Search results for '*Motor Cortex' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Hugo Théoret, Masahito Kobayashi, Lotfi Merabet, Tim Wagner, Jose M. Tormos & Alvaro Pascual-Leone (2004). Modulation of Right Motor Cortex Excitability Without Awareness Following Presentation of Masked Self-Images. Cognitive Brain Research 20 (1):54-57.
  2. Elliot Clayton Brown, Jan Roelf Wiersema, Gilles Pourtois & Martin Brüne (2013). Modulation of Motor Cortex Activity When Observing Rewarding and Punishing Actions. Neuropsychologia 51 (1):52-58.
    Interpreting others' actions is essential for understanding the intentions and goals in social interactions. Activity in the motor cortex is evoked when we see another person performing actions, which can also be influenced by the intentions and context of the observed action. No study has directly explored the influence of reward and punishment on motor cortex activity when observing others' actions, which is likely to have substantial relevance in different social contexts. In this experiment, EEG was recorded while (...)
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  3.  15
    Jun Wang, Gregory Dam, Sule Yildirim, William Rand, Uri Wilensky & James C. Houk (2008). Reciprocity Between the Cerebellum and the Cerebral Cortex: Nonlinear Dynamics in Microscopic Modules for Generating Voluntary Motor Commands. Complexity 14 (2):29-45.
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  4.  15
    James H. Abbs & Roxanne DePaul (1998). Motor Cortex Fields and Speech Movements: Simple Dual Control is Implausible. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):511-512.
    We applaud the spirit of MacNeilage's attempts to better explain the evolution and cortical control of speech by drawing on the vast literature in nonhuman primate neurobiology. However, he oversimplifies motor cortical fields and their known individual functions to such an extent that he undermines the value of his effort. In particular, MacNeilage has lumped together the functional characteristics across multiple mesial and lateral motor cortex fields, inadvertantly creating two hypothetical centers that simply may not exist.
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  5.  3
    Karl U. Smith (1947). Bilateral Integrative Action of the Cerebral Cortex in Man in Verbal Association and Sensori-Motor Coordination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (5):367.
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  6. Yong Kyun Kim & Sung Hun Shin (2014). Comparison of Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Primary Motor Cortex and Supplementary Motor Area in Motor Skill Learning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  7. Ernest V. Pedapati, Donald L. Gilbert, Paul S. Horn, David A. Huddleston, Cameron S. Laue, Nasrin Shahana & Steve W. Wu (2015). Effect of 30 Hz Theta Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on the Primary Motor Cortex in Children and Adolescents. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  8. Shaofeng Zhao, Zulin Dou, Xiaomei Wei, Jin Li, Meng Dai, Yujue Wang, Qinglu Yang & Huai He (2015). Task-Concurrent Anodal tDCS Modulates Bilateral Plasticity in the Human Suprahyoid Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  9.  5
    Jana Speth, Clemens Speth & Trevor A. Harley (2015). Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Motor Cortex in Waking Resting State Induces Motor Imagery. Consciousness and Cognition 36:298-305.
  10. Michela Balconi & Adriana Bortolotti (2013). Conscious and Unconscious Face Recognition is Improved by High-Frequency rTMS on Pre-Motor Cortex. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):771-778.
    Simulation process and mirroring mechanism appear to be necessary to the recognition of emotional facial expressions. Prefrontal areas were found to support this simulation mechanism. The present research analyzed the role of premotor area in processing emotional faces with different valence , considering both conscious and unconscious pathways. High-frequency rTMS stimulation was applied to prefrontal area to induce an activation response when overt and covert processing was implicated. Twenty-two subjects were asked to detect emotion/no emotion . Error rates and response (...)
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  11.  1
    Joaquim P. Brasil-Neto (2016). Motor Cortex Stimulation for Pain Relief: Do Corollary Discharges Play a Role? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
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  12.  1
    Coquelet Nicolas, Wens Vincent, Bourguignon Mathieu, Carrette Evelien, Op De Beeck Marc, Marty Brice, Van Bogaert Patrick, Goldman Serge & De Tiège Xavier (2014). Primary Motor Cortex Mapping in Brain-Lesioned Patients Using MEG Resting-State Functional Connectivity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
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  13.  1
    Ryoki Sasaki, Shota Miyaguchi, Shinichi Kotan, Sho Kojima, Hikari Kirimoto & Hideaki Onishi (2016). Modulation of Cortical Inhibitory Circuits After Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Over the Primary Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
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  14.  7
    Gregory Hickok, Lori L. Holt & Andrew J. Lotto (2009). Response to Wilson: What Does Motor Cortex Contribute to Speech Perception? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (8):330-331.
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  15.  5
    Michael S. A. Graziano (2016). Ethological Action Maps: A Paradigm Shift for the Motor Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (2):121-132.
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  16.  5
    Mark Hallett, Jordan Fieldman, Leonardo G. Cohen, Norihiro Sadato & Alvaro Pascual-Leone (1994). Involvement of Primary Motor Cortex in Motor Imagery and Mental Practice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):210.
