Search results for '*Neuroimaging' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Adina L. Roskies (2008). Neuroimaging and Inferential Distance. Neuroethics 1 (1):19-30.score: 16.0
    Brain images are used both as scientific evidence and to illustrate the results of neuroimaging experiments. These images are apt to be viewed as photographs of brain activity, and in so viewing them people are prone to assume that they share the evidential characteristics of photographs. Photographs are epistemically compelling, and have a number of characteristics that underlie what I call their inferential proximity. Here I explore the aptness of the photography analogy, and argue that although neuroimaging does bear important (...)
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  2. Colin Klein (2011). The Dual Track Theory of Moral Decision-Making: A Critique of the Neuroimaging Evidence. Neuroethics 4 (2):143-162.score: 16.0
    The dual-track theory of moral reasoning has received considerable attention due to the neuroimaging work of Greene et al. Greene et al. claimed that certain kinds of moral dilemmas activated brain regions specific to emotional responses, while others activated areas specific to cognition. This appears to indicate a dissociation between different types of moral reasoning. I re-evaluate these claims of specificity in light of subsequent empirical work. I argue that none of the cortical areas identified by Greene et al. are (...)
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  3. Nicole A. Vincent (2009). Neuroimaging and Responsibility Assessments. Neuroethics 4 (1):35-49.score: 16.0
    Could neuroimaging evidence help us to assess the degree of a person’s responsibility for a crime which we know that they committed? This essay defends an affirmative answer to this question. A range of standard objections to this high-tech approach to assessing people’s responsibility is considered and then set aside, but I also bring to light and then reject a novel objection—an objection which is only encountered when functional (rather than structural) neuroimaging is used to assess people’s responsibility.
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  4. Alison C. Boyce (2009). Neuroimaging in Psychiatry: Evaluating the Ethical Consequences for Patient Care. Bioethics 23 (6):349-359.score: 16.0
    According to many researchers, it is inevitable and obvious that psychiatric illnesses are biological in nature, and that this is the rationale behind the numerous neuroimaging studies of individuals diagnosed with mental disorders. Scholars looking at the history of psychiatry have pointed out that in the past, the origins and motivations behind the search for biological causes, correlates, and cures for mental disorders are thoroughly social and historically rooted, particularly when the diagnostic category in question is the subject of controversy (...)
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  5. Christian G. Huber & Johannes Huber (2009). Epistemological Considerations on Neuroimaging – a Crucial Prerequisite for Neuroethics. Bioethics 23 (6):340-348.score: 16.0
    Purpose: Whereas ethical considerations on imaging techniques and interpretations of neuroimaging results flourish, there is not much work on their preconditions. In this paper, therefore, we discuss epistemological considerations on neuroimaging and their implications for neuroethics. Results: Neuroimaging uses indirect methods to generate data about surrogate parameters for mental processes, and there are many determinants influencing the results, including current hypotheses and the state of knowledge. This leads to an interdependence between hypotheses and data. Additionally, different levels of description are (...)
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  6. Bert Heinrichs (2011). A New Challenge for Research Ethics: Incidental Findings in Neuroimaging. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):59-65.score: 16.0
    It has become evident that neuroimaging raises new normative questions that cannot be addressed adequately within the (in this regard unspecific) frameworks of existing research ethics. Questions that are especially troubling are, among others, provoked by incidental findings. Two questions are particularly intricate in view of incidental findings: (1) How can the research subject’s right not to know be guaranteed? And (2) should a diagnostic check of scans by a neuroradiologist become an obligatory part of neuroscientific research protocols? The present (...)
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  7. Emily Borgelt, Daniel Buchman & Judy Illes (2011). Erratum: “ This is Why You've Been Suffering”: Reflections of Providers on Neuroimaging in Mental Health Care. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):107-107.score: 16.0
    Erratum: “ This is Why you’ve Been Suffering”: Reflections of Providers on Neuroimaging in Mental Health Care Content Type Journal Article Pages 107-107 DOI 10.1007/s11673-011-9284-4 Authors Emily Borgelt, National Core for Neuroethics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Daniel Z. Buchman, National Core for Neuroethics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Judy Illes, National Core for Neuroethics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529 Journal Volume Volume 8 Journal Issue Volume (...)
