Search results for '*Hypothesis Testing' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  3
    Richard T. Fink (1972). Response Latency as a Function of Hypothesis-Testing Strategies in Concept Identification. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):337.
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  2.  1
    Dianne S. Silver, Eli Saltz & Vito Modigliani (1970). Awareness and Hypothesis Testing in Concept and Operant Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (2):198.
  3. David H. Dodd & Lyle E. Bourne Jr (1969). Test of Some Assumptions of a Hypothesis-Testing Model of Concept Identification. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (1):69.
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  4.  7
    David J. Pittenger (2001). Hypothesis Testing as a Moral Choice. Ethics and Behavior 11 (2):151 – 162.
    Although many researchers may perceive empirical hypothesis testing using inferential statistics to be a value free process, I argue that any conclusion based on inferential statistics contains an important and intractable value judgment. Consequently, I conclude that researchers should use the same rationale for examining the ethical ramifications of committing errors in statistical inference that they use to examine the ethical parameters of a proposed research design.
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  5.  12
    Chris Haufe (2013). Why Do Funding Agencies Favor Hypothesis Testing? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):363-374.
    Exploratory inquiry has difficulty attracting research funding because funding agencies have little sense of how to detect good science in exploratory contexts. After documenting and explaining the focus on hypothesis testing among a variety of institutions responsible for distinguishing between good and bad science, I analyze the NIH grant review process. I argue that a good explanation for the focus on hypothesis testing—at least at the level of science funding agencies—is the fact that hypothesis-driven research is relatively easy (...)
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  6.  11
    Curtis K. Deutsch, Wesley W. Ludwig & William J. McIlvane (2008). Heterogeneity and Hypothesis Testing in Neuropsychiatric Illness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):266-267.
    The confounding effects of heterogeneity in biological psychiatry and psychiatric genetics have been widely discussed in the literature. We suggest an approach in which heterogeneity may be put to use in hypothesis testing, and may find application in evaluation of the Crespi & Badcock (C&B) imprinting hypothesis. Here we consider three potential sources of etiologic subtypes for analysis.
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  7.  3
    Ian I. Mitroff & Tom R. Featheringham (1976). Towards a Behavioral Theory of Systemic Hypothesis-Testing and the Error of the Third Kind. Theory and Decision 7 (3):205-220.
    Scientific ideas neither arise nor develop in a vacuum. They are always nutured against a background of prior, partially conflicting ideas. Systemic hypothesistesting is the problem of testing scientific hypotheses relative to various systems of background knowledge. This paper shows how the problem of systemic hypothesis-testing (Sys HT) can be systematically expressed as a constrained maximimization problem. It is also shown how the error of the third kind (E III) is fundamental to the theory of Sys (...)
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  8.  10
    Bruno D. Zumbo (1998). A Viable Alternative to Null-Hypothesis Testing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):227-228.
    This commentary advocates an alternative to null-hypothesis testing that was originally represented by Rozeboom over three decades ago yet is not considered by Chow (1996). The central distinguishing feature of this approach is that it allows the scientist to conclude that the data are much better fit by those hypotheses whose values fall inside the interval than by those outside.
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  9.  10
    G. William Moore, Grover M. Hutchins & Robert E. Miller (1986). A New Paradigm for Hypothesis Testing in Medicine, with Examination of the Neyman Pearson Condition. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 7 (3).
    In the past, hypothesis testing in medicine has employed the paradigm of the repeatable experiment. In statistical hypothesis testing, an unbiased sample is drawn from a larger source population, and a calculated statistic is compared to a preassigned critical region, on the assumption that the comparison could be repeated an indefinite number of times. However, repeated experiments often cannot be performed on human beings, due to ethical or economic constraints. We describe a new paradigm for hypothesis testing (...)
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  10.  8
    David P. Barash (2005). Sex Differences: Empiricism, Hypothesis Testing, and Other Virtues. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):276-277.
    “Sociosexuality from Argentina to Zimbabwe: A 48-nation study of sex, culture, and strategies of human mating” delivers on its title. By combining empiricism and careful hypothesis testing, it not only contributes to our current knowledge but also points the way to further advances.
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  11.  7
    Fenna H. Poletiek (2009). Popper's Severity of Test as an Intuitive Probabilistic Model of Hypothesis Testing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):99-100.
    Severity of Test (SoT) is an alternative to Popper's logical falsification that solves a number of problems of the logical view. It was presented by Popper himself in 1963. SoT is a less sophisticated probabilistic model of hypothesis testing than Oaksford & Chater's (O&C's) information gain model, but it has a number of striking similarities. Moreover, it captures the intuition of everyday hypothesis testing.
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  12.  7
    Robert W. Frick (1998). Chow's Defense of Null-Hypothesis Testing: Too Traditional? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):199-199.
    I disagree with several of Chow's traditional descriptions and justifications of null hypothesis testing: (1) accepting the null hypothesis whenever p > .05; (2) random sampling from a population; (3) the frequentist interpretation of probability; (4) having the null hypothesis generate both a probability distribution and a complement of the desired conclusion; (5) assuming that researchers must fix their sample size before performing their study.
