Search results for '*Imitation (Learning)' (try it on Scholar)

107 found
Sort by:
  1. Philip S. Gerrans (2013). Imitation, Mind Reading, and Social Learning. Biological Theory 8 (1):20-27.score: 96.0
    Imitation has been understood in different ways: as a cognitive adaptation subtended by genetically specified cognitive mechanisms; as an aspect of domain general human cognition. The second option has been advanced by Cecilia Heyes who treats imitation as an instance of associative learning. Her argument is part of a deflationary treatment of the “mirror neuron” phenomenon. I agree with Heyes about mirror neurons but argue that Kim Sterelny has provided the tools to provide a better account of the nature and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jochen Triesch (2013). Imitation Learning Based on an Intrinsic Motivation Mechanism for Efficient Coding. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 88.0
    A hypothesis regarding the development of imitation learning is presented that is rooted in intrinsic motivations. It is derived from a recently proposed form of intrinsically motivated learning (IML) for efficient coding in active perception, wherein an agent learns to perform actions with its sense organs to facilitate efficient encoding of the sensory data. To this end, actions of the sense organs that improve the encoding of the sensory data trigger an internally generated reinforcement signal. Here it is argued that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Milton E. Rosenbaum & Irving F. Tucker (1962). The Competence of the Model and the Learning of Imitation and Non-Imitation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (2):183.score: 80.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Karen J. Kaplan (1972). Vicarious Reinforcement and Model's Behavior in Verbal Learning and Imitation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):448.score: 80.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Richard W. Byrne & Anne E. Russon (1998). Learning by Imitation: A Hierarchical Approach. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):667-684.score: 72.0
    To explain social learning without invoking the cognitively complex concept of imitation, many learning mechanisms have been proposed. Borrowing an idea used routinely in cognitive psychology, we argue that most of these alternatives can be subsumed under a single process, priming, in which input increases the activation of stored internal representations. Imitation itself has generally been seen as a This has diverted much research towards the all-or-none question of whether an animal can imitate, with disappointingly inconclusive results. In the great (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Thomas R. Zentall (2011). Social Learning Mechanisms: Implications for a Cognitive Theory of Imitation. Interaction Studies 12 (2):233-261.score: 64.0
    Social influence and social learning are important to the survival of many organisms, and certain forms of social learning also may have important implications for their underlying cognitive processes. The various forms of social influence and learning are discussed with special emphasis on the mechanisms that may be responsible for opaque imitation (the copying of a response that the observer cannot easily see when it produces the response). Three procedures are examined, the results of which may qualify as opaque imitation: (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Peter E. Midford (1998). High-Level Social Learning in Apes: Imitation or Observation-Assisted Planning? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):698-699.score: 64.0
    Byrne & Russon's notion of program-level imitation is based on the ability of apes to plan novel sequences of behavior and on how information gleaned by observation can aid the planning process. Byrne & Russon would have made a stronger case by focusing on social learning and planning and expending less effort interpreting their results as a new category of imitation.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Dietmar Todt (1998). Hierarchical Learning of Song in Birds: A Case of Vocal Imitation? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):702-703.score: 64.0
    The target article by Byrne & Russon treats imitation as an achievement that originates from observation. In my commentary I propose extending the database to the role of listening. Referring to current studies on song learning in birds, I suggest that at least some features of this accomplishment also may be based on learning by imitation.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Justin H. G. Williams (2008). Imitation and the Effort of Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):40-41.score: 64.0
    Central to Hurley's argument is the position that imitation is and requires inhibition. The evidence for this is poor. Imitation is intentional, involves active comparison between self and other, and involves new learning to improve self-other likeness. Abnormal imitation behaviour may result from impaired learning rather than disinhibition. Mentalizing may be similarly effortful and dependent upon learning about others.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Richard Moore (2013). Social Learning and Teaching in Chimpanzees. Biology and Philosophy 28 (6):879-901.score: 60.0