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  8. Guillermo Del Pinal & Marco J. Nathan (2013). There and Up Again: On the Uses and Misuses of Neuroimaging in Psychology. Cognitive Neuropsychology 30 (4):233-252.score: 16.0
    The aim of this article is to discuss the conditions under which functional neuroimaging can contribute to the study of higher cognition. We begin by presenting two case studies—on moral and economic decision making—which will help us identify and examine one of the main ways in which neuroimaging can help advance the study of higher cognition. We agree with critics that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies seldom “refine” or “confirm” particular psychological hypotheses, or even provide details of the neural (...)
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  9. Jan-Hendrik Heinrichs (2012). The Sensitivity of Neuroimaging Data. Neuroethics 5 (2):185-195.score: 16.0
    Abstract When new methods of generating information about individuals leave the confined space of research application the possibility of morally dubious application arises. The current propagation of neuroscientific diagnostics leads to new possibilities of misuse and accordingly new needs for the protection of individual privacy emerge. While most current privacy discussion focuses on sensationalist applications which aim/claim to gather information about psychological traits or even the content of thoughts, the more sober but much more realistic endeavour to gather health data (...)
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  10. Wael K. Al-Delaimy (2012). Ethical Concepts and Future Challenges of Neuroimaging: An Islamic Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):509-518.score: 16.0
    Neuroscience is advancing at a rapid pace, with new technologies and approaches that are creating ethical challenges not easily addressed by current ethical frameworks and guidelines. One fascinating technology is neuroimaging, especially functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Although still in its infancy, fMRI is breaking new ground in neuroscience, potentially offering increased understanding of brain function. Different populations and faith traditions will likely have different reactions to these new technologies and the ethical challenges they bring with them. Muslims are approximately (...)
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  11. Vince D. Calhoun & Kenneth Hugdahl (2012). Cognition and Neuroimaging in Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 16.0
    Cognition and Neuroimaging in Schizophrenia.
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  12. Margherita Melloni, Claudia Urbistondo, Lucas Sedeño, Carlos Gelormini, Rafael Kichic & Agustin Ibanez (2012). The Extended Fronto-Striatal Model of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Convergence From Event-Related Potentials, Neuropsychology and Neuroimaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 16.0
    In this work, we explored convergent evidence supporting the fronto-striatal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (FSMOCD) and the contribution of event-related potential (ERP) studies to this model. First, we considered minor modifications to the FSMOCD model based on neuroimaging and neuropsychological data. We noted the brain areas most affected in this disorder -anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), basal ganglia (BG) and orbito-frontal cortex (OFC)- and their related cognitive functions, such as monitoring and inhibition. Then, we assessed the ERPs that are directly related (...)
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  13. Walter Glannon (2014). The Limitations and Potential of Neuroimaging in the Criminal Law. Journal of Ethics 18 (2):153-170.score: 16.0
    Neuroimaging showing brain abnormalities is increasingly being introduced in criminal court proceedings to argue that a defendant could not control his behavior and should not be held responsible for it. But imaging has questionable probative value because it does not directly capture brain function or a defendant’s mental states at the time of a criminal act. Advanced techniques could transform imaging from a coarse-grained measure of correlations between brain states and behavior to a fine-grained measure of causal connections between them. (...)
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  14. Lars Marstaller & Hana Burianová (forthcoming). The Multisensory Perception of Co-Speech Gestures – A Meta-Analysis of Neuroimaging Studies. Frontiers in Psychology.score: 16.0
    Co-speech gestures constitute a unique form of multimodal communication because here the hand movements are temporally synchronized with speech, specifically with prosody, i.e., the rhythm and intonation of speech. Behavioral studies show that listeners utilize the coordination of gesture movements together with prosodic features of speech to improve language comprehension. Neuroimaging studies provide further evidence that the perception of a certain type of co-speech gesture, so-called beat gestures, which have long been suspected to relate to phonological units beyond the word (...)
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  15. Jesper Ryberg (2014). When Should Neuroimaging Be Applied in the Criminal Court? On Ideal Comparison and the Shortcomings of Retributivism. Journal of Ethics 18 (2):81-99.score: 16.0
    When does neuroimaging constitute a sufficiently developed technology to be put into use in the work of determining whether or not a defendant is guilty of crime? This question constitutes the starting point of the present paper. First, it is suggested that an overall answer is provided by what is referred to as the “ideal comparative view.” Secondly, it is—on the ground of this view—argued that the answer as to whether neuroimaging technology should be applied presupposes penal theoretical considerations. Thirdly, (...)
