Search results for '*Neuroanatomy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. Dietrich (2003). Functional Neuroanatomy of Altered States of Consciousness: The Transient Hypofrontality Hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):231-256.score: 14.0
  2. Peter Århem, Hans Liljenström & B. I. B. Lindahl (2003). Consciousness and Comparative Neuroanatomy: Report on the Agora Workshop in Sigtuna, Sweden, on 21 August, 2002. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):85-88.score: 14.0
     
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  3. Bruce Bridgeman (2000). Neuroanatomy and Function in Two Visual Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):535-536.score: 12.0
    Neuroanatomy and neurophysiology are insufficient to specify function. Modeling is essential to elucidate function, but psychophysics is also required. An example is the cognitive and sensorimotor branches of the visual system: anatomy shows direct cross talk between the branches. Psychophysics in normal humans shows links from cognitive to sensorimotor, but the reverse link is excluded by visual illusions affecting the cognitive system but not the sensorimotor system.
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  4. Christopher Cherniak, Optimal-Wiring Models of Neuroanatomy.score: 12.0
    Combinatorial network optimization appears to fit well as a model of brain structure: connections in the brain are a critically constrained resource, hence their deployment in a wide range of cases is finely optimized to “‘save wire". This review focuses on minimization of large-scale costs, such as total volume for mammal dendrite and axon arbors and total wirelength for positioning of connected neural components such as roundworm ganglia (and also mammal cortex areas). Phenomena of good optimization raise questions about mechanisms (...)
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  5. Ricardo de Oliveira-Souza, Jorge Moll & Jordan Grafman (2011). Emotion and Social Cognition: Lessons From Contemporary Human Neuroanatomy. Emotion Review 3 (3):310-312.score: 12.0
    Two paradigms have guided emotion research over the past decades. The dual-system view embraces the long-held Western belief, espoused most prominently by decision-making and social cognition researchers, that emotion and reason are often at odds. The integrative view, which asserts that emotion and cognition work synergistically, has been less explored experimentally. However, the integrative view (a) may help explain several findings that are not easily accounted for by the dual-system approach, and (b) is better supported by a growing body of (...)
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  6. Alain Morin, Self-Awareness Part 2: Neuroanatomy and Importance of Inner Speech.score: 10.0
    The present review of literature surveys two main issues related to self-referential processes: (1) Where in the brain are these processes located, and do they correlate with brain areas uniquely specialized in self-processing? (2) What are the empirical and theoretical links between inner speech and self-awareness? Although initial neuroimaging attempts tended to favor a right hemispheric view of selfawareness, more recent work shows that the brain areas which support self-related processes are located in both hemispheres and are not uniquely activated (...)
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  7. Giorgio A. Ascoli (2000). The Complex Link Between Neuroanatomy and Consciousness. Complexity 6 (1):20-26.score: 10.0
  8. Petra Stoerig (2001). The Neuroanatomy of Phenomenal Vision: A Psychological Perspective. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 929:176-94.score: 10.0
  9. R. Joseph (2001). The Limbic System and the Soul: Evolution and the Neuroanatomy of Religious Experience. Zygon 36 (1):105-136.score: 10.0
  10. Christopher Cherniak (1994). Philosophy and Computational Neuroanatomy. Philosophical Studies 73 (2-3):89-107.score: 10.0
  11. Christof Koch (1998). The Neuroanatomy of Visual Consciousness. In H. Jasper, L. Descarries, V. Castellucci & S. Rossignol (eds.), Consciousness: At the Frontiers of Neuroscience. Lippincott-Raven.score: 10.0
  12. Christopher Cherniak (1990). The Bounded Brain: Toward Quantitative Neuroanatomy. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 2 (1).score: 10.0
  13. J. Smythies (1997). The Functional Neuroanatomy of Awareness: With a Focus on the Role of Various Anatomical Systems in the Control of Intermodal Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (4):455-81.score: 10.0
  14. Richard J. Davidson & William Irwin (1999). The Functional Neuroanatomy of Emotion and Affective Style. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):11-21.score: 10.0
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  15. Heini Hakosalo (2006). The Brain Under the Knife: Serial Sectioning and the Development of Late Nineteenth-Century Neuroanatomy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (2):172-202.score: 10.0
  16. Gregory Hickok & David Poeppel (2000). Towards a Functional Neuroanatomy of Speech Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):131-138.score: 10.0
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  17. Christopher Cherniak (1991). Meta-Neuroanatomy: The Myth of the Unbounded Mind/Brain. In Evandro Agazzi & Alberto Cordero (eds.), Philosophy and the Origin and Evolution of the Universe. Norwell: Kluwer. 219--252.score: 10.0
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  18. Nicolas Kopp (1978). Possible Contribution of Neuroanatomy to the Comprehension of Growth and Inheritance of Human Cerebral Asymmetries. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (2):302.score: 10.0
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  19. P. Arhem & H. Liljenstrom (2003). Peter Arhem, Hans Liljenstrom and BIB Lindahl Consciousness and Comparative Neuroanatomy Report on the Agora Workshop in Sigtuna, Sweden, on 21 August, 2002. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):88-85.score: 10.0
