Search results for '*Lateral Dominance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. E. T. Raney (1938). Reversed Lateral Dominance in Identical Twins. Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (3):304.score: 147.0
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  2. E. T. Raney (1939). Brain Potentials and Lateral Dominance in Identical Twins. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (1):21.score: 147.0
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  3. Howard B. Orenstein & Walter B. Meighan (1976). Recognition of Bilaterally Presented Words Varying in Concreteness and Frequency: Lateral Dominance or Sequential Processing? Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (2):179-180.score: 105.0
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  4. Joseph Sirosh & Risto Miikkulainen (1996). Lateral Connections In The Visual Cortex Can Self-Organize Cooperatively With Multisize RFs Just As With Ocular Dominance and Orientation Columns. In. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 18--430.score: 85.0
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  5. B. Cucchiara, S. E. Kasner, D. A. Wolk, P. D. Lyden, V. A. Knappertz, T. Ashwood, T. Odergren & A. Nordlund (2003). Lack of Hemispheric Dominance for Consciousness in Acute Ischaemic Stroke. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry 74 (7):889-892.score: 67.0
  6. Guido Gainotti (2005). Emotions, Unconscious Processes, and the Right Hemisphere. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 7 (1):71-81.score: 42.0
  7. Lucina Q. Uddin, Jan Rayman & Eran Zaidel (2005). Split-Brain Reveals Separate but Equal Self-Recognition in the Two Cerebral Hemispheres. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):633-640.score: 42.0
  8. J. Decety & T. Chaminade (2003). When the Self Represents the Other: A New Cognitive Neuroscience View on Psychological Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):577-596.score: 42.0
    There is converging evidence from developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as from neuroscience, to suggest that the self is both special and social, and that self-other interaction is the driving force behind self-development. We review experimental findings which demonstrate that human infants are motivated for social interactions and suggest that the development of an awareness of other minds is rooted in the implicit notion that others are like the self. We then marshal evidence from functional neuroimaging explorations of the (...)
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  9. Jillian H. Fecteau, Alan Kingstone & James T. Enns (2004). Hemisphere Differences in Conscious and Unconscious Word Reading. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):550-64.score: 42.0
  10. Stephen D. Smith & M. Barbara Bulman-Fleming (2004). A Hemispheric Asymmetry for the Unconscious Perception of Emotion. Brain and Cognition 55 (3):452-457.score: 42.0
  11. Martin Eimer, Angelo Maravita, Jose Van Velzen, Masud Husain & Jon Driver (2002). The Electrophysiology of Tactile Extinction: ERP Correlates of Unconscious Somatosensory Processing. Neuropsychologia 40 (13):2438-2447.score: 42.0
  12. Iraj Derakhshan (2003). The Preservation of Consciousness, Automatism, and Movement Control. Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 15 (4):456.score: 42.0
  13. C. Marzi, M. Girelli, Carlo Miniussi, N. Smania & Angelo Maravita (2000). Electrophysiological Correlates of Conscious Vision: Evidence From Unilateral Extinction. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12 (5):869-877.score: 42.0
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  14. Christopher L. Niebauer, Justin Aselage & Christian Schutte (2002). Hemispheric Interaction and Consciousness: Degree of Handedness Predicts the Intensity of a Sensory Illusion. Laterality 7 (1):85-96.score: 42.0
  15. Elzbieta Szelag, Krystyna Rymarczyk & Ernst Poppel (2001). Conscious Control of Movements: Increase of Temporal Precision in Voluntarily Delayed Actions. Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis 61 (3):175-179.score: 42.0
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  16. Norman D. Cook (2003). Hemispheric Dominance has its Origins in the Control of the Midline Organs of Speech. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):216-217.score: 42.0
    Unlike all other lateral specializations, the necessity for unilateral dominance is clear only for the case of the motor control of the speech organs lying on the midline of the body and innervated from both hemispheres. All functional asymmetries are likely to be a consequence of this asymmetry of executive control.
