Search results for '*Magnetic Resonance Imaging' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  91
    Charles Weijer, Tommaso Bruni, Teneille Gofton, G. Bryan Young, Loretta Norton, Andrew Peterson & Adrian M. Owen (2015). Ethical Considerations in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research in Acutely Comatose Patients. Brain:0-0.
    After severe brain injury, one of the key challenges for medical doctors is to determine the patient’s prognosis. Who will do well? Who will not do well? Physicians need to know this, and families need to do this too, to address choices regarding the continuation of life supporting therapies. However, current prognostication methods are insufficient to provide a reliable prognosis. -/- Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) holds considerable promise for improving the accuracy of prognosis in acute brain injury (...)
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  2. Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, Melanie Boly, Matthew H. Davis, Steven Laureys & John D. Pickard (2007). Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Covert Awareness in the Vegetative State. Archives of Neurology 64 (8):1098-1102.
  3.  57
    Mark Povich (2015). Mechanisms and Model-Based Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Philosophy of Science 82 (5):1035-1046.
    Mechanistic explanations satisfy widely held norms of explanation: the ability to manipulate and answer counterfactual questions about the explanandum phenomenon. A currently debated issue is whether any nonmechanistic explanations can satisfy these explanatory norms. Weiskopf argues that the models of object recognition and categorization, JIM, SUSTAIN, and ALCOVE, are not mechanistic yet satisfy these norms of explanation. In this article I argue that these models are mechanism sketches. My argument applies recent research using model-based functional magnetic resonance imaging, (...)
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  4.  4
    Charles A. Nelson (2008). Incidental Findings in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Brain Research. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (2):315-319.
    The use of magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain structure and function has become increasingly common among neuroscientists, psychologists, and even economists in recent years. Yet, despite this increase in use, relatively little attention has been paid to the issue of incidental fndings. The current paper discusses these issues, and anticipates the future of incidental fndings in the context of other neuroimaging tools currently being used to investigate the living brain.
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  5.  26
    Amy E. White (2010). The Lie of Fmri: An Examination of the Ethics of a Market in Lie Detection Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (3):253-266.
    In this paper, I argue that companies who use functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans for lie detection encounter the same basic ethical stumbling blocks as commercial companies that market traditional polygraphs. Markets in traditional voluntary polygraphs are common and fail to elicit much uproar among ethicists. Thus, for consistency, if markets in polygraphs are ethically unproblematic, markets using fMRIs for lie detection are equally as acceptable. Furthermore, while I acknowledge two substantial differences between the ethical concerns involving (...)
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  6.  13
    N. Hoggard, G. Darwent, D. Capener, I. D. Wilkinson & P. D. Griffiths (2009). The High Incidence and Bioethics of Findings on Magnetic Resonance Brain Imaging of Normal Volunteers for Neuroscience Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):194-199.
    Background: We were finding volunteers for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies with abnormalities requiring referral surprisingly frequently. The bioethics surrounding the incidental findings are not straightforward and every imaging institution will encounter this situation in their normal volunteers. Yet the implications for the individuals involved may be profound. Should all participants have review of their imaging by an expert and who should be informed? Methods: The normal volunteers that were imaged with magnetic resonance (MR) which (...)
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  7.  26
    Hannah Fitsch (2012). (A)E(s)Th(Et)Ics of Brain Imaging. Visibilities and Sayabilities in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neuroethics 5 (3):275-283.
    Producing and interpreting functional brain data is part of the negotiation we imagine our brain. To take a closer look at the idea of brain imaging as a form of visual knowledge, it is necessary to put the research of today into a historical context. In my article I will point to a specific approach of functional imaging which depends on historical shifts entangled with the visual aspect of producing pictures of the brain. I will bring out the (...)
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  8.  1
    Long-Biao Cui, Jian Liu, Liu-Xian Wang, Chen Li, Yi-Bin Xi, Fan Guo, Hua-Ning Wang, Lin-Chuan Zhang, Wen-Ming Liu, Hong He, Ping Tian, Hong Yin & Hongbing Lu (2015). Anterior Cingulate Cortex-Related Connectivity in First-Episode Schizophrenia: A Spectral Dynamic Causal Modeling Study with Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  9. Catarina Saiote, Zsolt Turi, Walter Paulus & Andrea Antal (2013). Combining Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Transcranial Electrical Stimulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  10.  18
    R. Christopher deCharms (2007). Reading and Controlling Human Brain Activation Using Real-Time Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (11):473-481.
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  11.  6
    Martin Hoffmann (2013). Two Basic Ethical Problems of Incidental Findings in Population‐Based, Non‐Intervening Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Research. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):427-432.
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  12. Ulrich Ettinger, Philip J. Corr, Ardeshier Mofidi, Steven C. R. Williams & Veena Kumari (2013). Dopaminergic Basis of the Psychosis-Prone Personality Investigated with Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Procedural Learning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  13. Nathalie Valenza, Mohamed L. Seghier, Sophie Schwartz, François Lazeyras & Patrik Vuilleumier (2004). Tactile Awareness and Limb Position in Neglect: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Annals of Neurology 55 (1):139-143.
  14.  1
    Paulo Branco, Daniela Seixas, Sabine Deprez, Silvia Kovacs, Ronald Peeters, São L. Castro & Stefan Sunaert (2016). Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Language Preoperative Planning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
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  15.  1
    Marwa M. T. Ismail, Robert S. Keynton, Mahmoud M. M. O. Mostapha, Ahmed H. ElTanboly, Manuel F. Casanova, Georgy L. Gimel'farb & Ayman El-Baz (2016). Studying Autism Spectrum Disorder with Structural and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Survey. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
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  16. Adrian M. Owen (2011). Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Covert Awareness, and Brain Iniury. In Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics. Oxford University Press 135.
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  17.  1
    Stacey A. Tovino (2005). The Confidentiality and Privacy Implications of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 33 (4):844-850.
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  18.  15
    Adrian M. Owen (1997). Tuning in to the Temporal Dynamics of Brain Activation Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):123-125.
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  19.  7
    Josef Vymazal, Aaron Rulseh, Miloš Táborský & Radovan Žáček (2011). Magnetic Resonance Imaging with MR Conditional Cardiac Pacemakers. Emergence: Complexity and Organization 1.
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  20.  12
    K. Giovanello, F. De Brigard, J. Ford, D. Kaufer, J. Browndyke & K. Welsh-Bohmer (2012). Event-Related Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Changes During Relational Retrieval in Normal Aging and Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 18:886-897.
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  21.  25
    Athena Demertzi & Mario Stanziano, Reaching Across the Abyss: Recent Advances in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Their Potential Relevance to Disorders of Consciousness.
    Disorders of consciousness (DOC) raise profound scientific, clinical, ethical, and philosophical issues. Growing knowledge on fundamental principles of brain organization in healthy individuals offers new opportunities for a better understanding of residual brain function in DOCs. We here discuss new perspectives derived from a recently proposed scheme of brain organization underlying consciousness in healthy individuals. In this scheme, thalamo-cortical networks can be divided into two, often antagonistic, global systems: (i) a system of externally oriented, sensory-motor networks (the ‘‘extrinsic’’ system); and (...)
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  22.  29
    Vinay K. Shukla (2011). Magnetic Resonance Imaging. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 4 (3):271-271.
  23.  34
    Kim Celone & Chantal Stern (2009). A Neuroimaging Perspective on the Use of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) in Educational and Legal Systems. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):28 – 29.
  24.  18
    Kevin A. Johnson, F. Andrew Kozel, Steven J. Laken & Mark S. George (2007). The Neuroscience of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Fmri for Deception Detection. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):58 – 60.
  25.  15
    Emily Bell & Eric Racine (2009). Enthusiasm for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) Often Overlooks its Dependence on Task Selection and Performance. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):23 – 25.
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  26.  13
    Moriah E. Thomason (2009). Children in Non-Clinical Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) Studies Give the Scan Experience a “Thumbs Up”. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):25 – 27.
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  27.  2
    Dandan Tong, Wenfu Li, Chaoying Tang, Wenjing Yang, Yan Tian, Lei Zhang, Meng Zhang, Jiang Qiu, Yijun Liu & Qinglin Zhang (2015). An Illustrated Heuristic Prototype Facilitates Scientific Inventive Problem Solving: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study. Consciousness and Cognition 34:43-51.
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  28.  13
    Caitlin M. Connors & Ilina Singh (2009). What We Should Really Worry About in Pediatric Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri). American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):16 – 18.
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  29.  9
    Jennifer J. Kulynych (2007). Some Thoughts About the Evaluation of Non-Clinical Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):57 – 58.
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  30.  2
    Allyson C. Rosen (2009). Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) in the Classroom. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):30 – 31.
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  31. Fatima Ahmed, Johan Ras & Soraya Seedat (2012). Volumetric Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Pediatric Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: A Systematic Review. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  32. Laura Bonzano, Andrea Tacchino, Luca Roccatagliata, Matilde Inglese, Giovanni Luigi Mancardi, Antonio Novellino & Marco Bove (2015). An Engineered Glove for Investigating the Neural Correlates of Finger Movements Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  33. Richard Cowan & Chris Frith (2010). Do Calendrical Savants Use Calculation to Answer Date Questions? A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study. In Francesca Happé & Uta Frith (eds.), Autism and Talent. OUP/the Royal Society
     
