Search results for '*Fetus' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. William David Hart (2014). Slaves, Fetuses, and Animals. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (4):661-690.score: 8.0
    This essay is an exploration in ethical rhetoric, specifically, the ethics of comparing the status of fetuses and animals to enslaved Africans. On the view of those who make such comparisons, the fetus is treated as a slave through abortion, reproductive technologies, and stem cell research, while animals are enslaved through factory farming, experimentation, and as laborers, circus performers, and the like. I explore how the apotheosis of the fetus and the humanization of animals represent the flipside of the subjugation (...)
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  2. Ezio Di Nucci (2013). Killing Fetuses and Killing Newborns. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):19-20.score: 6.0
    The argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns is a challenge to liberal positions on abortion because it can be considered a reductio of their defence of abortion. Here I defend the liberal stance on abortion by arguing that the argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns on ground of the social, psychological and economic burden on the parents recently put forward by Giubilini and Minerva is not valid; this is because they fail to show that newborns cannot (...)
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  3. Carol A. Tauer (1985). Personhood and Human Embryos and Fetuses. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (3):253-266.score: 6.0
    Public policy decisions concerning embryos and fetuses tend to lack reasoned argument on their moral status. While agreement on personhood is elusive, this concept has unquestioned moral relevance. A stipulated usage of the term, the psychic sense of ‘person’, applies to early human prenatal life and encompasses morally relevant aspects of personhood. A ‘person’ in the psychic sense has (1) a minimal psychology, defined as the capacity to retain experiences, which may be nonconscious, through physiological analogs of memory; and (2) (...)
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  4. Carson Strong (2011). Minimal Risk in Research Involving Pregnant Women and Fetuses. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):529-538.score: 6.0
    The concept of minimal risk plays a key role in federal regulations on the protection of human research subjects. Although there has been considerable discussion of the meaning of minimal risk, the question of how this concept should be interpreted in research involving pregnant women and fetuses has not been addressed. This essay reviews the literature on minimal risk and argues for an interpretation of that concept in the context of research involving pregnant women and fetuses.
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  5. Alexander Pruss, Cooperation with Past Evil and Use of Cell-Lines Derived From Aborted Fetuses Alexander R. Pruss May 25, 2004.score: 6.0
    The production of a number of vaccines involves the use of cell-lines originally derived from fetuses directly aborted in the 1960s and 1970s. Such cell-lines, indeed sometimes the very same ones, are important to on-going research, including at Catholic institutions. The cells currently used are removed by a number of decades and by a significant number of cellular generations from the original cells. Moreover, the original cells extracted from the bodies of the aborted fetuses were transformed to produce the cell (...)
     
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  6. C. Strong (2012). Abortion Decisions as Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria in Research Involving Pregnant Women and Fetuses. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (1):43-47.score: 6.0
    From the perspective of investigators conducting research involving pregnant women and fetuses, a woman's decision about whether to have an abortion can sometimes be relevant to the suitability of the woman and fetus as research subjects. However, prominent ethicists disagree over whether it is permissible for a woman's decision about abortion to be an inclusion or exclusion criterion for participation in research. A widely held view is that fetuses to be aborted and fetuses to be carried to term should be (...)
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  7. C. Strong (1997). The Moral Status of Preembryos, Embryos, Fetuses, and Infants. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (5):457-478.score: 6.0
    Some have argued that embryos and fetuses have the moral status of personhood because of certain criteria that are satisfied during gestation. However, these attempts to base personhood during gestation on intrinsic characteristics have uniformly been unsuccessful. Within a secular framework, another approach to establishing a moral standing for embryos and fetuses is to argue that we ought to confer some moral status upon them. There appear to be two main approaches to defending conferred moral standing; namely, consequentialist and contractarian (...)
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  8. Hanzade Doğan & Serap Sahinoglu (2005). Fetuses with Neural Tube Defects: Ethical Approaches and the Role of Health Care Professionals in Turkish Health Care Institutions. Nursing Ethics 12 (1):59-78.score: 6.0
    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are very serious malformations for the fetus, causing either low life expectancy or a chance of survival only with costly and difficult surgical interventions. In western countries the average prevalence is 1/1000-2000 and in Turkey it is 4/1000. The aim of the study was to characterize ethical approaches at institutional level to the fetus with an NTD and the mother, and the role of health care professionals in four major centers in Turkey. The authors chose perinatology (...)
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  9. N. Pfeffer & J. Kent (2006). Consent to the Use of Aborted Fetuses in Stem Cell Research and Therapies. Clinical Ethics 1 (4):216-218.score: 6.0
    This paper identifies the legal and policy framework relating to the use of aborted fetuses in stem cell research and therapies and contrasts this with the collection of embryos for research. It suggests that more attention should be given to questions about the kind of consent sought by researchers from women and that there should be more transparency about how aborted fetuses are used. It reports on variability in current practices of research ethics committees and researchers and uncertainty about the (...)
