Search results for '*Oral Communication' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stefan Hirschauer (forthcoming). How Editors Decide. Oral Communication in Journal Peer Review. Human Studies:1-19.score: 180.0
    The operative nucleus of peer review processes has largely remained a ‘black box’ to analytical empirical research. There is a lack of direct insights into the communicative machinery of peer review, i.e., into ‘gatekeeping in action’. This article attempts to fill a small part of this huge research gap. It is based on an ethnographic case study about peer review communication in a sociological journal. It looks at the final phase of the peer review process: the decisions taken in (...)
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  2. Rowles Phillip (2004). Action Research: Japanese High School-Aged Students' Difficulties in English Oral Communication. Dialogos 4:163-178.score: 150.0
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  3. Examples From Grade (2000). Oral and Written Communication for Promoting Mathematical. In Ian Westbury, Stefan Hopmann & Kurt Riquarts (eds.), Teaching as a Reflective Practice: The German Didaktik Tradition. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 120.0
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  4. Christiane Senn-Fennell (2000). Oral and Written Communication for Promoting Mathematical Understanding: Teaching Examples From Grade 3. In Ian Westbury, Stefan Hopmann & Kurt Riquarts (eds.), Teaching as a Reflective Practice: The German Didaktik Tradition. L. Erlbaum Associates. 223--250.score: 120.0
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  5. Jeanine Czubaroff (1997). The Public Dimension Of Scientific Controversies. Argumentation 11 (1):51-74.score: 66.0
    Acceptance of three tenets of the doctrine of scientific objectivity, namely, the tenets of consensus, compartmentalization, and ahistorical truth, undermines scientists‘ appreciation of the importance of scientific controversy and consideration of the policy and value implications of controversial scientific theories. This essay rejects these tenets and suggests scientists appreciate theoretical diversity, learn rational means for adjudicating value differences, and cultivate conversational as well as written forms of communication.
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  6. Michelle Scalise Sugiyama (2011). The Forager Oral Tradition and the Evolution of Prolonged Juvenility. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 66.0
    The foraging niche is characterized by the exploitation of nutrient-rich resources using complex extraction techniques that take a long time to acquire. This costly period of development is supported by intensive parental investment. Although human life history theory tends to characterize this investment in terms of food and care, ethnographic research on foraging skill transmission suggests that the flow of resources from old to young also includes knowledge. Given the adaptive value of information, parents may have been under selection pressure (...)
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  7. Michael A. Arbib (2001). Co-Evolution of Human Consciousness and Language. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 929:195-220.score: 60.0
  8. Avraham ben ʻAḳiva Erlanger (ed.) (2011). Hagadah Shel Peh Saḥ: Meʻuṭeret Be-Divre Musar Ṿe-Hashḳafah ... Be-ʻinyan Galut U-Geʼulat Ha-Dibur. Feldhaim.score: 60.0
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  9. Avraham ben ʻAḳiva Erlanger (ed.) (2011). Hagadah Shel Peh Saḥ: Meʻuṭeret Be-Divre Musar Ṿe-Hashḳafah. Feldhaim.score: 60.0
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  10. Richard Fleming (2009). Evil and Silence. Paradigm Publishers.score: 60.0
    First book: Just plain evil -- You cannot meaningfully talk this way : violence is a virtue-so you cannot justifiably act that way -- Second book: Ordinary silence -- Affirming the limits of our words : listening attentively makes a life worth living -- Supplements to first and second books -- The difficulty is to stop.
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  11. Susan L. Hurley (2006). Bypassing Conscious Control: Unconscious Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech. In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. 301-337.score: 60.0
  12. Richard L. Lanigan (1984). Semiotic Phenomenology of Rhetoric: Eidetic Practice in Henry Grattan's Discourse on Tolerance. University Press of America.score: 60.0
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  13. J. C. Nyìri (1999). Philosophy, Education, and the History of Communication Technologies. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 3:185-192.score: 54.0
    The emergence and development of the humanities were initially bound up with the spread of alphabetic writing, and subsequently with the development of printing; the original task of the nascent humanities disciplines was a thoroughly practical one: that of building up our knowledge about the characteristics of the new media with the aim of exploiting this knowledge in everyday life—for the sake of economic, educational, or political benefits. In particular, the beginnings of philosophy lead us back to the times of (...)
