Search results for '*Feedback' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Dennis Norris, James M. McQueen & Anne Cutler (2000). Merging Information in Speech Recognition: Feedback is Never Necessary. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):299-325.score: 24.0
    Top-down feedback does not benefit speech recognition; on the contrary, it can hinder it. No experimental data imply that feedback loops are required for speech recognition. Feedback is accordingly unnecessary and spoken word recognition is modular. To defend this thesis, we analyse lexical involvement in phonemic decision making. TRACE (McClelland & Elman 1986), a model with feedback from the lexicon to prelexical processes, is unable to account for all the available data on phonemic decision making. The modular Race model (Cutler (...)
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  2. Elise Springer (2008). Moral Feedback and Motivation: Revisiting the Undermining Effect. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (4):407 - 423.score: 24.0
    Social psychologists have evidence that evaluative feedback on others’ choices sometimes has unwelcome negative effects on hearers’ motivation. Holroyd’s article (Holroyd J. Ethical Theory Moral Pract 10:267–278, 2007) draws attention to one such result, the undermining effect, that should help to challenge moral philosophers’ complacency about blame and praise. The cause for concern is actually greater than she indicates, both because there are multiple kinds of negative effect on hearer motivation, and because these are not, as she hopes, reliably counteracted (...)
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  3. [deleted]Kerstin Unger, Sonja Heintz & Jutta Kray (2012). Punishment Sensitivity Modulates the Processing of Negative Feedback but Not Error-Induced Learning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:186-186.score: 24.0
    Accumulating evidence suggests that individual differences in punishment and reward sensitivity are associated with functional alterations in neural systems underlying error and feedback processing. In particular, individuals highly sensitive to punishment have been found to be characterized by larger midfrontal error signals as reflected in the error negativity (Ne/ERN) and the FRN (feedback-related negativity). By contrast, reward sensitivity has been shown to relate to the error positivity (Pe). Given that Ne/ERN, FRN, and Pe have been functionally linked to flexible behavioral (...)
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  4. Kathryn L. Bollich, Paul M. Johannet & Simine Vazire (2011). In Search of Our True Selves: Feedback as a Path to Self-Knowledge. Frontiers in Psychology 2:312.score: 24.0
    How can self-knowledge of personality be improved? What path is the most fruitful source for learning about our true selves? Previous research has noted two main avenues for learning about the self: looking inward (e.g., introspection) and looking outward (e.g., feedback). Although most of the literature on these topics does not directly measure the accuracy of self-perceptions (i.e., self-knowledge), we review these paths and their potential for improving self-knowledge. We come to the conclusion that explicit feedback, a largely unexamined path, (...)
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  5. Timothy V. Nguyen Jeffrey T. Fairbrother, David D. Laughlin (2012). Self-Controlled Feedback Facilitates Motor Learning in Both High and Low Activity Individuals. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this study was to determine if high and low activity individuals differed in terms of the effects of self-controlled feedback on the performance and learning of a movement skill. The task consisted of a blindfolded beanbag toss using the non-preferred arm. Participants were pre-screened according to their physical activity level using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. An equal number of high activity (HA) and low activity (LA) participants were assigned to self-control (SC) and yoked (YK) feedback conditions, (...)
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  6. Randall O'Reilly Dean Wyatte, Seth Herd, Brian Mingus (2012). The Role of Competitive Inhibition and Top-Down Feedback in Binding During Object Recognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    How does the brain bind together visual features that are processed concurrently by different neurons into a unified percept suitable for processes such as object recognition? Here, we describe how simple, commonly accepted principles of neural processing can interact over time to solve the brain's binding problem. We focus on mechanisms of neural inhibition and top-down feedback. Specifically, we describe how inhibition creates competition among neural populations that code different features, effectively suppressing irrelevant information, and thus minimizing illusory conjunctions. Top-down (...)
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  7. [deleted]Srikantan S. Nagarajan John F. Houde (2011). Speech Production as State Feedback Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 24.0
    Spoken language exists because of a remarkable neural process. Inside a speaker’s brain, an intended message gives rise to neural signals activating the muscles of the vocal tract. The process is remarkable because these muscles are activated in just the right way that the vocal tract produces sounds a listener understands as the intended message. What is the best approach to understanding the neural substrate of this crucial motor control process? One of the key recent modeling developments in neuroscience has (...)
