Search results for '*Logical Thinking' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marion E. Smith (1978). Moral Reasoning: Its Relation to Logical Thinking and Role‐Taking. Journal of Moral Education 8 (1):41-49.score: 126.0
    Abstract The relations between the development of logical thinking, role?taking and moral reasoning were investigated in a sample of 100 children, aged eight?14 years. Positive correlation was found between the three areas. There was a clear association between consolidated concrete operational thinking and Kohlberg's Stage 2 moral reasoning, and some evidence that, in order of development, logical thinking precedes role?taking, and role?taking precedes moral reasoning, at corresponding levels of conceptual complexity. Although many attained high scores in logical (...)
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  2. Marilyn Vos Savant (1996). The Power of Logical Thinking: Easy Lessons in the Art of Reasoning, and Hard Facts About its Absence in Our Lives. St. Martin's Press.score: 115.0
  3. Robert Klee (1993). The Phrenetic Calculus: A Logician's View of Disordered Logical Thinking in Schizophrenia. Behavior and Philosophy 20:49 - 61.score: 110.0
    This paper contains a preliminary investigation of an experimental, first-order logic with identity which encodes as an inference rule the faulty reasoning which Von Domarus (1944) suggested underwrote much of the bizarre thinking seen in certain forms of schizophrenia. I begin with a discussion of the "Von Domarus thesis," note its fate under statistical testing, and remark on its continued explanatory power in the hands of certain psychiatrists. I next discuss a proof calculus which contains a rule representing Von (...)
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  4. Günter Figal (2008). Colloquium 7: On Names and Concepts: Mythical and Logical Thinking in Plato's Symposium. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):187-204.score: 100.0
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  5. Floyd E. Maltheis, William E. Spooner, Charles R. Coble, Shigekazu Takemura, Shinji Matsumoto, Katsunobu Matsumoto & Atsushi Yoshida (1992). A Study of the Logical Thinking Skills and Integrated Process Skills of Junior High School Students in North Carolina and Japan. Science Education 76 (2):211-222.score: 100.0
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  6. Michael Pomedli (1986). Mythical and Logical Thinking : Friends or Foes ? Laval Théologique et Philosophique 42 (3):377-387.score: 100.0
  7. E. Conze (1934). Social Implications of Logical Thinking. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 35:23 - 44.score: 100.0
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  8. Richard L. Purtill (1994). Logical Thinking. University Press of America.score: 100.0
  9. Charles F. Kielkopf (1985). Logical Thinking. Teaching Philosophy 8 (3):255-257.score: 100.0
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  10. Clarence Norton (1978). The Convincing Power of Logical Thinking. American Classical College Press.score: 100.0
     
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  11. Robert Rogers (1981). Review: Peter A. Facione, Donald Scherer, Logic and Logical Thinking: A Modular Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 46 (3):672-673.score: 100.0
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  12. Lionel Ruby (1969). The Art of Making Sense: A Guide to Logical Thinking. London, Angus & Robertson.score: 100.0
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  13. Jose Maria Sanchez de Leon Serrano (forthcoming). 1.3 Logical Thinking and Imagination: Task of a Logic as Prima Philosophia with Reference to Marking Intelligence. Hegel-Studien.score: 100.0
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  14. John Pollock (2006). Thinking About Acting: Logical Foundations for Rational Decision Making. Oxford University Press, Usa.score: 90.0
    Pollock argues that theories of ideal rationality are largely irrelevant to the decision making of real agents. Thinking about Acting aims to provide a theory of "real rationality.".
