Search results for '*Oral Communication' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rowles Phillip (2004). Action Research: Japanese High School-Aged Students' Difficulties in English Oral Communication. Dialogos 4:163-178.score: 90.0
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  2. Examples From Grade (2000). Oral and Written Communication for Promoting Mathematical. In Ian Westbury, Stefan Hopmann & Kurt Riquarts (eds.), Teaching as a Reflective Practice: The German Didaktik Tradition. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 72.0
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  3. Christiane Senn-Fennell (2000). Oral and Written Communication for Promoting Mathematical Understanding: Teaching Examples From Grade 3. In Ian Westbury, Stefan Hopmann & Kurt Riquarts (eds.), Teaching as a Reflective Practice: The German Didaktik Tradition. L. Erlbaum Associates. 223--250.score: 72.0
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  4. Jeanine Czubaroff (1997). The Public Dimension Of Scientific Controversies. Argumentation 11 (1):51-74.score: 66.0
    Acceptance of three tenets of the doctrine of scientific objectivity, namely, the tenets of consensus, compartmentalization, and ahistorical truth, undermines scientists‘ appreciation of the importance of scientific controversy and consideration of the policy and value implications of controversial scientific theories. This essay rejects these tenets and suggests scientists appreciate theoretical diversity, learn rational means for adjudicating value differences, and cultivate conversational as well as written forms of communication.
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  5. Michael A. Arbib (2001). Co-Evolution of Human Consciousness and Language. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 929:195-220.score: 60.0
  6. Avraham ben ʻAḳiva Erlanger (ed.) (2011). Hagadah Shel Peh Saḥ: Meʻuṭeret Be-Divre Musar Ṿe-Hashḳafah ... Be-ʻinyan Galut U-Geʼulat Ha-Dibur. Feldhaim.score: 60.0
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  7. Avraham ben ʻAḳiva Erlanger (ed.) (2011). Hagadah Shel Peh Saḥ: Meʻuṭeret Be-Divre Musar Ṿe-Hashḳafah. Feldhaim.score: 60.0
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  8. Richard Fleming (2009). Evil and Silence. Paradigm Publishers.score: 60.0
    First book: Just plain evil -- You cannot meaningfully talk this way : violence is a virtue-so you cannot justifiably act that way -- Second book: Ordinary silence -- Affirming the limits of our words : listening attentively makes a life worth living -- Supplements to first and second books -- The difficulty is to stop.
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  9. Susan L. Hurley (2006). Bypassing Conscious Control: Unconscious Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech. In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. 301-337.score: 60.0
  10. Richard L. Lanigan (1984). Semiotic Phenomenology of Rhetoric: Eidetic Practice in Henry Grattan's Discourse on Tolerance. University Press of America.score: 60.0
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  11. Michelle Scalise Sugiyama (2011). The Forager Oral Tradition and the Evolution of Prolonged Juvenility. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 54.0
    The foraging niche is characterized by the exploitation of nutrient-rich resources using complex extraction techniques that take a long time to acquire. This costly period of development is supported by intensive parental investment. Although human life history theory tends to characterize this investment in terms of food and care, ethnographic research on foraging skill transmission suggests that the flow of resources from old to young also includes knowledge. Given the adaptive value of information, parents may have been under selection pressure (...)
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  12. J. C. Nyìri (1999). Philosophy, Education, and the History of Communication Technologies. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 3:185-192.score: 42.0
    The emergence and development of the humanities were initially bound up with the spread of alphabetic writing, and subsequently with the development of printing; the original task of the nascent humanities disciplines was a thoroughly practical one: that of building up our knowledge about the characteristics of the new media with the aim of exploiting this knowledge in everyday life—for the sake of economic, educational, or political benefits. In particular, the beginnings of philosophy lead us back to the times of (...)