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  8. Ana Torres, Andrés Catena, Antonio Cándido, Antonio Maldonado, Alberto Megías & José César Perales (2013). Cocaine Dependent Individuals and Gamblers Present Different Associative Learning Anomalies in Feedback-Driven Decision Making: A Behavioral and ERP Study. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Several recent studies have demonstrated that addicts behave less flexibly than healthy controls in the probabilistic reversal-learning task (PRLT), in which participants must gradually learn to choose between a probably-rewarded option and an improbably-rewarded one, on the basis of corrective feedback, and in which preferences must adjust to abrupt reward contingency changes (reversals). In the present study, pathological gamblers (PG) and cocaine-dependent individuals (CDI) showed different learning curves in the PRLT. PG also showed a reduced electroencephalographic response to feedback (Feedback-Related (...)
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  9. Dean Wyatte, Seth Herd, Brian Mingus & Randall O'Reilly (2012). The Role of Competitive Inhibition and Top-Down Feedback in Binding During Object Recognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    How does the brain bind together visual features that are processed concurrently by different neurons into a unified percept suitable for processes such as object recognition? Here, we describe how simple, commonly accepted principles of neural processing can interact over time to solve the brain's binding problem. We focus on mechanisms of neural inhibition and top-down feedback. Specifically, we describe how inhibition creates competition among neural populations that code different features, effectively suppressing irrelevant information, and thus minimizing illusory conjunctions. Top-down (...)
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  10. [deleted]Felicia Pei-Hsin Cheng, Michael Grossbach & Eckart Altenmüller (2013). Altered Sensory Feedbacks in Pianist's Dystonia: The Altered Auditory Feedback Paradigm and the Glove Effect. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:868.score: 24.0
    Background: This study investigates the effect of altered auditory feedback (AAF) in musician's dystonia (MD) and discusses whether altered auditory feedback can be considered as a sensory trick in MD. Furthermore, the effect of AAF is compared with altered tactile feedback, which can serve as a sensory trick in several other forms of focal dystonia. Methods: The method is based on scale analysis (Jabusch et al. 2004). Experiment 1 employs synchronization paradigm: 12 MD patients and 25 healthy pianists had to (...)
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  11. [deleted]André Brechmann Christin Kohrs, Nicole Angenstein, Henning Scheich (2012). Human Striatum is Differentially Activated by Delayed, Omitted, and Immediate Registering Feedback. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    The temporal contingency of feedback during conversations is an essential requirement of a successful dialog. In the current study, we investigated the effects of delayed and omitted registering feedback on fMRI activation and compared both unexpected conditions to immediate feedback. In the majority of trials of an auditory task, participants received an immediate visual feedback which merely indicated that a button press was registered but not whether the response was correct or not. In a minority of trials, and thus unexpectedly, (...)
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  12. Virginia Conde, Eckart Altenmüller, Arno Villringer & Patrick Ragert (2012). Task-Irrelevant Auditory Feedback Facilitates Motor Performance in Musicians. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    An efficient and fast auditory–motor network is a basic resource for trained musicians due to the importance of motor anticipation of sound production in musical performance. When playing an instrument, motor performance always goes along with the production of sounds and the integration between both modalities plays an essential role in the course of musical training. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of task-irrelevant auditory feedback during motor performance in musicians using a serial reaction time (...)
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  13. Waka Fujisaki (2012). Effects of Delayed Visual Feedback on Grooved Pegboard Test Performance. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Using four experiments, this study investigates what amount of delay brings about maximal impairment under delayed visual feedback and whether a critical interval, such as that in audition, also exists in vision. The first experiment measured the Grooved Pegboard test performance as a function of visual feedback delays from 120 to 2120 ms in 16 steps. Performance sharply decreased until about 490 ms, then more gradually until 2120 ms, suggesting that two mechanisms were operating under delayed visual feedback. Since delayed (...)
