Search results for '*Magnetic Resonance Imaging' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Paulo César Gonçalves Marques, Jose Miguel Soares, Victor Alves & Nuno Sousa (2013). BrainCAT - a Tool for Automated and Combined Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Brain Connectivity Analysis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 148.0
    Multimodal neuroimaging studies have recently become a trend in the neuroimaging field and are certainly a standard for the future. Brain connectivity studies combining functional activation patterns using resting-state or task related functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) tractography have growing popularity. However, there is a scarcity of solutions to perform optimized, intuitive and consistent multimodal fMRI/DTI studies. Here we propose a new tool, BrainCAT (Brain Connectivity Analysis Tool), for an automated and standard (...)
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  2. Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, Melanie Boly, Matthew H. Davis, Steven Laureys & John D. Pickard (2007). Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Covert Awareness in the Vegetative State. Archives of Neurology 64 (8):1098-1102.score: 123.3
  3. Soraya Seedat Fatima Ahmed, Johan Ras (2012). Volumetric Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Pediatric Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: A Systematic Review. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 104.7
    Objectives: Structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) studies of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents are limited. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been best studied in this regard. We systematically reviewed structural neuroimaging findings in pediatric PTSD and OCD. Methods: The literature was reviewed for all sMRI studies examining volumetric parameters using PubMed, ScienceDirect and PsychInfo databases, with no limit on the time frame of publication. Nine studies in pediatric PTSD and 6 in OCD were (...)
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  4. Amy E. White (2010). The Lie of Fmri: An Examination of the Ethics of a Market in Lie Detection Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (3):253-266.score: 98.7
    In this paper, I argue that companies who use functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans for lie detection encounter the same basic ethical stumbling blocks as commercial companies that market traditional polygraphs. Markets in traditional voluntary polygraphs are common and fail to elicit much uproar among ethicists. Thus, for consistency, if markets in polygraphs are ethically unproblematic, markets using fMRIs for lie detection are equally as acceptable. Furthermore, while I acknowledge two substantial differences between the ethical concerns involving (...)
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  5. Stefan Geyer, Marcel Weiss, Katja Reimann, Gabriele Lohmann & Robert Turner (2011). Microstructural Parcellation of the Human Cerebral Cortex – From Brodmann's Post-Mortem Map to in Vivo Mapping with High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 98.7
    The year 2009 marked the 100th anniversary of the publication of the famous brain map of Korbinian Brodmann. Although a "classic" guide to microanatomical parcellation of the cerebral cortex, it is – from today's state-of-the-art neuroimaging perspective – problematic to use Brodmann's map as a structural guide to functional units in the cortex. In this article we discuss some of the reasons, especially the problematic compatibility of the "post-mortem world" of microstructural brain maps with the "in vivo world" of neuroimaging. (...)
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  6. Andrea Antal Catarina Saiote, Zsolt Turi, Walter Paulus (2013). Combining Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Transcranial Electrical Stimulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 98.7
    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) is a neuromodulatory method with promising potential for basic research and as a therapeutic tool. The most explored type of tES is transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but also transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) have been shown to affect cortical excitability, behavioral performance and brain activity. Although providing indirect measure of brain activity, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can tell us more about the global effects of stimulation in (...)
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  7. Coenraad J. Hattingh, Jonathan Ipser, Sean Tromp, Supriya Syal, Christine Lochner, Samantha Jane Brooks Brooks & Dan J. Stein (2013). Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging During Emotion Recognition in Social Anxiety Disorder: An Activation Likelihood Meta-Analysis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:347-347.score: 98.7
    Background: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterised by abnormal fear and anxiety in social situations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a brain imaging technique that can be used to illustrate neural activation to emotionally salient stimuli. However, no attempt has yet been made to statistically collate fMRI studies of brain activation, using the activation likelihood-estimate technique, in response to emotion recognition tasks in individuals with social anxiety disorder. Methods: A systematic search of fMRI studies of neural (...)
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  8. Axel Mecklinger Kerstin H. Kipp, Bertram Opitz, Martina Becker, Juliane Hofmann, Christoph Krick, Ludwig Gortner (2012). Neural Correlates of Recognition Memory in Children with Febrile Seizures: Evidence From Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 98.7
    Febrile seizures (FS) are assumed to not have adverse long-term effects on cognitive development. Nevertheless, FS are often associated with hippocampal sclerosis which can imply episodic memory deficits. This interrelation has hardly been studied so far. In the current study 13 children who had suffered from FS during infancy and 14 control children (7–9 years old) were examined for episodic and semantic memory with standardized neuropsychological tests. Furthermore, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we studied neuronal activation while (...)
