Search results for '*Imagery' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  15
    Stephen M. Kosslyn, Steven Pinker, Sophie Schwartz & G. Smith (1979). On the Demystification of Mental Imagery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):535-81.
    What might a theory of mental imagery look like, and how might one begin formulating such a theory? These are the central questions addressed in the present paper. The first section outlines the general research direction taken here and provides an overview of the empirical foundations of our theory of image representation and processing. Four issues are considered in succession, and the relevant results of experiments are presented and discussed. The second section begins with a discussion of the proper form (...)
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  2. Robert Briscoe (2011). Mental Imagery and the Varieties of Amodal Perception. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (2):153-173.
    The problem of amodal perception is the problem of how we represent features of perceived objects that are occluded or otherwise hidden from us. Bence Nanay (2010) has recently proposed that we amodally perceive an object's occluded features by imaginatively projecting them into the relevant regions of visual egocentric space. In this paper, I argue that amodal perception is not a single, unitary capacity. Drawing appropriate distinctions reveals amodal perception to be characterized not only by mental imagery, as Nanay suggests, (...)
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  3.  15
    Bence Nanay (forthcoming). Hallucination as Mental Imagery. Journal of Consciousness Studies.
    Hallucination is a big deal in contemporary philosophy of perception. The main reason for this is that the way hallucination is treated marks an important stance in one of the most vicious debates in this subdiscipline: the debate between ‘relationalists’ and ‘representationalists’. I argue that if we take hallucinations to be a form of mental imagery (as the literature in neuroscience and psychiatry routinely does), then we have a very straightforward way of arguing against disjunctivism: if hallucination is a (...)
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  4. Bence Nanay (2010). Perception and Imagination: Amodal Perception as Mental Imagery. Philosophical Studies 150 (2):239 - 254.
    When we see an object, we also represent those parts of it that are not visible. The question is how we represent them: this is the problem of amodal perception. I will consider three possible accounts: (a) we see them, (b) we have non-perceptual beliefs about them and (c) we have immediate perceptual access to them, and point out that all of these views face both empirical and conceptual objections. I suggest and defend a fourth account, according to which we (...)
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  5. Bence Nanay (2015). Perceptual Content and the Content of Mental Imagery. Philosophical Studies 172 (7):1723-1736.
    The aim of this paper is to argue that the phenomenal similarity between perceiving and visualizing can be explained by the similarity between the structure of the content of these two different mental states. And this puts important constraints on how we should think about perceptual content and the content of mental imagery.
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  6. Evan Thompson (2007). Look Again: Phenomenology and Mental Imagery. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):137-170.
    This paper (1) sketches a phenomenological analysis of visual mental imagery; (2) applies this analysis to the mental imagery debate in cognitive science; (3) briefly sketches a neurophenomenological approach to mental imagery; and (4) compares the results of this discussion with Dennett’s heterophenomenology.
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  7.  56
    M. Jeannerod (1994). The Representing Brain: Neural Correlates of Motor Intention and Imagery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):187.
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  8. Evan Thompson (2008). Representationalism and the Phenomenology of Mental Imagery. Synthese 160 (3):203--213.
    This paper sketches a phenomenological analysis of visual mental imagery and uses it to criticize representationalism and the internalist-versus-externalist framework for understanding consciousness. Contrary to internalist views of mental imagery imagery experience is not the experience of a phenomenal mental picture inspected by the mind’s eye, but rather the mental simulation of perceptual experience. Furthermore, there are experiential differences in perceiving and imagining that are not differences in the properties represented by these experiences. Therefore, externalist representationalism, which maintains that the (...)
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  9.  64
    J. C. Berendzen (2014). Motor Imagery and Merleau-Pontyian Accounts of Skilled Action. Ergo 1 (7):169-198.
    Maurice Merleau-Ponty is often interpreted as claiming that opportunities for action are directly present in perceptual experience. However, he does not provide much evidence for how or why this would occur, and one can doubt that this is an appropriate interpretation of his phenomenological descriptions. In particular, it could be argued the Merleau-Pontyian descriptions mistakenly attribute pre-perceptual or post-perceptual elements such as allocation of attention or judgment to the perceptual experience itself. This paper argues for the Merleau-Pontyian idea that opportunities (...)
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  10.  91
    James Genone (2006). Concepts and Imagery in Episodic Memory. Anthropology and Philosophy 7 (1/2):95-107.