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  16. Judy Illes Emily Borgelt, Daniel Z. Buchman (2011). “This is Why You've Been Suffering”: Reflections of Providers on Neuroimaging in Mental Health Care. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):15.score: 16.0
    Mental health care providers increasingly confront challenges posed by the introduction of new neurotechnology into the clinic, but little is known about the impact of such capabilities on practice patterns and relationships with patients. To address this important gap, we sought providers’ perspectives on the potential clinical translation of functional neuroimaging for prediction and diagnosis of mental illness. We conducted 32 semi-structured telephone interviews with mental health care providers representing psychiatry, psychology, family medicine, and allied mental health. Our results suggest (...)
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  17. Ezemenari Obasi Marian Beasley, Dean Sabatinelli (2012). Neuroimaging Evidence for Social Rank Theory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 16.0
    Neuroimaging Evidence for Social Rank Theory.
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  18. Agustin Ibanez Margherita Melloni, Claudia Urbistondo, Lucas Sedeño, Carlos Gelormini, Rafael Kichic (2012). The Extended Fronto-Striatal Model of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Convergence From Event-Related Potentials, Neuropsychology and Neuroimaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 16.0
    In this work, we explored convergent evidence supporting the fronto-striatal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (FSMOCD) and the contribution of event-related potential (ERP) studies to this model. First, we considered minor modifications to the FSMOCD model based on neuroimaging and neuropsychological data. We noted the brain areas most affected in this disorder -anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), basal ganglia (BG) and orbito-frontal cortex (OFC)- and their related cognitive functions, such as monitoring and inhibition. Then, we assessed the ERPs that are directly related (...)
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  19. Julia Sacher, Hadas Okon-Singer & Arno Villringer (2013). Evidence From Neuroimaging for the Role of the Menstrual Cycle in the Interplay of Emotion and Cognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 16.0
    Women show increased predisposition for certain psychiatric disorders, such as depression, that are associated with disturbances in the integration of emotion and cognition. While this suggests that sex hormones need to be considered as modulating factors in the regulation of emotion, we still lack a sound understanding of how the menstrual cycle impacts emotional states and cognitive function. Though signals for the influence of the menstrual cycle on the integration of emotion and cognition have appeared as secondary findings in numerous (...)
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  20. Erin D. Bigler (2013). Traumatic Brain Injury, Neuroimaging, and Neurodegeneration. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 16.0
    Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1) the (...)
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  21. E. L. Borgelt, D. Z. Buchman & J. Illes (2011). Neuroimaging in Mental Health Care: Voices in Translation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:293-293.score: 16.0
    Images of brain function, popularly called “neuroimages,” have become a mainstay of contemporary communication about neuroscience and mental health. Paralleling media coverage of neuroimaging research and the high visibility of clinics selling scans is pressure from sponsors to move basic research about brain function along the translational pathway. Indeed, neuroimaging benefit mental health care with early or tailored intervention, opportunities for education and planning, and access to resources afforded by objectification of disorder. However, risks of premature technology transfer, such as (...)
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  22. Adrianne G. Huxtable Dave J. Hayes (2012). Interpreting Deactivations in Neuroimaging. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 16.0
    Interpreting Deactivations in Neuroimaging.
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  23. Elizabeth B. Isaacs (2013). Neuroimaging, a New Tool for Investigating the Effects of Early Diet on Cognitive and Brain Development. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 16.0
    Nutrition is crucial to the initial development of the central nervous system, and then to its maintenance, because both depend on dietary intake to supply the elements required to develop and fuel the system. Diet in early life is often seen in the context of “programming” where a stimulus occurring during a vulnerable period can have long-lasting or even lifetime effects on some aspect of the organism’s structure or function. Nutrition was first shown to be a programing stimulus for growth, (...)
