Search results for '*Neuropsychology' (try it on Scholar)

492 found
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  1.  47
    C. Glymour (1994). On the Methods of Cognitive Neuropsychology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (3):815-35.
    Contemporary cognitive neuropsychology attempts to infer unobserved features of normal human cognition, or ?cognitive architecture?, from experiments with normals and with brain-damaged subjects in whom certain normal cognitive capacities are altered, diminished, or absent. Fundamental methodological issues about the enterprise of cognitive neuropsychology concern the characterization of methods by which features of normal cognitive architecture can be identified from such data, the assumptions upon which the reliability of such methods are premised, and the limits of such methods?even granting their assumptions?in (...)
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  2.  15
    Andrew B. Newberg & Eugene G. D'Aquili (2000). The Neuropsychology of Religious and Spiritual Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):251-266.
    This paper considers the neuropsychology of religious and spiritual experiences. This requires a review of our current understanding of brain function as well as an integrated synthesis to derive a neuropsychological model of spiritual experiences. Religious and spiritual experiences are highly complex states that likely involve many brain structures including those involved in higher order processing of sensory and cognitive input as well as those involved in the elaboration of emotions and autonomic responses. Such an analysis can help elucidate the (...)
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  3.  25
    Jeffrey Bub (1994). Is Cognitive Neuropsychology Possible? Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 1:417-427.
    The aim of cognitive neuropsychology is to articulate the functional architecture underlying normal cognition, on the basis of cognitive performance data involving brain-damaged subjects. Glymour (forthcoming) formulates a discovery problem for cognitive neuropsychology, in the sense of formal learning theory, concerning the existence of a reliable methodology, and argues that the problem is insoluble: granted certain apparently plausible assumptions about the form of neuropsychological theories and the nature of the available evidence, a reliable methodology does not exist! I argue for (...)
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  4.  7
    Tim Shallice (1991). Précis of From Neuropsychology to Mental Structure. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):429-438.
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  5.  8
    Karalyn Patterson & David C. Plaut (2009). “Shallow Draughts Intoxicate the Brain”: Lessons From Cognitive Science for Cognitive Neuropsychology. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (1):39-58.
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  6.  8
    Max Coltheart (2010). Lessons From Cognitive Neuropsychology for Cognitive Science: A Reply to Patterson and Plaut (2009). Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (1):3-11.
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  7.  86
    Victoria McGeer (2007). Why Neuroscience Matters to Cognitive Neuropsychology. Synthese 159 (3):347 - 371.
    The broad issue in this paper is the relationship between cognitive psychology and neuroscience. That issue arises particularly sharply for cognitive neurospsychology, some of whose practitioners claim a methodological autonomy for their discipline. They hold that behavioural data from neuropsychological impairments are sufficient to justify assumptions about the underlying modular structure of human cognitive architecture, as well as to make inferences about its various components. But this claim to methodological autonomy can be challenged on both philosophical and empirical grounds. A (...)
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  8.  74
    Tony Stone & Martin Davies (1993). Cognitive Neuropsychology and the Philosophy of Mind. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (4):589-622.
  9.  5
    Lee Xenakis Blonder (1991). Human Neuropsychology and the Concept of Culture. Human Nature 2 (2):83-116.
    American anthropology is distinguished by a four-fields approach in which biological, cultural, archaeological, and linguistic dimensions of behavior are examined in evolutionary and cross-cultural perspective. Nevertheless, assumptions of mind-body dualism pervade scholarly thinking in anthropology and have prevented the development of a truly integrated science of human experience. This dualism is most exemplified by the lack of consideration of the role of the brain in both “physical” and “mental” processes, including phenomena labeled as cultural. In this paper, I review (...)
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  10.  10
    David C. Plaut & Karalyn Patterson (2010). Beyond Functional Architecture in Cognitive Neuropsychology: A Reply to Coltheart (2010). Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (1):12-14.
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  11.  30
    Glyn W. Humphreys (2003). Conscious Visual Representations Built From Multiple Binding Processes: Evidence From Neuropsychology. In Axel Cleeremans (ed.), The Unity of Consciousness. Oxford University Press
  12.  6
    Louise Bøttcher (2010). An Eye for Possibilities in the Development of Children with Cerebral Palsy: Neurobiology and Neuropsychology in a Cultural-Historical Dynamic Understanding. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 12 (1):3-23.