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  14. J. Agar (2001). Community (Net) Work - James A. Anderson and Edward Rosenfeld (Eds), Talking Nets: An Oral History of Neural Networks (Cambridge, MA, and London: MIT Press, 1998), XI + 500 Pp., ISBN 0-262-01167-0. Hardback £31.95. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (3):557-564.score: 50.0
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  15. Tarcísio Vanderlinde (2013). Motivação eclesial luterana e inserção social entre comunidades quilombolas: a força da oralidade (Lutheran ecclesial motivation and social insertion among quilombolas communities: the power of orality) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n30p593. [REVIEW] Horizonte 11 (30):593-606.score: 48.0
    O artigo emerge de resultado da pesquisa sobre a inserção socioeconômica do Centro de Apoio ao Pequeno Agricultor (Capa) em territórios de remanescentes de quilombos no extremo sul do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil. O Capa se caracteriza como uma entidade mediadora, que nasce de motivações eclesiais da Igreja Evangélica de Confissão Luterana no Brasil (IECLB) ao final dos anos de 1970. Seu objetivo é disseminar sistemas agroecológicos entre populações de pequenos agricultores a fim de criar possibilidades (...)
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  16. Michael J. Hyde (1980). Philosophical Hermeneutics and the Communicative Experience: The Paradigm of Oral History. [REVIEW] Man and World 13 (1):81-98.score: 40.0
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  17. Charles Ess (2002). Cultures in Collision: Philosophical Lessons From Computer-Mediated Communication. In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub.. 229-253.score: 40.0
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  18. Madeline Davis & Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy (forthcoming). Oral History and the Study of Sexuality in the Lesbian Community: Buffalo, New York, 1940-1960. Feminist Studies.score: 40.0
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  19. Edward Watts (2005). Orality and Communal Identity in Eunapius' Lives of the Sophists and Philosophers. Byzantion 75:334-361.score: 40.0
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  20. Nuria Lorenzo-Dus & Patricia Bou-Franch (2013). A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Email Communication in Peninsular Spanish and British English: The Role of (in)Formality and (in)Directness. Pragmatics and Society 4 (1):1-25.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the email discursive practices of particular speakers of two different languages, namely Peninsular Spanish and British English. More specifically, our study focuses on (in)formality and (in)directness therein, for these lie at the heart of considerable scholarly debate regarding, respectively (i) the general stylistic drift towards orality and informality in technology-mediated communication, and (ii) the degree of communicative (in)directness - within broader politeness orientations - of speakers of different languages, specifically an orientation towards directness in Peninsular Spanish (...)
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  21. Gölge Seferoğlu (2008). Using Feature Films in Language Classes. Educational Studies 34 (1):1-9.score: 30.0
    This study aimed at finding students? perspectives on integrating feature films on digital versatile discs (DVDs) in oral communication classes of advanced English as foreign language (EFL) learners. A total of 29 students being trained as teachers of English participated in the study. Data were collected through a survey questionnaire. All participants unanimously agreed that through films they had the opportunity to learn about how people initiate and sustain a conversational exchange, and how they negotiate meaning; types of exclamation (...)
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  22. Manlio Simonetti (2011). Qualche novità sulla dottrina origeniana del Logos. Augustinianum 51 (2):331-348.score: 30.0
    The Author, taking account of the deficiencies of the surviving documentation on the doctrinal thought of the 2nd and 3rd centuries, and considering the primacy of oral communication, nevertheless rejects the conclusion of a recent article on Origen’s doctrine of the Logos. There are no concrete data in the work of the Alexandrian theologian to support the hypothesis that he engaged in controversy with radical supporters of the doctrine of the Logos, who – as Arians ante litteram – separated (...)
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  23. Asunción López-Varela Azcárate (2011). Intertextuality and Intermediality as Cross-Cultural Comunication Tools. Cultura 8 (2):7-22.score: 30.0
    Cross-cultural communication is about generating dialogical positions across cultural barriers. Communication is achieved when participants are able to construct meaning across varied sign systems. Oral communication makes use of a wide range of signs that contribute to make meaning, from eye contact to gestures and speech. In written/printed communication, together with the reproduction of visual images through painting, photography, etc., the most important resource is the textual format. Texts are grounded on a cognitive deictic basis and (...)