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  17.  4
    M. Rushworth (1999). Order in the Motor Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (6):206.
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  18.  4
    D. R. Humphrey (1978). On the Proportions of Identified Output Cells and Putative Interneurons the Precentral Arm Area of the Monkey's Motor Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):492.
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  19. Douglas Cheyne & Paul Ferrari (2013). MEG Studies of Motor Cortex Gamma Oscillations: Evidence for a Gamma “Fingerprint” in the Brain? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
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  20. George V. N. Dearborn (1899). On the Alleged Sensory Functions of the Motor Cortex Cerebri. Psychological Review 6 (3):338-339.
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  21. Huang Gan & Mouraux André (2014). The Latency of Motor-Evoked Potentials Can Predict Whether cTBS Will Exert an Inhibitory or Excitatory Effect on the Ipsilateral and Contralateral Primary Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
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  22. Alavi Hesam, Riek Stephan, Marinovic Welber & Carroll Tim (2015). Assessing the Role of the Motor Cortex in Visuomotor Memory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  23. J. C. Houk (1989). Cooperative Control of Limb Movements by the Motor Cortex, Brainstem and Cerebellum. In Rodney M. J. Cotterill (ed.), Models of Brain Function. Cambridge University Press 309--325.
     
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  24. Ming-Kuei Lu, Chon-Haw Tsai & Ulf Ziemann (2012). Cerebellum to Motor Cortex Paired Associative Stimulation Induces Bidirectional STDP-Like Plasticity in Human Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
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  25. Kamke Marc, Ryan Alexander, Sale Martin, Campbell Megan, Riek Stephan, Carroll Timothy & Mattingley Jason (2015). Spatial Attention Influences Plasticity Induction in the Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  26. Katherine R. Naish, Brittany Barnes & Sukhvinder S. Obhi (2016). Stimulation Over Primary Motor Cortex During Action Observation Impairs Effector Recognition. Cognition 149:84-94.
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  27. Koyo Nakamura & Hideaki Kawabata (2015). Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Over the Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Left Primary Motor Cortex Affects Subjective Beauty but Not Ugliness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  28. Grégory Nordmann, Valeriya Azorina, Berthold Langguth & Martin Schecklmann (2015). A Systematic Review of Non-Motor rTMS Induced Motor Cortex Plasticity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  29. Teresa Sollfrank, Daniel Hart, Rachel Goodsell, Jonathan Foster & Tele Tan (2015). 3D Visualization of Movements Can Amplify Motor Cortex Activation During Subsequent Motor Imagery. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  30. Kazutaka Takahashi, Maryam Saleh, Richard D. Penn & Nicholas G. Hatsopoulos (2011). Propagating Waves in Human Motor Cortex. Frontiers Human Neuroscience 5.
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  31.  8
    Lorelei D. Shoemaker & Paola Arlotta (2010). Untangling the Cortex: Advances in Understanding Specification and Differentiation of Corticospinal Motor Neurons. Bioessays 32 (3):197-206.
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  32. Stephen Grossberg & Lance R. Pearson (2008). Laminar Cortical Dynamics of Cognitive and Motor Working Memory, Sequence Learning and Performance: Toward a Unified Theory of How the Cerebral Cortex Works. Psychological Review 115 (3):677-732.
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  33. Richard A. Andersen (1995). Coordinate Transformations and Motor Planning in Posterior Parietal Cortex. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press 519--532.
     
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  34. Avisa Asemi, Karthik Ramaseshan, Ashley Burgess, Vaibhav A. Diwadkar & Steven L. Bressler (2015). Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex Modulates Supplementary Motor Area in Coordinated Unimanual Motor Behavior. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  35. No Authorship Indicated (1894). The Sensory Motor Functions of the Central Convolutions of the Cerebral Cortex. Psychological Review 1 (4):422-422.
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  36. Bill Faw (2003). Pre-Frontal Executive Committee for Perception, Working Memory, Attention, Long-Term Memory, Motor Control, and Thinking: A Tutorial Review. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):83-139.
    As an explicit organizing metaphor, memory aid, and conceptual framework, the prefrontal cortex may be viewed as a five-member ‘Executive Committee,’ as the prefrontal-control extensions of five sub-and-posterior-cortical systems: the ‘Perceiver’ is the frontal extension of the ventral perceptual stream which represents the world and self in object coordinates; the ‘Verbalizer’ is the frontal extension of the language stream which represents the world and self in language coordinates; the ‘Motivator’ is the frontal cortical extension of a subcortical extended-amygdala stream (...)
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  37.  4
    James C. Lynch (1980). The Functional Organization of Posterior Parietal Association Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):485.
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  38.  36
    Helen Johnson & Patrick Haggard (2005). Motor Awareness Without Perceptual Awareness. Neuropsychologia. Special Issue 43 (2):227-237.
    The control of action has traditionally been described as "automatic". In particular, movement control may occur without conscious awareness, in contrast to normal visual perception. Studies on rapid visuomotor adjustment of reaching movements following a target shift have played a large part in introducing such distinctions. We suggest that previous studies of the relation between motor performance and perceptual awareness have confounded two separate dissociations. These are: (a) the distinction between motoric and perceptual representations, and (b) an orthogonal distinction between (...)