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  10. Alexander R. Pruss, Cooperation with Past Evil and Use of Cell-Lines Derived From Aborted Fetuses.score: 6.0
              The production of a number of vaccines involves the use of cell-lines originally derived from fetuses directly aborted in the 1960s and 1970s. Such cell-lines, indeed sometimes the very same ones, are important to on-going research, including at Catholic institutions. The cells currently used are removed by a number of decades and by a significant number of cellular generations from the original cells. Moreover, the original cells extracted from the bodies (...)
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  11. Scott F. Gilbert & Rebecca Howes-Mischel (2004). 'Show Me Your Original Face Before You Were Born': The Convergence of Public Fetuses and Sacred DNA. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 26 (3/4):377 - 479.score: 6.0
    Embryology is an intensely visual field, and it has provided the public with images of human embryos and fetuses. The responses to these images can be extremely powerful and personal, and the images (as well as our reactions to them) are conditioned by social and political agendas. The image of the 'autonomous fetus' abstracts the fetus from the mother, the womb, and from all social contexts, thereby emphasizing 'individuality'. The image of 'sacred DNA' emphasizes DNA as the unmoved mover, the (...)
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  12. George W. Harris (1986). Fathers and Fetuses. Ethics 96 (3):594-603.score: 5.0
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  13. Robert Francescotti (2005). Fetuses, Corpses and the Psychological Approach to Personal Identity. Philosophical Explorations 8 (1):69-81.score: 5.0
    Olson (1997a) tries to refute the Psychological Approach to personal identity with his Fetus Argument, and Mackie (1999) aims to do the same with the Death Argument. With the help of a suggestion made by Baker (1999), the following discussion shows that these arguments fail. In the process of defending the Psychological Approach, it is made clear exactly what one is and is not committed to as a proponent of the theory.
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  14. Elizabeth Harman (1999). Creation Ethics: The Moral Status of Early Fetuses and the Ethics of Abortion. Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (4):310–324.score: 5.0
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  15. Mary Anne Warren (1994). Book Review:Life Before Birth: The Moral and Legal Status of Embryos and Fetuses. Bonnie Steinbock. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (2):408-.score: 5.0
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  16. Elizabeth Harman (2007). Sacred Mountains and Beloved Fetuses: Can Loving or Worshipping Something Give It Moral Status? Philosophical Studies 133 (1):55 - 81.score: 5.0
    Part One addresses the question whether the fact that some persons love something, worship it, or deeply care about it, can endow moral status on that thing. I argue that the answer is “no.” While some cases lend great plausibility to the view that love or worship can endow moral status, there are other cases in which love or worship clearly fails to endow moral status. Furthermore, there is no principled way to distinguish these two types of cases, so we (...)
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  17. Jason T. Eberl (2010). Fetuses Are Neither Violinists nor Violators. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):53-54.score: 5.0
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  18. Russell DiSilvestro (2009). Capacities, Hierarchies, and the Moral Status of Normal Human Infants and Fetuses. Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (4):479-492.score: 5.0
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  19. Don Marquis (1995). Fetuses, Futures and Values. Southwest Philosophy Review 11 (2):263-265.score: 5.0
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  20. Leonard M. Fleck (1979). Abortion, Deformed Fetuses, and the Omega Pill. Philosophical Studies 36 (3):271 - 283.score: 5.0
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  21. Kathleen Nolan (1990). Protecting Fetuses From Prenatal Hazards: Whose Crimes? What Punishment? Criminal Justice Ethics 9 (1):13-23.score: 5.0
  22. George Schedler (1991). Does Society Have the Right to Force Pregnant Drug Addicts to Abort Their Fetuses? Social Theory and Practice 17 (3):369-384.score: 5.0
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  23. Daniel I. Wikler (1979). Ought We to Try to Save Aborted Fetuses? Ethics 90 (1):58-65.score: 5.0
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  24. Daniela Cutaş (2008). Immortal Fetuses. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (03):322-329.score: 5.0
    edited by Tuija Takala and Matti Häyry, welcomes contributions on the conceptual and theoretical dimensions of bioethics.
