Search results for '*Motor Cortex' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. [deleted]Bernhard Sehm, Judy Anett Kipping, Alexander Schaefer, Arno Villringer & Patrick Ragert (2013). A Comparison Between Uni- and Bilateral tDCS Effects on Functional Connectivity of the Human Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    tDCS over the primary motor cortex (M1) has been shown to induce changes in motor performance and learning. Recent studies indicate that tDCS is capable of modulating widespread neural network properties within the brain. However the temporal evolution of online- and after- effects of tDCS on functional connectivity within and across the stimulated motor cortices (M1) still remain elusive. In the present study, two different tDCS setups were investigated: (i) unilateral M1 tDCS (anode over right M1, cathode over the (...)
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  2. [deleted]Nicholas G. Hatsopoulos Kazutaka Takahashi, Maryam Saleh, Richard D. Penn (2011). Propagating Waves in Human Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 240.0
    Previous studies in non-human primates have shown that beta oscillations (15-30Hz) of local field potentials (LFPs) in the arm/hand areas of primary motor cortex (MI) propagate as traveling waves across the cortex. These waves exhibited two stereotypical features across animals and tasks: 1) The waves propagated in two dominant modal directions roughly 180 degrees apart, and 2) their propagation speed ranged from 10 ~ 35 cm/s. It is, however, unknown if such cortical waves occur in the human motor (...)
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  3. [deleted]Paul Ferrari Douglas Cheyne (2013). MEG Studies of Motor Cortex Gamma Oscillations: Evidence for a Gamma “Fingerprint” in the Brain? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    The human motor cortex exhibits transient bursts of high frequency gamma oscillations in the 60 to 90 Hz range during movement. It has been proposed that gamma oscillations generally reflect local intracortical activity. However, movement-evoked gamma is observed simultaneously in both cortical and subcortical (basal ganglia) structures and thus appears to reflect long-range cortical-subcortical interactions. Recent evidence suggests that gamma oscillations do not simply reflect sensory reafference, but have a facilitative role in movement initiation. Here we summarize contributions of (...)
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  4. [deleted]Ulf Ziemann Ming-Kuei Lu, Chon-Haw Tsai (2012). Cerebellum to Motor Cortex Paired Associative Stimulation Induces Bidirectional STDP-Like Plasticity in Human Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    The cerebellum is crucially important for motor control and motor adaptation. Recent non-invasive brain stimulation studies have indicated the possibility to alter the excitability of the cerebellum and its projections to the contralateral motor cortex, with behavioral consequences on motor control and motor adaptation. Here we sought to induce bidirectional spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP)-like modifications of motor cortex (M1) excitability by application of paired associative stimulation (PAS) in healthy subjects. Conditioning stimulation over the right lateral cerebellum (CB) preceded (...)
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  5. [deleted]Stefan Dimou, Michael Biggs, Michael Tonkin, Ian B. Hickie & Jim Lagopoulos (2013). Motor Cortex Neuroplasticity Following Brachial Plexus Transfer. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
  6. Hugo Théoret, Masahito Kobayashi, Lotfi Merabet, Tim Wagner, Jose M. Tormos & Alvaro Pascual-Leone (2004). Modulation of Right Motor Cortex Excitability Without Awareness Following Presentation of Masked Self-Images. Cognitive Brain Research 20 (1):54-57.score: 210.0
     
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  7. [deleted]B. Lindström C.-J. Olsson, M. Hedlund, P. Sojka, R. Lundström (2012). Increased Prefrontal Activity and Reduced Motor Cortex Activity During Imagined Eccentric Compared to Concentric Muscle Actions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 192.0
    In this study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine differences in recruited brain regions during the concentric and the eccentric phase of an imagined maximum resistance training task of the elbow flexors in healthy young subjects. The results showed that during the eccentric phase, pre-frontal cortex (BA44) bilaterally was recruited when contrasted to the concentric phase. During the concentric phase, however, the motor and pre-motor cortex (BA 4/6) was recruited when contrasted to the eccentric phase. (...)
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  8. [deleted]Luca F. Ticini (2013). Does the Motor Cortex Differentiate Between Linguistic Symbols and Scribbles? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 192.0
    Does the motor cortex differentiate between linguistic symbols and scribbles?
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  9. Elliot Clayton Brown, Jan Roelf Wiersema, Gilles Pourtois & Martin Brüne (2013). Modulation of Motor Cortex Activity When Observing Rewarding and Punishing Actions. Neuropsychologia 51 (1):52-58.score: 180.0
    Interpreting others' actions is essential for understanding the intentions and goals in social interactions. Activity in the motor cortex is evoked when we see another person performing actions, which can also be influenced by the intentions and context of the observed action. No study has directly explored the influence of reward and punishment on motor cortex activity when observing others' actions, which is likely to have substantial relevance in different social contexts. In this experiment, EEG was recorded while (...)