    There is increasing evidence that some behavioural differences between groups of chimpanzees can be attributed neither to genetic nor to ecological variation. Such differences are likely to be maintained by social learning. While humans teach their offspring, and acquire cultural traits through imitative learning, there is little evidence of such behaviours in chimpanzees. However, by appealing only to incremental changes in motivation, attention and attention-soliciting behaviour, and without expensive changes in cognition, we can hypothesise the possible emergence of imitation and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Richard Moore (2013). Imitation and Conventional Communication. Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):481-500.score: 60.0
    To the extent that language is conventional, non-verbal individuals, including human infants, must participate in conventions in order to learn to use even simple utterances of words. This raises the question of which varieties of learning could make this possible. In this paper I defend Tomasello’s (The cultural origins of human cognition. Harvard UP, Cambridge, 1999, Origins of human communication. MIT, Cambridge, 2008) claim that knowledge of linguistic conventions could be learned through imitation. This is possible because Lewisian accounts of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Thomas N. Wisdom, Xianfeng Song & Robert L. Goldstone (2013). Social Learning Strategies in Networked Groups. Cognitive Science 37 (8):1383-1425.score: 60.0
    When making decisions, humans can observe many kinds of information about others' activities, but their effects on performance are not well understood. We investigated social learning strategies using a simple problem-solving task in which participants search a complex space, and each can view and imitate others' solutions. Results showed that participants combined multiple sources of information to guide learning, including payoffs of peers' solutions, popularity of solution elements among peers, similarity of peers' solutions to their own, and relative payoffs from (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Stefan Schaal (1999). Is Imitation Learning the Route to Humanoid Robots? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (6):233-242.score: 60.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Aaron P. Shon, David B. Grimes, Chris L. Baker, Rajesh Pn Rao & Andrew N. Meltzoff (forthcoming). A Model-Based Goal-Directed Bayesian Framework for Imitation Learning in Humans and Machines. Cognitive Science.score: 60.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Talia Welsh (2006). Do Neonates Display Innate Self-Awareness? Why Neonatal Imitation Fails to Provide Sufficient Grounds for Innate Self-and Other-Awareness. Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):221-238.score: 56.0
    Until the 1970s, models of early infancy tended to depict the young child as internally preoccupied and incapable of processing visual-tactile data from the external world. Meltzoff and Moore's groundbreaking studies of neonatal imitation disprove this characterization of early life: They suggest that the infant is cognizant of its external environment and is able to control its own body. Taking up these experiments, theorists argue that neonatal imitation provides an empirical justification for the existence of an innate ability to engage (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ellen Fridland (2013). Imitation, Skill Learning, and Conceptual Thought: An Embodied, Developmental Approach. In Liz Swan (ed.), Origins of Mind. 203--224.score: 56.0
  17. Claudia Canevari, Leonardo Badino, Alessandro D'Ausilio, Luciano Fadiga & Giorgio Metta (2013). Modeling Speech Imitation and Ecological Learning of Auditory-Motor Maps. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 56.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Robert E. Phillips (1969). "Vicarious Reinforcement and Imitation in a Verbal Learning Situation": Erratum. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (3, Pt.1):524-524.score: 56.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jeremy J. Belarmino (2013). Imitation and Education: A Philosophical Inquiry Into Learning by Example by Bryan R. Warnick (Review). Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (1):111-126.score: 52.0
    When I reflect on reading Bryan Warnick's Imitation and Education, I am appreciative that I was given the opportunity not only to read it but also to think about its issues as thoroughly as I have in the process of writing this essay. I share Warnick's surprise that, prior to his book, no one had attempted to explore the relationship between imitation and education in a philosophically meaningful manner. Before reading his book, I did not realize that imitation was such (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Bennett G. Galef (1992). The Question of Animal Culture. Human Nature 3 (2):157-178.score: 52.0
    In this paper I consider whether traditional behaviors of animals, like traditions of humans, are transmitted by imitation learning. Review of the literature on problem solving by captive primates, and detailed consideration of two widely cited instances of purported learning by imitation and of culture in free-living primates (sweet-potato washing by Japanese macaques and termite fishing by chimpanzees), suggests that nonhuman primates do not learn to solve problems by imitation. It may, therefore, be misleading to treat animal traditions and human (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Susan L. Hurley (2006). Bypassing Conscious Control: Unconscious Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech. In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. 301-337.score: 52.0