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  15. T. A. Ryckman (1992). “P(Oint)-C(Oincidence) Thinking”: The Ironical Attachment of Logical Empiricism to General Relativity (and Some Lingering Consequences). Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (3):471-497.score: 80.0
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  16. J. O. Urmson (1957). Conceptual Thinking, a Logical Inquiry. By Stephan Körner. (C.U.P. 1955. Pp. Viii + 301. Price 30s.). Philosophy 32 (122):267-.score: 80.0
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  17. A. Morton (2008). Review: John L. Pollock: Thinking About Acting: Logical Foundations for Rational Decision Making. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (467):716-719.score: 80.0
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  18. H. A. Bedau (1957). Book Review:Conceptual Thinking: A Logical Inquiry Stephan Korner. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 24 (1):87-.score: 80.0
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  19. Paul Weirich (2007). Thinking About Acting: Logical Foundations for Rational Decision Making - by John L. Pollock. Philosophical Books 48 (3):283-285.score: 80.0
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  20. Teddy Seidenfel, Mark J. Schervish & Joseph B. Kadane (2012). What Kind of Uncertainty is That? Using Personal Probability for Expressing One's Thinking About Logical and Mathematical Propositions. Journal of Philosophy 109 (8-9):516-533.score: 80.0
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  21. D. J. O'Connor & Stephan Korner (1957). Conceptual Thinking: A Logical Enquiry. Philosophical Quarterly 7 (27):182.score: 80.0
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  22. Andre Schuwer (1971). Remarks on the Idea of Authentic Thinking in the Logical Investigations. Research in Phenomenology 1 (1):17-32.score: 80.0
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  23. Robert Carson & Stuart Rowlands (2005). Mechanics as the Logical Point of Entry for the Enculturation Into Scientific Thinking. Science and Education 14 (3-5):473-492.score: 80.0
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  24. J. L. Vieillard-Baron (2003). The Logical Idea, the Idea of Philosophy and Theological-Historical Structure in the Thinking of Hegel. Hegel-Studien 38:61-82.score: 80.0
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  25. Donald D. Hoffman (2006). The Scrambling Theorem: A Simple Proof of the Logical Possibility of Spectrum Inversion. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):31-45.score: 60.0
  26. Shuren Wang (2009). The Roots of Chinese Philosophy and Culture — an Introduction to “ Xiang ” and “ Xiang Thinking”. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):1-12.score: 56.0
    To grasp the truth in traditional Chinese classics, we need to uncover the long obscured xiang 象 (image) thinking, which has long been overshadowed by Occidentalism. xiang thinking is the most fundamental thought of human beings. The logic of linguistics all comes from xiang thinking . Through conceptual thinking, people can understand Western classics on metaphysics, yet they may not completely understand the various schools of Chinese classics. The difference between Chinese and Western ways of (...) originated in the difference of the basic views developed in the Axial period . Since Aristotle, Western metaphysical ideas have all been manifested in substantiality, objectivity, and being ready-made, whereas Chinese Taiji, Dao, Xin-xing, and Zen were manifested in the non-substantiality, non-objectivity, and non-ready-made-ness of a dynamic whole. To grasp substance, rational and logical thinking such as definition, judgment, and reasoning is necessary. On the other hand, to grasp Taiji, Dao, etc., which is a dynamic whole or non-substances, xiang thinking , which is related to perception and rich in poetic association, is essential. History has taught us a lesson, i.e., when we opened the window to logical thought, we closed that of xiang thinking . We should remember the words of Xu Guangqi, i.e., To mingle harmoniously and understand thoroughly so as to excel. (shrink)
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  27. Wang Shuren & Zhang Lin (2009). The Roots of Chinese Philosophy and Culture — An Introduction to "Xiang" and "Xiang Thinking". Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):1 - 12.score: 56.0
    To grasp the truth in traditional Chinese classics, we need to uncover the long obscured "xiang" 象 (image) thinking, which has long been overshadowed by Occidentalism, "xiang thinking" is the most fundamental thought of human beings. The logic of linguistics all comes from "xiang thinking". Through conceptual thinking, people can understand Western classics on metaphysics, yet they may not completely understand the various schools of Chinese classics. The difference between Chinese and Western ways of thinking (...)
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  28. Jonathan E. Adler (1991). Critical Thinking, A Deflated Defense: A Critical Study of John E. McPeck's Teaching Critical Thinking: Dialogue and Dialectic. Informal Logic 13 (2).score: 52.0
    A critical study of McPeck's recent book, in which he strengthens and develops his arguments against teaching critical thinking (CT). Accepting McPeck's basic claim that there is no unitary skill of reasoning or thinking, I argue that his strictures on CT courses or programs do not follow. I set out what I consider the proper justification that programs in CT have to meet, and argue both that McPeck demands much more than is required, and also that it is (...)