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  10. James H. Abbs & Roxanne DePaul (1998). Motor Cortex Fields and Speech Movements: Simple Dual Control is Implausible. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):511-512.score: 180.0
    We applaud the spirit of MacNeilage's attempts to better explain the evolution and cortical control of speech by drawing on the vast literature in nonhuman primate neurobiology. However, he oversimplifies motor cortical fields and their known individual functions to such an extent that he undermines the value of his effort. In particular, MacNeilage has lumped together the functional characteristics across multiple mesial and lateral motor cortex fields, inadvertantly creating two hypothetical centers that simply may not exist.
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  11. [deleted]Olaf Hauk & Friedemann Pulvermüller (2011). The Lateralization of Motor Cortex Activation to Action-Words. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:149-149.score: 180.0
    What determines the laterality of activation in motor cortex for words whose meaning is related to bodily actions? It has been suggested that the neuronal representation of the meaning of action-words is shaped by individual experience. However, core language functions are left-lateralized in the majority of both right- and left-handers. It is still an open question to what degree connections between left-hemispheric core language areas and right-hemispheric motor areas can play a role in semantics. We investigated laterality of brain (...)
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  12. Jun Wang, Gregory Dam, Sule Yildirim, William Rand, Uri Wilensky & James C. Houk (2008). Reciprocity Between the Cerebellum and the Cerebral Cortex: Nonlinear Dynamics in Microscopic Modules for Generating Voluntary Motor Commands. Complexity 14 (2):29-45.score: 180.0
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  13. Karl U. Smith (1947). Bilateral Integrative Action of the Cerebral Cortex in Man in Verbal Association and Sensori-Motor Coordination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (5):367.score: 168.0
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  14. D. R. Humphrey (1978). On the Proportions of Identified Output Cells and Putative Interneurons the Precentral Arm Area of the Monkey's Motor Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):492.score: 150.0
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  15. [deleted]Ronen Sosnik, Tamar Flash, Anna Sterkin, Bjoern Hauptmann & Avi Karni (2014). The Activity in the Contralateral Primary Motor Cortex, Dorsal Premotor and Supplementary Motor Area is Modulated by Performance Gains. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 150.0
  16. [deleted]A. Dilene van Campen, Franz-Xaver Neubert, Wery P. M. Van den Wildenberg, K. Richard Ridderinkhof & Rogier B. Mars (2013). Paired-Pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Reveals Probability-Dependent Changes in Functional Connectivity Between Right Inferior Frontal Cortex and Primary Motor Cortex During Go/No-Go Performance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 150.0
  17. [deleted]Mattingley Jason (2012). Visual Spatial Attention Influences Plasticity in the Human Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 150.0
  18. [deleted]Brüne Martin (2012). Catharsis in the Motor Cortex: Reward and Punishment When Observing Others' Actions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 150.0
  19. [deleted]Sowman Paul, Dueholm Søren, Rasmussen Jesper & Mrachacz-Kersting Natalie (2013). Induction of Plasticity in the Human Motor Cortex by Pairing an Auditory Stimulus with TMS. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 150.0
  20. Michela Balconi & Adriana Bortolotti (2013). Conscious and Unconscious Face Recognition is Improved by High-Frequency rTMS on Pre-Motor Cortex. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):771-778.score: 150.0
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  21. [deleted]Karayanidis Frini (2012). Sustained Effects of Anodal tDCS Over the Dominant Motor Cortex on Response Preparation Processes. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 150.0
  22. [deleted]Alireza Gharabaghi, Dominic Kraus, Maria T. LeãO., Martin Spüler, Armin Walter, Martin Bogdan, Wolfgang Rosenstiel, Georgios Naros & Ulf Ziemann (2014). Coupling Brain-Machine Interfaces with Cortical Stimulation for Brain-State Dependent Stimulation: Enhancing Motor Cortex Excitability for Neurorehabilitation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 150.0
  23. Mark Hallett, Jordan Fieldman, Leonardo G. Cohen, Norihiro Sadato & Alvaro Pascual-Leone (1994). Involvement of Primary Motor Cortex in Motor Imagery and Mental Practice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):210.score: 150.0
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  24. Gregory Hickok, Lori L. Holt & Andrew J. Lotto (2009). Response to Wilson: What Does Motor Cortex Contribute to Speech Perception? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (8):330-331.score: 150.0