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  17. Michael S. Gazzaniga & Melvin E. Miller (2000). Testing Tulving: The Split Brain Approach. In Endel Tulving (ed.), Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.score: 42.0
  18. Stephen Jackson (2000). Perception, Awareness and Action: Insights From Blindsight. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.score: 42.0
  19. Robert K. Kretz (2000). The Evolution of Self-Awareness: Advances in Neurological Understandings Since Julian Jaynes' "Bicameral Mind&Quot;. Dissertation Abstracts International 60.score: 42.0
  20. Stephen D. Smith, Hemispheric Specialization for the Conscious and Unconscious Perception of Emotional Stimuli.score: 42.0
  21. Elizabeth K. Taitano, Individual Differences in Emotional Awareness and the Lateralized Processing of Emotion.score: 42.0
  22. Hugo Théoret, Masahito Kobayashi, Lotfi Merabet, Tim Wagner, Jose M. Tormos & Alvaro Pascual-Leone (2004). Modulation of Right Motor Cortex Excitability Without Awareness Following Presentation of Masked Self-Images. Cognitive Brain Research 20 (1):54-57.score: 42.0
     
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  23. Rolf Verleger (2001). Comment on Electrophysiological Correlates of Conscious Vision: Evidence From Unilateral Extinction by Marzi, Girelli, Miniussi, Smania, and Maravita, in JOCN 12:. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 13 (3):416-417.score: 42.0
     
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  24. Theofanis I. Panagiotaropoulos, Vishal Kapoor & Nikos K. Logothetis (2013). Desynchronization and Rebound of Beta Oscillations During Conscious and Unconscious Local Neuronal Processing in the Macaque Lateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 36.0
    Accumulating evidence indicates that control mechanisms are not tightly bound to conscious perception since both conscious and unconscious information can trigger control processes, probably through the activation of higher-order association areas like the prefrontal cortex. Studying the modulation of control-related prefrontal signals in a microscopic, neuronal level during conscious and unconscious neuronal processing and under control-free conditions could provide an elementary understanding of these interactions. Here we performed extracellular electrophysiological recordings in the macaque lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) during monocular physical (...)
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  25. J. R. Knott & T. D. Tjossem (1943). Bilateral Electroencephalograms From Normal Speakers and Stutterers. Journal of Experimental Psychology 32 (4):357.score: 34.0
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  26. John S. Wilkins, Gods Above: Naturalizing Religion in Terms of Our Shared Ape Social Dominance Behavior.score: 24.0
    To naturalize religion we must identify what religion is, and what aspects of it we are trying to explain. In this paper religious social institutional behavior is the explanatory target, and an explanatory hypothesis based on shared primate social dominance psychology is given. The argument is that various religious features, including the high status afforded the religious, and the high status afforded to deities, is an expression of this social dominance psychology in a context for which it did (...)
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  27. Allan Mazur & Alan Booth (1998). Testosterone and Dominance in Men. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):353-363.score: 24.0
    In men, high levels of endogenous testosterone (T) seem to encourage behavior intended to dominate other people. Sometimes dominant behavior is aggressive, its apparent intent being to inflict harm on another person, but often dominance is expressed nonaggressively. Sometimes dominant behavior takes the form of antisocial behavior, including rebellion against authority and law breaking. Measurement of T at a single point in time, presumably indicative of a man's basal T level, predicts many of these dominant or antisocial behaviors. T (...)
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  28. Anya Plutynski (2008). Explaining How and Explaining Why: Developmental and Evolutionary Explanations of Dominance. Biology and Philosophy 23 (3):363-381.score: 24.0
    There have been two different schools of thought on the evolution of dominance. On the one hand, followers of Wright [Wright S. 1929. Am. Nat. 63: 274–279, Evolution: Selected Papers by Sewall Wright, University of Chicago Press, Chicago; 1934. Am. Nat. 68: 25–53, Evolution: Selected Papers by Sewall Wright, University of Chicago Press, Chicago; Haldane J.B.S. 1930. Am. Nat. 64: 87–90; 1939. J. Genet. 37: 365–374; Kacser H. and Burns J.A. 1981. Genetics 97: 639–666] have defended the view that (...)
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  29. Denise Dellarosa Cummins (1996). Dominance Hierarchies and the Evolution of Human Reasoning. Minds and Machines 6 (4):463-480.score: 24.0
    Research from ethology and evolutionary biology indicates the following about the evolution of reasoning capacity. First, solving problems of social competition and cooperation have direct impact on survival rates and reproductive success. Second, the social structure that evolved from this pressure is the dominance hierarchy. Third, primates that live in large groups with complex dominance hierarchies also show greater neocortical development, and concomitantly greater cognitive capacity. These facts suggest that the necessity of reasoning effectively about dominance hierarchies (...)
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  30. Yi-Hui Huang & Shih-Hsin Su (2009). Public Relations Autonomy, Legal Dominance, and Strategic Orientation as Predictors of Crisis Communicative Strategies. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):29 - 41.score: 24.0
    This article investigates the factors affecting how public relations autonomy, legal dominance, and strategic orientation affect crisis communicative response in corporate contexts. Communication managers, crisis managers, public affairs managers, and/or public relations managers were solicited from Taiwan’s top 500 companies to participate in a survey. The results revealed that, in contrast to public relations autonomy being the strongest and sole predictor of concession strategy, legal dominance could predict defensive and diversionary responses in crisis events. The article concludes with (...)