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  13.  6
    Dr Francesco Mancini & Amelia Gangemi (2004). The Influence of Responsibility and Guilt on Naive Hypothesis-Testing. Thinking and Reasoning 10 (3):289 – 320.
    Three experiments were used to investigate individuals' hypothesis-testing process as a function of moral perceived utilities , which in turn depend on perceived responsibility and fear of guilt. Moral perceived utilities are related to individuals' moral standards and specifically to people's attempt to face up to their own responsibilities, and to avoid feeling guilty of irresponsibility. The results showed that responsibility and fear of guilt in testing hypotheses involved a process defined as prudential mode , which entails focusing (...)
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  14.  10
    Barbara A. Spellman (1999). Hypothesis Testing: Strategy Selection for Generalising Versus Limiting Hypotheses. Thinking and Reasoning 5 (1):67 – 92.
    Humans appear to follow normative rules of inductive reasoning in "premise diversity tasks" that is, they know that dissimilar rather than similar evidence is better for generalising hypotheses. In three experiments, we use a "hypothesis limitation task" to compare a related inductive reasoning skill knowing how to limit hypotheses by using a negative test strategy. Participants are told that one category member has some property (e.g. Dogs have a merocrine gland) and are asked what evidence they would test to ensure (...)
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  15.  19
    Edward Erwin (1998). The Logic of Null Hypothesis Testing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):197-198.
    In this commentary, I agree with Chow's treatment of null hypothesis significance testing as a noninferential procedure. However, I dispute his reconstruction of the logic of theory corroboration. I also challenge recent criticisms of NHSTP based on power analysis and meta-analysis.
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  16.  7
    Jonathan J. Koehler (1997). A Farewell to Normative Null Hypothesis Testing in Base Rate Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):780-782.
    I agree with Gibbs that the message of the base rate literature reads differently depending on which null hypothesis is used to frame the issue. But I argue that the normative null hypothesis, H0: “People use base rates in a Bayesian manner,” is no longer appropriate. I also challenge Adler's distinction between unused and ignored base rates, and criticize Goodie's reluctance to shift research attention to the field. Macchi's arguments about textual ambiguities in traditional base rate problems suggest that empirical (...)
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  17. Jakob Hohwy, The Hypothesis Testing Brain: Some Philosophical Applications. Proceedings of the Australian Society for Cognitive Science Conference.
    According to one theory, the brain is a sophisticated hypothesis tester: perception is Bayesian unconscious inference where the brain actively uses predictions to test, and then refine, models about what the causes of its sensory input might be. The brain’s task is simply continually to minimise prediction error. This theory, which is getting increasingly popular, holds great explanatory promise for a number of central areas of research at the intersection of philosophy and cognitive neuroscience. I show how the theory can (...)
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  18.  4
    Carlyle Smith & Gregory M. Rose (2000). Evaluating the Relationship Between Rem and Memory Consolidation: A Need for Scholarship and Hypothesis Testing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1007-1008.
    The function of REM, or any other stage of sleep, can currently only be conjectured. A rational evaluation of the role of REM in memory processing requires systematic testing of hypotheses that are optimally derived from a complete synthesis of existing knowledge. Our view is that the large number of studies supporting a relationship between REM-related brain activity and memory is not easily explained away. [Vertes & Eastman].
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  19.  3
    Daniel Malinsky (2015). Hypothesis Testing, “Dutch Book” Arguments, and Risk. Philosophy of Science 82 (5):917-929.
    “Dutch Book” arguments and references to gambling theorems are typical in the debate between Bayesians and scientists committed to “classical” statistical methods. These arguments have rarely convinced non-Bayesian scientists to abandon certain conventional practices, partially because many scientists feel that gambling theorems have little relevance to their research activities. In other words, scientists “don’t bet.” This article examines one attempt, by Schervish, Seidenfeld, and Kadane, to progress beyond such apparent stalemates by connecting “Dutch Book”–type mathematical results with principles actually endorsed (...)
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  20.  4
    N. Liberman (1996). Hypothesis Testing in Wason's Selection Task: Social Exchange Cheating Detection or Task Understanding. Cognition 58 (1):127-156.
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  21.  2
    Gary L. Brase & James Shanteau (2011). The Unbearable Lightness of “Thinking”: Moving Beyond Simple Concepts of Thinking, Rationality, and Hypothesis Testing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (5):250-251.
    Three correctives can get researchers out of the trap of constructing unitary theories of : (1) Strong inference methods largely avoid problems associated with universal prescriptive normativism; (2) theories must recognize that significant modularity of cognitive processes is antithetical to general accounts of thinking; and (3) consideration of the domain-specificity of rationality render many of the present article's issues moot.
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  22.  3
    Ryan Nichols (2015). Hypothesis-Testing of the Humanities: The Hard and Soft Humanities As Two Emerging Cultures. Southwest Philosophy Review 31 (1):1-19.
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  23. R. D. Tweney, M. E. Doherty & C. R. Mynatt (1981). Hypothesis Testing: The Role of Confirmation. In Ryan D. Tweney, Michael E. Doherty & Clifford R. Mynatt (eds.), On Scientific Thinking. Columbia University Press 115--128.
     
