Search results for '*Human Computer Interaction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Philip Brey (2005). The Epistemology and Ontology of Human-Computer Interaction. Minds and Machines 15 (3-4):383-398.score: 720.0
    This paper analyzes epistemological and ontological dimensions of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) through an analysis of the functions of computer systems in relation to their users. It is argued that the primary relation between humans and computer systems has historically been epistemic: computers are used as information-processing and problem-solving tools that extend human cognition, thereby creating hybrid cognitive systems consisting of a human processor and an artificial processor that process information in tandem. In this role, computer (...)
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  2. Markus F. Peschl & Chris Stary (1998). The Role of Cognitive Modeling for User Interface Design Representations: An Epistemological Analysis of Knowledge Engineering in the Context of Human-Computer Interaction. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 8 (2):203-236.score: 720.0
    In this paper we review some problems with traditional approaches for acquiring and representing knowledge in the context of developing user interfaces. Methodological implications for knowledge engineering and for human-computer interaction are studied. It turns out that in order to achieve the goal of developing human-oriented (in contrast to technology-oriented) human-computer interfaces developers have to develop sound knowledge of the structure and the representational dynamics of the cognitive system which is interacting with the computer.We show that (...)
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  3. W. Oberschelp (1998). The Sorcerer and the Apprentice. Human-Computer Interaction Today. AI and Society 12 (1-2):97-104.score: 624.0
    Human-computer interaction today has got a touch of magic: Without understanding the causal coherence, using a computer seems to become the art to use the right spell with the mouse as the magic wand — the sorcerer's staff. Goethes's poem admits an allegoric interpretation. We explicate the analogy between using a computer and casting a spell with emphasis on teaching magic skills. The art to create an ergonomic user interface has to take care of various levels (...)
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  4. David Kirsh (2000). Distributed Cognition, Toward a New Foundation for Human-Computer Interaction Research. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 7 (2):174-196.score: 621.0
    We are quickly passing through the historical moment when people work in front of a single computer, dominated by a small CRT and focused on tasks involving only local information. Networked computers are becoming ubiquitous and are playing increasingly significant roles in our lives and in the basic infrastructure of science, business, and social interaction. For human-computer interaction o advance in the new millennium we need to better understand the emerging dynamic of interaction in which (...)
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  5. David Kirsh, Jim Hollan & Edwin Hutchins (2000). Distributed Cognition, Toward a New Foundation for Human-Computer Interaction Research. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 7 (2):174-196.score: 621.0
    We are quickly passing through the historical moment when people work in front of a single computer, dominated by a small CRT and focused on tasks involving only local information. Networked computers are becoming ubiquitous and are playing increasingly significant roles in our lives and in the basic infrastructure of science, business, and social interaction. For human-computer interaction o advance in the new millennium we need to better understand the emerging dynamic of interaction in which (...)
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  6. Robert G. Magee & Sriram Kalyanaraman (2010). The Perceived Moral Qualities of Web Sites: Implications for Persuasion Processes in Human–Computer Interaction. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 12 (2):109-125.score: 540.0
    This study extended the scope of previous findings in human–computer interaction research within the computers are social actors paradigm by showing that online users attribute perceptions of moral qualities to Websites and, further, that differential perceptions of morality affected the extent of persuasion. In an experiment (N = 138) that manipulated four morality conditions (universalist, relativist, egotistic, control) across worldview, a measured independent variable, users were asked to evaluate a Web site designed to aid them in making ethical (...)
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  7. Daniel Fallman (2010). A Different Way of Seeing: Albert Borgmann's Philosophy of Technology and Human–Computer Interaction. [REVIEW] AI and Society 25 (1):53-60.score: 540.0
    Traditional human–computer interaction (HCI) allowed researchers and practitioners to share and rely on the ‘five E’s’ of usability, the principle that interactive systems should be designed to be effective, efficient, engaging, error tolerant, and easy to learn. A recent trend in HCI, however, is that academic researchers as well as practitioners are becoming increasingly interested in user experiences, i.e., understanding and designing for relationships between users and artifacts that are for instance affective, engaging, fun, playable, sociable, creative, involving, (...)
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  8. Christine L. Lisetti & Diane J. Schiano (2000). Automatic Facial Expression Interpretation: Where Human Computer Interaction, Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science Intersect. Pragmatics and Cognition 8 (1):185-236.score: 540.0
    We discuss here one of our projects, aimed at developing an automatic facial expression interpreter, mainly in terms of signaled emotions. We present some of the relevant findings on facial expressions from cognitive science and psychology that can be understood by and be useful to researchers in Human-Computer Interaction and Artificial Intelligence. We then give an overview of HCI applications involving automated facial expression recognition, we survey some of the latest progresses in this area reached by various approaches (...)