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  9. Kerstin H. Kipp, Bertram Opitz, Martina Becker, Juliane Hofmann, Christoph Krick, Ludwig Gortner & Axel Mecklinger (2012). Neural Correlates of Recognition Memory in Children with Febrile Seizures: Evidence From Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:17-17.score: 98.7
    Febrile seizures (FS) are assumed to not have adverse long-term effects on cognitive development. Nevertheless, FS are often associated with hippocampal sclerosis which can imply episodic memory deficits. This interrelation has hardly been studied so far. In the current study 13 children who had suffered from FS during infancy and 14 control children (7–9 years old) were examined for episodic and semantic memory with standardized neuropsychological tests. Furthermore, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we studied neuronal activation while (...)
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  10. Akihiro T. Sasaki, Takanori Kochiyama, Motoaki Sugiura, Hiroki C. Tanabe & Norihiro Sadato (2012). Neural Networks for Action Representation: A Functional Magnetic-Resonance Imaging and Dynamic Causal Modeling Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 98.7
    Automatic mimicry is based on the tight linkage between motor and perception action representations in which internal models play a key role. Based on the anatomical connection, we hypothesized that the direct effective connectivity from the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) to the ventral premotor area (PMv) formed an inverse internal model, converting visual representation into a motor plan, and that reverse connectivity formed a forward internal model, converting the motor plan into a sensory outcome of action. To test this (...)
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  11. N. Hoggard, G. Darwent, D. Capener, I. D. Wilkinson & P. D. Griffiths (2009). The High Incidence and Bioethics of Findings on Magnetic Resonance Brain Imaging of Normal Volunteers for Neuroscience Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):194-199.score: 94.7
    Background: We were finding volunteers for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies with abnormalities requiring referral surprisingly frequently. The bioethics surrounding the incidental findings are not straightforward and every imaging institution will encounter this situation in their normal volunteers. Yet the implications for the individuals involved may be profound. Should all participants have review of their imaging by an expert and who should be informed? Methods: The normal volunteers that were imaged with magnetic resonance (MR) which (...)
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  12. Charlotte J. Stagg & Heidi Johansen-Berg (2013). Studying The Effects Of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation In Stroke Recovery Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:857.score: 84.3
    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is showing increasing promise as an adjunct therapy in stroke rehabilitation. However questions still remain concerning its mechanisms of action, which currently limit its potential. Magnetic Resonance (MR) techniques are increasingly being applied to understand the neural effects of tDCS. Here, we review the MR evidence supporting the use of tDCS to aid recovery after stroke and discuss the important open questions that remain.
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  13. Hannah Fitsch (2012). (A)E(s)Th(Et)Ics of Brain Imaging. Visibilities and Sayabilities in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neuroethics 5 (3):275-283.score: 83.0
    Producing and interpreting functional brain data is part of the negotiation we imagine our brain. To take a closer look at the idea of brain imaging as a form of visual knowledge, it is necessary to put the research of today into a historical context. In my article I will point to a specific approach of functional imaging which depends on historical shifts entangled with the visual aspect of producing pictures of the brain. I will bring out the (...)
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  14. From Galen to Magnetic Resonance (1996). Pedro Lain Entralgo. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21:571-591.score: 80.0
     
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  15. G. A. Ojemann, J. Ojemann & N. F. Ramsey (2012). Relation Between Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Single Neuron, Local Field Potential (LFP) and Electrocorticography (ECoG) Activity in Human Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:34-34.score: 75.0
    The relation between changes in the blood oxygen dependent metabolic changes imaged by fMRI and neural events directly recorded from human cortex from single neurons, LFPs and ECoG is critically reviewed, based on the published literature including findings from the authors’ laboratories. All these data are from special populations, usually patients with medically refractory epilepsy, as this provides the major opportunity for direct cortical neuronal recording in humans. For LFP and ECoG changes are often sought in different frequency bands, for (...)