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  14. [deleted]D. D. Garrett, S. W. Macdonald & F. I. Craik (2011). Intraindividual Reaction Time Variability is Malleable: Feedback- and Education-Related Reductions in Variability with Age. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:101-101.score: 24.0
    Intraindividual variability (IIV) in trial-to-trial reaction time is a robust and stable within-person marker of aging. However, it remains unknown whether IIV can be modulated experimentally. In a sample of healthy younger and older adults, we examined the effects of motivation- and performance-based feedback, age, and education level on IIV in a choice RT task (four blocks over 15 minutes). We found that IIV was reduced with block-by-block feedback, particularly for highly educated older adults. Notably, the baseline difference in IIV (...)
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  15. Takuya Honda, Nobuhiro Hagura, Toshinori Yoshioka & Hiroshi Imamizu (2013). Imposed Visual Feedback Delay of an Action Changes Mass Perception Based on the Sensory Prediction Error. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    While performing an action, the timing of when the sensory feedback is given can be used to establish the causal link between the action and its consequence. It has been shown that delaying the visual feedback while carrying an object makes people feel the mass of the object to be greater, suggesting that the feedback timing can also impact the perceived quality of an external object. In this study, we investigated the origin of the feedback timing information that influences the (...)
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  16. [deleted]Marcus Lindskog, Anders Winman & Peter Juslin (2013). Are There Rapid Feedback Effects on Approximate Number System Acuity? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7 (June).score: 24.0
    Humans are believed to be equipped with an Approximate Number System (ANS) that supports non-symbolic representations of numerical magnitude. Correlations between individual measures of the precision of the ANS and mathematical ability have raised the question of whether the precision can be improved by feedback training. A study (DeWind and Brannon, 2012) reported improvement in discrimination precision occurring within 600-700 trials of feedback, suggesting ANS malleability with rapidly improving acuity in response to feedback. We tried to replicate the rapid improvement (...)
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  17. [deleted]Gabry Mies, Ivo Van Den Berg, Ingmar H. A. Franken, Marion Smits, Maurits Van Der Molen & Frederik Van Der Veen (2013). Neurophysiological Correlates of Anhedonia in Feedback Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Disturbances in feedback processing and a dysregulation of the neural circuit in which the cingulate cortex plays a key role have been frequently observed in depression. Since depression is a heterogeneous disease, instead of focusing on the depressive state in general, this study investigated the relations between the two core symptoms of depression, i.e., depressed mood and anhedonia, and the neural correlates of feedback processing using fMRI. The focus was on the different subdivisions of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Undergraduates (...)
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  18. [deleted]D. M. Pfabigan, J. Alexopoulos, H. Bauer, C. Lamm & U. Sailer (2010). All About the Money - External Performance Monitoring is Affected by Monetary, but Not by Socially Conveyed Feedback Cues in More Antisocial Individuals. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:100-100.score: 24.0
    This study investigated the relationship between feedback processing and antisocial personality traits measured by the PSSI questionnaire (Kuhl & Kazén, 1997) in a healthy undergraduate sample. While event-related potentials (Feedback Related Negativity [FRN], P300) were recorded, participants encountered expected and unexpected feedback during a gambling task. As recent findings suggest learning problems and deficiencies during feedback processing in clinical populations of antisocial individuals, we performed two experiments with different healthy participants in which feedback about monetary gains or losses consisted either (...)
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  19. [deleted]Beate Schuermann, Tanja Endrass & Norbert Kathmann (2012). Neural Correlates of Feedback Processing in Decision-Making Under Risk. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:204-204.score: 24.0
    Introduction. Event-related brain potentials (ERP) provide important information about the sensitivity of the brain to process varying risks. The aim of the present study was to determine how different risk levels are reflected in decision-related ERPs, namely the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300. Material and Methods. 20 participants conducted a probabilistic two-choice gambling task while an electroencephalogram was recorded. Choices were provided between a low-risk option yielding low rewards and low losses and a high-risk option yielding high rewards and (...)
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  20. [deleted]Wouter Van Den Bos, Berna Güroğlu, Bianca G. Van Den Bulk, Serge A. R. Rombouts & Eveline A. Crone (2009). Better Than Expected or as Bad as You Thought? The Neurocognitive Development of Probabilistic Feedback Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 24.0
    Learning from feedback lies at the foundation of adaptive behavior. Two prior neuroimaging studies have suggested that there are qualitative differences in how children and adults use feedback by demonstrating that dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and parietal cortex were more active after negative feedback for adults, but after positive feedback for children. In the current study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test whether this difference is related to valence or informative value of the feedback by examining neural (...)