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  13. Tarcísio Vanderlinde (2013). Motivação eclesial luterana e inserção social entre comunidades quilombolas: a força da oralidade (Lutheran ecclesial motivation and social insertion among quilombolas communities: the power of orality) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n30p593. [REVIEW] Horizonte 11 (30):593-606.score: 32.0
    O artigo emerge de resultado da pesquisa sobre a inserção socioeconômica do Centro de Apoio ao Pequeno Agricultor (Capa) em territórios de remanescentes de quilombos no extremo sul do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil. O Capa se caracteriza como uma entidade mediadora, que nasce de motivações eclesiais da Igreja Evangélica de Confissão Luterana no Brasil (IECLB) ao final dos anos de 1970. Seu objetivo é disseminar sistemas agroecológicos entre populações de pequenos agricultores a fim de criar possibilidades (...)
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  14. Charles Ess (2002). Cultures in Collision: Philosophical Lessons From Computer-Mediated Communication. In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub.. 229-253.score: 32.0
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  15. J. Agar (2001). Community (Net) Work - James A. Anderson and Edward Rosenfeld (Eds), Talking Nets: An Oral History of Neural Networks (Cambridge, MA, and London: MIT Press, 1998), XI + 500 Pp., ISBN 0-262-01167-0. Hardback £31.95. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (3):557-564.score: 30.0
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  16. Gölge Seferoğlu (2008). Using Feature Films in Language Classes. Educational Studies 34 (1):1-9.score: 30.0
    This study aimed at finding students? perspectives on integrating feature films on digital versatile discs (DVDs) in oral communication classes of advanced English as foreign language (EFL) learners. A total of 29 students being trained as teachers of English participated in the study. Data were collected through a survey questionnaire. All participants unanimously agreed that through films they had the opportunity to learn about how people initiate and sustain a conversational exchange, and how they negotiate meaning; types of exclamation (...)
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  17. Manlio Simonetti (2011). Qualche novità sulla dottrina origeniana del Logos. Augustinianum 51 (2):331-348.score: 30.0
    The Author, taking account of the deficiencies of the surviving documentation on the doctrinal thought of the 2nd and 3rd centuries, and considering the primacy of oral communication, nevertheless rejects the conclusion of a recent article on Origen’s doctrine of the Logos. There are no concrete data in the work of the Alexandrian theologian to support the hypothesis that he engaged in controversy with radical supporters of the doctrine of the Logos, who – as Arians ante litteram – separated (...)
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  18. Asunción López-Varela Azcárate (2011). Intertextuality and Intermediality as Cross-Cultural Comunication Tools. Cultura 8 (2):7-22.score: 30.0
    Cross-cultural communication is about generating dialogical positions across cultural barriers. Communication is achieved when participants are able to construct meaning across varied sign systems. Oral communication makes use of a wide range of signs that contribute to make meaning, from eye contact to gestures and speech. In written/printed communication, together with the reproduction of visual images through painting, photography, etc., the most important resource is the textual format. Texts are grounded on a cognitive deictic basis and (...)
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  19. Renata Jasnos (2013). The Consequences of Early Literacy for the Discursive Transmission in the Old Testament. Dialogue and Universalism 23 (1):91-103.score: 30.0
    The books of the Old Testament contain elements of oral communication as well as the characteristic features of written elaboration. S. Niditch attempts to determine the probable oral-literate processes leading to the formation of the biblical message but does not answer the question concerning the history of the creation of any of the books. Biblical scholars examine the process of the shaping of the books as redaction criticism. This shaping, however, progressed according to different standards as evidenced by the (...)
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  20. Jonathan Rée (1999). I See a Voice: Deafness, Language, and the Senses--A Philosophical History. Metropolitan Books, H. Holt and Co..score: 30.0
    A groundbreaking study of deafness, by a philosopher who combines the scientific erudition of Oliver Sacks with the historical flair of Simon Schama. There is nothing more personal than the human voice, traditionally considered the expression of the innermost self. But what of those who have no voice of their own and cannot hear the voices of others? In this tour de force of historical narrative, Jonathan Ree tells the astonishing story of the deaf, from the sixteenth century to the (...)