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  24.  3
    Francesco Mancini & Amelia Gangemi (2004). The Influence of Responsibility and Guilt on Naive Hypothesis-Testing. Thinking and Reasoning 10 (3):289-320.
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  25.  5
    Frédéric Vallée-Tourangeau & Teresa Payton (2008). Goal-Driven Hypothesis Testing in a Rule Discovery Task. In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society 2122--2127.
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  26. Steven Miller & Marcel Fredericks (2002). Social Science and Hypothesis Testing: Some Ontological Issues. Protosociology 17:188-201.
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  27.  1
    E. M. Dadlez (2015). Thinking Hypothetically About Hypothesis-Testing in the Humanities. Southwest Philosophy Review 31 (1):21-28.
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  28.  6
    Dirk Geeraerts, Caroline Gevaert & Dirk Speelman (2011). How Anger Rose: Hypothesis Testing in Diachronic Semantics. In Kathryn Allan & Justyna A. Robinson (eds.), Current Methods in Historical Semantics. De Gruyter Mouton 73--109.
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  29.  1
    Daniel B. Wright (1996). Hypothesis Testing in Experimental and Naturalistic Memory Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):210.
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  30.  8
    M. I. Charles E. Woodson (1969). Parameter Estimation Vs. Hypothesis Testing. Philosophy of Science 36 (2):203-204.
  31.  3
    Jennifer Nerissa Davis (2000). A Few Tips on Hypothesis Testing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):600-601.
    Gangestad & Simpson's account of the role of good-gene sexual selection in conditional human mating strategies is reasonably convincing, but could be more so with a little more attention to (1), dropping unnecessary sub hypotheses and especially (2) the inclusion of alternative evolutionary explanations.
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  32.  3
    J. David McKee (1974). The Effect of Problem Difficulty on Hypothesis Testing and an Extension of Levine’s Theory. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (3):188-190.
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  33.  10
    Henderikus J. Stam & Grant A. Pasay (1998). The Historical Case Against Null-Hypothesis Significance Testing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):219-220.
    We argue that Chow's defense of hypothesis-testing procedures attempts to restore an aura of objectivity to the core procedures, allowing these to take on the role of judgment that should be reserved for the researcher. We provide a brief overview of what we call the historical case against hypothesis testing and argue that the latter has led to a constrained and simplified conception of what passes for theory in psychology.
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  34.  3
    Lee Cronk (1991). Hypothesis Testing and Social Engineering. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):305-306.
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  35. Ronald T. Kellogg (1983). Age Differences in Hypothesis Testing and Frequency Processing in Concept Learning. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 21 (2):101-104.
  36.  2
    Rickard A. Sebby & Kenneth L. Witte (1980). The Effects of Labeling Upon Hypothesis-Testing Behavior. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 15 (3):191-193.
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  37.  2
    Kim Wallen (1992). Evolutionary Hypothesis Testing: Consistency is Not Enough. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):118-119.
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  38.  1
    Ernst PÖppel (1975). Parameter Estimation or Hypothesis Testing in the Statistical Analysis of Biological Rhythms? Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (5):511-512.
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  39.  1
    Joan H. Cantor & Charles C. Spiker (1984). Evidence for Long-Term Planning in Children’s Hypothesis Testing. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (6):493-496.
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  40.  1
    Lizbeth J. Martin (1980). Inadequate Criteria for Hypothesis Testing in Cerebral Asymmetry Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):243.
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  41.  1
    Kent L. Norman (1977). Hypothesis Testing in Stimulus Integration Tasks of Varying Difficulty. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (2):106-108.
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  42. C. J. Barnard (2011). Asking Questions in Biology: A Guide to Hypothesis Testing, Experimental Design and Presentation in Practical Work and Research Projects. Pearson.
  43. G. Casella & R. Berger (2001). Hypothesis Testing in Statistics. In International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. 7118--7121.
     
