Search results for '*Nonverbal Communication' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Loris Tamara Schiaratura (2013). Analyse et interprétation psychologiques des comportements corporels en situation de communication interpersonnelle. Methodos 13 (13).score: 30.0
    Dans une communication interpersonnelle, l’échange se fait avec des mots mais aussi avec le corps. Les comportements corporels sont souvent considérés comme un langage dont le code est directement interprétable. Dans la plupart des cas, les comportements corporels sont codés de manière continue, probable et iconique. Il faut alors prendre en compte le processus d’inférence à la base d’une représentation de l’état de la personne qui interagit. L’article présente les outils théoriques et méthodologiques de la psychologie qui permettent d’analyser (...)
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  2. P. Krausser (1958). Book Reviews : The Primitive World and its Transformations by Robert Redfield (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, I953; 2d Ed., Great Seal Books, I957.) Pp. XIII+I85. Language, Thought, and Reality: Selected Writings of Benjamin Lee Whorf Edited and with an Introduction by J. B. Carroll, Foreword by Stuart Chase (New York: Technology Press of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and John Wiley & Sons; London: Chapman & Hall, Ltd., I956.) Pp. X+278. Nonverbal Communication: Notes on the Visual Perception of Human Relations by Jurgen Ruesch and Weldon Kees (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, I956.) Pp. 205. [REVIEW] Diogenes 6 (23):111-119.score: 30.0
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  3. Anna Wierzbicka (1995). Kisses, Handshakes, Bows: The Semantics of Nonverbal Communication. Semiotica 103 (3-4):207-252.score: 30.0
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  4. Michael Argyle (1987). Functions of Nonverbal Communication. Semiotica 67 (1/2):65.score: 30.0
     
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  5. Geoffrey W. Beattie (1985). Nonverbal-Communication. Semiotica 57 (3-4):375-379.score: 30.0
     
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  6. Hillary Anger Elfenbein, Maw Der Foo, Jennifer Boldry & Hwee Hoon Tan (2006). Brief Report Dyadic Effects in Nonverbal Communication: A Variance Partitioning Analysis. Cognition and Emotion 20 (1):149-159.score: 30.0
  7. S. H. Foster (1985). " Of-Shoes-and-Ships-and-Sealing-Wax, Nonverbal-Communication and its Development-a Linguistic Perspective. Semiotica 55 (3-4):275-294.score: 30.0
     
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  8. Mele Koneya (1981). Unresolved Theoretical Issues in Nonverbal Communication. Semiotica 37 (1-2):1-14.score: 30.0
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  9. Sharron J. Lennon & Ruth V. Clayton (1992). Age, Body Type, and Style Features as Cues in Nonverbal Communication. Semiotica 91 (1-2):43-56.score: 30.0
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  10. Jeffrey E. Nash (1982). The Family Camps Out: A Study in Nonverbal Communication. Semiotica 39 (3-4).score: 30.0
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  11. Maria N. Popova (forthcoming). Nonverbal Communication in the Theater. Semiotics:321-332.score: 30.0
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  12. Fernando Poyatos (1977). Forms and Functions of Nonverbal Communication in the Novel: A New Perspective of the Author-Character-Reader Relationship. Semiotica 21 (3-4).score: 30.0
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  13. Fernando Poyatos (1981). Punctuation as Nonverbal Communication: Toward an Interdisciplinary Approach to Writing. Semiotica 34 (1-2).score: 30.0
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  14. Monica Rector (forthcoming). Nonverbal Communication Project for Brazilian Portuguese. Semiotics:241-246.score: 30.0
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  15. Digby Tantam (1986). A Semiotic Model of Nonverbal Communication. Semiotica 58 (1-2):41-58.score: 30.0
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  16. Patricia Tway (1976). Verbal and Nonverbal Communication of Factory Workers. Semiotica 16 (1).score: 30.0
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  17. Luc van Poecke (1988). Denotation/Connotation and Verbal/Nonverbal Communication. Semiotica 71 (1-2):125-152.score: 30.0
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  18. Ian Vine (1986). Does Nonverbal Communication Have a Future. Semiotica 60:297-313.score: 30.0
     
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  19. Anneke Vrugt & Ada Kerkstra (1984). Sex Differences in Nonverbal Communication. Semiotica 50 (1-2):1-42.score: 30.0
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  20. Disa Sauter (2013). The Role of Motivation and Cultural Dialects in the in-Group Advantage for Emotional Vocalizations. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 28.0
    It is well established that nonverbal emotional communication via both facial and vocal information is more accurate when expresser and perceiver are from the same cultural group. Two accounts have been put forward to explain this finding: According to the dialect theory, culture-specific learning modulates the largely cross-culturally consistent expressions of emotions. Consequently, within-group signalling benefits from a better match of the "emotion dialect" of the expresser and perceiver. However, it has been proposed that the in-group advantage in emotion (...)