     
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  21. Stefano Micali (2013). The Transformation of Intercorporeality in Melancholia. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):215-234.score: 24.0
    In this article the author seeks to highlight a specific disorder related to bodily experience in melancholia conceived as a severe form of clinical depression. The article is divided into three parts. In the first section, the author investigates the intersubjective dimension of bodily experience in light of the categories of Außen- and Innenleiblichkeit. In the second section, I explore a specific disturbance of the dimension of intercorporeality. The excessive feeling of the bodily (außenleibliche) visibility of his/her own sufferance is (...)
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  22. Arthur C. Graesser & Danielle S. McNamara (2011). Computational Analyses of Multilevel Discourse Comprehension. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):371-398.score: 24.0
    The proposed multilevel framework of discourse comprehension includes the surface code, the textbase, the situation model, the genre and rhetorical structure, and the pragmatic communication level. We describe these five levels when comprehension succeeds and also when there are communication misalignments and comprehension breakdowns. A computer tool has been developed, called Coh-Metrix, that scales discourse (oral or print) on dozens of measures associated with the first four discourse levels. The measurement of these levels with an automated tool helps (...)
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  23. Michael J. Hyde (1980). Philosophical Hermeneutics and the Communicative Experience: The Paradigm of Oral History. [REVIEW] Man and World 13 (1):81-98.score: 24.0
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  24. Giovanni Reale, Alonso Tordesillas & Luc Brisson (forthcoming). Le «Phèdre»: Manifeste Programmatique de Platon, «Écrivain» Et «Philosophe». Les Études Philosophiques.score: 24.0
    L'auteur résume dans cet article le contenu du commentaire du Phèdre qui doit paraître en mai 1998. Le Phèdre constitue un véritable « manifeste » qui présente un programme dans lequel Platon, alors âgé de soixante à soixante-cinq ans environ, prend position sur la question de l'écriture, à un moment où celle-ci était en train de se substituer à l'oralité pour constituer un instrument de communication privilégié. Dans le Phèdre, Platon veut montrer que, au moment même où il écrit, (...)
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  25. Alexei V. Zadorojnyi (2011). The Ethico-Politics of Writing in Plutarch's Life of Dion. Journal of Hellenic Studies 131 (147):147-163.score: 24.0
    The paper focuses on the representation of pedagogical and political communication between (and around) Plato, Dion and Dionysius II in Plutarch's Life of Dion. Plutarch's narrative invokes both the Platonic critique of writing as an inadequate medium for teaching philosophy, and the polarity between free oral speech and writing as a symptom of tyranny. It is argued that the Life espouses but also complicates and implicitly interrogates the opposition between writtenness and orality across the philosophical and the political domain, (...)
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  26. Félix Duque (2011). The Skin and Me (a Piece to Be Read Aloud and, If Possible, Amongst Friends). Iris 3 (6):139-154.score: 24.0
    The following text revolves around a contrast in the form of a chiasm: the human skin of the word is the word of human skin, of its orifices and crevices. Halfway between a phenomenology of the life-world and quasi-surrealistic automatic writing, we attempt per impossibile to restore its rights to the living and speaking body, to allow the ear to speak (Heidegger), the eye to smell (Heraclitus), and the hands to look (Lucretius) – an exercise in synesthesia not devoid of (...)
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  27. P. Gulbrandsen & B. F. Jensen (2010). Post-Recruitment Confirmation of Informed Consent by SMS. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (2):126-128.score: 24.0
    Background To allow patients to reflect about a decision to participate in a clinical trial, guidelines suggest a 24-h delay from when they are informed about the trial to when they give consent. In certain clinical settings, this is likely to hamper recruitment. Method After oral and written information about the trial has been given in person, the patient signs the declaration of consent knowing that they will be asked again after 24 h whether they confirm or regret the decision. (...)
