Search results for '*Linguistics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Devitt (2006). Intuitions in Linguistics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (3):481-513.score: 16.0
    Linguists take the intuitive judgments of speakers to be good evidence for a grammar. Why? The Chomskian answer is that they are derived by a rational process from a representation of linguistic rules in the language faculty. The paper takes a different view. It argues for a naturalistic and non-Cartesian view of intuitions in general. They are empirical central-processor responses to phenomena differing from other such responses only in being immediate and fairly unreflective. Applying this to linguistic intuitions yields an (...)
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  2. Guy Longworth (2009). Ignorance of Linguistics: A Note on Devitt's Ignorance of Language. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):21-34.score: 16.0
    Michael Devitt has argued that Chomsky, along with many other Linguists and philosophers, is ignorant of the true nature of Generative Linguistics. In particular, Devitt argues that Chomsky and others wrongly believe the proper object of linguistic inquiry to be speakers' competences, rather than the languages that speakers are competent with. In return, some commentators on Devitt's work have returned the accusation, arguing that it is Devitt who is ignorant about Linguistics. In this note, I consider whether there might be (...)
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  3. Wolfram Hinzen & Juan Uriagereka (2006). On the Metaphysics of Linguistics. Erkenntnis 65 (1):71-96.score: 16.0
    Mind–body dualism has rarely been an issue in the generative study of mind; Chomsky himself has long claimed it to be incoherent and unformulable. We first present and defend this negative argument but then suggest that the generative enterprise may license a rather novel and internalist view of the mind and its place in nature, different from all of, (i) the commonly assumed functionalist metaphysics of generative linguistics, (ii) physicalism, and (iii) Chomsky’s negative stance. Our argument departs from the empirical (...)
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  4. Barbara C. Scholz, Francis Jeffry Pelletier & Geoffrey K. Pullum (2000). Philosophy and Linguistics. Dialogue 39 (3):605-607.score: 16.0
    Philosophy of linguistics is the philosophy of science as applied to linguistics. This differentiates it sharply from the philosophy of language, traditionally concerned with matters of meaning and reference.
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  5. Fritz J. McDonald (2009). Linguistics, Psychology, and the Ontology of Language. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):291-301.score: 16.0
    Noam Chomsky’s well-known claim that linguistics is a “branch of cognitive psychology” has generated a great deal of dissent—not from linguists or psychologists, but from philosophers. Jerrold Katz, Scott Soames, Michael Devitt, and Kim Sterelny have presented a number of arguments, intended to show that this Chomskian hypothesis is incorrect. On both sides of this debate, two distinct issues are often conflated: (1) the ontological status of language and (2) the relation between psychology and linguistics. The ontological issue is, I (...)
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  6. D. L. Spivak (2004). Linguistics of Altered States of Consciousness: Problems and Prospects. Journal of Quantitative Linguistics 11 (1):27-32.score: 16.0
  7. Peer F. Bundgaard (2004). The Ideal Scaffolding of Language: Husser's Fourth Logical Investigation in the Light of Cognitive Linguistics. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):49-80.score: 16.0
    One of the central issues in linguistics is whether or not language should be considered a self-contained, autonomous formal system, essentially reducible to the syntactic algorithms of meaning construction (as Chomskyan grammar would have it), or a holistic-functional system serving the means of expressing pre-organized intentional contents and thus accessible with respect to features and structures pertaining to other cognitive subsystems or to human experience as such (as Cognitive Linguistics would have it). The latter claim depends critically on the existence (...)
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  8. Hayley G. Davis (2003). Rethinking Linguistics. Routledgecurzon.score: 16.0
    This book deals with the need to rethink the aims and methods of contemporary linguistics. Orthodox linguists' discussions of linguistic form fail to exemplify how language users become language makers. Integrationist theory is used here as a solution to this basic problem within general linguistics. The book is aimed at an interdisciplinary readership, comprising those engaged in study, teaching and research in the humanities and social sciences, including linguistics, philosophy, sociology and psychology.
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  9. Ruth M. Kempson, Tim Fernando & Nicholas Asher (eds.) (2012). Philosophy of Linguistics. North Holland.score: 16.0
    This groundbreaking collection, the most thorough treatment of the philosophy of linguistics ever published, brings together philosophers, scientists and historians to map out both the foundational assumptions set during the second half of ...
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  10. Kumiko Murasugi & Robert Stainton (eds.) (1999). Philosophy and Linguistics. Westview Press.score: 16.0
    This edited volume offers ten new essays on semantics, philosophy of language, and philosophy of linguistics by top scholars in the field. Covering a wide range of topics, the collection is sure to be of interest to scholars in those areas as well as some philosophers of mind. Because of the diversity of topics and perspectives inherent in the collection, readers will find both exposition and debate among the contributors.
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  11. Jerrold J. Katz (ed.) (1985). The Philosophy of Linguistics. Oxford University Press.score: 16.0
    In light of the sharp linguistic turn philosophy has taken in this century, this collection provides a much-needed and long-overdue reference for philosophical discussion. The first collection of its kind, it explores questions of the nature and existence of linguistic objects--including sentences and meanings--and considers the concept of truth in linguistics. The status of linguistics and the nature of language now take a central place in discussions of the nature of philosophy; the essays in this volume both inform these discussions (...)
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  12. Rom Harré & Roy Harris (eds.) (1993). Linguistics and Philosophy: The Controversial Interface. Pergamon Press.score: 16.0
    As hopes that generative linguistics might solve philosophical problems about the mind give way to disillusionment, old problems concerning the relationship between linguistics and philosophy survive unresolved. This collection surveys the historical engagement between the two, and opens up avenues for further reflection. In Part 1 two contrasting views are presented of the interface nowadays called 'philosophy of linguistics'. Part 2 gives a detailed historical survey of the engagement of analytic philosophy with linguistic problems during the present century, and sees (...)
     