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  16. Kim Celone & Chantal Stern (2009). A Neuroimaging Perspective on the Use of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) in Educational and Legal Systems. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):28 – 29.score: 74.0
  17. Vinay K. Shukla (2011). Magnetic Resonance Imaging. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 4 (3):271-271.score: 74.0
  18. Ralf J. Jox & Katja Kuehlmeyer (2013). Introduction: Reconsidering Disorders of Consciousness in Light of Neuroscientific Evidence. Neuroethics 6 (1):1-3.score: 74.0
    Disorders of consciousness pose a substantial ethical challenge to clinical decision making, especially regarding the use of life-sustaining medical treatment. For these decisions it is paramount to know whether the patient is aware or not. Recent brain research has been striving to assess awareness by using mainly functional magnetic resonance imaging. We review the neuroscientific evidence and summarize the potential and problems of the different approaches to prove awareness. Finally, we formulate the crucial ethical questions and outline the (...)
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  19. Kevin A. Johnson, F. Andrew Kozel, Steven J. Laken & Mark S. George (2007). The Neuroscience of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Fmri for Deception Detection. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):58 – 60.score: 74.0
  20. Emily Bell & Eric Racine (2009). Enthusiasm for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) Often Overlooks its Dependence on Task Selection and Performance. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):23 – 25.score: 74.0
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  21. Moriah E. Thomason (2009). Children in Non-Clinical Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) Studies Give the Scan Experience a “Thumbs Up”. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):25 – 27.score: 74.0
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  22. Caitlin M. Connors & Ilina Singh (2009). What We Should Really Worry About in Pediatric Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri). American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):16 – 18.score: 74.0
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  23. Nathalie Valenza, Mohamed L. Seghier, Sophie Schwartz, François Lazeyras & Patrik Vuilleumier (2004). Tactile Awareness and Limb Position in Neglect: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Annals of Neurology 55 (1):139-143.score: 74.0
  24. Jennifer J. Kulynych (2007). Some Thoughts About the Evaluation of Non-Clinical Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):57 – 58.score: 74.0
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  25. Athena Demertzi & Mario Stanziano, Reaching Across the Abyss: Recent Advances in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Their Potential Relevance to Disorders of Consciousness.score: 74.0
    Disorders of consciousness (DOC) raise profound scientific, clinical, ethical, and philosophical issues. Growing knowledge on fundamental principles of brain organization in healthy individuals offers new opportunities for a better understanding of residual brain function in DOCs. We here discuss new perspectives derived from a recently proposed scheme of brain organization underlying consciousness in healthy individuals. In this scheme, thalamo-cortical networks can be divided into two, often antagonistic, global systems: (i) a system of externally oriented, sensory-motor networks (the ‘‘extrinsic’’ system); and (...)
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  26. Jocelyn Downie, Matthais Schmidt, Nuala Kenny, Ryan D’Arcy, Michael Hadskis & Jennifer Marshall (2007). Paediatric MRI Research Ethics: The Priority Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (2):85-91.score: 74.0
    In this paper, we first briefly describe neuroimaging technology, our reasons for studying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, and then provide a discussion of what we have identified as priority issues for paediatric MRI research. We examine the issues of respectful involvement of children in the consent process as well as privacy and confidentiality for this group of MRI research participants. In addition, we explore the implications of unexpected findings for paediatric MRI research participants. Finally, we explore the (...)
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  27. Sebastian Lehmann & Martin Reimann (2012). Neural Correlates of Time Versus Money in Product Evaluation. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 74.0
    The common saying “time is money” reflects the widespread belief in many people’s everyday life that time is valuable like money. Psychologically and neurophysiologically, however, these concepts seem to be quite different. This research replicates prior behavioral investigations by showing that merely mentioning “time” (compared to merely mentioning “money”) leads participants to evaluate a product more positively. Beyond this finding, the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment provides novel insight into the neurophysiological underpinnings of this behavioral effect (...)
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  28. Charles A. Nelson (2008). Incidental Findings in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Brain Research. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):315-319.score: 74.0
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  29. Huafu Chen Qing Gao, Qiang Xu, Xujun Duan, Wei Liao, Jurong Ding, Zhiqiang Zhang, Yuan Li, Guangming Lu (2013). Extraversion and Neuroticism Relate to Topological Properties of Resting-State Brain Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 74.0
    With the advent and development of modern neuroimaging techniques, there is an increasing interest in linking extraversion and neuroticism to anatomical and functional brain markers. Here we aimed to test the theoretically derived biological personality model as proposed by Eysenck using graph theoretical analyses. Specifically, the association between the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks and extraversion/neuroticism was explored. To construct functional brain networks, functional connectivity among 90 brain regions was measured by temporal correlation using resting-state functional magnetic resonance (...)
