Search results for '*Neurosciences' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.) (2001). Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader. Blackwell.score: 12.0
    2. Daugman, J. G. Brain metaphor and brain theory 3. Mundale, J. Neuroanatomical Foundations of Cognition: Connecting the Neuronal Level with the Study of Higher Brain Areas.
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  2. Fenna van Nes (2011). Mathematics Education and Neurosciences: Towards Interdisciplinary Insights Into the Development of Young Children's Mathematical Abilities. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):75-80.score: 12.0
    The Mathematics Education and Neurosciences project is an interdisciplinary research program that bridges mathematics education research with neuroscientific research. The bidirectional collaboration will provide greater insight into young children's (aged four to six years) mathematical abilities. Specifically, by combining qualitative ‘design research’ with quantitative ‘experimental research’, we aim to come to a more thorough understanding of prerequisites that are involved in the development of early spatial and number sense. The mathematics education researchers are concerned with kindergartner's spatial structuring ability, while (...)
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  3. Tamara Fischmann, Michael O. Russ & Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber (2013). Trauma, Dream and Psychic Change in Psychoanalyses: A Dialogue Between Psychoanalysis and the Neurosciences. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:877.score: 12.0
    How can a fruitful dialogue with neuroscientists add knowledge to the unconscious – the specific research object of psychoanalysis? Apparently a growing number of worldwide research groups have begun to realize that the neurosciences and psychoanalysis can benefit from each other in interesting ways. Sometimes empirical studies evoke challenging research questions for both research fields. In the on-going LAC-Depressionstudy, for example, one interesting and unexpected finding for both research fields is that a large majority of chronically depressed in long-term psychoanalytic (...)
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  4. Tilo Kircher & Anthony S. David (2003). Self-Consciousness: An Integrative Approach From Philosophy, Psychopathology and the Neurosciences. In Tilo Kircher & Anthony S. David (eds.), The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press. 445-473.score: 10.0
  5. Christian Poirel (2008). La Neurophilosophie Et la Question de L'Être: Les Neurosciences Et le Déclin Métaphysique de la Pensée. Harmattan.score: 10.0
    Situé à la croisée des sciences humaines et de la recherche neurobiologique, cet essai entend dépasser les clivages conceptuels.
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  6. William Bechtel, Pete Mandik & Jennifer Mundale (2001). Philosophy Meets the Neurosciences. In William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.), Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader. Blackwell.score: 8.0
  7. Arthur J. Dyck & Carlos Padilla (2009). The Empathic Emotions and Self-Love in Bishop Joseph Butler and the Neurosciences. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):577-612.score: 8.0
    In Joseph Butler, we have an account of human beings as moral beings that is, as this essay demonstrates, being supported by the recently emerging findings of the neurosciences. This applies particularly to Butler's portrayal of our empathic emotions. Butler discovered their moral significance for motivating and guiding moral decisions and actions before the neurosciences did. Butler has, in essence, added a sixth sense to our five senses: this is the moral sense by means of which we perceive what we (...)
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  8. Sabine Müller & Henrik Walter (2010). Reviewing Autonomy: Implications of the Neurosciences and the Free Will Debate for the Principle of Respect for the Patient's Autonomy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (02):205-.score: 8.0
    Beauchamp and Childress have performed a great service by strengthening the principle of respect for the patient's autonomy against the paternalism that dominated medicine until at least the 1970s. Nevertheless, we think that the concept of autonomy should be elaborated further. We suggest such an elaboration built on recent developments within the neurosciences and the free will debate. The reason for this suggestion is at least twofold: First, Beauchamp and Childress neglect some important elements of autonomy. Second, neuroscience itself needs (...)
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  9. Stephan Hartmann (2001). Mechanisms, Coherence, and Theory Choice in the Cognitive Neurosciences. In Peter McLaughlin, Peter Machamer & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. Pittsburgh University Press.score: 8.0
    Let me first state that I like Antti Revonsuo’s discussion of the various methodological and interpretational problems in neuroscience. It shows how careful and methodologically reflected scientists have to proceed in this fascinating field of research. I have nothing to add here. Furthermore, I am very sympathetic towards Revonsuo’s general proposal to call for a Philosophy of Neuroscience that stresses foundational issues, but also focuses on methodological and explanatory strategies. In a footnote of his paper, Revonsuo complains – as many (...)
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  10. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (2004). The Cognitive Neurosciences III. MIT Press.score: 8.0
  11. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (1995). The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.score: 8.0
  12. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (2000). The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. MIT Press.score: 8.0
    The majority of the chapters in this edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences are new, and those from the first edition have been completely rewritten and updated ...