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  20. M. D. Demetrios Sahlas (forthcoming). Functional Neuroanatomy in the Pre-Hippocratic Era: Observations From the Iliad of Homer. Convivium.score: 10.0
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  21. Michael Hagner (2001). Cultivating the Cortex in German Neuroanatomy. Science in Context 14 (4).score: 10.0
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  22. Kent C. Berridge Morten L. Kringelbach (2009). Towards a Functional Neuroanatomy of Pleasure and Happiness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (11):479.score: 10.0
  23. R. Glenn Northcutt (1984). A Parochial View Comparative Correlative Neuroanatomy of the Vertebrate Telencephalon Elizabeth C. Crosby H. N. Schnitzlein. [REVIEW] BioScience 34 (4):264-264.score: 10.0
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  24. Bernard J. Baars (1999). Attention Vs Consciousness in the Visual Brain: Differences in Conception, Phenomenology, Behavior, Neuroanatomy, and Physiology. Journal of General Psychology 126:224-33.score: 10.0
  25. Richard J. Davidson (2000). The Functional Neuroanatomy of Affective Style. In Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel, G. L. Ahern, J. Allen & Alfred W. Kaszniak (eds.), Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Oxford University Press. 371--388.score: 10.0
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  26. Morten L. Kringelbach & Kent C. Berridge (2009). Towards a Functional Neuroanatomy of Pleasure and Happiness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (11):479-487.score: 10.0
  27. C. J. Price (1998). The Functional Neuroanatomy of Language Processing. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2:281-288.score: 10.0
     
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  28. [deleted]Emiliano Ricciardi, Giuseppina Rota, Lorenzo Sani, Claudio Gentili, Anna Gaglianese, Mario Guazzelli & Pietro Pietrini (2013). How the Brain Heals Emotional Wounds: The Functional Neuroanatomy of Forgiveness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:839.score: 10.0
    In life, everyone goes through hurtful events caused by significant others: a deceiving friend, a betraying partner, or an unjustly blaming parent. In response to painful emotions, individuals may react with anger, hostility, and the desire for revenge. As an alternative, they may decide to forgive the wrongdoer and relinquish resentment. In the present study, we examined the brain correlates of forgiveness using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Healthy participants were induced to imagine social scenarios that described emotionally hurtful events (...)
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  29. Sophie K. Scott & Richard J. S. Wise (2004). The Functional Neuroanatomy of Prelexical Processing in Speech Perception. Cognition 92 (1-2):13-45.score: 10.0
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  30. Wendy A. Suzuki (1994). What Can Neuroanatomy Tell Us About the Functional Components of the Hippocampal Memory System? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):496-498.score: 10.0
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  31. Yosef Grodzinsky (2000). The Neurology of Syntax: Language Use Without Broca's Area. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):1-21.score: 6.0
    A new view of the functional role of the left anterior cortex in language use is proposed. The experimental record indicates that most human linguistic abilities are not localized in this region. In particular, most of syntax (long thought to be there) is not located in Broca's area and its vicinity (operculum, insula, and subjacent white matter). This cerebral region, implicated in Broca's aphasia, does have a role in syntactic processing, but a highly specific one: It is the neural home (...)
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  32. Frank W. Stahnisch (2009). Transforming the Lab: Technological and Societal Concerns in the Pursuit of De- and Regeneration in the German Morphological Neurosciences, 1910–1930. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (1):41-54.score: 6.0
    This paper focuses on the make-up of different cultures in experimental neurology, neuroanatomy, and clinical psychiatry. These cultures served as important research bases for early regenerative concepts and projects in the area of neurology and psychiatry at the beginning of the 20th century. Nevertheless, the developments in brain research and clinical neurology cannot be regarded to be isolated from broader societal developments, as the discourses on social de- and regeneration, neurasthenia, nerve-weakness and experiences of the brain-injured after WWI show. Societal (...)
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  33. J. Parvizi & Antonio R. Damasio (2001). Consciousness and the Brainstem. Cognition 79 (1):135-59.score: 4.0
  34. Bernard J. Baars (2001). There Are No Known Differences in Brain Mechanisms of Consciousness Between Humans and Other Mammals. Animal Welfare Supplement 10:31- 40.score: 4.0
  35. Anil K. Seth & Bernard J. Baars (2005). Neural Darwinism and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):140-168.score: 4.0
    Neural Darwinism (ND) is a large scale selectionist theory of brain development and function that has been hypothesized to relate to consciousness. According to ND, consciousness is entailed by reentrant interactions among neuronal populations in the thalamocortical system (the ‘dynamic core’). These interactions, which permit high-order discriminations among possible core states, confer selective advantages on organisms possessing them by linking current perceptual events to a past history of value-dependent learning. Here, we assess the consistency of ND with 16 widely recognized (...)