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  31. Mahdi Muhammad Moosa & S. M. Minhaz Ud-Dean (2011). The Role of Dominance Hierarchy in the Evolution of Social Species. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (2):203-208.score: 24.0
    A number of animal species from different lineages live socially. One of the features of social living is the formation of dominance hierarchy. Despite its obvious benefit in the survival probability of the species, the hierarchical structureitself poses psychological and physiological burden leading to the chronic activation of stress related pathways. Considering these apparently conflicting observations, here we propose that social hierarchy can act as a selective force in the evolution of social species. We also discuss its role on (...)
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  32. Douglas Allchin (2005). The Dilemma of Dominance. Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):427-451.score: 24.0
    The concept of dominance poses several dilemmas. First, while entrenched in genetics education, the metaphor of dominance promotes several misconceptions and misleading cultural perspectives. Second, the metaphors of power, prevalence and competition extend into science, shaping assumptions and default concepts. Third, because genetic causality is complex, the simplified concepts of dominance found in practice are highly contingent or inconsistent. The conceptual problems are illustrated in the history of studies on the evolution of dominance. Conceptual clarity may (...)
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  33. Andrew M. Colman & Michael Bacharach (1997). Payoff Dominance and the Stackelberg Heuristic. Theory and Decision 43 (1):1-19.score: 24.0
    Payoff dominance, a criterion for choosing between equilibrium points in games, is intuitively compelling, especially in matching games and other games of common interests, but it has not been justified from standard game-theoretic rationality assumptions. A psychological explanation of it is offered in terms of a form of reasoning that we call the Stackelberg heuristic in which players assume that their strategic thinking will be anticipated by their co-player(s). Two-person games are called Stackelberg-soluble if the players' strategies that maximize (...)
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  34. Thierry Magnac & Jean-Marc Robin (1999). Dynamic Stochastic Dominance in Bandit Decision Problems. Theory and Decision 47 (3):267-295.score: 24.0
    The aim of this paper is to study the monotonicity properties with respect to the probability distribution of the state processes, of optimal decisions in bandit decision problems. Orderings of dynamic discrete projects are provided by extending the notion of stochastic dominance to stochastic processes.
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  35. Udo Ebert (2010). Dominance Criteria for Welfare Comparisons: Using Equivalent Income to Describe Differences in Needs. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 69 (1):55-67.score: 24.0
    The article demonstrates that the dominance approach—often used for the measurement of welfare in a population in which there are different household types (see e.g., Atkinson and Bourguignon, Arrow and the foundations of the theory of economic policy, 350–370, 1987)—can be based on explicit value judgments on the households’ living standard. We define living standard by equivalent income (functions) and consider classes of inequality averse social welfare functions: Welfare increases if the inequality of living standard is decreased. In this (...)
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  36. Emiliano Lorini (2013). On the Epistemic Foundation for Iterated Weak Dominance: An Analysis in a Logic of Individual and Collective Attitudes. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 42 (6):863-904.score: 24.0
    This paper proposes a logical framework for representing static and dynamic properties of different kinds of individual and collective attitudes. A complete axiomatization as well as a decidability result for the logic are given. The logic is applied to game theory by providing a formal analysis of the epistemic conditions of iterated deletion of weakly dominated strategies (IDWDS), or iterated weak dominance for short. The main difference between the analysis of the epistemic conditions of iterated weak dominance given (...)
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  37. Lucas Champollion (2011). Lexicalized Non-Local MCTAG with Dominance Links is NP-Complete. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 20 (3):343-359.score: 24.0
    An NP-hardness proof for non-local Multicomponent Tree Adjoining Grammar (MCTAG) by Rambow and Satta (1st International Workshop on Tree Adjoining Grammers 1992 ), based on Dahlhaus and Warmuth (in J Comput Syst Sci 33:456–472, 1986 ), is extended to some linguistically relevant restrictions of that formalism. It is found that there are NP-hard grammars among non-local MCTAGs even if any or all of the following restrictions are imposed: (i) lexicalization: every tree in the grammar contains a terminal; (ii) dominance (...)