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  13. Jürgen Zielasek & Wolfgang Gaebel (2008). Modularity in Philosophy, the Neurosciences, and Psychiatry. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):93-108.score: 8.0
    The neurosciences are generating new findings regarding genetic and neurobiological aspects of the pathophysiology of mental disorders. Especially, certain genetic risk factors like neuregulin-1 seem to predispose individuals to a psychotic phenotype beyond the limits of traditional classificatory boundaries between organic psychoses in Alzheimer’s disease, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia. Little, however, is known about how such genetic risk factors actually confer an increased risk for psychosis in an individual patient. A gap between neuroscientific findings and psychopathological phenomena exists. The (...)
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  14. Felix Thiele & Barbara Hawellek (2008). The Impact of Current Developments in the Neurosciences on the Concept of Psychiatric Diseases. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):1-2.score: 8.0
    The impact of current developments in the neurosciences on the concept of psychiatric diseases Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10202-008-0054-2 Authors Felix Thiele, Europäische Akademie zur Erforschung von Folgen wissenschaftlich-technischer Entwicklungen Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler GmbH Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler Germany Barbara Hawellek, Universität Bonn Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie Bonn Germany Journal Poiesis & Praxis: International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science Online ISSN 1615-6617 Print ISSN 1615-6609 Journal Volume Volume 6 Journal Issue Volume 6, Numbers 1-2.
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  15. Antti Revonsuo (2001). On the Nature of Explanation in the Neurosciences. In Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Wpress. 45--69.score: 8.0
  16. Emily Bell (forthcoming). A Room with a View of Integrity and Professionalism: Personal Reflections on Teaching Responsible Conduct of Research in the Neurosciences. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-9.score: 8.0
    Neuroscientists are increasingly put into situations which demand critical reflection about the ethical and appropriate use of research tools and scientific knowledge. Students or trainees also have to know how to navigate the ethical domains of this context. At a time when neuroscience is expected to advance policy and practice outcomes, in the face of academic pressures and complex environments, the importance of scientific integrity comes into focus and with it the need for training at the graduate level in the (...)
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  17. Grigoris Vaslamatzis (2007). Framework for a New Dialogue Between Psychoanalysis and Neurosciences: Is the Combined Neuro-Psychoanalytic Approach the Missing Link? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):25-.score: 8.0
    Freud's legacy deriving from his work The project for a scientific psychology (1895) could give a new impetus to the dialogue between psychoanalysis and neurosciences. A rapproachment phase is warrented. Based on the work of psychoanalysts who are themselves neuroscientists (such as Mauro Mancia, Martha Koukkou and Harold Shevrin) or have a long term dialogue with neuroscientists (Arnold Modell), three points of epistemological congruence are described: dualism is no longer a satisfactory solutioncautions for the centrality of interpretation (hermeneutics)the self-criticism of (...)
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  18. Alfredo Pereira Jr (2007). What The Cognitive Neurosciences Mean To Me. Mens Sana Monographs 5 (1):158.score: 8.0
    _Cognitive Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary area of research that combines measurement of brain activity (mostly by means of neuroimaging) with a simultaneous performance of cognitive tasks by human subjects. These investigations have been successful in the task of connecting the sciences of the brain (Neurosciences) and the sciences of the mind (Cognitive Sciences). Advances on this kind of research provide a map of localization of cognitive functions in the human brain. Do these results help us to understand how mind relates (...)
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  19. W. Bechtel (2008). L'épistémologie des données en neurosciences cognitives. In Pierre Poirier & Luc Faucher (eds.), Des Neurones a la Philosophie: Neurophilosophie Et Philosophie des Neurosciences. Éditions Syllepse. 91--118.score: 8.0
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  20. H. Cruse (2001). The Explanatory Power and Limits of Simulation Models in the Neurosciences. In Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Press. 138--154.score: 8.0
  21. Ilya B. Farber & Patricia S. Churchland (1995). Consciousness and the Neurosciences: Philosophical and Theoretical Issues. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. Mit Press.score: 8.0
  22. G. M. Shepherd (1995). The Cognitive Neurosciences. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. Mit Press. 105--102.score: 8.0
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  23. E. Tulving & Dans Ms Gazzaniga (1995). The Cognitive Neurosciences. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. Mit Press.score: 8.0
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  24. David J. Chalmers (2004). How Can We Construct a Science of Consciousness? In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. Mit Press. 1111--1119.score: 6.0
    In recent years there has been an explosion of scientific work on consciousness in cognitive neuroscience, psychology, and other fields. It has become possible to think that we are moving toward a genuine scientific understanding of conscious experience. But what is the science of consciousness all about, and what form should such a science take? This chapter gives an overview of the agenda.