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  21. Amanda Bischoff-Grethe, Shawnette M. Proper, Hui Mao, Karen A. Daniels & Gregory S. Berns (2000). Conscious and Unconscious Processing of Nonverbal Predictability in Wernicke's Area. Journal of Neuroscience 20 (5):1975-1981.score: 26.0
  22. Michaela Safadi & Carol Ann Valentine (1990). Contrastive Analyses of American and Arab Nonverbal and Paralinguistic Communication. Semiotica 82 (3-4):269-292.score: 24.0
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  23. Thomas L. Veenendall (1991). Creative Communication Through the Nonverbal Experience. Inquiry 7 (3):30-31.score: 24.0
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  24. Adrian Costache (2011). Toward a New Middle Ages? On Aurel Codoban’s The Empire of Communication. [REVIEW] Journal for Communication and Culture 1 (2):162-166.score: 21.0
    Codoban, Aurel. Imperiul comunicării: corp, imagine şi relaţionare (The Empire of Communication: Body, Image and Relation). Cluj-Napoca: Idea, 2011.
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  25. Michael A. Arbib (2001). Co-Evolution of Human Consciousness and Language. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 929:195-220.score: 20.0
  26. Uri Hasson, Asif A. Ghazanfar, Bruno Galantucci, Simon Garrod & Christian Keysers (2012). Brain-to-Brain Coupling: A Mechanism for Creating and Sharing a Social World. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (2):114-121.score: 20.0
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  27. Raymond Tallis (2010). Michelangelo's Finger: An Exploration of Everyday Transcendence. Yale University Press.score: 20.0
    How to point : a primer for Martians -- What it takes to be a pointer -- Do animals get the point? -- People who don't point -- Pinning language to the world -- Pointing and power -- Assisted pointing and pointing by proxy -- The transcendent animal : pointing and the beyond.
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  28. Peter Auer & Aldo Di Luzio (eds.) (1992). The Contextualization of Language. J. Benjamins.score: 20.0
  29. Eva Maria Simms (1993). The Infant's Experience of the World: Stern, Merleau-Ponty and the Phenomenology of the Preverbal Self. Humanistic Psychologist 21 (1):26-40.score: 20.0
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  30. Josiane Cristina Coradi Prado Telles, Maíra Bonafé Sei & Sérgio Luiz Saboya Arruda (2010). Comunicação silenciosa mãe-bebê na visão winnicottiana: reflexões teórico-clínicas. Aletheia 33:109-122.score: 20.0
    Objetivou-se discutir a comunicação silenciosa entre mãe e bebê, a partir do pensamento de Winnicott. Fez-se uma pesquisa qualitativa, baseada no método clínico e referencial psicanalítico, por meio do estudo de caso de uma criança, com 8 anos de idade e dificuldades no desenvolvimento da fala, sem ..
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  31. Clas Weber (2013). Centered Communication. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):205-223.score: 18.0
    According to an attractive account of belief, our beliefs have centered content. According to an attractive account of communication, we utter sentences to express our beliefs and share them with each other. However, the two accounts are in conflict. In this paper I explore the consequences of holding on to the claim that beliefs have centered content. If we do in fact express the centered content of our beliefs, the content of the belief the hearer acquires cannot in general (...)
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  32. Antony Aumann (2008). Kierkegaard on the Need for Indirect Communication. Dissertation, Indiana Universityscore: 18.0
    This dissertation concerns Kierkegaard’s theory of indirect communication. A central aspect of this theory is what I call the “indispensability thesis”: there are some projects only indirect communication can accomplish. The purpose of the dissertation is to disclose and assess the rationale behind the indispensability thesis. -/- A pair of questions guides the project. First, to what does ‘indirect communication’ refer? Two acceptable responses exist: (1) Kierkegaard’s version of Socrates’ midwifery method and (2) Kierkegaard’s use of artful (...)
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  33. Antony Aumann (2010). Kierkegaard on Indirect Communication, the Crowd, and a Monstrous Illusion. In Robert L. Perkins (ed.), International Kierkegaard Commentary: Point of View. Mercer University Press.score: 18.0
    Following the pattern set by the early German Romantics, Kierkegaard conveys many of his insights through literature rather than academic prose. What makes him a valuable member of this tradition is the theory he develops to support it, his so-called “theory of indirect communication.” The most exciting aspect of this theory concerns the alleged importance of indirect communication: Kierkegaard claims that there are some projects only it can accomplish. This paper provides a critical account of two arguments Kierkegaard (...)