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  21. [deleted]B. Drueke, M. Boecker, V. Mainz, S. Gauggel & L. Mungard (2011). Can Executive Control Be Influenced by Performance Feedback? Two Experimental Studies with Younger and Older Adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:90-90.score: 24.0
    Executive control describes a wide range of cognitive processes which are critical for the goal-directed regulation of stimulus processing and action regulation. Previous studies have shown that executive control performance declines with age but yet, it is still not clear whether different internal and external factors - as performance feedback and age - influence these cognitive processes and how they might interact with each other. Therefore, we investigated feedback effects in the flanker task in young as well as in older (...)
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  22. [deleted]Freddy van der Veen Erik M. Mueller, Elisabeth A. Evers, Jan Wacker (2012). Acute Tryptophan Depletion Attenuates Brain-Heart Coupling Following External Feedback. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    External and internal performance feedback triggers neural and visceral modulations such as reactions in the medial prefrontal cortex and insulae or changes of heart period (HP). The functional coupling of neural and cardiac responses following feedback (cortico-cardiac connectivity) is not well understood. While linear time-lagged within-subjects correlations of single-trial EEG and HP (cardio-electroencephalographic covariance-tracing, CECT) indicate a robust negative coupling of EEG magnitude 300 ms after presentation of an external feedback stimulus with subsequent alterations of heart period (the so-called N300H (...)
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  23. [deleted]René San Martín (2012). Event-Related Potential Studies of Outcome Processing and Feedback-Guided Learning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    In order to control behavior in an adaptive manner the brain has to learn how some situations and actions predict positive or negative outcomes. During the last decade cognitive neuroscientists have shown that the brain is able to evaluate and learn from outcomes within a few hundred milliseconds of their occurrence. This research has been primarily focused on the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P3, two event-related potential (ERP) components that are elicited by outcomes. The FRN is a frontally distributed (...)
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  24. Livia Silveira Pogetti, Rosana Machado Souza, Eloísa Tudella & Luis Augusto Teixeira (2013). Early Infant's Use of Visual Feedback in Voluntary Reaching for a Spatial Target. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Capacity of using visual feedback by infants at the age of reaching onset has been controversial. In this investigation we assessed movement kinematics in the task of reaching for a toy in 5-month-olds, comparing movements performed with the preferred arm under full vision versus visual occlusion. That comparison was made in consecutive periods of visual occlusion. Analysis of results revealed that visual occlusion led to decreased straightness of arm displacement toward the toy as compared to full vision. Longer periods of (...)
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  25. [deleted]James M. Gold Sarah E. Morris, Clay B. Holroyd, Monica C. Mann-Wrobel (2011). Dissociation of Response and Feedback Negativity in Schizophrenia: Electrophysiological and Computational Evidence for a Deficit in the Representation of Value. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 24.0
    Contrasting theories of schizophrenia propose that the disorder is characterized by a deficit in phasic changes in dopamine activity in response to ongoing events or, alternatively, by a weakness in the representation of the value of responses. Schizophrenia patients have reliably reduced brain activity following incorrect responses but other research suggests that they may have intact feedback-related potentials, indicating that the impairment may be specifically response-related. We used event-related brain potentials and computational modeling to examine this issue by comparing the (...)
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  26. Daichi Nozaki Takuya Honda, Masaya Hirashima (2012). Habituation to Feedback Delay Restores Degraded Visuomotor Adaptation by Altering Both Sensory Prediction Error and the Sensitivity of Adaptation to the Error. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Sensory prediction error, which is the difference between actual and predicted sensory consequences, is a driving force of motor learning. Thus, appropriate temporal associations between the actual sensory feedback signals and motor commands for predicting sensory consequences are crucial for the brain to calculate the sensory prediction error accurately. Indeed, it has been shown that artificially introduced delays in visual feedback degrade motor learning. However, our previous study has showed that degraded adaptation is alleviated by prior habituation to the delay. (...)