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  25. T. T. J. Kircher & D. Leube (2003). Self-Consciousness, Self-Agency, and Schizophrenia. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):656-669.score: 6.0
    Empirical approaches on topics such as consciousness, self-awareness, or introspective perspective, need a conceptual framework so that the emerging, still unconnected findings can be integrated and put into perspective. We introduce a model of self-consciousness derived from phenomenology, philosophy, the cognitive, and neurosciences. We will then give an overview of research data on one particular aspect of our model, self-agency, trying to link findings from cognitive psychology and neuroscience. Finally, we will expand on pathological aspects of self-agency, and in particular (...)
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  26. Anthony P. Atkinson, Michael S. C. Thomas & Axel Cleeremans (2000). Consciousness: Mapping the Theoretical Landscape. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (10):372-382.score: 6.0
    What makes us conscious? Many theories that attempt to answer this question have appeared recently in the context of widespread interest about consciousness in the cognitive neurosciences. Most of these proposals are formulated in terms of the information processing conducted by the brain. In this overview, we survey and contrast these models. We first delineate several notions of consciousness, addressing what it is that the various models are attempting to explain. Next, we describe a conceptual landscape that addresses how the (...)
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  27. Don Gustafson (2007). Neurosciences of Action and Noncausal Theories. Philosophical Psychology 20 (3):367–374.score: 6.0
    Recent neuroscience and psychology of behavior have suggested that conscious decisions may have no causal role in the etiology of intentional action. Such results pose a threat to traditional philosophical analyses of action. On such views beliefs, desires and conscious willing are part of the causal structure of intentional action. But if the suggestions from neuroscience/psychology are correct, analyses of this kind are wrong. Conscious antecedents of action are epiphenomenal. This essay explores this consequence. It also notes that the traditional (...)
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  28. Louis C. Charland (2007). Affective Neuroscience and Addiction. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):20 – 21.score: 6.0
    The author comments on the article “The neurobiology of addiction: Implications for voluntary control of behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. Hyman suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The author states that brain and neurochemical systems are involved in addiction. He also suggests that neuroscience can link the diseased brain processes in addiction to the moral struggles of the addicts. Accession Number: 24077919; Authors: Charland, Louis C. 1; Email Address: charland@uwo.ca; Affiliations: 1: University of Western (...)
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  29. Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.) (2001). Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 6.0
  30. Lukas van Oudenhove & Stefaan E. Cuypers (2010). The Philosophical "Mind-Body Problem" and Its Relevance for the Relationship Between Psychiatry and the Neurosciences. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (4):545-557.score: 6.0
    Psychiatry is a discipline on the border between the biomedical sciences on the one hand and the humanities and social sciences (most notably psychology and anthropology) on the other. This unique position undoubtedly contributes to the attractiveness of psychiatry as a medical specialism for many young doctors, but it also causes significant problems. Unlike other medical disciplines, in which the definitions of diseases are based on objective, measurable pathophysiological underpinnings, psychiatric diagnosis and classification has been based on descriptions of inherently (...)
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  31. Maurice Kenneth Davy Schouten & Huibert Looren de Jong (eds.) (2007). The Matter of the Mind: Philosophical Essays on Psychology, Neuroscience, and Reduction. Blackwell Pub..score: 6.0
    The Matter of the Mind addresses and illuminates the relationship between psychology and neuroscience by focusing on the topic of reduction. Written by leading philosophers in the field Discusses recent theorizing in the mind-brain sciences and reviews and weighs the evidence in favour of reductionism against the backdrop of recent important advances within psychology and the neurosciences Collects the latest work on central topics where neuroscience is now making inroads in traditional psychological terrain, such as adaptive behaviour, reward systems, consciousness, (...)
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  32. Benoît Dubreuil (2010). Reviews: Explaining the Brain: Mechanisms and the Mosaic Unity of Neurosciences, by Carl F. Craver. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):471-474.score: 6.0
  33. Birgitta Dresp (1999). The Cognitive Impenetrability Hypothesis: Doomsday for the Unity of the Cognitive Neurosciences? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):375-376.score: 6.0
    The heuristic value of Pylyshyn's cognitive impenetrability theory is questioned in this commentary, mainly because, as it stands, the key argument cannot be challenged empirically. Pylyshyn requires unambiguous evidence for an effect of cognitive states on early perceptual mechanisms, which is impossible to provide because we can only infer what might happen at these earlier levels of processing on the basis of evidence collected at the post-perceptual stage. Furthermore, the theory that early visual processes cannot be modified by cognitive states (...)