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  44. M. E. Doherty, R. D. Tweney & C. R. Mynatt (1981). Null Hypothesis Testing, Confirmation Bias and Strong Inference. In Ryan D. Tweney, Michael E. Doherty & Clifford R. Mynatt (eds.), On Scientific Thinking. Columbia University Press 262--267.
     
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  45. Klayman Joshua & Ha Young-Won (1989). Hypothesis Testing in Rule Discovery: Strategy, Structure, and Content. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15.
     
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  46. Gerald J. Massey (2011). Quine and Duhem on Holistic Hypothesis Testing. American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (3):239-266.
     
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  47. Alfred Mele (2007). Self-Deception and Hypothesis Testing. In M. Marraffa, M. De Caro & F. Ferreti (eds.), Cartographies of the Mind. Kluwer
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  48. Giovanni B. Moneta (1987). Are Psychological Experiments on Hypothesis-Testing Strategies a Good Simulation of Scientific Problem Solving? Epistemologia 10 (1):29.
     
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  49. L. M. Osbeck (2002). Fenna H. Poletiek, Hypothesis-Testing Behaviour. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (2):187-190.
     
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  50. James Rocha (2015). A Priori Progress: A Comment on Ryan Nichols’ “Hypothesis-Testing of the Humanities: The Hard and Soft Humanities As Two Emerging Cultures”. Southwest Philosophy Review 31 (1):29-35.
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