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  34. Anne E. McGuire & Rod Michalko (2011). Minds Between Us: Autism, Mindblindness and the Uncertainty of Communication. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (2):162-177.score: 18.0
    This paper problematizes contemporary cultural understandings of autism. We make use of the developmental psychology concepts of ‘Theory of Mind’ and ‘mindblindness’ to uncover the meaning of autism as expressed in these concepts. Our concern is that autism is depicted as a puzzle and that this depiction governs not only the way Western culture treats autism but also the way in which it governs everyday interactions with autistic people. Moreover, we show how the concepts of Theory of Mind and mindblindness (...)
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  35. Reggy Hooghiemstra (2000). Corporate Communication and Impression Management – New Perspectives Why Companies Engage in Corporate Social Reporting. Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):55 - 68.score: 18.0
    This paper addresses the theoretical framework on corporate social reporting. Although that corporate social reporting has been analysed from different perspectives, legitmacy theory currently is the dominating perspective. Authors employing this framework suggest that social and environmental disclosures are responses to both public pressure and increased media attention resulting from major social incidents such as the Exxon Valdez oil spill and the chemical leak in Bhopal (India). More specifically, those authors argue that the increase in social disclosures represent a strategy (...)
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  36. Richard Breheny (2006). Communication and Folk Psychology. Mind and Language 21 (1):74-107.score: 18.0
    Prominent accounts of language use (those of Grice, Lewis, Stalnaker, Sperber and Wilson among others) have viewed basic communicative acts as essentially involving the attitudes of the participating agents. Developmental data poses a dilemma for these accounts, since it suggests children below age four are competent communicators but would lack the ability to conceptualise communication if philosophers and linguists are right about what communication is. This paper argues that this dilemma is quite serious and that these prominent accounts (...)
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  37. Steffen Borge (2012). Communication, Conflict and Cooperation. ProtoSociology 29.score: 18.0
    According to Steven Pinker and his associates the cooperative model of human communication fails, because evolutionary biology teaches us that most social relationships, including talk-exchange, involve combinations of cooperation and conflict. In particular, the phenomenon of the strategic speaker who uses indirect speech in order to be able to deny what he meant by a speech act (deniability of conversational implicatures) challenges the model. In reply I point out that interlocutors can aim at understanding each other (cooperation), while being (...)
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  38. Richard Moore (2013). Evidence and Interpretation in Great Ape Gestural Communication. Humana.Mente 24:27-51.score: 18.0
    Tomasello and colleagues have offered various arguments to explain why apes find the comprehension of pointing difficult. They have argued that: (i) apes fail to understand communicative intentions; (ii) they fail to understand informative, cooperative communication, and (iii) they fail to track the common ground that pointing comprehension requires. In the course of a review of the literature on apes' production and comprehension of pointing, I reject (i) and (ii), and offer a qualified defence of (iii). Drawing on work (...)
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  39. Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.) (2005). Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 18.0
    Sometime around their first birthday most infants begin to engage in relatively sustained bouts of attending together with their caretakers to objects in their environment. By the age of 18 months, on most accounts, they are engaging in full-blown episodes of joint attention. As developmental psychologists (usually) use the term, for such joint attention to be in play, it is not sufficient that the infant and the adult are in fact attending to the same object, nor that the one’s attention (...)
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  40. Ernesto Perini-Santos (2009). DOES CONTEXTUALISM MAKE COMMUNICATION A MIRACLE? Manuscrito 32 (Jan-Jul):231-247.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I argue against the thesis suggested by Cappelen and Lepore (2005), according to which if contextualism were true, communication would require many items, and therefore would be fragile; communication is not fragile, and therefore, communication does not demand a large number of conditions, and contextualism is false. While we should grant the robustness of communication, it is not guaranteed by some unchanging conditions, but by different flexible mechanisms that enhance the chances of mutual (...)
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  41. Christopher Gauker (1992). The Lockean Theory of Communication. Noûs 26 (3):303-324.score: 18.0
    The Lockean theory of communication is here defined as the theory that communication takes place when a hearer grasps some sort of mental object, distinct from the speaker's words, that the speaker's words express. This theory contrasts with the view that spoken languages are the very medium of a kind of thought of which overt speech is the most basic form. This article is a critique of some of the most common motives for adopting a Lockean theory of (...)