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  24. Jonathan Rée (1999). I See a Voice: Deafness, Language, and the Senses--A Philosophical History. Metropolitan Books, H. Holt and Co..score: 30.0
    A groundbreaking study of deafness, by a philosopher who combines the scientific erudition of Oliver Sacks with the historical flair of Simon Schama. There is nothing more personal than the human voice, traditionally considered the expression of the innermost self. But what of those who have no voice of their own and cannot hear the voices of others? In this tour de force of historical narrative, Jonathan Ree tells the astonishing story of the deaf, from the sixteenth century to the (...)
     
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  25. Renata Jasnos (2013). The Consequences of Early Literacy for the Discursive Transmission in the Old Testament. Dialogue and Universalism 23 (1):91-103.score: 30.0
    The books of the Old Testament contain elements of oral communication as well as the characteristic features of written elaboration. S. Niditch attempts to determine the probable oral-literate processes leading to the formation of the biblical message but does not answer the question concerning the history of the creation of any of the books. Biblical scholars examine the process of the shaping of the books as redaction criticism. This shaping, however, progressed according to different standards as evidenced by the (...)
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  26. Enrico Pasini (1992). L'antico E Il Nuovo. Multimedia 7:37-43; 40-45.score: 30.0
    The paper discusses problems related to historical change in the field of technology applied to the preservation and communication of knowledge. Debates of the years 1990s about the possible decadence of (printed) books in favour of other technologies, are evaluated with the help of a historical analogy. The art of memory was a widespread non-material technique for managing information in a world of prevalent oral communication, which was set aside by the new technologies of printed communication. In (...)
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  27. Adrian Costache (2011). Toward a New Middle Ages? On Aurel Codoban’s The Empire of Communication. [REVIEW] Journal for Communication and Culture 1 (2):162-166.score: 27.0
    Codoban, Aurel. Imperiul comunicării: corp, imagine şi relaţionare (The Empire of Communication: Body, Image and Relation). Cluj-Napoca: Idea, 2011.
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  28. Antony Aumann (2008). Kierkegaard on the Need for Indirect Communication. Dissertation, Indiana Universityscore: 24.0
    This dissertation concerns Kierkegaard’s theory of indirect communication. A central aspect of this theory is what I call the “indispensability thesis”: there are some projects only indirect communication can accomplish. The purpose of the dissertation is to disclose and assess the rationale behind the indispensability thesis. -/- A pair of questions guides the project. First, to what does ‘indirect communication’ refer? Two acceptable responses exist: (1) Kierkegaard’s version of Socrates’ midwifery method and (2) Kierkegaard’s use of artful (...)
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  29. Clas Weber (2013). Centered Communication. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):205-223.score: 24.0
    According to an attractive account of belief, our beliefs have centered content. According to an attractive account of communication, we utter sentences to express our beliefs and share them with each other. However, the two accounts are in conflict. In this paper I explore the consequences of holding on to the claim that beliefs have centered content. If we do in fact express the centered content of our beliefs, the content of the belief the hearer acquires cannot in general (...)
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  30. Antony Aumann (2010). Kierkegaard on Indirect Communication, the Crowd, and a Monstrous Illusion. In Robert L. Perkins (ed.), International Kierkegaard Commentary: Point of View. Mercer University Press.score: 24.0
    Following the pattern set by the early German Romantics, Kierkegaard conveys many of his insights through literature rather than academic prose. What makes him a valuable member of this tradition is the theory he develops to support it, his so-called “theory of indirect communication.” The most exciting aspect of this theory concerns the alleged importance of indirect communication: Kierkegaard claims that there are some projects only it can accomplish. This paper provides a critical account of two arguments Kierkegaard (...)
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  31. Anne E. McGuire & Rod Michalko (2011). Minds Between Us: Autism, Mindblindness and the Uncertainty of Communication. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (2):162-177.score: 24.0
    This paper problematizes contemporary cultural understandings of autism. We make use of the developmental psychology concepts of ‘Theory of Mind’ and ‘mindblindness’ to uncover the meaning of autism as expressed in these concepts. Our concern is that autism is depicted as a puzzle and that this depiction governs not only the way Western culture treats autism but also the way in which it governs everyday interactions with autistic people. Moreover, we show how the concepts of Theory of Mind and mindblindness (...)
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  32. Richard Breheny (2006). Communication and Folk Psychology. Mind and Language 21 (1):74-107.score: 24.0
    Prominent accounts of language use (those of Grice, Lewis, Stalnaker, Sperber and Wilson among others) have viewed basic communicative acts as essentially involving the attitudes of the participating agents. Developmental data poses a dilemma for these accounts, since it suggests children below age four are competent communicators but would lack the ability to conceptualise communication if philosophers and linguists are right about what communication is. This paper argues that this dilemma is quite serious and that these prominent accounts (...)