  22. C. M. Heyes (1998). Theory of Mind in Nonhuman Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):101-114.score: 48.0
    Since the BBS article in which Premack and Woodruff (1978) asked “Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?,” it has been repeatedly claimed that there is observational and experimental evidence that apes have mental state concepts, such as “want” and “know.” Unlike research on the development of theory of mind in childhood, however, no substantial progress has been made through this work with nonhuman primates. A survey of empirical studies of imitation, self-recognition, social relationships, deception, role-taking, and perspective-taking suggests (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Caroline Catmur & Cecilia Heyes (2013). Is It What You Do, or When You Do It? The Roles of Contingency and Similarity in Pro‐Social Effects of Imitation. Cognitive Science 37 (8):1541-1552.score: 48.0
    Being imitated has a wide range of pro-social effects, but it is not clear how these effects are mediated. Naturalistic studies of the effects of being imitated have not established whether pro-social outcomes are due to the similarity and/or the contingency between the movements performed by the actor and those of the imitator. Similarity is often assumed to be the active ingredient, but we hypothesized that contingency might also be important, as it produces positive affect in infants and can be (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Kim Sterelny (2013). The Evolved Apprentice Model: Scope and Limits. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 8 (1):37-43.score: 48.0
    Downes, Gerrans, and Sutton all raise important issues for the account of human social learning and cooperation developed in The Evolved Apprentice. Downes suggests that I have bought too uncritically into the view that hunting was economically critical to forager life; I remain unpersuaded, while conceding something to the alternative view that hunting was signaling. Downes also suggests that I consider extending the evolved apprentice model to contemporary issues in social epistemology; I wonder whether that might make the model so (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Natalie Sebanz, Harold Bekkering & Günther Knoblich (2006). Social Learning: From Imitation to Joint Action. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):70-76.score: 48.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Aude Billard & Michael Arbib (2002). For Learning by Imitation Computational Modeling. In Maxim I. Stamenov & Vittorio Gallese (eds.), Mirror Neurons and the Evolution of Brain and Language. John Benjamins. 42--343.score: 48.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Elizabeth R. Marsh & Arthur M. Glenberg (2010). The Embodied Statistician. Frontiers in Psychology 1:184-184.score: 48.0
    How do infants, children, and adults learn grammatical rules from the mere observation of grammatically structured sequences? We present an embodied hypothesis that a) people covertly imitate stimuli; b) imitation tunes the particular neuromuscular systems used in the imitation, facilitating transitions between the states corresponding to the successive grammatical stimuli; and c) the discrimination between grammatical and ungrammatical stimuli is based on differential ease of imitation of the sequences. We report two experiments consistent with the embodied account of statistical learning. (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Carlos Alós-Ferrer Karl H. Schlag (2009). Imitation and Learning. In Paul Anand, Prastanta Pattanaik & Clemens Puppe (eds.), The Handbook of Rational and Social Choice. Oxford University Press, Usa.score: 48.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Carlos Alós-Ferrer & Karl Schlag (2009). Imitation and Learning. In Paul Anand, Prasanta Pattanaik & Clemens Puppe (eds.), The Handbook of Rational and Social Choice. Oup Oxford.score: 48.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Norbert Zmyj David Buttelmann (2012). Evaluating the Empirical Evidence for the Two-Stage-Model of Infant Imitation. A Commentary on Paulus, Hunnius, Vissers, and Bekkering (2011). Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 48.0
    Evaluating the empirical evidence for the two-stage-model of infant imitation. A commentary on Paulus, Hunnius, Vissers, and Bekkering (2011).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Alison Gopnik & Andrew Meltzoff (1993). Imitation, Cultural Learning and the Origins of “Theory of Mind”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):521.score: 48.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. A. Gopnick & A. N. Meltzoff (1993). Imitation, Cultural Learning, and Theory of Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5:521-523.score: 48.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jeremy Kendal (2006). Review of “Social Learning and Imitation”: Volume 32(1), 2004, Of. [REVIEW] Interaction Studies 7 (2):273-288.score: 48.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Noël Nguyen Marc Sato, Krystyna Grabski, Maëva Garnier, Lionel Granjon, Jean-Luc Schwartz (2013). Converging Toward a Common Speech Code: Imitative and Perceptuo-Motor Recalibration Processes in Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 48.0