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  42. Naomi M. Eilan (2005). Joint Attention, Communication, and Mind. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 1.score: 18.0
    This chapter argues that a central division among accounts of joint attention, both in philosophy and developmental psychology, turns on how they address two questions: What, if any, is the connection between the capacity to engage in joint attention triangles and the capacity to grasp the idea of objective truth? How do we explain the kind of openness or sharing of minds that occurs in joint attention? The chapter explores the connections between answers to both questions, and argues that theories (...)
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  43. Rafael Capurro & Christoph Pingel (2002). Ethical Issues of Online Communication Research. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (3):189-194.score: 18.0
    The paper addresses severalethical issues in online communication researchin light of digital ontology as well as theepistemological questions raised by theblurring boundary between fact and theory inthis field. The concept of ontology is used ina Heideggerian sense as related to the humancapacity of world construction on the basis ofthe givenness of our being-in-the-world.Ethical dilemmas of Internet research thusarise from the tension between bodily existenceand the proper object of research, i.e., onlineexistence. The following issues are beingconsidered: online identity, online language,online (...)
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  44. Susanne Arvidsson (2010). Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Study of the Views of Management Teams in Large Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):339 - 354.score: 18.0
    In light of the many corporate scandals, social and ethical commitment of society has increased considerably, which puts pressure on companies to communicate information related to corporate social responsibility (CSR). The reasons underlying the decision by management teams to engage in ethical communication are scarcely focussed on. Thus, grounded on legitimacy and stakeholder theory, this study analyses the views management teams in large listed companies have on communication of CSR. The focus is on aspects on interest, motives/reasons, users (...)
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  45. Xinli Wang (2007). Incommensurability and Cross-Language Communication. Ashgate Publishing Ltd, England.score: 18.0
    Against the received translation-failure interpretation, this book presents a presuppositional interpretation of incommensurability, that is, the thesis of incommensurability as cross-language communication breakdown due to the incompatible metaphysical presuppositions underlying two competing presuppositional languages, such as scientific languages. This semantically sound, epistemologically well-established, and metaphysically profound interpretation not only affirms the tenability of the notion of incommensurability and confirms the reality of the phenomenon of incommensurability, but also makes some significant contributions to the discussion of many related issues, such (...)
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  46. Melissa A. Cook & Annette Holba (eds.) (2008). Philosophies of Communication: Implications for Everyday Experience. Peter Lang.score: 18.0
    The essays in this volume consider, in multiple ways, how philosophies of communication and communication ethics can shape and enhance human communication.
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  47. Jamie Cullen (2009). Imitation Versus Communication: Testing for Human-Like Intelligence. Minds and Machines 19 (2):237-254.score: 18.0
    Turing’s Imitation Game is often viewed as a test for theorised machines that could ‘think’ and/or demonstrate ‘intelligence’. However, contrary to Turing’s apparent intent, it can be shown that Turing’s Test is essentially a test for humans only. Such a test does not provide for theorised artificial intellects with human-like, but not human-exact, intellectual capabilities. As an attempt to bypass this limitation, I explore the notion of shifting the goal posts of the Turing Test, and related tests such as the (...)
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  48. Endre Begby (2013). Semantic Minimalism and the “Miracle of Communication”. Philosophical Studies 165 (3):957-973.score: 18.0
    According to semantic minimalism, context-invariant minimal semantic propositions play an essential role in linguistic communication. This claim is key to minimalists’ argument against semantic contextualism: if there were no such minimal semantic propositions, and semantic content varied widely with shifts in context, then it would be “miraculous” if communication were ever to occur. This paper offers a critical examination of the minimalist account of communication, focusing on a series of examples where communication occurs without a minimal (...)
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  49. Guglielmo Tamburrini (2009). Brain to Computer Communication: Ethical Perspectives on Interaction Models. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 2 (3):137-149.score: 18.0
    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) enable one to control peripheral ICT and robotic devices by processing brain activity on-line. The potential usefulness of BCI systems, initially demonstrated in rehabilitation medicine, is now being explored in education, entertainment, intensive workflow monitoring, security, and training. Ethical issues arising in connection with these investigations are triaged taking into account technological imminence and pervasiveness of BCI technologies. By focussing on imminent technological developments, ethical reflection is informatively grounded into realistic protocols of brain-to-computer communication. In (...)
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  50. Birgitta Dresp-Langley (2009). The Communication Contract and its ten Ground Clauses. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):415 - 436.score: 18.0
    Global society issues are putting increasing pressure on both small and large organizations to communicate ethically at all levels. Achieving this requires social skills beyond the choice of language or vocabulary and relies above all on individual social responsibility. Arguments from social contract philosophy and speech act theory lead to consider a communication contract that identifies the necessary individual skills for ethical communication on the basis of a limited number of explicit clauses. These latter are pragmatically binding for (...)
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