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  28. M. Ashby & B. Stoffell (1995). Artificial Hydration and Alimentation at the End of Life: A Reply to Craig. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (3):135-140.score: 24.0
    Dr Gillian Craig (1) has argued that palliative medicine services have tended to adopt a policy of sedation without hydration, which under certain circumstances may be medically inappropriate, causative of death and distressing to family and friends. We welcome this opportunity to defend, with an important modification, the approach we proposed without substantive background argument in our original article (2). We maintain that slowing and eventual cessation of oral intake is a normal part of a natural dying process, that artificial (...)
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  29. Alf Hornborg (2001). Vital Signs. Sign Systems Studies 29 (1):121-151.score: 24.0
    Ecosemiotics represents a theoretical approach to human ecology that can be applied across several disciplines. lts primary justification lies inthe ambition to transcend "Cartesian", conceptual dichotomies such as culture/nature. society/nature, mental/material. etc. It argues that ecosystems areconstituted no less by flows of signs than by flows of matter and energy. This paper discusses the roles of different kinds of hmnan sign systems in the ecologyof Amazonia, ranging from the phenomenology of unconscious sensations. through linguistic signs such as metaphors and ethnobiological (...)
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  30. Nikos Logothetis, Report Vocal-Tract Resonances as Indexical Cues in Rhesus Monkeys.score: 24.0
    Asif A. Ghazanfar,1,3,* Hjalmar K. Turesson,1,3 statistical pattern recognition [16, 17] and psychophys- Joost X. Maier,1 Ralph van Dinther,2 ics [13, 18–23] have suggested that formants are signif- Roy D. Patterson,2 and Nikos K. Logothetis1 icant contributors to these indexical cues. It is likely, 1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics then, that detecting formants could have provided 72076 Tuebingen ancestral primates with indexical cues necessary for Germany navigating the complex social interactions that are the 2Centre for the Neural Basis of (...)
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  31. Steven L. Small Michael Andric (2012). Gesture's Neural Language. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    When people talk to each other, they often make arm and hand movements that accompany what they say. These manual movements, called “co-speech gestures,” can convey meaning by way of their interaction with the oral message. Another class of manual gestures, called “emblematic gestures” or “emblems,” also convey meaning, but in contrast to co-speech gestures, they can do so directly and independent of speech. There is currently significant interest in the behavioral and biological relationships between action and language. Since co-speech (...)
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  32. Feliz Molina (2013). Readymades in the Social Sphere: An Interview with Daniel Peltz. Continent 3 (1):17-24.score: 24.0
    Since 2008 I have been closely following the conceptual/performance/video work of Daniel Peltz. Gently rendered through media installation, ethnographic, and performance strategies, Peltz’s work reverently and warmly engages the inner workings of social systems, leaving elegant rips and tears in any given socio/cultural quilt. He engages readymades (of social and media constructions) and uses what are identified as interruptionist/interventionist strategies to disrupt parts of an existing social system, thus allowing for something other to emerge. Like the stereoscope that requires two (...)
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  33. Madeline Davis & Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy (forthcoming). Oral History and the Study of Sexuality in the Lesbian Community: Buffalo, New York, 1940-1960. Feminist Studies.score: 24.0
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  34. José Granero-Molina, Cayetano Fernández-Sola & Gabriel Aguilera-Manrique (2009). Applying a Sociolinguistic Model to the Analysis of Informed Consent Documents. Nursing Ethics 16 (6):797-812.score: 24.0
    Information on the risks and benefits related to surgical procedures is essential for patients in order to obtain their informed consent. Some disciplines, such as sociolinguistics, offer insights that are helpful for patient—professional communication in both written and oral consent. Communication difficulties become more acute when patients make decisions through an informed consent document because they may sign this with a lack of understanding and information, and consequently feel deprived of their freedom to make their choice about different (...)