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  25. J. C. Houk (1989). Cooperative Control of Limb Movements by the Motor Cortex, Brainstem and Cerebellum. In Rodney M. J. Cotterill (ed.), Models of Brain Function. Cambridge University Press. 309--325.score: 150.0
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  26. [deleted]Mattingley Jason (2012). Dissociable Effects of Focal Inhibition and Excitation of Primary Motor Cortex on Functional Connectivity Within the Motor Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 150.0
  27. [deleted]Mattingley Jason (2012). Focal Disruption to Primary Motor Cortex Causes Widespread Changes in Functional Connectivity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 150.0
  28. [deleted]C. -J. Olsson, Mattias Hedlund, Peter Sojka, Ronnie Lundström & Britta Lindström (2012). Increased Prefrontal Activity and Reduced Motor Cortex Activity During Imagined Eccentric Compared to Concentric Muscle Actions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 150.0
  29. M. Rushworth (1999). Order in the Motor Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (6):206.score: 150.0
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  30. [deleted]Karen D. I. Schuil, Marion Smits & Rolf A. Zwaan (2013). Sentential Context Modulates the Involvement of the Motor Cortex in Action Language Processing: An fMRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 150.0
  31. [deleted]Paul F. Sowman, Søren S. Dueholm, Jesper H. Rasmussen & Natalie Mrachacz-Kersting (2014). Induction of Plasticity in the Human Motor Cortex by Pairing an Auditory Stimulus with TMS. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 150.0
  32. [deleted]Kazutaka Takahashi, Maryam Saleh, Richard D. Penn & Nicholas G. Hatsopoulos (2011). Propagating Waves in Human Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 150.0
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  33. Lorelei D. Shoemaker & Paola Arlotta (2010). Untangling the Cortex: Advances in Understanding Specification and Differentiation of Corticospinal Motor Neurons. Bioessays 32 (3):197-206.score: 132.0
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  34. [deleted]Danielmeier Claudia (2011). Posterior Medial Frontal Cortex Signals the Need for Adaptations in Visual and Motor Areas. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 120.0
  35. [deleted]Cinthia Maria Saucedo Marquez, Xue Zhang, Stephan Patrick Swinnen, Raf Meesen & Nicole Wenderoth (2013). Task-Specific Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Motor Learning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 120.0
    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a relatively new non-invasive brain stimulation technique that modulates neural processes. When applied to the human primary motor cortex (M1), tDCS has beneficial effects on motor skill learning and consolidation in healthy controls and in patients. However, it remains unclear whether tDCS improves motor learning in a general manner or whether these effects depend on which motor task is acquired. Here we compare whether the effect of tDCS differs when the same individual acquires (...)
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  36. Richard A. Andersen (1995). Coordinate Transformations and Motor Planning in Posterior Parietal Cortex. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. Mit Press. 519--532.score: 120.0
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  37. [deleted]Francesca Baglio, Monia Cabinio, Cristian Ricci, Gisella Baglio, Susanna Lipari, Ludovica Griffanti, Maria G. Preti, Raffaello Nemni, Mario Clerici, Michela Zanette & Valeria Blasi (2014). Abnormal Development of Sensory-Motor, Visual Temporal and Parahippocampal Cortex in Children with Learning Disabilities and Borderline Intellectual Functioning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 120.0
  38. [deleted]Sonia M. Brodie, Sean Meehan, Michael R. Borich & Lara A. Boyd (2014). 5 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over the Ipsilesional Sensory Cortex Enhances Motor Learning After Stroke. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 120.0
  39. [deleted]James A. Cheyne Douglas O. Cheyne, Paul Ferrari (2012). Intended Actions and Unexpected Outcomes: Automatic and Controlled Processing in a Rapid Motor Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 120.0
    Human action involves a combination of controlled and automatic behavior. These processes may interact in tasks requiring rapid response selection or inhibition, where temporal constraints preclude timely intervention by conscious, controlled processes over automatized prepotent responses. Such contexts tend to produce frequent errors, but also rapidly executed correct responses, both of which may sometimes be perceived as surprising, unintended, or “automatic”. In order to identify neural processes underlying these two aspects of cognitive control, we measured neuromagnetic brain activity in 12 (...)