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  9. D. Alexander Varakin, Daniel T. Levin & Roger Fidler (2004). Unseen and Unaware: Implications of Recent Research on Failures of Visual Awareness for Human-Computer Interface Design. Human-Computer Interaction 19 (4):389-422.score: 480.0
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  10. Jaeseon Lee, Kyoung Shin Park & Minsoo Hahn (2006). Human-Computer Interaction-The 3D Sensor Table for Bare Hand Tracking and Posture Recognition. In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer-Verlag. 138-146.score: 459.0
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  11. Yoshiyuki Takahashi, Osamu Nitta, Shigeru Okikawa & Takashi Komeda (2006). People with Motor and Mobility Impairement: Human Computer Interaction, Rehabilitation-Development of a Power Assisted Handrail--Handrail Trajectory and Standing Up Motion. In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer-Verlag. 935-942.score: 459.0
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  12. Matthias Rehm, Yukiko Nakano, Elisabeth André & Toyoaki Nishida (2009). Enculturating Human–Computer Interaction. AI and Society 24 (3):209-211.score: 450.0
  13. Robert J. K. Jacob & Keith S. Karn (2003). Eye Tracking in Human-Computer Interaction and Usability Research: Ready to Deliver the Promises. Mind 2 (3):4.score: 450.0
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  14. Barbara Gorayska & Jacob Mey (1996). Cognitive Technology: A New Deal in Human Computer Interaction. [REVIEW] AI and Society 10 (3-4):219-225.score: 450.0
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  15. John H. Connolly, Alan Chamberlain & Iain W. Phillips (2008). An Approach to Context in Human-Computer Interaction. Semiotica 2008 (169):45-70.score: 450.0
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  16. Stephen Downes (1987). Human-Computer Interaction: A Critical Synthesis. Social Epistemology 1 (1):27 – 36.score: 450.0
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  17. Chris Fields (1987). Human-Computer Interaction: A Critical Synthesis. Social Epistemology 1 (1):5 – 25.score: 450.0
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  18. H. H. Huang, A. Cerekovic, I. S. Pandzic, Y. Nakano & T. Nishida (2009). Enculturating Human-Computer Interaction. AI and Society 24:225-235.score: 450.0
  19. Piyush Kumar, Jyoti Verma & Shitala Prasad (2012). Hand Data Glove: A Wearable Real-Time Device for Human-Computer Interaction. In Zdravko Radman (ed.), The Hand. Mit Press. 43.score: 450.0
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  20. Yoonjae Nam & Joohan Kim (2010). A Semiotic Analysis of Sounds in Personal Computers: Toward a Semiotic Model of Human-Computer Interaction. Semiotica 2010 (182):269-284.score: 450.0
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  21. Marcin Składanek (2008). Hybrid Spaces of Human-Computer Interaction in View of Ubicomp Postulates. Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 10:51-62.score: 450.0
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  22. Kristinn R. Thórisson (1994). Simulated Perceptual Grouping: An Application to Human-Computer Interaction. In Ashwin Ram & Kurt Eiselt (eds.), Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Erlbaum.score: 450.0
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  23. Yun Xia (2001). Human-Computer Interaction: Sign and Its Application in the Digital Representation and Code Conversion in Computers. American Journal of Semiotics 17 (2):369-390.score: 450.0
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  24. Vladimir Popescu & Jean Caelen (2009). Argumentative Ordering of Utterances for Language Generation in Multi-Party Human–Computer Dialogue. Argumentation 23 (2):205-237.score: 432.0
    In trying to control various aspects concerning utterance production in multi-party human–computer dialogue, argumentative considerations play an important part, particularly in choosing appropriate lexical units so that we fine-tune the degree of persuasion that each utterance has. A preliminary step in this endeavor is the ability to place an ordering relation between semantic forms (that are due to be realized as utterances, by the machine), concerning their persuasion strength, with respect to certain (explicit or implicit) conclusions. Thus, in this (...)