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  35. Edward Watts (2005). Orality and Communal Identity in Eunapius' Lives of the Sophists and Philosophers. Byzantion 75:334-361.score: 24.0
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  36. Nuria Lorenzo-Dus & Patricia Bou-Franch (2013). A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Email Communication in Peninsular Spanish and British English: The Role of (in)Formality and (in)Directness. Pragmatics and Society 4 (1):1-25.score: 22.0
    This paper examines the email discursive practices of particular speakers of two different languages, namely Peninsular Spanish and British English. More specifically, our study focuses on (in)formality and (in)directness therein, for these lie at the heart of considerable scholarly debate regarding, respectively (i) the general stylistic drift towards orality and informality in technology-mediated communication, and (ii) the degree of communicative (in)directness - within broader politeness orientations - of speakers of different languages, specifically an orientation towards directness in Peninsular Spanish (...)
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  37. Adrian Costache (2011). Toward a New Middle Ages? On Aurel Codoban’s The Empire of Communication. [REVIEW] Journal for Communication and Culture 1 (2):162-166.score: 21.0
    Codoban, Aurel. Imperiul comunicării: corp, imagine şi relaţionare (The Empire of Communication: Body, Image and Relation). Cluj-Napoca: Idea, 2011.
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  38. Antony Aumann (2008). Kierkegaard on the Need for Indirect Communication. Dissertation, Indiana Universityscore: 18.0
    This dissertation concerns Kierkegaard’s theory of indirect communication. A central aspect of this theory is what I call the “indispensability thesis”: there are some projects only indirect communication can accomplish. The purpose of the dissertation is to disclose and assess the rationale behind the indispensability thesis. -/- A pair of questions guides the project. First, to what does ‘indirect communication’ refer? Two acceptable responses exist: (1) Kierkegaard’s version of Socrates’ midwifery method and (2) Kierkegaard’s use of artful (...)
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  39. Clas Weber (2013). Centered Communication. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):205-223.score: 18.0
    According to an attractive account of belief, our beliefs have centered content. According to an attractive account of communication, we utter sentences to express our beliefs and share them with each other. However, the two accounts are in conflict. In this paper I explore the consequences of holding on to the claim that beliefs have centered content. If we do in fact express the centered content of our beliefs, the content of the belief the hearer acquires cannot in general (...)
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  40. Antony Aumann (2010). Kierkegaard on Indirect Communication, the Crowd, and a Monstrous Illusion. In Robert L. Perkins (ed.), International Kierkegaard Commentary: Point of View. Mercer University Press.score: 18.0
    Following the pattern set by the early German Romantics, Kierkegaard conveys many of his insights through literature rather than academic prose. What makes him a valuable member of this tradition is the theory he develops to support it, his so-called “theory of indirect communication.” The most exciting aspect of this theory concerns the alleged importance of indirect communication: Kierkegaard claims that there are some projects only it can accomplish. This paper provides a critical account of two arguments Kierkegaard (...)
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  41. Anne E. McGuire & Rod Michalko (2011). Minds Between Us: Autism, Mindblindness and the Uncertainty of Communication. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (2):162-177.score: 18.0
    This paper problematizes contemporary cultural understandings of autism. We make use of the developmental psychology concepts of ‘Theory of Mind’ and ‘mindblindness’ to uncover the meaning of autism as expressed in these concepts. Our concern is that autism is depicted as a puzzle and that this depiction governs not only the way Western culture treats autism but also the way in which it governs everyday interactions with autistic people. Moreover, we show how the concepts of Theory of Mind and mindblindness (...)
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  42. Reggy Hooghiemstra (2000). Corporate Communication and Impression Management – New Perspectives Why Companies Engage in Corporate Social Reporting. Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):55 - 68.score: 18.0
    This paper addresses the theoretical framework on corporate social reporting. Although that corporate social reporting has been analysed from different perspectives, legitmacy theory currently is the dominating perspective. Authors employing this framework suggest that social and environmental disclosures are responses to both public pressure and increased media attention resulting from major social incidents such as the Exxon Valdez oil spill and the chemical leak in Bhopal (India). More specifically, those authors argue that the increase in social disclosures represent a strategy (...)