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  30. Ralph E. Hoffman & Michelle Hampson (2012). Functional Connectivity Studies of Patients with Auditory Verbal Hallucinations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 74.0
    Functional connectivity (FC) studies of brain mechanisms leading to auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) utilizing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data are reviewed. Initial FC studies utilized fMRI data collected during performance of various tasks, which suggested frontotemporal disconnection and/or source-monitoring.disturbances. Later FC studies have utilized resting (no-task) fMRI data. These studies have produced a mixed picture of disconnection and hyperconnectivity involving different pathways associated with AVHs. Results of our most recent FC study of AVHs are reviewed in detail. (...)
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  31. Rhoshel Krystyna Lenroot & Pui Ka Yeung (2013). Heterogeneity Within Autism Spectrum Disorders: What Have We Learned From Neuroimaging Studies? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 74.0
    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) display significant heterogeneity. Although most neuroimaging studies in ASD have been designed to identify commonalities among affected individuals, rather than differences, some studies have explored variation within ASD. There have been two general types of approaches used for this in the neuroimaging literature to date: comparison of subgroups within ASD, and analyses using dimensional measures to link clinical variation to brain differences. This review focuses on structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that have (...)
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  32. Allyson C. Rosen (2009). Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) in the Classroom. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):30 – 31.score: 74.0
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  33. Stacey A. Tovino (2005). The Confidentiality and Privacy Implications of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):844-850.score: 74.0
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  34. Honghui Yang, Jingyu Liu, Jing Sui, Godfrey Pearlson & Vince D. Calhoun (2010). A Hybrid Machine Learning Method for Fusing fMRI and Genetic Data: Combining Both Improves Classification of Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:192.score: 74.0
    We demonstrate a hybrid machine learning method to classify schizophrenia patients and healthy controls, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. The method consists of four stages: (1) SNPs with the most discriminating information between the healthy controls and schizophrenia patients are selected to construct a support vector machine ensemble (SNP-SVME). (2) Voxels in the fMRI map contributing to classification are selected to build another SVME (Voxel-SVME). (3) Components of fMRI activation obtained with (...)
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  35. Estela Camara, Antoni Rodriguez-Fornells & Thomas F. Münte (2009). Functional Connectivity of Reward Processing in the Brain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:19.score: 74.0
    Controversial results have been reported concerning the neural mechanisms involved in the processing of rewards and punishments. On the one hand, there is evidence suggesting that monetary gains and losses activate a similar fronto-subcortical network. On the other hand, results of recent studies imply that reward and punishment may engage distinct neural mechanisms. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we investigated both regional and interregional functional connectivity patterns while participants performed a gambling task featuring unexpectedly high monetary gains and (...)
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  36. Richard Cowan & Chris Frith (2010). Do Calendrical Savants Use Calculation to Answer Date Questions? A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study. In Francesca Happé & Uta Frith (eds.), Autism and Talent. Oup/the Royal Society.score: 74.0
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  37. Woods David (2011). Meta-Analysis of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies on Human Auditory Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 74.0
  38. R. Christopher deCharms (2007). Reading and Controlling Human Brain Activation Using Real-Time Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (11):473-481.score: 74.0
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  39. K. Giovanello, F. De Brigard, J. Ford, D. Kaufer, J. Browndyke & K. Welsh-Bohmer (2012). Event-Related Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Changes During Relational Retrieval in Normal Aging and Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 18:886-897.score: 74.0
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  40. Martin Hoffmann (2013). Two Basic Ethical Problems of Incidental Findings in Population‐Based, Non‐Intervening Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Research. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):427-432.score: 74.0
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  41. Sharna Jamadar, Joanne Fielding & Gary Egan (2013). Quantitative Meta-Analysis of fMRI and PET Studies Reveals Consistent Activation in Fronto-Striatal-Parietal Regions and Cerebellum During Antisaccades and Prosaccades. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 74.0
    The antisaccade task is a classic task of oculomotor control that requires participants to inhibit a saccade to a target and instead make a voluntary saccade to the mirror opposite location. By comparison, the prosaccade task requires participants to make a visually-guided saccade to the target. These tasks have been studied extensively using behavioural oculomotor, electrophysiological and neuroimaging in both non-human primates and humans. In humans, the antisaccade task is under active investigation as a potential endophenotype or biomarker for multiple (...)