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  24. Walter Glannon (2005). Neurobiology, Neuroimaging, and Free Will. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):68-82.score: 14.0
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  25. Nicholas D. Schiff (2006). Multimodal Neuroimaging Approaches to Disorders of Consciousness. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 21 (5):388-397.score: 14.0
  26. Geraint Rees (2001). Neuroimaging of Visual Awareness in Patients and Normal Subjects. Current Opinion in Neurobiology 11 (2):150-156.score: 14.0
  27. Erin D. Bigler & Elisabeth A. Wilde (2010). Quantitative Neuroimaging and the Prediction of Rehabilitation Outcome Following Traumatic Brain Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 14.0
  28. Raja Parasuraman & Scott Galster (2013). Sensing, Assessing, and Augmenting Threat Detection: Behavioral, Neuroimaging, and Brain Stimulation Evidence for the Critical Role of Attention. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 14.0
  29. H. Shitara, T. Shinozaki, K. Takagishi, M. Honda & T. Hanakawa (2013). Movement and Afferent Representations in Human Motor Areas: A Simultaneous Neuroimaging and Transcranial Magnetic/Peripheral Nerve-Stimulation Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 14.0
  30. Jonathan K. Wynn & Michael F. Green (2006). Backward Masking in Schizophrenia: Neuropsychological, Electrophysiological, and Functional Neuroimaging Findings. In Gmen, Haluk; Breitmeyer, Bruno G. (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. (Pp. 171-184). Cambridge, Ma, Us: Mit Press. Xi, 410 Pp.score: 14.0
  31. Colin Klein (2010). Philosophical Issues in Neuroimaging. Philosophy Compass 5 (2):186-198.score: 12.0
    Functional neuroimaging (NI) technologies like Positron Emission Tomography and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) have revolutionized neuroscience, and provide crucial tools to link cognitive psychology and traditional neuroscientific models. A growing discipline of 'neurophilosophy' brings fMRI evidence to bear on traditional philosophical issues such as weakness of will, moral psychology, rational choice, social interaction, free will, and consciousness. NI has also attracted critical attention from psychologists and from philosophers of science. I review debates over the evidential status of fMRI, including (...)
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  32. Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy (2008). Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):3 – 12.score: 12.0
    The application of neuroimaging technology to the study of the injured brain has transformed how neuroscientists understand disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states, and deepened our understanding of mechanisms of recovery. This scientific progress, and its potential clinical translation, provides an opportunity for ethical reflection. It was against this scientific backdrop that we convened a conference of leading investigators in neuroimaging, disorders of consciousness and neuroethics. Our goal was to develop an ethical frame to move (...)
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  33. Joseph J. Fins (2008). Neuroethics and Neuroimaging: Moving Toward Transparency. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):46 – 52.score: 12.0
    Without exaggeration, it could be said that we are entering a golden age of neuroscience. Informed by recent developments in neuroimaging that allow us to peer into the working brain at both a structural and functional level, neuroscientists are beginning to untangle mechanisms of recovery after brain injury and grapple with age-old questions about brain and mind and their correlates neural mechanisms and consciousness. Neuroimaging, coupled with new diagnostic categories and assessment scales are helping us develop a new diagnostic nosology (...)
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  34. Thierry Chaminade & Jean Decety (2001). A Common Framework for Perception and Action: Neuroimaging Evidence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):879-882.score: 12.0
    In recent years, neurophysiological evidence has accumulated in favor of a common coding between perception and execution of action. We review findings from recent neuroimaging experiments in the action domain with three complementary perspectives: perception of action, covert action triggered by perception, and reproduction of perceived action (imitation). All studies point to the parietal cortex as a key region for body movement representation, both observed and performed.
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  35. Daniel V. Meegan (2008). Neuroimaging Techniques for Memory Detection: Scientific, Ethical, and Legal Issues. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):9 – 20.score: 12.0
    There is considerable interest in the use of neuroimaging techniques for forensic purposes. Memory detection techniques, including the well-publicized Brain Fingerprinting technique (Brain Fingerprinting Laboratories, Inc., Seattle WA), exploit the fact that the brain responds differently to sensory stimuli to which it has been exposed before. When a stimulus is specifically associated with a crime, the resulting brain activity should differentiate between someone who was present at the crime and someone who was not. This article reviews the scientific literature on (...)