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  43. Richard Breheny (2006). Communication and Folk Psychology. Mind and Language 21 (1):74-107.score: 18.0
    Prominent accounts of language use (those of Grice, Lewis, Stalnaker, Sperber and Wilson among others) have viewed basic communicative acts as essentially involving the attitudes of the participating agents. Developmental data poses a dilemma for these accounts, since it suggests children below age four are competent communicators but would lack the ability to conceptualise communication if philosophers and linguists are right about what communication is. This paper argues that this dilemma is quite serious and that these prominent accounts (...)
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  44. Steffen Borge (2012). Communication, Conflict and Cooperation. ProtoSociology 29.score: 18.0
    According to Steven Pinker and his associates the cooperative model of human communication fails, because evolutionary biology teaches us that most social relationships, including talk-exchange, involve combinations of cooperation and conflict. In particular, the phenomenon of the strategic speaker who uses indirect speech in order to be able to deny what he meant by a speech act (deniability of conversational implicatures) challenges the model. In reply I point out that interlocutors can aim at understanding each other (cooperation), while being (...)
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  45. Richard Moore (2013). Evidence and Interpretation in Great Ape Gestural Communication. Humana.Mente 24:27-51.score: 18.0
    Tomasello and colleagues have offered various arguments to explain why apes find the comprehension of pointing difficult. They have argued that: (i) apes fail to understand communicative intentions; (ii) they fail to understand informative, cooperative communication, and (iii) they fail to track the common ground that pointing comprehension requires. In the course of a review of the literature on apes' production and comprehension of pointing, I reject (i) and (ii), and offer a qualified defence of (iii). Drawing on work (...)
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  46. Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.) (2005). Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 18.0
    Sometime around their first birthday most infants begin to engage in relatively sustained bouts of attending together with their caretakers to objects in their environment. By the age of 18 months, on most accounts, they are engaging in full-blown episodes of joint attention. As developmental psychologists (usually) use the term, for such joint attention to be in play, it is not sufficient that the infant and the adult are in fact attending to the same object, nor that the one’s attention (...)
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  47. Christopher Gauker (1992). The Lockean Theory of Communication. Noûs 26 (3):303-324.score: 18.0
    The Lockean theory of communication is here defined as the theory that communication takes place when a hearer grasps some sort of mental object, distinct from the speaker's words, that the speaker's words express. This theory contrasts with the view that spoken languages are the very medium of a kind of thought of which overt speech is the most basic form. This article is a critique of some of the most common motives for adopting a Lockean theory of (...)
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  48. Naomi M. Eilan (2005). Joint Attention, Communication, and Mind. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 1.score: 18.0
    This chapter argues that a central division among accounts of joint attention, both in philosophy and developmental psychology, turns on how they address two questions: What, if any, is the connection between the capacity to engage in joint attention triangles and the capacity to grasp the idea of objective truth? How do we explain the kind of openness or sharing of minds that occurs in joint attention? The chapter explores the connections between answers to both questions, and argues that theories (...)
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  49. Rafael Capurro & Christoph Pingel (2002). Ethical Issues of Online Communication Research. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (3):189-194.score: 18.0
    The paper addresses severalethical issues in online communication researchin light of digital ontology as well as theepistemological questions raised by theblurring boundary between fact and theory inthis field. The concept of ontology is used ina Heideggerian sense as related to the humancapacity of world construction on the basis ofthe givenness of our being-in-the-world.Ethical dilemmas of Internet research thusarise from the tension between bodily existenceand the proper object of research, i.e., onlineexistence. The following issues are beingconsidered: online identity, online language,online (...)
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  50. Susanne Arvidsson (2010). Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Study of the Views of Management Teams in Large Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):339 - 354.score: 18.0
    In light of the many corporate scandals, social and ethical commitment of society has increased considerably, which puts pressure on companies to communicate information related to corporate social responsibility (CSR). The reasons underlying the decision by management teams to engage in ethical communication are scarcely focussed on. Thus, grounded on legitimacy and stakeholder theory, this study analyses the views management teams in large listed companies have on communication of CSR. The focus is on aspects on interest, motives/reasons, users (...)
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