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  29. Herman E. Stark (2000). The Lord Scroop Fallacy. Informal Logic 20 (3).score: 48.0
    In this paper I identify a fallacy. The fallacy is worth noting for practical and theoretical reasons. First, the rampant occurrences ofthis fallacy-especially at moments calling for careful thought-indicate that it is more pernicious to clear thinking than many of those found in standard logic texts. Second, the fallacy stands apart from most others in that it contains multiple kinds oflogical error (i.e., fallacious and non-fallacious logical errors) that are themselves committed in abnormal ways, and thus it presents a (...)
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  30. Martin Davies (2012). Computer-Aided Mapping and the Teaching of Critical Thinking. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 27 (2):15-30.score: 47.0
    This paper is in two parts. Part I outlines three traditional approaches to the teaching of critical thinking: the normative, cognitive psychology, and educational approaches. Each of these approaches is discussed in relation to the influences of various methods of critical thinking instruction. The paper contrasts these approaches with what I call the “visualisation” approach. This approach is explained with reference to computer-aided argument mapping (CAAM) which uses dedicated computer software to represent inferences between premise and conclusions. The (...)
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  31. Isaac Levi (2010). Probability Logic, Logical Probability, and Inductive Support. Synthese 172 (1):97 - 118.score: 44.0
    This paper seeks to defend the following conclusions: The program advanced by Carnap and other necessarians for probability logic has little to recommend it except for one important point. Credal probability judgments ought to be adapted to changes in evidence or states of full belief in a principled manner in conformity with the inquirer’s confirmational commitments—except when the inquirer has good reason to modify his or her confirmational commitment. Probability logic ought to spell out the constraints on rationally coherent confirmational (...)
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  32. Markus Knauff (2007). How Our Brains Reason Logically. Topoi 26 (1):19-36.score: 44.0
    The aim of this article is to strengthen links between cognitive brain research and formal logic. The work covers three fundamental sorts of logical inferences: reasoning in the propositional calculus, i.e. inferences with the conditional “if...then”, reasoning in the predicate calculus, i.e. inferences based on quantifiers such as “all”, “some”, “none”, and reasoning with n-place relations. Studies with brain-damaged patients and neuroimaging experiments indicate that such logical inferences are implemented in overlapping but different bilateral cortical networks, including parts of the (...)
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  33. Matthew William McKeon (2009). A Plea for Logical Objects. Synthese 167 (1):163 - 182.score: 44.0
    An account of validity that makes what is invalid conditional on how many individuals there are is what I call a conditional account of validity. Here I defend conditional accounts against a criticism derived from Etchemendy’s well-known criticism of the model-theoretic analysis of validity. The criticism is essentially that knowledge of the size of the universe is non-logical and so by making knowledge of the extension of validity depend on knowledge of how many individuals there are, conditional accounts fail to (...)
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  34. Kathleen Miller (1995). A Feminist Defense of the Critical-Logical Model. Informal Logic 17 (3).score: 44.0
    In his (1994) "Feminism, Argumentation, and Coalescence", Michael Gilbert argues that the "Critical Thinking Industry" is antagonistic to women. Because the critical-logical skills in which the industry deals tend to be gender-specific. its adoption as the dominant mode of discourse disenfranchises women, making its overhaul a moral imperative. Following a variety offeminist epistemologists. this conclusion is reached by confiating "critical reasoning" with "communicating about ideas," as though the two were inseparable. In this paper it is argued that the inclusion (...)
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  35. Wolfgang Achtner (2005). Infinity in Science and Religion. The Creative Role of Thinking About Infinity. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 47 (4):392-411.score: 42.0
    This article discusses the history of the concepts of potential infinity and actual infinity in the context of Christian theology, mathematical thinking and metaphysical reasoning. It shows that the structure of Ancient Greek rationality could not go beyond the concept of potential infinity, which is highlighted in Aristotle's metaphysics. The limitations of the metaphysical mind of ancient Greece were overcome through Christian theology and its concept of the infinite God, as formulated in Gregory of Nyssa's theology. That is how (...)