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  42. K. D. Singh J. B. Swettenham, S. D. Muthukumaraswamy (2013). BOLD Responses in Human Primary Visual Cortex Are Insensitive to Substantial Changes in Neural Activity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 74.0
    The relationship between BOLD-fMRI (blood oxygenation level dependent-functional magnetic resonance imaging) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) metrics were explored using low-level visual stimuli known to elicit a rich variety of neural responses. Stimuli were either perceptually isoluminant red/green or luminance-modulated black/yellow square-wave gratings with spatial frequencies of 0.5, 3 and 6 cycles per degree. Neural responses were measured with BOLD-fMRI (3-tesla) and whole head MEG. For all stimuli, the BOLD response showed bilateral activation of early visual cortex that was greater (...)
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  43. Fell Juergen (2011). Investigating the Neural Correlates of Metamemory Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Intracranial Electroencephalography (IEEG). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 74.0
  44. Ema Kantorová, Peter Žiak, Egon Kurča, Mária Koyšová, Mária Hladká, Kamil Zeleňák & Jozef Michalik (2014). Visual Evoked Potential and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Are More Effective Markers of Multiple Sclerosis Progression Than Laser Polarimetry with Variable Corneal Compensation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 74.0
  45. Peter Weyers Katja U. Likowski, Andreas Mühlberger, Antje B. M. Gerdes, Matthias J. Wieser, Paul Pauli (2012). Facial Mimicry and the Mirror Neuron System: Simultaneous Acquisition of Facial Electromyography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 74.0
    Numerous studies have shown that humans automatically react with congruent facial reactions, i.e. facial mimicry, when seeing a vis-á-vis’ facial expressions. The current experiment is the first investigating the neuronal structures responsible for differences in the occurrence of such facial mimicry reactions by simultaneously measuring BOLD and facial EMG in an MRI scanner. Therefore, 20 female students viewed emotional facial expressions (happy, sad, and angry) of male and female avatar characters. During Differentiation presentation, the BOLD signal as well as M. (...)
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  46. Jingyu Liu, Mohammad M. Ghassemi, Andrew M. Michael, David Boutte, William Wells, Nora Perrone-Bizzozero, Fabio Macciardi, Daniel H. Mathalon, Judith M. Ford, Steven G. Potkin, Jessica A. Turner & Vince D. Calhoun (2012). An ICA with Reference Approach in Identification of Genetic Variation and Associated Brain Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:21-21.score: 74.0
    To address the statistical challenges associated with genome-wide association studies, we present an independent component analysis (ICA) with reference approach to target a specific genetic variation and associated brain networks. First, a small set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are empirically chosen to reflect a feature of interest and these SNPs are used as a reference when applying ICA to a full genomic SNP array. After extracting the genetic component maximally representing the characteristics of the reference, we test its association (...)
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  47. Adrian M. Owen (2011). Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Covert Awareness, and Brain Iniury. In Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics. Oxford University Press. 135.score: 74.0
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  48. Adrian M. Owen (1997). Tuning in to the Temporal Dynamics of Brain Activation Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):123-125.score: 74.0
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  49. T. M. Peters (1988). Principles and Applications of Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (Mri) in Neurology and Neurosurgery. Journal of Mind and Behavior 9 (3):241-262.score: 74.0
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  50. Sylvia Richter, Xenia Gorny, Josep Marco-Pallares, Ulrike M. Krämer, Judith Machts, Adriana Barman, Hans-Gert Bernstein, Rebecca Schüle, Ludger Schoels, Antoni Rodriguez-Fornells, Carsten Reissner, Torsten Wüstenberg, Hans-Jochen Heinze, Eckart D. Gundelfinger, Emrah Düzel, Thomas F. Münte, Constanze I. Seidenbecher & Björn H. Schott (2011). A Potential Role for a Genetic Variation of AKAP5 in Human Aggression and Anger Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 74.0
    The A-kinase-anchoring protein 5 (AKAP5), a post-synaptic multi-adaptor molecule that binds G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and intracellular signaling molecules has been implicated in emotional processing in rodents, but its role in human emotion and behavior is up to now still not quite clear. Here, we report an association of individual differences in aggressive behavior and anger expression with a functional genetic polymorphism (Pro100Leu) in the human AKAP5 gene. Among a cohort of 527 young, healthy individuals, carriers of the less common Leu (...)
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