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  36. Danielle C. Turner & Barbara J. Sahakian (2006). Ethical Questions in Functional Neuroimaging and Cognitive Enhancement. Poiesis and Praxis 4 (2):81-94.score: 12.0
    The new field of neuroethics has recently emerged following unprecedented developments in the neurosciences. Neuroimaging and cognitive enhancement in particular are demanding ethical debate. For example, neuroscientists are able to measure, with increasing accuracy, intimate personal biases and thoughts as they occur in the brain. Smart drugs are now available that can effectively and safely enhance mental functioning in both healthy and clinical populations. This article describes the scientific principles behind these technologies, and urges the development of ethical principles based (...)
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  37. Christian G. Huber (2009). Interdependence of Theoretical Concepts and Neuroimaging Data. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (3-4):203-217.score: 12.0
    Traditionally, discussion about neuroimaging focuses on methodological improvement and neurobiological findings. In current psychiatric neuroimaging, the research focus broadens and includes concepts such as the self, personality, well-being, and psychiatric disease. This calls for the inclusion of disciplines like psychology and philosophy in a dialogue with neuroscience. Furthermore, it raises the question of how theories from these areas relate to neuroimaging findings: are results generated by objective data independent of theories? Is there an epistemological priority for the theories used for (...)
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  38. Rex E. Jung & Richard J. Haier (2007). The Parieto-Frontal Integration Theory (P-FIT) of Intelligence: Converging Neuroimaging Evidence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):135-154.score: 12.0
    Here we review 37 modern neuroimaging studies in an attempt to address this question posed by Halstead (1947) as he and other icons of the last century endeavored to understand how brain and behavior are linked through the expression of intelligence and reason. Reviewing studies from functional (i.e., functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography) and structural (i.e., magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, voxel-based morphometry) neuroimaging paradigms, we report a striking consensus suggesting that variations in a distributed network predict (...)
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  39. Lisa J. Burklund & Matthew D. Lieberman (2012). Advances in Functional Neuroimaging of Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (4):333-337.score: 12.0
    In their paper "Conceptual Challenges in the Neuroimaging of Psychiatric Disorders," Kanaan and McGuire (2011) review a number of methodological and analytical obstacles associated with the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study psychiatric disorders. Although we agree that there are challenges and limitations to this end, it would be a shame for those without a background in neuroimaging to walk away from this article with the impression that such work is too daunting, and thus not worth pursuing. (...)
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  40. Carl E. Fisher & Paul S. Appelbaum (2010). Diagnosing Consciousness: Neuroimaging, Law, and the Vegetative State. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):374-385.score: 12.0
    In this paper, we review recent neuroimaging investigations of disorders of consciousness and different disciplines' understanding of consciousness itself. We consider potential tests of consciousness, their legal significance, and how they map onto broader themes in U.S. statutory law pertaining to advance directives and surrogate decision-making. In the process, we outline a taxonomy of themes to illustrate and clarify the variance in state-law definitions of consciousness. Finally, we discuss broader scientific, ethical, and legal issues associated with the advent of neuroimaging (...)
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  41. Gardar Árnason (2010). Neuroimaging, Uncertainty, and the Problem of Dispositions. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (02):188-.score: 12.0
    Brain research in neuroscience and related fields is changing our understanding of the brain and its relation to the mind and to human behavior, giving a new impetus to the problem of free will and moral responsibility. The reactions have covered the entire range, from claims to the effect that neuroscientific research is showing that our folkrnason, Ph.D., is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Department of Social and Moral Philosophy, University of Helsinki, Finland. His research interests include bioethics, neuroethics, and (...)
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  42. Stacey A. Tovino (2007). Functional Neuroimaging and the Law: Trends and Directions for Future Scholarship. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):44 – 56.score: 12.0
    Under the umbrella of the burgeoning neurotransdisciplines, scholars are using the principles and research methodologies of their primary and secondary fields to examine developments in neuroimaging, neuromodulation and psychopharmacology. The path for advanced scholarship at the intersection of law and neuroscience may clear if work across the disciplines is collected and reviewed and outstanding and debated issues are identified and clarified. In this article, I organize, examine and refine a narrow class of the burgeoning neurotransdiscipline scholarship; that is, scholarship at (...)