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  36. Mark Schroeder (2011). How Not to Avoid Wishful Thinking. In Michael Brady (ed.), New Waves in Metaethics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
    Expressivists famously have important and difficult problems with semantics and logic. Their difficulties providing an adequate account of the semantics of material conditionals involving moral terms, and explaining why they have the right semantic and logical properties – for example, why they validate modus ponens – have received a great deal of attention. Cian Dorr [2002] points out that their problems do not stop here, but also extend to epistemology. The problem he poses for expressivists is the problem of wishful (...)
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  37. Peter Carruthers (1998). Thinking in Language?: Evolution and a Modularist Possibility. In Peter Carruthers & Jill Boucher (eds.), [Book Chapter]. Cambridge. 94-119.score: 42.0
    This chapter argues that our language faculty can both be a peripheral module of the mind and be crucially implicated in a variety of central cognitive functions, including conscious propositional thinking and reasoning. I also sketch arguments for the view that natural language representations (e.g. of Chomsky's Logical Form, or LF) might serve as a lingua franca for interactions (both conscious and non-conscious) between a number of quasi-modular central systems. The ideas presented are compared and contrasted with the evolutionary (...)
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  38. Sven Ove Hansson (2006). Ideal Worlds — Wishful Thinking in Deontic Logic. Studia Logica 82 (3):329 - 336.score: 42.0
    The ideal world semantics of standard deontic logic identifies our obligations with how we would act in an ideal world. However, to act as if one lived in an ideal world is bad moral advice, associated with wishful thinking rather than well-considered moral deliberation. Ideal world semantics gives rise to implausible logical principles, and the metaphysical arguments that have been put forward in its favour turn out to be based on a too limited view of truth-functional representation. It is (...)
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  39. Kanit Sirichan (2008). Thinking Critically as an Examination of Thoughts. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:259-266.score: 42.0
    In introducing a course on critical thinking or reasoning, many emphasize the philosophical background of the idea of critical thinking, that is, the Socratic motto: “life without examination is not worth living”. It is actually right to do so, because critical thinking is basically the activity of doing philosophy. However, in manyuniversities, the course on critical thinking is taught mainly as a basic course for first year undergraduates who may not go on to major in philosophy. (...)
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  40. Wang Fengyan * (2004). Confucian Thinking in Traditional Moral Education: Key Ideas and Fundamental Features. Journal of Moral Education 33 (4):429-447.score: 42.0
    Ancient Chinese ideas of moral education could be said to have five main dimensions ? philosophical foundations, content, principles, methods and evaluation ? which are described in this paper. An analysis of the fundamental features of Confucian thinking on moral education shows that it took the idea that human beings have a good and kind nature as its logical starting point. It built a system of ethical norms, based on the idea that an individual's feelings come from the inner (...)
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  41. Hye-Kyung Kim (2006). Learning, Critical Thinking, and Confucius. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 4:79-84.score: 42.0
    In this paper I argue that Confucius' view of learning in the Analects entails critical thinking. Although he neither specified the logical rules of good reasoning nor theorised about the structure of argument, Confucius advocated and emphasised the importance of critical thinking. For this thesis, I argue that a close examination of Confucius' pronouncements on learning reveals that he takes critical thinking to be essential to learning. For Confucius critical thinking refers to reflective thinking: reflection (...)
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  42. Yiu-ming Fung (2010). On the Very Idea of Correlative Thinking. Philosophy Compass 5 (4):296-306.score: 42.0
    This article aims at providing a general picture of the idea of correlative thinking developed by sinologists and philosophers in the field of Chinese and comparative studies, including Marcel Granet, Joseph Needham, A. C. Graham, David Hall and Roger Ames. As a matter of fact, there is no exactly the same view among these scholars when they use the term "correlative thinking"? to describe the Chinese mode of thinking; but they all recognize, more or less, the term's (...)