    The relationship between perceptual experience and memory can seem to pose a chal- lenge for conceptualism, the thesis that perceptual experiences require the actualization of conceptual capacities. Since subjects can recall features of past experiences for which they lacked corresponding concepts at the time of the original experience, it would seem that a subject’s conceptual capacities do not impose a limit on what he or she can experience perceptually. But this conclusion ignores the fact that concepts can be composed of (...)
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  11.  61
    Gregory Currie & Ian Ravenscroft (1997). Mental Simulation and Motor Imagery. Philosophy of Science 64 (1):161-80.
    Motor imagery typically involves an experience as of moving a body part. Recent studies reveal close parallels between the constraints on motor imagery and those on actual motor performance. How are these parallels to be explained? We advance a simulative theory of motor imagery, modeled on the idea that we predict and explain the decisions of others by simulating their decision-making processes. By proposing that motor imagery is essentially off-line motor action, we explain the tendency of motor imagery to mimic (...)
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  12. Kim Sterelny (1986). The Imagery Debate. Philosophy of Science 53 (December):560-83.
    One central debate in cognitive science is over imagery. Do images constitute, or constitute evidence for, a distinctive, depictive form of mental representation? The most sophisticated advocacy of this view has been developed by Kosslyn and his coworkers. This paper focuses on his position and argues (i) that though Kosslyn has not developed a satisfactory account of depiction, there is nothing in principle unintelligible about the idea of depictive neural representation, but (ii) Kosslyn's model of imagery rescues the intelligibility of (...)
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  13. Amy Kind, Imagery and Imagination. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Both imagery and imagination play an important part in our mental lives. This article, which has three main sections, discusses both of these phenomena, and the connection between them. The first part discusses mental images and, in particular, the dispute about their representational nature that has become known as the _imagery debate_ . The second part turns to the faculty of the imagination, discussing the long philosophical tradition linking mental imagery and the imagination—a tradition that came under attack in the (...)
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  14.  23
    Sven Dupr (2008). Inside the Camera Obscura. Kepler's Experiment and Theory of Optical Imagery. Early Science and Medicine 13 (3):219-244.
    In his Paralipomena Johannes Kepler reported an experimentum that he had seen in the Dresden Kunstkammer. In one of the rooms there, which had been turned in its entirety into a camera obscura, he had witnessed the images formed by a lens. I discuss the role of this experiment in the development and foundation of his new theory of optical imagery, which made a distinction between two concepts of image, pictura and imago. My focus is on how Kepler used (...)
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  15.  59
    Myrto I. Mylopoulos (2011). Why Reject a Sensory Imagery Theory of Control Consciousness? Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):268-272.
    Mandik (2010) defends a motor theory of control consciousness according to which nonsensory states, like motor commands, directly contribute to the awareness we have of ourselves as being in control of our actions. Along the way, he argues that his theory is to be preferred over Prinz’s (2007) sensory imagery theory, which denies that nonsensory states play any direct role in the generation of control consciousness. I argue that Mandik’s criticisms of Prinz’s theory (...)
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  16.  72
    Berit Brogaard (2012). Seeing as a Non-Experiental Mental State: The Case From Synesthesia and Visual Imagery. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Neuroscience Series, Synthese Library
    The paper argues that the English verb ‘to see’ can denote three different kinds of conscious states of seeing, involving visual experiences, visual seeming states and introspective seeming states, respectively. The case for the claim that there are three kinds of seeing comes from synesthesia and visual imagery. Synesthesia is a relatively rare neurological condition in which stimulation in one sensory or cognitive stream involuntarily leads to associated experiences in a second unstimulated stream. Visual synesthesia is often considered a case (...)
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  17.  81
    Jennifer A. McMahon (2002). An Explanation for Normal and Anomalous Drawing Ability and Some Implications for Research on Perception and Imagery. Visual Arts Research 28 (1):38-52.
    The aim of this paper is to draw the attention of those conducting research on imagery to the different kinds of visual information deployed by expert drawers compared to non-expert drawers. To demonstrate this difference I draw upon the cognitive science literature on vision and imagery to distinguish between three different ways that visual phenomena can be represented in memory: structural descriptions, denotative descriptions, and configural descriptions. Research suggests that perception and imagery deploy the same mental processes and that the (...)
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  18.  77
    Nigel J. T. Thomas (2005). Mental Imagery, Philosophical Issues About. In Lynn Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science, Volume 2, pp. 1147-1153. Nature Publishing Group
    An introduction to the science and philosophy of mental imagery.