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  13. Vivien Law (2003). The History of Linguistics in Europe From Plato to 1600. Cambridge University Press.score: 16.0
    Authoritative and wide-ranging, this book examines the history of western linguistics over a 2000-year timespan, from its origins in ancient Greece up to the crucial moment of change in the Renaissance that laid the foundations of modern linguistics. Some of today's burning questions about language date back a long way: in 1400 BC Plato was asking how words relate to reality. Other questions go back just a few generations, such as our interest in the mechanisms of language change, or in (...)
     
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  14. James Higginbotham (2002). On Linguistics in Philosophy, and Philosophy in Linguistics. Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5-6):573-584.score: 14.0
    After reviewing some major features of theinteractions between Linguistics and Philosophyin recent years, I suggest that the depth and breadthof current inquiry into semanticshas brought this subject into contact both with questionsof the nature of linguistic competence and with modern andtraditional philosophical study of the nature ofour thoughts, and the problems of metaphysics.I see this development as promising for thefuture of both subjects.
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  15. Jakub Mácha (2011). Metaphor in the Twilight Area Between Philosophy and Linguistics. In P. Stalmaszczyk & K. Kosecki (eds.), Turning Points in the Philosophy of Language and Linguistics. Peter Lang. 159--169.score: 14.0
    This paper investigates the issue whether metaphors have a metaphorical or secondary meaning and how this question is related to the borderline between philosophy and linguistics. On examples by V. Woolf and H. W. Auden, it will be shown that metaphor accomplishes something more than its literal meaning expresses and this “more” cannot be captured by any secondary meaning. What is essential in the metaphor is not a secondary meaning but an internal relation between a metaphorical proposition and a description (...)
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  16. Michael Devitt (1989). Linguistics: What's Wrong with 'the Right View'. Philosophical Perspectives 3:497-531.score: 14.0
  17. Siobhan Chapman & Christopher Routledge (eds.) (2005). Key Thinkers in Linguistics and the Philosophy of Language. Edinburgh University Press.score: 14.0
    A reference guide to the work of figures who have played an important role in the development of ideas about language.
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  18. Ullin T. Place (1992). Eliminative Connectionism: Its Implications for a Return to an Empiricist/Behaviorist Linguistics. Behavior and Philosophy 20 (1):21-35.score: 14.0
    For the past three decades linguistic theory has been based on the assumption that sentences are interpreted and constructed by the brain by means of computational processes analogous to those of a serial-digital computer. The recent interest in devices based on the neural network or parallel distributed processor (PDP) principle raises the possibility ("eliminative connectionism") that such devices may ultimately replace the S-D computer as the model for the interpretation and generation of language by the brain. An analysis of the (...)
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  19. J. Dickins (1998). Extended Axiomatic Linguistics. Mouton De Gruyter.score: 14.0
    This volume presents the semiotic and linguistic theory of extended axiomatic functionalism, focusing on its application to linguistic description.
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  20. Joe Pater (2009). Weighted Constraints in Generative Linguistics. Cognitive Science 33 (6):999-1035.score: 14.0
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  21. Manuel Rebuschi, Martine Batt, Gerhard Heinzmann, Franck Lihoreau, Michel Musiol & Alain Trognon (eds.) (forthcoming). Dialogue, Rationality, Formalism. Interdisciplinary Works in Logic, Epistemology, Psychology and Linguistics. Springer.score: 14.0
  22. Marcio Chaves-tannús (2011). Questions of Logic, Philosophy, and Linguistics. Principia 15 (1):111-122.score: 14.0
    There were in the past, just as there are in the present, several diverse attempts to establish a unique theory capable of identifying in all natural languages a similar, invariable basic structure of a logical nature. If such a theory exists, then there must be principles that rule the functioning of these languages and they must have a logical origin. Based on a work by the French linguist, Oswald Ducrot, entitled D’un mauvais usage de la logique , this paper aims (...)
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  23. Prisca Augustyn (2011). On the Concept of Code in Linguistics and Biosemiotics. Biosemiotics 4 (3):281-289.score: 14.0
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  24. Ayọ Bamgboṣe (1973). Linguistics in a Developing Country: An Inaugural Lecture Delivered at the University of Ibadan on 27 October 1972. University of Ibadan.score: 14.0
     