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  27. Grant Reaber (2012). Rational Feedback. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):797-819.score: 21.0
    Suppose you think that whether you believe some proposition A at some future time t might have a causal influence on whether A is true. For instance, maybe you think a woman can read your mind, and either (1) you think she will snap her fingers shortly after t if and only if you believe at t that she will, or (2) you think she will snap her fingers shortly after t if and only if you don't believe at t (...)
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  28. Jean Bullier (2001). Feedback Connections and Conscious Vision. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (9):369-370.score: 21.0
  29. Victor A. F. Lamme (2001). Blindsight: The Role of Feedforward and Feedback Corticocortical Connections. Acta Psychologica 107 (1):209-228.score: 21.0
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  30. Yasuki Hashimoto & Kuniyoshi L. Sakai (2003). Brain Activations During Conscious Self-Monitoring of Speech Production with Delayed Auditory Feedback: An fMRI Study. Human Brain Mapping 20 (1):22-28.score: 21.0
  31. Sukhvinder S. Obhi (2007). Evidence for Feedback Dependent Conscious Awareness of Action. Brain Research 1161:88-94.score: 21.0
  32. P. E. Roland (1978). Sensory Feedback to the Cerebral Cortex During Voluntary Movement in Man. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):129.score: 21.0
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  33. Jack A. Adams, Ernest T. Goetz & Phillip H. Marshall (1972). Response Feedback and Motor Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):391.score: 21.0
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  34. Ina Mcd Bilodea & Henry S. Rosenquist (1964). Supplementary Feedback in Rotary-Pursuit Tracking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (1):53.score: 21.0
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  35. Lyle E. Bourne Jr, Donald E. Guy & Nancy Wadsworth (1967). Verbal-Reinforcement Combinations and the Relative Frequency of Informative Feedback in a Card-Sorting Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (2):220.score: 21.0
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  36. Robert J. Gatchel (1974). Frequency of Feedback and Learned Heart Rate Control. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (2):274.score: 21.0
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  37. Norman B. Gordon (1968). Guidance Versus Augmented Feedback and Motor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (1):24.score: 21.0
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  38. Richard Held, Aglaia Efstathiou & Martha Greene (1966). Adaptation to Displaced and Delayed Visual Feedback From the Hand. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (6):887.score: 21.0
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  39. [deleted]Michael Herbert, Ben Eppinger & Jutta Kray (2011). Younger but Not Older Adults Benefit From Salient Feedback During Learning. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 21.0
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  40. Thomas K. Landauer & Lynn Eldridge (1967). Effect of Tests Without Feedback and Presentation-Test Interval in Paired-Associate Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 75 (3):290.score: 21.0
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  41. Vladimir Pishkin (1967). Availability of Feedback-Corrected Error Instances in Concept Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (2):318.score: 21.0
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  42. J. D. Read, Gayle Read & Ian Excell (1974). Effects of Probe-Digit Positions and Feedback on Item Retrievability in Short-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (6):1207.score: 21.0
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  43. George M. Robinson (1972). The Delayed Auditory Feedback Effect is a Function of Speech Rate. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):1.score: 21.0
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  44. Ronald W. Angel, Harry Garland & Martin Fischler (1971). Tracking Errors Amended Without Visual Feedback. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (2):422.score: 21.0
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  45. Derek Armstrong, Sam Carter, Gregory Frazier & Tiffany Frazier (2003). Autonomic Defense: Thwarting Automated Attacks Via Real‐Time Feedback Control. Complexity 9 (2):41-48.score: 21.0
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  46. John L. Bradshaw, Norman C. Nettleton & Gina Geffen (1972). Ear Asymmetry and Delayed Auditory Feedback: Effects of Task Requirements and Competitive Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (3):269.score: 21.0
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  47. L. Burwitz (1974). Short-Term Motor Memory as a Function of Feedback and Interpolated Activity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (2):338.score: 21.0
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  48. John W. Donahoe (1960). The Effect of Variations in the Form of Feedback on the Efficiency of Problem Solving. Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (3):193.score: 21.0
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  49. John D. Gould (1965). Differential Visual Feedback of Component Motions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (3):263.score: 21.0
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  50. John Gyr, Richmond Willey & Adele Henry (1979). Motor-Sensory Feedback and Geometry of Visual Space: An Attempted Replication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):59-64.score: 21.0
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