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  33. Reggy Hooghiemstra (2000). Corporate Communication and Impression Management – New Perspectives Why Companies Engage in Corporate Social Reporting. Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):55 - 68.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses the theoretical framework on corporate social reporting. Although that corporate social reporting has been analysed from different perspectives, legitmacy theory currently is the dominating perspective. Authors employing this framework suggest that social and environmental disclosures are responses to both public pressure and increased media attention resulting from major social incidents such as the Exxon Valdez oil spill and the chemical leak in Bhopal (India). More specifically, those authors argue that the increase in social disclosures represent a strategy (...)
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  34. Richard Moore (2013). Evidence and Interpretation in Great Ape Gestural Communication. Humana.Mente 24:27-51.score: 24.0
    Tomasello and colleagues have offered various arguments to explain why apes find the comprehension of pointing difficult. They have argued that: (i) apes fail to understand communicative intentions; (ii) they fail to understand informative, cooperative communication, and (iii) they fail to track the common ground that pointing comprehension requires. In the course of a review of the literature on apes' production and comprehension of pointing, I reject (i) and (ii), and offer a qualified defence of (iii). Drawing on work (...)
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  35. Steffen Borge (2012). Communication, Conflict and Cooperation. Protosociology 29.score: 24.0
    According to Steven Pinker and his associates the cooperative model of human communication fails, because evolutionary biology teaches us that most social relationships, including talk-exchange, involve combinations of cooperation and conflict. In particular, the phenomenon of the strategic speaker who uses indirect speech in order to be able to deny what he meant by a speech act (deniability of conversational implicatures) challenges the model. In reply I point out that interlocutors can aim at understanding each other (cooperation), while being (...)
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  36. Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.) (2005). Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 24.0
    Sometime around their first birthday most infants begin to engage in relatively sustained bouts of attending together with their caretakers to objects in their environment. By the age of 18 months, on most accounts, they are engaging in full-blown episodes of joint attention. As developmental psychologists (usually) use the term, for such joint attention to be in play, it is not sufficient that the infant and the adult are in fact attending to the same object, nor that the one’s attention (...)
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  37. Christopher Gauker (1992). The Lockean Theory of Communication. Noûs 26 (3):303-324.score: 24.0
    The Lockean theory of communication is here defined as the theory that communication takes place when a hearer grasps some sort of mental object, distinct from the speaker's words, that the speaker's words express. This theory contrasts with the view that spoken languages are the very medium of a kind of thought of which overt speech is the most basic form. This article is a critique of some of the most common motives for adopting a Lockean theory of (...)
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  38. Naomi M. Eilan (2005). Joint Attention, Communication, and Mind. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 1.score: 24.0
    This chapter argues that a central division among accounts of joint attention, both in philosophy and developmental psychology, turns on how they address two questions: What, if any, is the connection between the capacity to engage in joint attention triangles and the capacity to grasp the idea of objective truth? How do we explain the kind of openness or sharing of minds that occurs in joint attention? The chapter explores the connections between answers to both questions, and argues that theories (...)
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  39. Rafael Capurro & Christoph Pingel (2002). Ethical Issues of Online Communication Research. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (3):189-194.score: 24.0
    The paper addresses severalethical issues in online communication researchin light of digital ontology as well as theepistemological questions raised by theblurring boundary between fact and theory inthis field. The concept of ontology is used ina Heideggerian sense as related to the humancapacity of world construction on the basis ofthe givenness of our being-in-the-world.Ethical dilemmas of Internet research thusarise from the tension between bodily existenceand the proper object of research, i.e., onlineexistence. The following issues are beingconsidered: online identity, online language,online (...)
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  40. Susanne Arvidsson (2010). Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Study of the Views of Management Teams in Large Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):339 - 354.score: 24.0
    In light of the many corporate scandals, social and ethical commitment of society has increased considerably, which puts pressure on companies to communicate information related to corporate social responsibility (CSR). The reasons underlying the decision by management teams to engage in ethical communication are scarcely focussed on. Thus, grounded on legitimacy and stakeholder theory, this study analyses the views management teams in large listed companies have on communication of CSR. The focus is on aspects on interest, motives/reasons, users (...)