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  19.  20
    Jonathan Cohen (1996). The Imagery Debate: A Critical Assessment. Journal of Philosophical Research 21 (January):149-182.
    No one disputes that certain cognitive tasks involve the use of images. On the other hand, there has been substantial disagreement over whether the representations in which imaginal tasks are carried out are imaginal or propositional. The empirical literature on the topic which has accrued over the last twenty years suggests that there is a functional equivalence between mental imagery and perception: when peopIe imagine a scene or event, the mental processes that occur are functionally similar in important senses to (...)
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  20.  12
    Jan Degenaar (2014). Through the Inverting Glass: First-Person Observations on Spatial Vision and Imagery. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):373-393.
    Experience with inverting glasses reveals key factors of spatial vision. Interpretations of the literature based on the metaphor of a “visual image” have raised the question whether visual experience with inverting glasses remains inverted or whether it may turn back to normal after adaptation to the glasses. Here, I report on my experience with left/right inverting glasses and argue that a more fine-grained sensorimotor analysis can resolve the issue. Crucially, inverting glasses introduce a conflict at the very heart of spatial (...)
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  21.  4
    Jennifer Lapum, Terrence Yau, Kathryn Church, Perin Ruttonsha & Alison Matthews David (2015). Un-Earthing Emotions Through Art: Facilitating Reflective Practice with Poetry and Photographic Imagery. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 36 (2):171-176.
    In this article, we comment upon and provide an arts-informed example of an emotive-focused reflection of a health care practitioner. Specifically, we use poetry and photographic imagery as tools to un-earth practitioners’ emotions within agonizing and traumatic clinical encounters. In order to recognize one’s own humanness and authentically engage in the art of medicine, we immerse ourselves in the first author’s poetic and photographic self-reflection. The poem and image are intended to inspire interpretation and meaning based on the reader’s own (...)
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  22. Ralph D. Ellis (2005). The Roles of Imagery and Metaemotion in Deliberate Choice and Moral Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):140-157.
    Understanding the role of emotion in reasoned, deliberate choice -- particularly moral experience -- requires three components: Meta-emotion, allowing self-generated voluntary imagery and/or narratives that in turn trigger first-order emotions we may not already have, but would like to have for moral or other reasons. Hardwired mammalian altruistic sentiments, necessary but not sufficient for moral motivation. Neuropsychological grounding for what Hume called 'love of truth,' with two important effects in humans: generalization of altruistic feelings beyond natural sympathy for conspecifics; and (...)
     
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  23. William F. Brewer & Marlene Schommer-Aikins (2006). Scientists Are Not Deficient in Mental Imagery: Galton Revised. Review of General Psychology 10:130-146.
    In 1880, Galton carried out an investigation of imagery in a sample of distinguished men and a sample of nonscientists (adolescent male students). He concluded that scientists were either totally lacking in visual imagery or had “feeble” powers of mental imagery. This finding has been widely accepted in the secondary literature in psychology. A replication of Galton’s study with modern scientists and modern university undergraduates found no scientists totally lacking in visual imagery and very few with feeble visual imagery. Examination (...)
     
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  24. Rick Grush (2004). The Emulation Theory of Representation: Motor Control, Imagery, and Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):377-396.
    The emulation theory of representation is developed and explored as a framework that can revealingly synthesize a wide variety of representational functions of the brain. The framework is based on constructs from control theory (forward models) and signal processing (Kalman filters). The idea is that in addition to simply engaging with the body and environment, the brain constructs neural circuits that act as models of the body and environment. During overt sensorimotor engagement, these models are driven by efference (...)
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  25.  5
    Robert J. Weber & Roger Harnish (1974). Visual Imagery for Words: The Hebb Test. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (3):409-414.
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  26. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (1981). The Imagery Debate: Analog Media Vs. Tacit Knowledge. Psychological Review 88 (December):16-45.
     
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  27.  33
    Allan Paivio, John C. Yuille & Stephen A. Madigan (1968). Concreteness, Imagery, and Meaningfulness Values for 925 Nouns. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (1p2):1.
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  28.  3
    Roger Johansson, Jana Holsanova & Kenneth Holmqvist (2006). Pictures and Spoken Descriptions Elicit Similar Eye Movements During Mental Imagery, Both in Light and in Complete Darkness. Cognitive Science 30 (6):1053-1079.
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  29. Arthur I. Miller (1984/1986). Imagery in Scientific Thought: Creating 20th-Century Physics. MIT Press.