    Auditory and somatosensory systems play a key role in speech motor control. In the act of speaking, segmental speech movements are programmed to reach phonemic sensory goals, which in turn are used to estimate actual sensory feedback in order to further control production. The adult's tendency to automatically imitate a number of acoustic-phonetic characteristics in another speaker's speech however suggests that speech production not only relies on the intended phonemic sensory goals and actual sensory feedback but also on the processing (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Marc Sato, Krystyna Grabski, Maëva Garnier, Lionel Granjon, Jean-Luc L. Schwartz & Noël Nguyen (2013). Converging Toward a Common Speech Code: Imitative and Perceptuo-Motor Recalibration Processes in Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 4:422.score: 48.0
    Auditory and somatosensory systems play a key role in speech motor control. In the act of speaking, segmental speech movements are programmed to reach phonemic sensory goals, which in turn are used to estimate actual sensory feedback in order to further control production. The adult's tendency to automatically imitate a number of acoustic-phonetic characteristics in another speaker's speech however suggests that speech production not only relies on the intended phonemic sensory goals and actual sensory feedback but also on the processing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Joe Saunders, Chrystopher L. Nehaniv & Kerstin Dautenhahn (2007). Experimental Comparisons of Observational Learning Mechanisms for Movement Imitation in Mobile Robots. Interaction Studies 8 (2):307-335.score: 48.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Michael Tomasello, Ann Cale Kruger & Hilary Horn Ratner (1993). Cultural Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):495.score: 44.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. J. Decety & T. Chaminade (2003). When the Self Represents the Other: A New Cognitive Neuroscience View on Psychological Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):577-596.score: 40.0
    There is converging evidence from developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as from neuroscience, to suggest that the self is both special and social, and that self-other interaction is the driving force behind self-development. We review experimental findings which demonstrate that human infants are motivated for social interactions and suggest that the development of an awareness of other minds is rooted in the implicit notion that others are like the self. We then marshal evidence from functional neuroimaging explorations of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Alan M. Turing (1950). Computing Machinery and Intelligence. Mind 59 (October):433-60.score: 36.0
    I propose to consider the question, "Can machines think?" This should begin with definitions of the meaning of the terms "machine" and "think." The definitions might be framed so as to reflect so far as possible the normal use of the words, but this attitude is dangerous, If the meaning of the words "machine" and "think" are to be found by examining how they are commonly used it is difficult to escape the conclusion that the meaning and the answer to (...)
    Direct download (21 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Elliot C. Brown & Martin Brüne (2012). The Role of Prediction in Social Neuroscience. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6 (147):147-147.score: 36.0
    Research has shown that the brain is constantly making predictions about future events. Theories of prediction in perception, action and learning suggest that the brain serves to reduce the discrepancies between expectation and actual experience, i.e. by reducing the prediction error. Forward models of action and perception propose the generation of a predictive internal representation of the expected sensory outcome, which is matched to the actual sensory feedback. Shared neural representations have been found when experiencing one’s own and observing others’ (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Björn Vickhoff & Helge Malmgren, Why Does Music Move Us? Philosophical Communications.score: 36.0
    The communication of emotion in music has with few exceptions, as L. B. Meyer´s Emotion and Meaning in Music (1956) and the contour theory (Kivy 1989, 2002), focused on music structure as representations of emotions. This implies a semiotic approach - the assumption that music is a kind of language that could be read and decoded. Such an approach is largely restricted to the conscious level of knowing, understanding and communication. We suggest an understanding of music and emotion based on (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Mónica Tamariz & Simon Kirby (2014). Culture: Copying, Compression, and Conventionality. Cognitive Science 38 (5).score: 36.0