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  25. Guglielmo Tamburrini (2009). Brain to Computer Communication: Ethical Perspectives on Interaction Models. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 2 (3):137-149.score: 333.0
    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) enable one to control peripheral ICT and robotic devices by processing brain activity on-line. The potential usefulness of BCI systems, initially demonstrated in rehabilitation medicine, is now being explored in education, entertainment, intensive workflow monitoring, security, and training. Ethical issues arising in connection with these investigations are triaged taking into account technological imminence and pervasiveness of BCI technologies. By focussing on imminent technological developments, ethical reflection is informatively grounded into realistic protocols of brain-to-computer communication. (...)
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  26. Maria Miceli, Amedo Cesta & Paola Rizzo (1995). Distributed Artificial Intelligence From a Socio-Cognitive Standpoint: Looking at Reasons for Interaction. [REVIEW] AI and Society 9 (4):287-320.score: 315.0
    Distributed Artificial Intelligence (DAI) deals with computational systems where several intelligent components interact in a common environment. This paper is aimed at pointing out and fostering the exchange between DAI and cognitive and social science in order to deal with the issues of interaction, and in particular with the reasons and possible strategies for social behaviour in multi-agent interaction is also described which is motivated by requirements of cognitive plausibility and grounded the notions of power, dependence and help. (...)
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  27. Professor Mary L. Cummings (2006). Integrating Ethics in Design Through the Value-Sensitive Design Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):701-715.score: 270.0
    The Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET) has declared that to achieve accredited status, “engineering programs must demonstrate that their graduates have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.” Many engineering professors struggle to integrate this required ethics instruction in technical classes and projects because of the lack of a formalized ethics-in-design approach. However, one methodology developed in human-computer interaction research, the Value-Sensitive Design approach, can serve as an engineering education tool which bridges the gap between design (...)
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  28. Liam J. Bannon (1989). A Pilgrim's Progress: From Cognitive Science to Cooperative Design. [REVIEW] AI and Society 4 (4):259-275.score: 270.0
    This paper provides a glimpse of some different theoretical frameworks and empirical methods in the author's search for theories and practices that might improve the utility and usability of computer artifacts. The essay touches on some problematic aspects of currently accepted theories and techniques in the cognitive sciences, especially in their application to the field of human-computer interaction, and mentions some alternative conceptions based on a cultural-historical approach. The intent is to widen the nature of the debate (...)
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  29. Thomas Hermann & Katharina Just (1995). Experts' Systems Instead of Expert Systems. AI and Society 9 (4):321-355.score: 270.0
    By studying several cases of expert systems' use, a variety of difficulties were identified as directly depending on specific characteristics of experts and their tasks. This concerns more than the questions: “May experts be replaced by machines?” or “Is experts' knowledge explicable?”. The organisational structure of their work as well as the cyclic, non-plannable way of their task performing have further relevance. The paper introduces the concept of experts' systems to deal with diversities of their expertise and complexities of their (...)
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  30. Norm Friesen (2010). Mind and Machine: Ethical and Epistemological Implications for Research. [REVIEW] AI and Society 25 (1):83-92.score: 270.0
    Technologies are significant in research not only as instruments for gathering data and analyzing information; they also provide a valuable resource for the development of theory—in terms of what has been called the “tools to theory heuristic.” Focusing on the specific example of the fields of educational psychology and instructional technology and design, this paper begins by describing how the workings of the “tools to theory heuristic” are evident in the metaphors and descriptions of behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism. In each (...)
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  31. Brian Fisher, Tera Marie Green & Richard Arias-Hernández (2011). Visual Analytics as a Translational Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):609-625.score: 267.0
    Visual analytics is a new interdisciplinary field of study that calls for a more structured scientific approach to understanding the effects of interaction with complex graphical displays on human cognitive processes. Its primary goal is to support the design and evaluation of graphical information systems that better support cognitive processes in areas as diverse as scientific research and emergency management. The methodologies that make up this new field are as yet ill defined. This paper proposes a pathway for development (...)
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  32. Andrew Fordham & Nigel Gilbert (1995). On the Nature of Rules and Conversation. AI and Society 9 (4):356-372.score: 267.0
    The use of findings from conversation analysis in the design of human-computer interfaces and especially in the design of computer-human speech dialogues is a matter of considerable controversy. For example, in “Going up a Blind Alley” (Button, 1990) and “On Simulacrums of Conversation” (Button and Sharrock, 1995), Button argues that conversation analysis is of only limited use in the computational modelling of interaction. He suggests that computers will never be able to “converse” with humans because of the (...)