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  43. Marie-France Daniel, Louise Lafortune & Pierre Mongeau (2003). The Development of Dialogical Critical Thinking in Children. Inquiry 22 (4):43-55.score: 42.0
    In this paper, we study the manifestations of what we call “dialogical critical thinking” in elementary school pupils when they are engaged in philosophical exchanges among peers: What are thecharacteristics of dialogical critical thinking? How does it develop in youngsters? Our research was conducted during an entire school year, with eight groups of pupils from three different cultural contexts: Australia, Mexico and Quebec. Our findings were constructed in an inductive manner, inspired by qualitative analysis as defined by Glaser (...)
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  44. Marta Jorba (2010). Is There A Specific Experience of Thinking? Theoria 25 (2):187-196.score: 42.0
    In this paper I discuss whether there is a specific experience of thinking or not. I address this question by analysing if it is possible to reduce the phenomenal character of thinking to the phenomenal character of sensory experiences. My purpose is to defend that there is a specific phenomenality for at least somethinking mental states. I present Husserl's theory of intentionality in the Logical Investigations as a way to defend this claim and I consider its assumptions. Then (...)
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  45. Stephen Read (1994). Thinking About Logic: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Logic. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    In this book, Stephen Read sets out to rescue logic from its undeserved reputation as an inflexible, dogmatic discipline by demonstrating that its technicalities and processes are founded on assumptions which are themselves amenable to philosophical investigation. He examines the fundamental principles of consequence, logical truth and correct inference within the context of logic, and shows that the principles by which we delineate consequences are themselves not guaranteed free from error. Central to the notion of truth is the beguiling issue (...)
     
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  46. Robert Mutti (2014). Making Up Your Mind: A Textbook in Critical Thinking. Broadview Press.score: 42.0
    Making Up Your Mind is oriented toward the writing of arguments. It gives students techniques that they can use to better understand, organize, and present their own thoughts. The book provides an exceptionally clear statement of what critical thinking adds to the study of logic, along with complete and systematic coverage of all crucial logical operators and major logical relations. It also offers exceptionally clear and informative discussions of the definition of argument, the distinction between induction and deduction, and (...)
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  47. Margit Ruffing (2013). Thinking for oneself" and "publicity. Ideas Y Valores 62:73-84.score: 42.0
    "Pensar por sí mismo" y "publicidad" son ideas que caracterizan a la Ilustración, pues determinan la reivindicación del uso de la razón, refiriéndola al "progreso" tanto del individuo como de la sociedad. Según Kant, el desarrollo de la capacidad cognitivo- racional del hombre es solo un lado del "pensar por sí mismo". Que la razón sea desarrollada como conciencia de la capacidad de la moralidad, implica la necesidad de un pensar "más allá de sí mismo". "Pensar por sí mismo" abre (...)
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  48. Richard Shiff (2013). Watch Out for Thinking (Even Fuzzy Thinking) Concept and Percept in Modern Art. Common Knowledge 19 (1):65-87.score: 42.0
    This article, a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur,” documents how some modern artists and critics have argued against any sort of verbal thinking about art. Beyond describing works of visual art and pronouncing on their relative quality, critics often assume responsibility for explaining what a given work means. Because paintings and sculptures are less precisely codified, less articulate, than verbalized communications, they may seem to require verbal translation. Yet some artists and (...)
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  49. C. Stephen Evans (2009). Philosophy of Religion: Thinking About Faith. Ivp Academic.score: 42.0
    General preface -- Preface to the second edition -- What is philosophy of religion? -- Philosophy of religion and other disciplines -- Philosophy of religion and philosophy -- Can thinking about religion be neutral? -- Fideism -- Neutralism -- Critical dialogue -- The theistic God : the project of natural theology -- Concepts of God -- The theistic concept of God -- A case study : divine foreknowledge and human freedom -- The problem of religious language -- Natural theology (...)
     
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  50. William Hughes, Jonathan Lavery & Katheryn Doran (2014). Critical Thinking, Seventh Edition: An Introduction to the Basic Skills. Broadview Press.score: 42.0
    Critical Thinking is a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the essential skills required to make strong arguments. The authors provide a thorough treatment of such topics as deductive and inductive reasoning, logical fallacies, the importance of inference, how to recognize and avoid ambiguity, and how to assess what is or is not relevant to an argument. This seventh edition adds a chapter on legal reasoning, and grants access to a substantial website of additional questions and other interactive resources.
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