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  34. Mahta Karimpoor, Fred Tam, Stephen C. Strother, Corinne E. Fischer, Tom A. Schweizer & Simon J. Graham (2015). A Computerized Tablet with Visual Feedback of Hand Position for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  35. Dong-Hoon Lee, Cheolpyo Hong & Bong-Soo Han (2014). Diffusion-Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Hand and Foot Fibers Location at the Corona Radiata: Comparison with Two Lesion Studies. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
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  36. Katja U. Likowski, Andreas Mühlberger, Antje B. M. Gerdes, Matthias J. Wieser, Paul Pauli & Peter Weyers (2012). Facial Mimicry and the Mirror Neuron System: Simultaneous Acquisition of Facial Electromyography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
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  37. S. Manjura Hoque, C. Srivastava, N. Venkatesha, P. S. Anil Kumar & K. Chattopadhyay (2013). Superparamagnetic Behaviour andT1,T2relaxivity of ZnFe2O4nanoparticles for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Philosophical Magazine 93 (14):1771-1783.
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  38. Naoki Miura, Takayuki Nozawa, Makoto Takahashi, Ryoichi Yokoyama, Yukako Sasaki, Kohei Sakaki & Ryuta Kawashima (2015). Neural Substrates Underlying Reconcentration for the Preparation of an Appropriate Cognitive State to Prevent Future Mistakes: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  39. Charles A. Nelson (2008). Incidental Findings in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Brain Research. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):315-319.
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  40. T. M. Peters (1988). Principles and Applications of Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (Mri) in Neurology and Neurosurgery. Journal of Mind and Behavior 9 (3):241-262.
     