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  33. Toni Robertson (2006). Ethical Issues in Interaction Design. Ethics and Information Technology 8 (2):49-59.score: 261.0
    When we design information technology we risk building specific metaphors and models of human activities into the technology itself and into the embodied activities, work practices, organisational cultures and social identities of those who use it. This paper is motivated by the recognition that the assumptions about human activity used to guide the design of particular technology are made active, in use, by the interaction design of that technology. A fragment of shared design work is used to ground an (...)
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  34. [deleted]Jérémie Mattout (2012). Brain-Computer Interfaces: A Neuroscience Paradigm of Social Interaction? A Matter of Perspective. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 261.0
    Brain-Computer Interfaces: A Neuroscience Paradigm of Social Interaction? A Matter of Perspective.
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  35. Jonathan S. Herberg, Megan M. Saylor, Palis Ratanaswasd, Daniel T. Levin & D. Mitchell Wilkes (2008). Audience‐Contingent Variation in Action Demonstrations for Humans and Computers. Cognitive Science 32 (6):1003-1020.score: 240.0
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  36. Claude Draude (2011). Intermediaries: Reflections on Virtual Humans, Gender, and the Uncanny Valley. [REVIEW] AI and Society 26 (4):319-327.score: 231.0
    Embodied interface agents are designed to ease the use of technology. Furthermore, they present one possible solution for future interaction scenarios beyond the desktop metaphor. Trust and believability play an important role in the relationship between user and the virtual counterpart. In order to reach this goal, a high degree of anthropomorphism in appearance and behavior of the artifact is pursued. According to the notion of the Uncanny Valley, however, this actually may have quite the opposite effect. This article (...)
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  37. John R. Anderson (1987). Methodologies for Studying Human Knowledge. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (3):467.score: 225.0
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  38. R. Sorbello, A. Chella, C. Calì, M. Giardina, S. Nishio & H. Ishiguro (2014). Telenoid Android Robot as an Embodied Perceptual Social Regulation Medium Engaging Natural Human–Humanoid Interaction. Robotics and Autonomous System 62:1329-1341.score: 224.0
    The present paper aims to validate our research on human–humanoid interaction (HHI) using the minimalist humanoid robot Telenoid. We conducted the human–robot interaction test with 142 young people who had no prior interaction experience with this robot. The main goal is the analysis of the two social dimensions (‘‘Perception’’ and ‘‘Believability’’) useful for increasing the natural behaviour between users and Telenoid.Weadministered our custom questionnaire to human subjects in association with a well defined experimental setting (‘‘ordinary and goal-guided (...)
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  39. Stephen M. Fiore, Travis J. Wiltshire, Emilio J. C. Lobato, Florian G. Jentsch, Wesley H. Huang & Benjamin Axelrod (2013). Towards Understanding Social Cues and Signals in Human-Robot Interaction: Effects of Robot Gaze and Proxemic Behavior. Frontiers in Psychology 4:859.score: 224.0
    As robots are increasingly deployed in settings requiring social interaction, research is needed to examine the social signals perceived by humans when robots display certain social cues. In this paper, we report a study designed to examine how humans interpret social cues exhibited by robots. We first provide a brief overview of perspectives from social cognition in humans and how these processes are applicable to human-robot interaction (HRI). We then discuss the need to examine the relationship between social (...)
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  40. Shogo Okada, Yoichi Kobayashi, Satoshi Ishibashi & Toyoaki Nishida (2010). Incremental Learning of Gestures for Human–Robot Interaction. AI and Society 25 (2):155-168.score: 224.0
    For a robot to cohabit with people, it should be able to learn people’s nonverbal social behavior from experience. In this paper, we propose a novel machine learning method for recognizing gestures used in interaction and communication. Our method enables robots to learn gestures incrementally during human–robot interaction in an unsupervised manner. It allows the user to leave the number and types of gestures undefined prior to the learning. The proposed method (HB-SOINN) is based on a self-organizing incremental (...)
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  41. Robert Rosenberger (2013). The Importance of Generalized Bodily Habits for a Future World of Ubiquitous Computing. AI and Society 28 (3):289-296.score: 222.0
    In a future world of ubiquitous computing, in which humans interact with computerized technologies even more frequently and in even more situations than today, interface design will have increased importance. One feature of interface that I argue will be especially relevant is what I call abstract relational strategies. This refers to an approach (in both a bodily and conceptual sense) toward the use of a technology, an approach that is general enough to be applied in many different concrete scenarios. Such (...)
