxford.score: 150.0
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  38. Bruno Rossion (forthcoming). Understanding Face Perception by Means of Human Electrophysiology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences.score: 150.0
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  39. [deleted]Engel Andreas (2011). Differential Modulation of Oscillatory Activity in the Human Nucleus Accumbens by Face Perception, Target Detection and Novelty Signaling. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 150.0
  40. Kathrin Cohen Kadosh & Mark H. Johnson (2007). Developing a Cortex Specialized for Face Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (9):367-369.score: 150.0
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  41. Gillian Rhodes, Rachel Robbins, Emma Jacquet, Elinor McKone, Linda Jeffery & Clifford & Colin (2005). Adaptation and Face Perception: How Aftereffects Implicate Norm-Based Coding of Faces. In Colin W. G. Clifford & Gillian Rhodes (eds.), Fitting the Mind to the World: Adaptation and After-Effects in High-Level Vision. Oup Oxford.score: 150.0
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  42. Tirta Susilo, Galit Yovel, Jason Js Barton & Bradley Duchaine (2013). Face Perception is Category-Specific: Evidence From Normal Body Perception in Acquired Prosopagnosia. Cognition 129 (1):88-94.score: 150.0
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  43. Hadyn D. Ellis (1992). A Wise Child: Face Perception by Human Neonates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (3):514-515.score: 150.0
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  44. [deleted]Duncan J. (2008). Neural Correlates of Conscious Face Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 150.0
  45. Romina Palermo & Gillian Rhodes (2002). The Influence of Divided Attention on Holistic Face Perception. Cognition 82 (3):225-257.score: 150.0
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  46. [deleted]Bruno Rossion, Laurence Dricot, Rainer Goebel & Thomas Busigny (2011). Holistic Face Categorization in Higher Order Visual Areas of the Normal and Prosopagnosic Brain: Toward a Non-Hierarchical View of Face Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:225.score: 150.0
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  47. Edoardo Zamuner (2008). “Face Value. Perception and Knowledge Others’ Happiness”. In Lisa Bortolotti (ed.), The Philosophy of Happiness. Palgrave.score: 132.0
    Happiness, like other basic emotions, has visual properties that create the conditions for happiness to be perceived in others. This is to say that happiness is perceivable. Its visual properties are to be identified with those facial expressions that are characteristic of happiness. Yet saying that something is perceivable does not suffice for us to conclude that it is perceived. We therefore need to show that happiness is perceived. Empirical evidence suggests that the visual system functions to perceive happiness as (...)
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  48. Charles S. Travis (2005). The Face of Perception. In Hilary Putnam (Contemporary Philosophy in Focus). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.score: 132.0
  49. [deleted]William A. Cunningham, Jay J. Van Bavel, Nathan L. Arbuckle, Dominic J. Packer & Ashley S. Waggoner (2012). Rapid Social Perception is Flexible: Approach and Avoidance Motivational States Shape P100 Responses to Other-Race Faces. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 132.0
    Research on person categorization suggests that people automatically and inflexibly categorize others according to group memberships, such as race. Consistent with this view, research using electroencephalography (EEG) has found that White participants tend to show an early difference in processing Black versus White faces. Yet, new research has shown that these ostensibly automatic biases may not be as inevitable as once thought and that motivational influences may be able to eliminate these biases. It is unclear, however, whether motivational influences shape (...)
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  50. [deleted]Ashley S. Waggoner William A. Cunningham, Jay J. Van Bavel, Nathan L. Arbuckle, Dominic J. Packer (2012). Rapid Social Perception is Flexible: Approach and Avoidance Motivational States Shape P100 Responses to Other-Race Faces. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 132.0
    Research on person categorization suggests that people automatically and inflexibly categorize others according to group memberships, such as race. Consistent with this view, research using electroencephalography (EEG) has found that White participants tend to show an early difference in processing Black versus White faces. Yet, new research has shown that these ostensibly automatic biases may not be as inevitable as once thought and that motivational influences may be able to eliminate these biases. It is unclear, however, whether motivational influences shape (...)
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