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  41. Stacey A. Tovino (2005). The Confidentiality and Privacy Implications of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):844-850.
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  42. Ek Wong & Bp Gardner (1988). Magnetic-Resonance Imaging in Neuroophthalmology. Journal of Mind and Behavior 9 (3):273-287.
     
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  43. R. F. Young (1988). Functional Stereotactic Neurosurgery with Magnetic-Resonance Imaging Guidance. Journal of Mind and Behavior 9 (3):263-272.
     
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  44.  15
    Siobhan M. Leary, Charles A. Davie, Geoff J. M. Parker, Valerie L. Stevenson, Liqun Wang, Gareth J. Barker, David H. Miller & A. J. Thompson (1999). 1 H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Normal Appearing White Matter in Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis. Journal of Neurology 246 (11).
    Recent magnetic resonance imaging and pathological studies have indicated that axonal loss is a major contributor to disease progression in multiple sclerosis. 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, through measurement of N -acetyl aspartate, a neuronal marker, provides a unique tool to investigate this. Patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis have few lesions on conventional MRI, suggesting that changes in normal appearing white matter, such as axonal loss, may be particularly relevant to disease progression in this group. To (...)
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  45. Matthias Schmidt, Jennifer Marshall, Jocelyn Downie & Michael Hadskis (2011). Pediatric Magnetic Resonance Research and the Minimal-Risk Standard. IRB: Ethics & Human Research 33 (5):1-6.
    While an accurate assessment of risk is always important, it is especially so in pediatric research. Recognizing the pivotal nature of the minimal-risk standard, we set out to determine under what circumstances pediatric magnetic resonance imaging research does or does not meet this standard. We found that while the physical and psychological risks that attend the MRI procedure do not exceed minimal risk, the sedation and contrast enhancement that are sometimes associated with MRI research do, as both exceed (...)
     
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  46.  27
    Jocelyn Downie, Matthais Schmidt, Nuala Kenny, Ryan D’Arcy, Michael Hadskis & Jennifer Marshall (2007). Paediatric MRI Research Ethics: The Priority Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (2):85-91.
    In this paper, we first briefly describe neuroimaging technology, our reasons for studying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, and then provide a discussion of what we have identified as priority issues for paediatric MRI research. We examine the issues of respectful involvement of children in the consent process as well as privacy and confidentiality for this group of MRI research participants. In addition, we explore the implications of unexpected findings for paediatric MRI research participants. Finally, we explore the (...)
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  47.  40
    Ralf J. Jox & Katja Kuehlmeyer (2013). Introduction: Reconsidering Disorders of Consciousness in Light of Neuroscientific Evidence. Neuroethics 6 (1):1-3.
    Disorders of consciousness pose a substantial ethical challenge to clinical decision making, especially regarding the use of life-sustaining medical treatment. For these decisions it is paramount to know whether the patient is aware or not. Recent brain research has been striving to assess awareness by using mainly functional magnetic resonance imaging. We review the neuroscientific evidence and summarize the potential and problems of the different approaches to prove awareness. Finally, we formulate the crucial ethical questions and outline the (...)
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  48.  7
    Charles Weijer, Andrew Peterson, Fiona Webster, Mackenzie Graham, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Teneille Gofton, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Andrea Lazosky, Lorina Naci, Loretta Norton, Kathy Speechley, Bryan Young & Adrian M. Owen (2014). Ethics of Neuroimaging After Serious Brain Injury. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):41.
    Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. (...)
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  49. From Galen to Magnetic Resonance (1996). Pedro Lain Entralgo. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21:571-591.
     
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  50.  56
    Georg Northoff, Pengmin Qin & Todd E. Feinberg (2011). Brain Imaging of the Self–Conceptual, Anatomical and Methodological Issues. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):52–63.
    In this paper we consider two major issues: conceptual–experimental approaches to the self, and the neuroanatomical substrate of the self. We distinguish content- and processed-based concepts of the self that entail different experimental strategies, and anatomically, we investigate the concept of midline structures in further detail and present a novel view on the anatomy of an integrated subcortical–cortical midline system. Presenting meta-analytic evidence, we show that the anterior paralimbic, e.g. midline, regions do indeed seem to be specific for self-specific stimuli. (...)
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