    Taking children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) as an example, the article seeks an understanding of children with disabilities that connects neuropsychological theories of neural development with the situated cognition perspective and the child as an active participant in its social practices. The early brain lesion of CP is reconceptualised as a neurobiological constraint that exists in the relations between the neural, cognitive and social levels. Through a multi-method study of two children with CP, it is analysed how neurobiological constraints arise, (...)
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  13.  14
    Laurence F. Mucciolo (1974). The Identity Thesis and Neuropsychology. Noûs 8 (November):327-42.
  14.  5
    Jeffrey A. Gray (1982). Précis of The Neuropsychology of Anxiety: An Enquiry Into the Functions of the Septo-Hippocampal System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):469.
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  15.  74
    Martin Davies (2010). Double Dissociation: Understanding its Role in Cognitive Neuropsychology. Mind and Language 25 (5):500-540.
    The paper makes three points about the role of double dissociation in cognitive neuropsychology. First, arguments from double dissociation to separate modules work by inference to the best, not the only possible, explanation. Second, in the development of computational cognitive neuropsychology, the contribution of connectionist cognitive science has been to broaden the range of potential explanations of double dissociation. As a result, the competition between explanations, and the characteristic features of the assessment of theories against the criteria of probability and (...)
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  16.  61
    Matthew Ratcliffe (2002). Heidegger's Attunement and the Neuropsychology of Emotion. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):287-312.
    I outline the early Heidegger's views on mood and emotion, and then relate his central claims to some recent finding in neuropsychology. These findings complement Heidegger in a number of important ways. More specifically, I suggest that, in order to make sense of certain neurological conditions that traditional assumptions concerning the mind are constitutionally incapable of accommodating, something very like Heidegger's account of mood and emotion needs to be adopted as an interpretive framework. I conclude by supporting Heidegger's insistence that (...)
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  17.  22
    C. Glymour & C. Hanson (forthcoming). Reverse Inference in Neuropsychology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axv019.
    Reverse inference in cognitive neuropsychology has been characterized as inference to ‘psychological processes’ from ‘patterns of activation’ revealed by functional magnetic resonance or other scanning techniques. Several arguments have been provided against the possibility. Focusing on Machery’s presentation, we attempt to clarify the issues, rebut the impossibility arguments, and propose and illustrate a strategy for reverse inference. 1 The Problem of Reverse Inference in Cognitive Neuropsychology2 The Arguments2.1 The anti-Bayesian argument3 Patterns of Activation4 Reverse Inference Practiced5 Seek and Ye Shall (...)
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  18.  22
    Uljana Feest (2010). Concepts as Tools in the Experimental Generation of Knowledge in Cognitive Neuropsychology. Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):173-190.
    This paper asks (a) how new scientific objects of research are onceptualized at a point in time when little is known about them, and (b) how those conceptualizations, in turn, figure in the process of investigating the phenomena in question. Contrasting my approach with existing notions of concepts and situating it in relation to existing discussions about the epistemology of experimentation, I propose to think of concepts as research tools. I elaborate on the conception of a tool that informs my (...)
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  19.  37
    Daniel L. Schacter (1990). Toward a Cognitive Neuropsychology of Awareness: Implicit Knowledge and Anosognosia. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 12:155-78.
  20.  81
    Max Coltheart & Martin Davies (2003). Inference and Explanation in Cognitive Neuropsychology. Cortex 39 (1):188-191.
    The question posed by Dunn and Kirsner (D&K) is an instance of a more general one: What can we infer from data? One answer, if we are talking about logically valid deductive inference, is that we cannot infer theories from data. A theory is supposed to explain the data and so cannot be a mere summary of the data to be explained. The truth of an explanatory theory goes beyond the data and so is never logically guaranteed by the data. (...)
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  21.  52
    Gordon G. Gallup & Steven M. Platek (2001). Cognitive Empathy Presupposes Self-Awareness: Evidence From Phylogeny, Ontogeny, Neuropsychology, and Mental Illness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):36-37.