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  25. Pratibha Biswas (1995). Indian Mind Through the Ages: A Select Annotated Bibliography of Periodical Literature, 1951-1966, on Indian Philosophy, Religion, Literature, and Linguistics From the Post-Vedic to the Pre-Kalidasa Era. [REVIEW] Bharati Book Stall.score: 14.0
  26. Michael Devitt (2003). Linguistics is Not Psychology. In Alex Barber (ed.), Epistemology of Language. Oxford University Press.score: 14.0
  27. S. C. Dik (1968). Coordination: Its Implications for the Theory of General Linguistics. Amsterdam, North-Holland.score: 14.0
     
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  28. Nikola Dobric (2010). Theory of Names and Cognitive Linguistics: The Case of the Metaphor. Filozofija I Društvo 21 (1):135-147.score: 14.0
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  29. Claude Germain (1979). The Concept of Situation in Linguistics. University of Ottawa Press.score: 14.0
  30. Esa Itkonen (1978). Grammatical Theory and Metascience: A Critical Investigation Into the Methodological and Philosophical Foundations of "Autonomous" Linguistics. John Benjamins.score: 14.0
    In this book, the author analyses the nature of the science of grammar.
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  31. V. N. Jha (ed.) (2010). Language, Grammar, and Linguistics in Indian Tradition. Centre for Studies in Civilizations.score: 14.0
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  32. Asa Kasher (1977). Philosophical Linguistics: An Introd. Scriptor-Verlag.score: 14.0
     
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  33. Omkar N. Koul, Imtiaz S. Hasnain & Ruqaiya Hasan (eds.) (2004). Linguistics, Theoretical and Applied: A Festschrift for Ruqaiya Hasan. Distributed by Creative Books.score: 14.0
     
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  34. Stephen Laurence (2003). Is Linguistics a Branch of Psychology? In A. Barbar (ed.), The Epistemology of Language. Oup.score: 14.0
  35. Jan W. F. Mulder (2005). Ontological Questions in Linguistics. Lincom Europa.score: 14.0
     