  30.  8
    Ralph Norman Haber (1979). Twenty Years of Haunting Eidetic Imagery: Where's the Ghost? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):583-594.
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  31.  51
    Gregory Currie (1995). Visual Imagery as the Simulation of Vision. Mind and Language 10 (1-2):25-44.
  32.  69
    James A. Blachowicz (1997). Analog Representation Beyond Mental Imagery. Journal of Philosophy 94 (2):55-84.
  33.  6
    Mark Rollins (1989). Mental Imagery: On the Limits of Cognitive Science. Yale University Press.
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  34.  18
    Christoph Lüthy & Alexis Smets (2009). Words, Lines, Diagrams, Images: Towards a History of Scientific Imagery. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):398-439.
    This essay examines the problems encountered in contemporary attempts to establish a typology of medieval and early modern scientific images, and to associate apparent types with certain standard meanings. Five particular issues are addressed here: the unclear boundary between words and images; the problem of morphologically similar images possessing incompatible meanings; the converse problem of comparable objects or processes being expressed by extremely dissimilar visual means; the impossibility of matching modern with historical iconographical terminologies; and the fact that the meaning (...)
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  35.  8
    Michelle Verges & Sean Duffy (2009). Spatial Representations Elicit Dual‐Coding Effects in Mental Imagery. Cognitive Science 33 (6):1157-1172.
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  36.  77
    Marc F. Krellenstein (1995). Unsolvable Problems, Visual Imagery, and Explanatory Satisfaction. Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (3):235-54.
    It has been suggested that certain problems may be unsolvable because of the mind's cognitive structure, but we may wonder what problems, and exactly why. The ultimate origin of the universe and the mind-body problem seem to be two such problems. As to why, Colin McGinn has argued that the mind-body problem is unsolvable because any theoretical concepts about the brain will be observation-based and unable to connect to unobservable subjective experience. McGinn's argument suggests a requirement of imagability -- an (...)
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  37.  1
    M. Johnna Butter (1970). Differential Recall of Paired Associates as a Function of Arousal and Concreteness-Imagery Levels. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (2):252.
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  38.  47
    Mark Rollins (2001). The Strategic Eye: Kosslyn's Theory of Imagery and Perception. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 11 (2):267-286.
  39.  7
    Ellis M. Craig (1973). Role of Mental Imagery in Free Recall of Deaf, Blind, and Normal Subjects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 97 (2):249.
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  40.  36
    Nigel J. T. Thomas, Are There People Who Do Not Experience Imagery? (And Why Does It Matter?).
    To the best of my knowledge, with the exception of Galton's original work (1880, 1883), Sommer's brief case study (1978), and Faw's (1997, 2009) articles, this is the only really substantial discussion of the phenomenon of non-brain-damaged "non-imagers" available anywhere.
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  41.  5
    Allan Paivio & John C. Yuille (1969). Changes in Associative Strategies and Paired-Associate Learning Over Trials as a Function of Work Imagery and Type of Learning Set. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (3p1):458.
  42.  2
    P. J. Hampson & P. E. Morris (1978). Unfulfilled Expectations: A Criticism of Neisser's Theory of Imagery. Cognition 6 (March):79-85.
  43.  4
    Allan Paivio, John C. Yuille & T. B. Rogers (1969). Noun Imagery and Meaningfulness in Free and Serial Recall. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (3p1):509.
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  44.  3
    M. J. Peterson & S. E. Graham (1974). Visual Detection and Visual Imagery. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):509.
  45.  4
    Lee Elliott (1973). Imagery Versus Repetition Encoding in Short- and Long-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (2):270.
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  46.  3
    Edward J. Rowe & Allan Paivio (1971). Word Frequency and Imagery Effects in Verbal Discrimination Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 88 (3):319.
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  47.  3
    Peter A. de Villiers (1974). Imagery and Theme in Recall of Connected Discourse. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (2):263.
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  48.  13
    Peter F. R. Haynes (1976). Mental Imagery. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 6 (December):705-720.
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  49.  3
    Allan Paivio & Edward J. Rowe (1970). Noun Imagery, Frequency, and Meaningfulness in Verbal Discrimination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (2):264.
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  50.  4
    Edward J. Rowe & Allan Paivio (1972). Effects of Noun Imagery, Pronunciation, Method of Presentation, and Intrapair Order of Items in Verbal Discrimination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (2):427.
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