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  42. Zhengxin Chen (1993). From Participatory Design to Participating Problem Solving: Enhancing System Adaptability Through User Modelling. [REVIEW] AI and Society 7 (3):238-247.score: 216.0
    The issue on the role of users in knowledge-based systems can be investigated from two aspects: the design aspect and the functionality aspect. Participatory design is an important approach for the first aspect while system adaptability supported by user modelling is crucial to the second aspect. In the article, we discuss the second aspect. We view a knowledge-based computer system as the partner of users' problem-solving process, and we argue that the system functionality can be enhanced by adapting the (...)
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  43. Furio Di Paola (1988). Human-Oriented and Machine-Oriented Reasoning: Remarks on Some Problems in the History of Automated Theorem Proving. [REVIEW] AI and Society 2 (2):121-131.score: 210.0
    Examples in the history of Automated Theorem Proving are given, in order to show that even a seemingly ‘mechanical’ activity, such as deductive inference drawing, involves special cultural features and tacit knowledge. Mechanisation of reasoning is thus regarded as a complex undertaking in ‘cultural pruning’ of human-oriented reasoning. Sociological counterparts of this passage from human- to machine-oriented reasoning are discussed, by focusing on problems of man-machine interaction in the area of computer-assisted proof processing.
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  44. Tatsuya Nomura, Takayuki Kanda & Tomohiro Suzuki (2006). Experimental Investigation Into Influence of Negative Attitudes Toward Robots on Human–Robot Interaction. AI and Society 20 (2):138-150.score: 205.3
    Negative attitudes toward robots are considered as one of the psychological factors preventing humans from interacting with robots in the daily life. To verify their influence on humans‘ behaviors toward robots, we designed and executed experiments where subjects interacted with Robovie, which is being developed as a platform for research on the possibility of communication robots. This paper reports and discusses the results of these experiments on correlation between subjects’ negative attitudes and their behaviors toward robots. Moreover, it discusses influences (...)
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  45. Brian P. Bailey & Joseph A. Konstan (2006). On the Need for Attention-Aware Systems: Measuring Effects of Interruption on Task Performance, Error Rate, and Affective State. Computers in Human Behavior 22 (4):685-708.score: 198.0
  46. Colin T. Schmidt (1996). The Person-Machine Confrontation: Investigations Into the Pragmatics of Dialogism. [REVIEW] AI and Society 10 (3-4):315-332.score: 198.0
    Erroneously attributing propositional attitudes (desires, beliefs...) to computational artefacts has become internationally commonplace in the public arena, especially amongst the new generation of non-initiated users. Technology for rendering machines “user-friendly” is often inspired by interpersonal human communication. This calls forth designers to conceptualise a major component of human intelligence: the sense ofcommunicability, and its logical consequences. The inherentincommunicability of machines subsequently causes a shift in design strategy. Though cataloguing components of bouts between person and machine with Speech Act Theory has (...)
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  47. William Green & Boris de Ruyter (2010). The Design and Evaluation of Interactive Systems with Perceived Social Intelligence: Five Challenges. [REVIEW] AI and Society 25 (2):203-210.score: 198.0
    This paper reflects on discussions within the Social Intelligence for Tele-healthcare (SIFT) project. The SIFT project aims to establish a model of social intelligence, to support the user-centred design of social intelligence in interactive systems. The conceptual background of social intelligence for the SIFT project is presented. Five challenges identified for the design of socially aware interactions are described, and their implications are discussed.
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  48. Madeleine Keehner, Mary Hegarty, Cheryl Cohen, Peter Khooshabeh & Daniel R. Montello (2008). Spatial Reasoning With External Visualizations: What Matters Is What You See, Not Whether You Interact. Cognitive Science 32 (7):1099-1132.score: 195.0
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  49. Wayne D. Gray & Wai‐Tat Fu (2004). Soft Constraints in Interactive Behavior: The Case of Ignoring Perfect Knowledge in‐the‐World for Imperfect Knowledge in‐the‐Head*,*. Cognitive Science 28 (3):359-382.score: 195.0
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  50. Lorenz M. Hilty, Andreas Köhler, Fabian Schéele, Rainer Zah & Thomas Ruddy (2006). Rebound Effects of Progress in Information Technology. Poiesis and Praxis 4 (1):19-38.score: 189.0
    Information technology (IT) is continuously making astounding progress in technical efficiency. The time, space, material and energy needed to provide a unit of IT service have decreased by three orders of magnitude since the first personal computer (PC) was sold. However, it seems difficult for society to translate IT’s efficiency progress into progress in terms of individual, organizational or socio-economic goals. In particular it seems to be difficult for individuals to work more efficiently, for organizations to be more productive (...)
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