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  40. [deleted]Praamstra Peter (2008). Evidence for Concurrent and Mutually Inhibiting Representations of Reaching Directions in the Primary Motor and the Dorsal Premotor Cortex: An EEG Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 120.0
  41. [deleted]B. C. Wijk, P. J. Beek & A. Daffertshofer (2011). Neural Synchrony Within the Motor System: What Have We Learned so Far? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:252-252.score: 120.0
    Synchronization of neural activity is considered essential for information processing in the nervous system. Both local and inter-regional synchronization are omnipresent in different frequency regimes and relate to a variety of behavioral and cognitive functions. Over the years, many studies have sought to elucidate the question how alpha/mu, beta, and gamma synchronization contribute to motor control. Here, we review these studies with the purpose to delineate what they have added to our understanding of the neural control of movement. We highlight (...)
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  42. Steven L. Small Pascale Tremblay (2011). Motor Response Selection in Overt Sentence Production: A Functional MRI Study. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 102.0
    Many different cortical areas are thought to be involved in the process of selecting motor responses, from the inferior frontal gyrus, to the lateral and medial parts of the premotor cortex. The objective of the present study was to examine the neural underpinnings of motor response selection in a set of overt language production tasks. To this aim, we compared a sentence repetition task (externally constrained selection task) with a sentence generation task (volitional selection task) in a group of (...)
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  43. [deleted]Paulo S. Boggio Olivia M. Lapenta, Ludovico Minati, Felipe Fregni (2013). Je Pense Donc Je Fais: Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Brain Oscillations Associated with Motor Imagery and Movement Observation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 96.0
    Motor system neural networks are activated during movement imagery, observation and execution, with a neural signature characterized by suppression of the Mu rhythm. In order to investigate the origin of this neurophysiological marker, we tested whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modifies Mu rhythm oscillations during tasks involving observation and imagery of biological and non-biological movements. We applied tDCS (anodal, cathodal and sham) in 21 male participants (mean age 23.8+3.06), over the left M1 with a current of 2mA for 20 (...)
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  44. [deleted]Walter Paulus Andrea Antal (2013). Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) seems likely to open a new era of the field of noninvasive electrical stimulation of the human brain by directly interfering with cortical rhythms. It is expected to synchronize (by one single resonance frequency) or desynchronize (e.g. by the application of several frequencies) cortical oscillations. If applied long enough it may cause neuroplastic effects. In the theta range it may improve cognition when applied in phase. Alpha rhythms could improve motor performance, whereas beta intrusion may (...)
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  45. [deleted]Peter G. Enticott, Hayley A. Kennedy, Nicole J. Rinehart, John L. Bradshaw, Bruce J. Tonge, Zafiris J. Daskalakis & Paul B. Fitzgerald (2013). Interpersonal Motor Resonance in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence Against a Global “Mirror System” Deficit. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
  46. [deleted]Dawson Kidgell Timo Rantalainen, Ashleigh Weier, Michael Leung, Chris Brandner, Michael Spittle (2013). Short-Interval Intracortical Inhibition is Not Affected by Varying Visual Feedback in an Isometric Task in Biceps Brachii Muscle. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
    Short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) of the primary motor cortex (M1) appears to play a significant role in skill acquisition. Consequently, it is of interest to find out which factors cause modulation of SICI. Purpose: To establish if visual feedback and force requirements influence SICI. Methods: SICI was assessed from 10 healthy adults (5 males and 5 females aged between 21 and 35 years) in three submaximal isometric elbow flexion torque levels (5%, 20% and 40% of maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]) (...)
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  47. [deleted]Bettina Pollok Claudia Wach, Vanessa Krause, Vera Moliadze, Walter Paulus, Alfons Schnitzler (2013). The Effect of 10 Hz Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) on Corticomuscular Coherence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:511-511.score: 90.0
    Synchronous oscillatory activity at alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (13-30 Hz), and gamma (30-90 Hz) fre-quencies is assumed to play a key role for motor control. Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) represents an established measure of the pyramidal system’s integrity. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) offers the possibility to modulate ongoing oscillatory activity. Behaviourally, 20 Hz tACS in healthy subjects has been shown to result in movement slowing. However, the neurophysiological changes underlying these effects are not entirely understood yet. The present study aimed (...)
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  48. [deleted]Daniel T. Corp, Hannah G. K. Drury, Kayleigh Young, Michael Do, Tom Perkins & Alan J. Pearce (2013). Corticomotor Responses to Attentionally Demanding Motor Performance: A Mini-Review. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 90.0
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  49. [deleted]Vanessa Krause, Claudia Wach, Martin Südmeyer, Stefano Ferrea, Alfons Schnitzler & Bettina Pollok (2014). Cortico-Muscular Coupling and Motor Performance Are Modulated by 20 Hz Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) in Parkinson's Disease. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
  50. [deleted]Rachael D. Seidler & Sean K. Meehan (2013). Introduction to the Special Topic: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Motor Learning and Sensorimotor Adaptation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
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