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  38. Johan E. Gustafsson (forthcoming). Sequential Dominance and the Anti-Aggregation Principle. Philosophical Studies:1-9.score: 24.0
    According to the widely held anti-aggregation principle, it is wrong to save a larger number of people from minor harms rather than a smaller number from much more serious harms. This principle is a central part of many influential and anti-utilitarian ethical theories. According to the sequential-dominance principle, one does something wrong if one knowingly performs a sequence of acts whose outcome would be worse for everyone than the outcome of an alternative sequence of acts. The intuitive appeal of (...)
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  39. Felix Brandt & Paul Harrenstein (2010). Characterization of Dominance Relations in Finite Coalitional Games. Theory and Decision 69 (2):233-256.score: 24.0
    McGarvey (Econometrica, 21(4), 608–610, 1953) has shown that any irreflexive and anti-symmetric relation can be obtained as a relation induced by majority rule. We address the analogous issue for dominance relations of finite cooperative games with non-transferable utility (coalitional NTU games). We find any irreflexive relation over a finite set can be obtained as the dominance relation of some finite coalitional NTU game. We also show that any such dominance relation is induced by a non-cooperative game through (...)
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  40. Carolyn R. Hodges-Simeon, Steven J. C. Gaulin & David A. Puts (2010). Different Vocal Parameters Predict Perceptions of Dominance and Attractiveness. Human Nature 21 (4):406-427.score: 24.0
    Low mean fundamental frequency (F 0) in men’s voices has been found to positively influence perceptions of dominance by men and attractiveness by women using standardized speech. Using natural speech obtained during an ecologically valid social interaction, we examined relationships between multiple vocal parameters and dominance and attractiveness judgments. Male voices from an unscripted dating game were judged by men for physical and social dominance and by women in fertile and non-fertile menstrual cycle phases for desirability in (...)
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  41. Maryann Ayim (1991). Dominance and Affiliation: Paradigms in Conflict. Informal Logic 13 (2).score: 22.0
    Gender patterns in speech styles provide us with models of both the dominant confrontational style (male) and the affiliative nurturant style (female). In this paper, I argue that dominant confrontational styles are seriously problematic, in speech as well as in behaviour generally, whereas affiliative nurturant styles offer us a model which can be generalized without contradiction. I distinguish confrontation from competition and address briefly how our classrooms might be used to teach affiliative nurturant styles of talking and living.
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  42. Yoad Winter (2005). Scope Dominance with Upward Monotone Quantifiers. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 14 (4):445-455.score: 21.0
    We give a complete characterization of the class of upward monotone generalized quantifiers ¢¡ and ¤£ over countable domains that satisfy the scheme . This generalizes the characterization of such quantifiers over finite domains, according to which the scheme holds iff ¡ is or £ is ! (excluding trivial cases). Our result shows that in infinite domains, there are more general types of quantifiers that support these entailments.
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  43. Alon Altman, Ya'Acov Peterzil & Yoad Winter (2005). Scope Dominance with Upward Monotone Quantifiers. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 14 (4):445-455.score: 21.0
    We give a complete characterization of the class of upward monotone generalized quantifiers Q1 and Q2 over countable domains that satisfy the scheme Q1 x Q2 y φ → Q2 y Q1 x φ. This generalizes the characterization of such quantifiers over finite domains, according to which the scheme holds iff Q1 is ∃ or Q2 is ∀ (excluding trivial cases). Our result shows that in infinite domains, there are more general types of quantifiers that support these entailments.
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  44. Irwin P. Levin, Jeral R. Williams, Corinne S. Dulberg & Kent L. Norman (1970). Performance in a Verbal Transfer Task as a Function of Preshift and Postshift Response Dominance Levels and Method of Presentation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (3):469.score: 21.0
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  45. E. B. Coleman (1964). Verbal Concept Learning as a Function of Instructions and Dominance Level. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (2):213.score: 21.0
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  46. Robert L. Hudson (1969). Category Clustering for Immediate and Delayed Recall as a Function of Recall Cue Information and Response Dominance Variability. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (3):575.score: 21.0
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  47. Bruno Bost & Reiner A. Veitia (2014). Dominance and Interloci Interactions in Transcriptional Activation Cascades: Models Explaining Compensatory Mutations and Inheritance Patterns. Bioessays 36 (1):84-92.score: 21.0
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  48. J. E. Downey (1930). A Note on an Attempt at Judging Ocular Dominance From Photographs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 13 (3):286.score: 21.0
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  49. Louis Eeckhoudt & Pierre Hansen (1992). Mean-Preserving Changes in Risk with Tail-Dominance. Theory and Decision 33 (1):23-39.score: 21.0
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  50. S. I. Franz (1933). The Inadequacy of the Concept of Unilateral Cerebral Dominance in Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 16 (6):873.score: 21.0
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