    We argue that cognitive empathy and other instances of mental state attribution are a byproduct of self-awareness. Evidence is brought to bear on this proposition from comparative psychology, early child development, neuropsychology, and abnormal behavior.
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  22.  42
    Roman Frigg & Catherine Howard, Fact and Fiction in the Neuropsychology of Art.
    The time honoured philosophical issue of how to resolve the mind/body problem has taken a more scientific turn of late. Instead of discussing issues of the soul and emotion and person and their reduction to a physical form, we now ask ourselves how well-understood cognitive and social concepts fit into the growing and changing field of neuropsychology. One of the many projects that have come out of this new scientific endeavour is Zaidel’s (2005) inquiry into the neuropsychological bases of art.
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  23. Martin Davies, Inference and Explanation in Cognitive Neuropsychology.
    The question posed by Dunn and Kirsner (D&K) is an instance of a more general one: What can we infer from data? One answer, if we are talking about logically valid deductive inference, is that we cannot infer theories from data. A theory is supposed to explain the data and so cannot be a mere summary of the data to be explained. The truth of an explanatory theory goes beyond the data and so is never logically guaranteed by the data. (...)
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  24.  30
    Hank Davis (2001). Too Early for a Neuropsychology of Empathy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):32-33.
    To date, a wide range of interdisciplinary scholarship has done little to clarify either the why or the how of empathy. Preston & de Waal attempt to remedy this, although it remains unclear whether empathy consists of two discrete processes, or whether a perceptual and motor component are joined in some sort of behavioral inevitability. Although it is appealing to offer a neuroanatomy of empathy, the present level of neuropsychology may not support such reductionism.
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  25. R. Buck (1993). What is This Thing Called Subjective Experience? Reflections on the Neuropsychology of Qualia. Neuropsychology 7:490-99.
  26. J. P. Toth, S. Lindsay, L. L. Jacoby, L. R. Squire & N. Butters (1992). The Neuropsychology of Memory. In L. R. Squire & N. Butters (eds.), Neuropsychology of Memory. Guilford Press
     
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  27.  7
    Grant R. Gillett (1990). Neuropsychology and Meaning in Psychiatry. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (1):21-39.
    The relationship between "causal" and "meaningful" (Jaspers) influences on behavior is explored. The nature of meaning essentially involves rules and the human practices in which they are imparted to a person and have a formative influence on that person's thinking. The meanings that come to be discerned in life experience are then important in influencing the shape of that person's conduct. The reasoning and motivational structures that develop on this basis are realized by the shape of the neural processing networks (...)
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  28. Joan C. Borod (ed.) (2000). The Neuropsychology of Emotion. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This volume represents a comprehensive overview of the neuropsychology of emotion and the neural mechanisms underlying emotional processing. It draws on recent studies utilizing behavioral paradigms with normal subjects, the brain lesion approach, clinical evaluations of patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders, and neuroimaging techniques. The book opens with an introduction summarizing each chapter and pointing to directions for future research. The first section is on history, the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of emotion, and techniques that have been widely used to (...)
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  29. A. David Milner & M. D. Rugg (eds.) (1991). The Neuropsychology of Consciousness. Academic Press.
  30.  9
    Lawrence Weiskrantz (1988). Some Contributions of Neuropsychology of Vision and Memory to the Problem of Consciousness. In Anthony J. Marcel & E. Bisiach (eds.), Consciousness in Contemporary Science. Oxford University Press
  31.  33
    Ran Lahav (1993). What Neuropsychology Tells Us About Consciousness. Philosophy of Science 60 (1):67-85.
    I argue that, contrary to some critics, the notion of conscious experience is a good candidate for denoting a distinct and scientifically interesting phenomenon in the brain. I base this claim mainly on an analysis of neuropsychological data concerning deficits resulting from various types of brain damage as well as some additional supporting empirical evidence. These data strongly point to the hypothesis that conscious experience expresses information that is available for global, integrated, and flexible behavior.
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  32. Jason W. Brown (1977). Mind, Brain, and Consciousness the Neuropsychology of Cognition.