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  36. Jeffrey W. Cooney & Michael S. Gazzaniga (2003). Neurological Disorders and the Structure of Human Consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):161-165.score: 4.0
  37. D. B. Edelman, Bernard J. Baars & Anil K. Seth (2005). Identifying Hallmarks of Consciousness in Non-Mammalian Species. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):169-87.score: 4.0
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  38. J. Fell (2004). Identifying Neural Correlates of Consciousness: The State Space Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):709-29.score: 4.0
  39. M. T. Alkire, R. J. Haier & J. H. Fallon (2000). Toward a Unified Theory of Narcosis: Brain Imaging Evidence for a Thalamocortical Switch as the Neurophysiologic Basis of Anesthetic-Induced Unconsciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):370-386.score: 4.0
    A unifying theory of general anesthetic-induced unconsciousness must explain the common mechanism through which various anesthetic agents produce unconsciousness. Functional-brain-imaging data obtained from 11 volunteers during general anesthesia showed specific suppression of regional thalamic and midbrain reticular formation activity across two different commonly used volatile agents. These findings are discussed in relation to findings from sleep neurophysiology and the implications of this work for consciousness research. It is hypothesized that the essential common neurophysiologic mechanism underlying anesthetic-induced unconsciousness is, as with (...)
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  40. Rodney M. J. Cotterill (2003). Cyberchild: A Simulation Test-Bed for Consciousness Studies. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4):31-45.score: 4.0
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  41. Peter Cariani (2000). Anesthesia, Neural Information Processing, and Consciousness Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):387-395.score: 4.0
    Possible systemic effects of general anesthetic agents on neural information processing are discussed in the context of the thalamocortical suppression hypothesis presented by Drs. Alkire, Haier, and Fallon (this issue) in their PET study of the anesthetized state. Accounts of the neural requisites of consciousness fall into two broad categories. Neuronal-specificity theories postulate that activity in particular neural populations is sufficient for conscious awareness, while process-coherence theories postulate that particular organizations of neural activity are sufficient. Accounts of anesthetic narcosis, on (...)
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  42. David J. Mellor, Tamara J. Diesch, Alistair J. Gunn & Laura Bennet (2005). The Importance of 'Awareness' for Understanding Fetal Pain. Brain Research Reviews 49 (3):455-471.score: 4.0
  43. Mark Sherer, Tessa Hart, John Whyte, Toad G. Nick & Stuart A. Yablon (2005). Neuroanatomic Basis of Impaired Self-Awareness After Traumatic Brain Injury: Findings From Early Computed Tomography. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 20 (4):287-300.score: 4.0
  44. Ralf-Peter Behrendt (2004). A Neuroanatomical Model of Passivity Phenomena. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):579-609.score: 4.0
  45. Richard D. R. Lane (2000). Neural Correlates of Conscious Emotional Experience. In Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel, G. L. Ahern, J. Allen & Alfred W. Kaszniak (eds.), Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Oxford University Press. 345--370.score: 4.0
  46. Dean Falk (1990). Brain Evolution in Homo: The “Radiator” Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):333-344.score: 4.0
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  47. [deleted]Leah Krubitzer & James C. Dooley (2013). Cortical Plasticity Within and Across Lifetimes: How Can Development Inform Us About Phenotypic Transformations? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 4.0
  48. [deleted]Adam M. Brickman Kimberly G. Noble, Stuart M. Grieve, Mayuresh S. Korgaonkar, Laura E. Engelhardt, Erica Y. Griffith, Leanne M. Williams (2012). Hippocampal Volume Varies with Educational Attainment Across the Life-Span. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 4.0
    Socioeconomic disparities – and particularly differences in educational attainment – are associated with remarkable differences in cognition and behavior across the life-span. Decreased educational attainment has been linked to increased exposure to life stressors, which in turn have been associated with structural differences in the hippocampus and the amygdala. However, the degree to which educational attainment is directly associated with anatomical differences in these structures remains unclear. Recent studies in children have found socioeconomic differences in regional brain volume in the (...)
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  49. [deleted]Helen Barbas Yohan J. John, Daniel Bullock, Basilis Zikopoulos (2013). Anatomy and Computational Modeling of Networks Underlying Cognitive-Emotional Interaction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 4.0
    The classical dichotomy between cognition and emotion equated the first with rationality or logic and the second with irrational behaviors. The idea that cognition and emotion are separable, antagonistic forces competing for dominance of mind has been hard to displace despite abundant evidence to the contrary. For instance, it is now known that a pathological absence of emotion leads to profound impairment of decision making. Behavioral observations of this kind are corroborated at the mechanistic level: neuroanatomical studies reveal that brain (...)
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  50. Tobias Egner & Amir Raz (2007). Cognitive Control Processes and Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 29-50.score: 4.0
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