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  36. Lynsey Wolter (2009). Demonstratives in Philosophy and Linguistics. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):451-468.score: 12.0
    Demonstrative noun phrases (e.g., that guy , this ) are of interest to philosophers of language and semanticists because they are sensitive to demonstrations or speaker intentions. The interpretation of a demonstrative therefore sheds light on the role of the context in natural language semantics. This survey reviews two types of approaches to demonstratives: Kaplan's direct reference treatment of demonstratives and other indexicals, and recent challenges to Kaplan's approach that focus on less obviously context-sensitive uses of demonstratives. The survey then (...)
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  37. Scott Soames (1984). Linguistics and Psychology. Linguistics and Philosophy 7 (2):155 - 179.score: 12.0
  38. Peter Ludlow (2011). The Philosophy of Generative Linguistics. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    Peter Ludlow presents the first book on the philosophy of generative linguistics, including both Chomsky's government and binding theory and his minimalist ...
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  39. Frits Staal (1988). Universals: Studies in Indian Logic and Linguistics. University of Chicago Press.score: 12.0
    This collection of articles and review essays, including many hard to find pieces, comprises the most important and fundamental studies of Indian logic and linguistics ever undertaken. Frits Staal is concerned with four basic questions: Are there universals of logic that transcend culture and time? Are there universals of language and linguistics? What is the nature of Indian logic? And what is the nature of Indian linguistics? By addressing these questions, Staal demonstrates that, contrary to the general assumption among Western (...)
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  40. M. J. Cain (2010). Linguistics, Psychology and the Scientific Study of Language. Dialectica 64 (3):385-404.score: 12.0
    In this paper I address the issue of the subject matter of linguistics. According to the prominent Chomskyan view, linguistics is the study of the language faculty, a component of the mind-brain, and is therefore a branch of cognitive psychology. In his recent book Ignorance of Language Michael Devitt attacks this psychologistic conception of linguistics. I argue that the prominent Chomskyan objections to Devitt's position are not decisive as they stand. However, Devitt's position should ultimately be rejected as there is (...)
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  41. Sarah Moss (2012). The Role of Linguistics in the Philosophy of Language. In Delia Graff Fara & Gillian Russell (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Language.score: 12.0
    This paper discusses several case studies that illustrate the relationship between the philosophy of language and three branches of linguistics: syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Among other things, I identify binding arguments in the linguistics literature preceding (Stanley 2000), and I invent binding arguments to evaluate various semantic and pragmatic theories of belief ascriptions.
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  42. Lynsey Wolter (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Demonstratives in Philosophy and Linguistics. Philosophy Compass 5 (1):108-111.score: 12.0
    Demonstrative noun phrases (e.g. this; that guy over there ) are intimately connected to the context of use in that their reference is determined by demonstrations and/or the speaker's intentions. The semantics of demonstratives therefore has important implications not only for theories of reference, but for questions about how information from the context interacts with formal semantics. First treated by Kaplan as directly referential , demonstratives have recently been analyzed as quantifiers by King, and the choice between these two approaches (...)
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  43. Kent Johnson, Externalist Thoughts and the Scope of Linguistics.score: 12.0
    A common assumption in metaphysics and the philosophy of language is that the general structure of language displays the general metaphysical structure of the things we talk about. But expressions can easily be imperfect representations of what they are about. After clarifying this general point, I make a case study of a recent attempt to semantically analyze the nature of knowledge-how. This attempt fails because there appears to be no plausible bridge from the linguistic structure of knowledge-how reports to knowledge-how (...)
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  44. James Higginbotham (1991). Remarks on the Metaphysics of Linguistics. Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (5):555 - 566.score: 12.0
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  45. Jerrold J. Katz & Paul M. Postal (1991). Realism Vs. Conceptualism in Linguistics. Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (5):515 - 554.score: 12.0
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  46. Louise Antony (2008). Meta-Linguistics: Methodology and Ontology in Devitt's Ignorance of Language. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):643 – 656.score: 12.0
    (2008). Meta-Linguistics: Methodology and Ontology in Devitt's Ignorance of Language. Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 86, No. 4, pp. 643-656.
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  47. Christopher Hitchcock (1998). The Common Cause Principle in Historical Linguistics. Philosophy of Science 65 (3):425-447.score: 12.0
    Despite the platitude that analytic philosophy is deeply concerned with language, philosophers of science have paid little attention to methodological issues that arise within historical linguistics. I broach this topic by arguing that many inferences in historical linguistics conform to Reichenbach's common cause principle (CCP). Although the scope of CCP is narrower than many have thought, inferences about the genealogies of languages are particularly apt for reconstruction using CCP. Quantitative approaches to language comparison are readily understood as methods for detecting (...)
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  48. G. Fitzgerald, Is Linguistics a Part of Psychology?score: 12.0
    Noam Chomsky, the founding father of generative grammar and the instigator of some of its core research programs, claims that linguistics is a part of psychology, concerned with a class of cognitive structures employed in speaking and understanding. In a recent book, Ignorance of Language, Michael Devitt has challenged certain core aspects of linguistics, as prominent practitioners of the science conceive of it. Among Devitt’s major conclusions is that linguistics is not a part of psychology. In this thesis I defend (...)
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  49. Thomas Uebel (2011). Linguistics and the Vienna Circle. Metascience 20 (2):377-379.score: 12.0
    Linguistics and the Vienna Circle Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9445-9 Authors Thomas Uebel, Department of Philosophy, School of Social Science, University of Manchester, Arthur Lewis Building, Manchester, M13 9PL UK Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  50. Ronald W. Langacker (1999). A View From Cognitive Linguistics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):625-625.score: 12.0
    Barsalou's contribution converges with basic ideas and empirical findings of cognitive linguistics. They posit the same general architecture. The perceptual grounding of conceptual structure is a central tenet of cognitive linguistics. Our capacity to construe the same situation in alternate ways is fundamental to cognitive semantics, and numerous parallels are discernible between conceptual construal and visual perception. Grammar is meaningful, consisting of schematized patterns for the pairing of semantic and phonological structures. The meanings of grammatical elements reside primarily in the (...)
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