     
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  33.  65
    Robyn Langdon & Max Coltheart (2000). The Cognitive Neuropsychology of Delusions. Mind and Language 15 (1):183-216.
  34.  3
    Glyn W. Humphreys & M. Jane Riddoch (1993). Interactions Between Object and Space Systems Revealed Through Neuropsychology. In David E. Meyer & Sylvan Kornblum (eds.), Attention and Performance Xiv. The MIT Press 143--162.
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  35.  1
    Jeffrey A. Gray & Ilan Baruch (1987). Don't Leave the “Psych” Out of Neuropsychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):215.
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  36.  5
    Jennifer S. Beer, Michael V. Lombardo & J. J. Gross (2007). Insights Into Emotion Regulation From Neuropsychology. In James J. Gross (ed.), Handbook of Emotion Regulation. Guilford Press 69--86.
  37.  12
    William Badecker & Alfonso Caramazza (1985). On Considerations of Method and Theory Governing the Use of Clinical Categories in Neurolinguistics and Cognitive Neuropsychology: The Case Against Agrammatism. Cognition 20 (2):97-125.
  38.  56
    Martha J. Farah (1988). Is Visual Imagery Really Visual: Some Overlooked Evidence From Neuropsychology. Psychological Review 95:307-17.
  39.  5
    Elizabeth Schechter (2015). The Subject in Neuropsychology: Individuating Minds in the Split‐Brain Case. Mind and Language 30 (5):501-525.
    Many experimental findings with split-brain subjects intuitively suggest that each such subject has two minds. The conceptual and empirical basis of this duality intuition has never been fully articulated. This article fills that gap, by offering a reconstruction of early neuropsychological literature on the split-brain phenomenon. According to that work, the hemispheres operate independently of each other insofar as they interact via the mediation of effection and transduction—via behavior and sensation, essentially. This is how your mind and my mind interact (...)
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  40.  2
    Egon Weigl & Manfred Bierwisch (1970). Neuropsychology and Linguistics: Topics of Common Research. Foundations of Language 6 (1):1-18.
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  41.  7
    J. A. Gray, J. Feldon, J. N. P. Rawlins, D. R. Hemsley & A. D. Smith (1991). The Neuropsychology of Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (1):1-20.
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  42.  10
    Richard Davidson (1992). Prolegomenon to the Structure of Emotion: Gleanings From Neuropsychology. Cognition and Emotion 6 (3):245-268.
  43.  2
    Michele Miozzo (2003). On the Processing of Regular and Irregular Forms of Verbs and Nouns: Evidence From Neuropsychology. Cognition 87 (2):101-127.
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  44.  10
    Andrew W. Young (2000). Wondrous Strange: The Neuropsychology of Abnormal Beliefs. Mind and Language 15 (1):47–73.
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  45.  39
    Edouard Machery (2012). Dissociations in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Neuroscience. Philosophy of Science 79 (4):490-518.
  46.  78
    Richard Cytowic (1995). Synesthesia: Phenomenology and Neuropsychology. Psyche 2 (10).
  47.  5
    Stanley B. Klein, Judith Loftus & John F. Kihlstrom (1996). Self-Knowledge of an Amnesic Patient: Toward a Neuropsychology of Personality and Social Psychology. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 125 (3):250.
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  48.  87
    Carlo Semenza (2009). The Neuropsychology of Proper Names. Mind and Language 24 (4):347-369.
    The difference between common and proper names seems to derive from specific semantic characteristics of proper names. In particular, proper names refer to specific individual entities or events, and unlike common names, rarely map onto more general semantic characteristics (attributes, concepts, categories). This fact makes the link proper names have with their reference particularly fragile. Processing proper names seems, as a consequence, to require special cognitive and neural resources. Neuropsychological findings show that proper names and common names follow functionally distinct (...)
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  49.  2
    W. Gerrod Parrott & Jay Schulkin (1993). Neuropsychology and the Cognitive Nature of the Emotions. Cognition and Emotion 7 (1):43-59.
  50.  1
    Max Coltheart (2002). Cognitive Neuropsychology. In J. Wixted & H. Pashler (eds.), Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology. Wiley
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