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  39.  5
    W. T. Thach (1996). On the Specific Role of the Cerebellum in Motor Learning and Cognition: Clues From PET Activation and Lesion Studies in Man. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):411-433.
    Brindley proposed that we initially generate movements , under higher cerebral control. As the movement is practiced, the cerebellum learns to link within itself the context in which the movement is made to the lower level movement generators. Marr and Albus proposed that the linkage is established by a special input from the inferior olive, which plays upon an input-output element within the cerebellum during the period of the learning. When the linkage is complete, the occurrence of the context (represented (...)
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  40.  23
    Paul E. Tibbetts (2001). The Anterior Cingulate Cortex, Akinetic Mutism, and Human Volition. Brain and Mind 2 (3):323-341.
    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)has been identified as part of a supervisoryattentional network for selecting alternativemotor programs in response to top-down corticalprocessing, particularly in situationsinvolving conflicting cognitive tasks.Bilateral lesions to the ACC may be causallyassociated with akinetic mutism, where patientsare unable to voluntarily initiate responses.The clinical and neuroanatomical evidence forthis presumed causal association is examined atlength. However, given the many reciprocalprojections between cerebral, motor, limbic andparalimbic structures within the executivesupervisory network, the association ofvoluntary behavior with a particular structure(the ACC) (...)
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  41.  36
    E. Koechlin & C. Summerfield (2007). An Information Theoretical Approach to Prefrontal Executive Function. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):229-235.
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  42. Benjamin W. Libet (2004). Mind Time: The Temporal Factor in Consciousness. MIT Press.
    Over a long career, Libet has conducted experiments that have shown, in clear and concrete ways, how the brain produces conscious awareness.
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  43. Mircea Steriade (1978). Cortical Long-Axoned Cells and Putative Interneurons During the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):465.
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  44.  29
    F. Xavier Castellanos, Edmund J. S. Sonuga-Barke, Michael P. Milham & Rosemary Tannock (2006). Characterizing Cognition in ADHD: Beyond Executive Dysfunction. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):117-123.
  45.  20
    C. D. Chambers & J. B. Mattingley (2005). Neurodisruption of Selective Attention: Insights and Implications. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):542-550.
    Mechanisms of selective attention are vital for coherent perception and action. Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience have yielded key insights into the relationship between neural mechanisms of attention and eye movements, and the role of frontal and parietal brain regions as sources of attentional control. Here we explore the growing contribution of reversible neurodisruption techniques, including transcranial magnetic stimulation and microelectrode stimulation, to the cognitive neuroscience of spatial attention. These approaches permit unique causal inferences concerning the relationship between neural processes (...)
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  46.  10
    Martha Flanders, Stephen I. Helms Tillery & John F. Soechting (1992). Early Stages in a Sensorimotor Transformation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):309-320.
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  47.  4
    Bruce MacLennan, Field Computation in Motor Control.
    to small scales. Further, it is often useful to describe motor control and sensorimotor coordination in terms of external elds such as force elds and sensory images. We survey the basic concepts of eld computation, including both feed-forward eld operations and eld dynamics resulting from recurrent connections. Adaptive and learning mechanisms are discussed brie y. The application of eld computation to motor control is illustrated by several examples: external force elds associated with spinal neurons, population coding of direction in motor (...)
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  48.  28
    Jing Zhu (2003). Reclaiming Volition: An Alternative Interpretation of Libet's Experiment. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (11):61-77.
    Based on his experimental studies, Libet claims that voluntary actions are initiated by unconscious brain activities well before intentions or decisions to act are consciously experienced by people. This account conflicts with our common-sense conception of human agency, in which people consciously and intentionally exert volitions or acts of will to initiate voluntary actions. This paper offers an alternative interpretation of Libet's experiment. The cause of the intentional acts performed by the subjects in Libet's experiment should not be exclusively attributed (...)
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  49.  8
    James C. Houk, Jay T. Buckingham & Andrew G. Barto (1996). Models of the Cerebellum and Motor Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):368-383.
    This article reviews models of the cerebellum and motor learning, from the landmark papers by Marr and Albus through those of the present time. The unique architecture of the cerebellar cortex is ideally suited for pattern recognition, but how is pattern recognition incorporated into motor control and learning systems? The present analysis begins with a discussion of exactly what the cerebellar cortex needs to regulate through its anatomically defined projections to premotor networks. Next, we examine various models showing (...)
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  50.  12
    Yves Burnod (1991). Organizational Levels of the Cerebral Cortex: An Integrated Model. Acta Biotheoretica 39 (3-4):351-361.
    We propose a theoretical model of the cerebral cortex which is based on its cellular components and integrates its different levels of organization: (1) cells have general adaptive and memorization properties; (2) cortical columns are repetitive interneuronal circuits which determine an adaptive processing specific to the cerebral cortex; (3) cortical maps effect selective combinations which are very efficient to learn basic behaviourial adaptations such as invariant recognition of forms, visually-guided hand movements, or execution of structured motor programs; (4) (...)
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