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  43. Cordelia Fine (2013). Is There Neurosexism in Functional Neuroimaging Investigations of Sex Differences? Neuroethics 6 (2):369-409.score: 12.0
    The neuroscientific investigation of sex differences has an unsavoury past, in which scientific claims reinforced and legitimated gender roles in ways that were not scientifically justified. Feminist critics have recently argued that the current use of functional neuroimaging technology in sex differences research largely follows that tradition. These charges of ‘neurosexism’ have been countered with arguments that the research being done is informative and valuable and that an over-emphasis on the perils, rather than the promise, of such research threatens to (...)
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  44. Bart Rypma & John D. E. Gabrieli (2001). Functional Neuroimaging of Short-Term Memory: The Neural Mechanisms of Mental Storage. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):143-144.score: 12.0
    Cowan argues that the true short-term memory (STM) capacity limit is about 4 items. Functional neuroimaging data converge with this conclusion, indicating distinct neural activity patterns depending on whether or not memory task-demands exceed this limit. STM for verbal information within that capacity invokes focal prefrontal cortical activation that increases with memory load. STM for verbal information exceeding that capacity invokes widespread prefrontal activation in regions associated with executive and attentional processes that may mediate chunking processes to accommodate STM capacity (...)
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  45. Arlette Streri & Coralie Sann (2007). The Multiple Relations Between Vision and Touch: Neonatal Behavioral Evidence and Adult Neuroimaging Data. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):220-221.score: 12.0
    Neonatal behavioral data support the argument that multiple relations exist between vision and touch. Looking at an object triggers the motion of a neonate's arm and hand towards it. A textured surface that is seen can be recognized tactilely, but not a volumetric shaped object in cross-modal transfer tasks. These data are supported by adult neuroimaging data.
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  46. M. Emrah Aktunç (forthcoming). Tackling Duhemian Problems: An Alternative to Skepticism of Neuroimaging in Philosophy of Cognitive Science. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-16.score: 12.0
    Duhem’s problem arises especially in scientific contexts where the tools and procedures of measurement and analysis are numerous and complex. Several philosophers of cognitive science have cited its manifestations in fMRI as grounds for skepticism regarding the epistemic value of neuroimaging. To address these Duhemian arguments for skepticism, I offer an alternative approach based on Deborah Mayo’s error-statistical account in which Duhem's problem is more fruitfully approached in terms of error probabilities. This is illustrated in examples such as the use (...)
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  47. Helmut Laufs Enzo Tagliazucchi, Marion Behrens (2013). Sleep Neuroimaging and Models of Consciousness. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 12.0
    Human deep sleep is characterized by reduced or absent sensory activity, responsiveness to stimuli and conscious awareness. Given its ubiquity and reversible nature, it represents an attractive paradigm to study the neural changes which accompany the loss of consciousness in humans. In particular, the deepest stages of sleep can serve as an empirical test for the predictions of theoretical models relating the phenomenology of consciousness with underlying neural activity. A relatively recent shift of attention from the analysis of evoked responses (...)
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  48. David Jean Acunzo, Renaud Evrard & Thomas Rabeyron (2013). Anomalous Experiences, Psi and Functional Neuroimaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:893.score: 12.0
    Anomalous experiences, psi and functional neuroimaging.
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  49. Rhoshel Krystyna Lenroot & Pui Ka Yeung (2013). Heterogeneity Within Autism Spectrum Disorders: What Have We Learned From Neuroimaging Studies? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 12.0
    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) display significant heterogeneity. Although most neuroimaging studies in ASD have been designed to identify commonalities among affected individuals, rather than differences, some studies have explored variation within ASD. There have been two general types of approaches used for this in the neuroimaging literature to date: comparison of subgroups within ASD, and analyses using dimensional measures to link clinical variation to brain differences. This review focuses on structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that have used these (...)
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  50. Stephan Hamann (2012). What Can Neuroimaging Meta-Analyses Really Tell Us About the Nature of Emotion? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):150-152.score: 12.0
    In Vytal and Hamann (2010) we reported a neuroimaging meta-analysis that found that basic emotions can be distinguished by their brain activation correlates, in marked contrast to Lindquist et al.'s conclusions in the target article. Here, I discuss implications of these findings for understanding emotion, outline limitations of using meta-analyses and neuroimaging as the sole basis for deciding between emotion views, and suggest that these views are essentially compatible and could be adapted and combined into an integrated emotion framework.
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