    Through cultural transmission, repeated learning by new individuals transforms cultural information, which tends to become increasingly compressible (Kirby, Cornish, & Smith, ; Smith, Tamariz, & Kirby, ). Existing diffusion chain studies include in their design two processes that could be responsible for this tendency: learning (storing patterns in memory) and reproducing (producing the patterns again). This paper manipulates the presence of learning in a simple iterated drawing design experiment. We find that learning seems to be the causal factor behind the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Rik Wehrens (forthcoming). The Potential of the Imitation Game Method in Exploring Healthcare Professionals' Understanding of the Lived Experiences and Practical Challenges of Chronically Ill Patients. Health Care Analysis:1-19.score: 36.0
    This paper explores the potential and relevance of an innovative sociological research method known as the Imitation Game for research in health care. Whilst this method and its potential have until recently only been explored within sociology, there are many interesting and promising facets that may render this approach fruitful within the health care field, most notably to questions about the experiential knowledge or ‘expertise’ of chronically ill patients (and the extent to which different health care professionals are able to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Stephen J. Cowley & Karl MacDorman (1995). Simulating Convesations: The Communion Game. [REVIEW] AI and Society 9 (2-3):116-137.score: 36.0
    In their enthusiasm for programming, computational linguists have tended to lose sight of what humansdo. They have conceived of conversations as independent of sound and the bodies that produce it. Thus, implicit in their simulations is the assumption that the text is the essence of talk. In fact, unlike electronic mail, conversations are acoustic events. During everyday talk, human understanding depends both on the words spoken and on fine interpersonal vocal coordination. When utterances are analysed into sequences of word-based forms, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Ross Roberts Gavin Lawrence, Nichola Callow (2013). Watch Me If You Can: Imagery Ability Moderates Observational Learning Effectiveness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 36.0
    Recent research has revealed similarities in brain activity during observational learning and motor execution. However, whilst action develops visual, motor and afferent representations during acquisition, action-observation has been proposed to only develop visual-spatial learning via visual representation. In addition, it has been suggested that the vividness of visual representations are determined by imagery ability. Thus, the purpose of the current investigation was to explore the possible moderating role of imagery ability in the effectiveness of observational learning. Participants (n=40) were assessed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Nandini C. Singh Susanne M. Reiterer, Xiaochen Hu, T. A. Sumathi (2013). Are You a Good Mimic? Neuro-Acoustic Signatures for Speech Imitation Ability. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 36.0
    We investigated individual differences in speech imitation ability in late bilinguals using a neuro-acoustic approach. 138 German-English bilinguals matched on various behavioral measures were tested for “speech imitation ability” in a foreign language, Hindi, and categorised into “high ” and “low ability” groups. Brain activations and speech recordings were obtained from 26 participants from the two extreme groups as they performed a functional neuroimaging experiment which required them to “imitate“ sentences in three conditions: (A) German, (B) English and (C) German (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. C. Catmur (2010). Contingency is Crucial for Creating Imitative Responses. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:15-15.score: 32.0
    Contingency is Crucial for Creating Imitative Responses.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Clément Moulin-Frier, Sao M. Nguyen & Pierre-Yves Oudeyer (2014). Self-Organization of Early Vocal Development in Infants and Machines: The Role of Intrinsic Motivation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 32.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Susan Hurley (2008). The Shared Circuits Model (SCM): How Control, Mirroring, and Simulation Can Enable Imitation, Deliberation, and Mindreading. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.score: 28.0
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines. Imitation is surveyed in this target article under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model (SCM) explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, mirroring, and simulation. It is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Patricia Greenspan (2010). Learning Emotions and Ethics. In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press.score: 28.0
    Innate emotional bases of ethics have been proposed by authors in evolutionary psychology, following Darwin and his sources in eighteenth-century moral philosophy. Philosophers often tend to view such theories as irrelevant to, or even as tending to undermine, the project of moral philosophy. But the importance of emotions to early moral learning gives them a role to play in determining the content of morality. I argue, first, that research on neural circuits indicates that the basic elements or components of emotions (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 107