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  34. A. M. Viens (2007). Addiction, Responsibility and Moral Psychology. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):17 – 19.score: 6.0
    The author comments on several articles on addiction. Recent developments in neuroscience suggest that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in the cognitive control of voluntary behavior. The author differs on the observations that addicts either act on desires that are not conducive to rational action. The author also states that addiction seems to be a prime manifestation of akrasia, in which one fails to be motivated to act in accordance with what one judges ought to be done. Accession Number: 24077920; (...)
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  35. James B. Ashbrook (1996). Interfacing Religion and the Neurosciences: A Review of Twenty-Five Years of Exploration and Reflection. [REVIEW] Zygon 31 (4):545-572.score: 6.0
  36. Bernard Feltz (2000). L'inné et l'acquis dans les neurosciences contemporaines. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 98 (4):711-731.score: 6.0
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  37. Benoît Dubreuil (2009). Des neurosciences à la philosophie. Neurophilosophie et philosophie des neurosciences Pierre Poirier et Luc Faucher, dir. Paris, Éditions Syllepse, 2008, 528 pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 48 (04):902-.score: 6.0
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  38. P. Janich (2003). Human Nature and Neurosciences: A Methodical Cultural Criticism of Naturalism in the Neurosciences. Poiesis and Praxis: International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science 2 (1):29-40.score: 6.0
  39. G. Sommerhoff & Karl F. MacDorman (1994). An Account of Consciousness in Physical and Functional Terms: A Target for Research in the Neurosciences. Integrative Physiological and Behavioral Science 29:151-81.score: 6.0
  40. Rick Grush (1997). Book Review:The Cognitive Neurosciences Michael S. Gazzaniga. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 64 (1):188-.score: 6.0
  41. Erin J. Wamsley (2013). Dreaming, Waking Conscious Experience, and the Resting Brain: Report of Subjective Experience as a Tool in the Cognitive Neurosciences. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 6.0
    Even when we are ostensibly doing “nothing” – as during states of rest, sleep, and reverie – the brain continues to process information. In resting wakefulness, the mind generates thoughts, plans for the future, and imagines fictitious scenarios. In sleep, when the demands of sensory input are reduced, our experience turns to the thoughts and images we call “dreaming”. Far from being a meaningless distraction, the content of these subjective experiences provides an important and unique source of information about the (...)
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  42. Carmelo Calì (2013). Gestalt Models for Data Decomposition and Functional Architecture in Visual Neuroscience. Gestalt Theory 35 (227-264).score: 6.0
    Attempts to introduce Gestalt theory into the realm of visual neuroscience are discussed on both theoretical and experimental grounds. To define the framework in which these proposals can be defended, this paper outlines the characteristics of a standard model, which qualifies as a received view in the visual neurosciences, and of the research into natural images statistics. The objections to the standard model and the main questions of the natural images research are presented. On these grounds, this paper defends the (...)
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  43. Warren T. Reich (2012). From Ancient Consolation and Negative Care to Modern Empathy and the Neurosciences. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):25-32.score: 6.0
    A historical understanding of the virtue of consolation, as contrasted to empathy, compassion, or sympathy, is developed. Recent findings from neuroscience are presented which support and affirm this understanding. These findings are related to palliative care and its current practice in bioethics.
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  44. Vincent Barras & Jean-Claude Dupont (2011). Neurosciences et médecine. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 2:325-329.score: 6.0
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  45. Michael Hagner & Cornelius Borck (2001). Mindful Practices: On the Neurosciences in the Twentieth Century. Science in Context 14 (4).score: 6.0
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  46. Éric Racine (2005). Pourquoi et comment doit-on tenir compte des neurosciences en éthique? Esquisse d'une approche neurophilosophique émergentiste et interdisciplinaire. Laval Théologique Et Philosophique 61 (1):77-105.score: 6.0
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  47. Bernard Baertschi (2011). Neurosciences et responsabilité morale: Un argument en faveur du compatibilisme. Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 143 (3):257-272.score: 6.0
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  48. James Elwick (2007). Styles of Reasoning in Early to Mid-Victorian Life Research: Analysis: Synthesis and Palaetiology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 40 (1):35 - 69.score: 6.0
    To better understand the work of pre-Darwinian British life researchers in their own right, this paper discusses two different styles of reasoning. On the one hand there was analysis:synthesis, where an organism was disintegrated into its constituent parts and then reintegrated into a whole; on the other hand there was palaetiology, the historicist depiction of the progressive specialization of an organism. This paper shows how each style allowed for development, but showed it as moving in opposite directions. In analysis:synthesis, development (...)
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  49. Jean-Noël Missa (forthcoming). Neurosciences. Revue Internationale de Philosophie.score: 6.0
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