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  41. Xinli Wang (2007). Incommensurability and Cross-Language Communication. Ashgate Publishing Ltd, England.score: 24.0
    Against the received translation-failure interpretation, this book presents a presuppositional interpretation of incommensurability, that is, the thesis of incommensurability as cross-language communication breakdown due to the incompatible metaphysical presuppositions underlying two competing presuppositional languages, such as scientific languages. This semantically sound, epistemologically well-established, and metaphysically profound interpretation not only affirms the tenability of the notion of incommensurability and confirms the reality of the phenomenon of incommensurability, but also makes some significant contributions to the discussion of many related issues, such (...)
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  42. Endre Begby (2013). Semantic Minimalism and the “Miracle of Communication”. Philosophical Studies 165 (3):957-973.score: 24.0
    According to semantic minimalism, context-invariant minimal semantic propositions play an essential role in linguistic communication. This claim is key to minimalists’ argument against semantic contextualism: if there were no such minimal semantic propositions, and semantic content varied widely with shifts in context, then it would be “miraculous” if communication were ever to occur. This paper offers a critical examination of the minimalist account of communication, focusing on a series of examples where communication occurs without a minimal (...)
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  43. Marija Jankovic (2014). Communication and Shared Information. Philosophical Studies 169 (3):489-508.score: 24.0
    Strawson style counterexamples to Grice’s account of communication show that a communicative intention has to be overt. Saying what overtness consists in has proven to be difficult for Gricean accounts. In this paper, I show that a common explanation of overtness, one that construes it in terms of a network of shared beliefs or knowledge, is mistaken. I offer an alternative, collectivist, model of communication. This model takes the utterer’s communicative intention to be a we-intention, a kind of (...)
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  44. Melissa A. Cook & Annette Holba (eds.) (2008). Philosophies of Communication: Implications for Everyday Experience. Peter Lang.score: 24.0
    The essays in this volume consider, in multiple ways, how philosophies of communication and communication ethics can shape and enhance human communication.
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  45. Jamie Cullen (2009). Imitation Versus Communication: Testing for Human-Like Intelligence. Minds and Machines 19 (2):237-254.score: 24.0
    Turing’s Imitation Game is often viewed as a test for theorised machines that could ‘think’ and/or demonstrate ‘intelligence’. However, contrary to Turing’s apparent intent, it can be shown that Turing’s Test is essentially a test for humans only. Such a test does not provide for theorised artificial intellects with human-like, but not human-exact, intellectual capabilities. As an attempt to bypass this limitation, I explore the notion of shifting the goal posts of the Turing Test, and related tests such as the (...)
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  46. Guglielmo Tamburrini (2009). Brain to Computer Communication: Ethical Perspectives on Interaction Models. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 2 (3):137-149.score: 24.0
    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) enable one to control peripheral ICT and robotic devices by processing brain activity on-line. The potential usefulness of BCI systems, initially demonstrated in rehabilitation medicine, is now being explored in education, entertainment, intensive workflow monitoring, security, and training. Ethical issues arising in connection with these investigations are triaged taking into account technological imminence and pervasiveness of BCI technologies. By focussing on imminent technological developments, ethical reflection is informatively grounded into realistic protocols of brain-to-computer communication. In (...)
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  47. Ray Buchanan (2013). Reference, Understanding, and Communication. Australasian Journal of Philosophy (1):1-16.score: 24.0
    Brian Loar [1976] observed that, even in the simplest of cases, such as an utterance of (1): ‘He is a stockbroker’, a speaker's audience might misunderstand her utterance even if they correctly identify the referent of the relevant singular term, and understand what is being predicated of it. Numerous theorists, including Bezuidenhout [1997], Heck [1995], Paul [1999], and Récanati [1993, 1995], have used Loar's observation to argue against direct reference accounts of assertoric content and communication, maintaining that, even in (...)
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  48. Birgitta Dresp-Langley (2009). The Communication Contract and its ten Ground Clauses. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):415 - 436.score: 24.0
    Global society issues are putting increasing pressure on both small and large organizations to communicate ethically at all levels. Achieving this requires social skills beyond the choice of language or vocabulary and relies above all on individual social responsibility. Arguments from social contract philosophy and speech act theory lead to consider a communication contract that identifies the necessary individual skills for ethical communication on the basis of a limited number of explicit clauses. These latter are pragmatically binding for (...)
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  49. Bert Olivier (2009). Philosophy and Communication: Collected Essays. Peter Lang.score: 24.0
    The essays assembled in this volume focus on philosophical questions regarding various aspects of communication.
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