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  25. C. E. Harris (1991). Aborting Abnormal Fetuses: The Parental Perspective. Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (1):57-68.score: 5.0
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  26. Charles H. Baron (1983). "If You Prick Us, Do We Not Bleed?": Of Shylock, Fetuses, and the Concept of Person in the Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 11 (2):52-63.score: 5.0
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  27. S. D. Brown, K. Donelan, Y. Martins, S. A. Sayeed, C. Mitchell, T. L. Buchmiller, K. Burmeister & J. L. Ecker (2014). Does Professional Orientation Predict Ethical Sensitivities? Attitudes of Paediatric and Obstetric Specialists Toward Fetuses, Pregnant Women and Pregnancy Termination. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):117-122.score: 5.0
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  28. Norman Ford (2003). Destruction of Human Embryos, Fetuses and Ethics. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 9 (1):11.score: 5.0
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  29. Joel E. Frader (1993). Have We Lost Our Senses? Problems with Maintaining Brain-Dead Bodies Carrying Fetuses. Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (4):347.score: 5.0
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  30. Kevin O'Rourke & Jean DeBlois (1994). Induced Delivery of Anencephalic Fetuses: A Response to James L. Walsh and Moira M. McQueen. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 4 (1):47-53.score: 5.0
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  31. Carson Strong (1991). Delivering Hydrocephalic Fetuses. Bioethics 5 (1):1–22.score: 5.0
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  32. Lynn Marie Morgan (2006). The Rise and Demise of a Collection of Human Fetuses at Mount Holyoke College. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (3):435-451.score: 5.0
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  33. Ann Scholl (1997). Legally Protecting Fetuses. Public Affairs Quarterly 11 (2):141.score: 5.0
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  34. C. Strong (2010). How Should Risks and Benefits Be Balanced in Research Involving Pregnant Women and Fetuses? Irb 33 (6):1-5.score: 5.0
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  35. Pavel Tichtchenko & Boris Yudin (1997). The Moral Status of Fetuses in Russia. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):31-38.score: 5.0
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  36. Ronald F. White (1990). The Enforcement of Moral Obligations to Potential Fetuses. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 9 (3/4):55-68.score: 5.0
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  37. Very Rev Angel Rodríguez Luño (2006). Ethical Reflections on Vaccines Using Cells From Aborted Fetuses. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 6 (3):453-460.score: 5.0
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  38. John Bahde (1994). Fetuses and Violins. Hastings Center Report 24 (6):38-39.score: 5.0
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  39. Piers Benn (2004). Dead Fetuses and Insulting Displays. Think 2 (6):25.score: 5.0
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  40. Joan Callahan & James Knight (1992). Women, Fetuses, Medicine and the Law. In Helen B. Holmes & Laura Purdy (eds.), Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Indiana University Press. 695--224.score: 5.0
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  41. Kluwer Dordrecht & Peter Singer (1997). Persons, Animals and Fetuses: An Essay in Practical Ethics. Bioethics-Oxford 11 (2):179-180.score: 5.0
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  42. Charles A. Erin (1998). Some Comments on the Ethics of Consent to the Use of Ovarian Tissue From Aborted Fetuses and Dead Women. In John Harris & Søren Holm (eds.), The Future of Human Reproduction : Ethics, Choice, and Regulation. Oxford University Press. 162--175.score: 5.0
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  43. Kathi E. Hanna (2002). Aid to Fetuses with Dependent Mothers. Hastings Center Report 32 (2):8.score: 5.0
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  44. Nolan Kathleen (1990). Protecting Fetuses From Prenatal Hazards: Whose Crimes? What Punishment? Criminal Justice Ethics 9.score: 5.0
     
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  45. M. Mahowald (1995). As If There Were Fetuses Without Women: A Remedial Essay. In Joan C. Callahan (ed.), Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law: Feminist Perspectives. Indiana University Press. 199--218.score: 5.0
     
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  46. Ana Teresa Ortiz (1997). " Bare-Handed" Medicine and Its Elusive Patients: The Unstable Construction of Pregnant Women and Fetuses in Dominican Obstetrics Discourse. Feminist Studies 23 (2).score: 5.0
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  47. Christine Overall (1991). Biological Mothers and the Disposition of Fetuses After Abortion. In James Humber & Robert Almeder (eds.), Bioethics and the Fetus. Humana Press. 39--57.score: 5.0
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  48. Bonnie Steinbock & Leslie Cannold (1994). Life Before Birth: The Moral and Legal Status of Embryos and Fetuses. Bioethics-Oxford 8 (2):176-177.score: 5.0
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  49. Steven Takacs (2009). Some Semiotic Considerations Concerning Fetuses as People. Semiotics:538-546.score: 5.0
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  50. Jane Mary Trau (1991). Treating Fetuses: The Patient as Person. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 12 (4):173-181.score: 5.0
    The medical treatment in utero of human beings raises several ethical questions. I argue that treatment is sufficient to establish the fetus as person; and consider how conflicts between the interests of the fetus and mother are to be resolved when such treatment is proposed. My arguments rest upon a ‘relational model’ of ethical discourse derived from H. Richard Niebuhr's “ethics of the fitting.”I conclude that the limitation of personal autonomy is rarely justified, but may be when direct, grave, harm (...)
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