Search results for '*Performance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  40
    Geoff Moore (2001). Corporate Social and Financial Performance: An Investigation in the U.K. Supermarket Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):299 - 315.
    The comparison of corporate social performance with corporate financial performance has been a popular field of study over the past 25 years. The results, while broadly conclusive of a positive relationship, are not entirely consistent. In addition, most of the previous studies have concentrated on large-scale cross-industry studies and often with a single variable for corporate social performance, in order to produce statistically significant results. This weakens the richness of understanding that might be obtained from a single industry study with (...)
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  2. W. Gary Simpson & Theodor Kohers (2002). The Link Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance: Evidence From the Banking Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 35 (2):97 - 109.
    The purpose of this investigation is to extend earlier research on the relationship between corporate social and financial performance. The unique contribution of the study is the empirical analysis of a sample of companies from the banking industry and the use of Community Reinvestment Act ratings as a social performance measure. The empirical analysis solidly supports the hypothesis that the link between social and financial performance is positive.
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  3. Michèle N. Schubiger, Florian L. Wüstholz, André Wunder & Judith M. Burkart (2015). High Emotional Reactivity Toward an Experimenter Affects Participation, but Not Performance, in Cognitive Tests with Common Marmosets. Animal Cognition 18 (3):701-712.
    When testing primates with cognitive tasks, it is usually not considered that subjects differ markedly in terms of emotional reactivity toward the experimenter, which potentially affects a subject’s cognitive performance. We addressed this issue in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a monkey species in which males tend to show stronger emotional reactivity in testing situations, whereas females have been reported to outperform males in cognitive tasks. In a two-phase experiment, we first quantified the emotional reactivity of 14 subjects toward four different (...)
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  4.  19
    Jasmin Joecks, Kerstin Pull & Karin Vetter (2013). Gender Diversity in the Boardroom and Firm Performance: What Exactly Constitutes a “Critical Mass?”. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):61-72.
    The under-representation of women on boards is a heavily discussed topic—not only in Germany. Based on critical mass theory and with the help of a hand-collected panel dataset of 151 listed German firms for the years 2000–2005, we explore whether the link between gender diversity and firm performance follows a U-shape. Controlling for reversed causality, we find evidence for gender diversity to at first negatively affect firm performance and—only after a “critical mass” of about 30 % women has been reached—to (...)
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  5. Heather Schmidt Albinger & Sarah J. Freeman (2000). Corporate Social Performance and Attractiveness as an Employer to Different Job Seeking Populations. Journal of Business Ethics 28 (3):243 - 253.
    This study investigates the hypothesis that the advantage corporate social performance (CSP) yields in attracting human resources depends on the degree of job choice possessed by the job seeking population. Results indicate that organizational CSP is positively related to employer attractiveness for job seekers with high levels of job choice but not related for populations with low levels suggesting advantages to firms with high levels of CSP in the ability to attract the most qualified employees.
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  6.  32
    Jean McGuire, Sandra Dow & Kamal Argheyd (2003). CEO Incentives and Corporate Social Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 45 (4):341 - 359.
    This paper examines the relationship between CEO incentives and strong and weak corporate social performance. Using the KLD database we find that incentives have no significant relationship with strong social performance. Salary and long-term incentives have a positive association with weak social performance.
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  7.  21
    Roberto Garcia-Castro, Miguel A. Ariño & Miguel A. Canela (2010). Does Social Performance Really Lead to Financial Performance? Accounting for Endogeneity. Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):107 - 126.
    The empirical relationship between a firm’s social performance and its financial performance is still not well established in the literature. Despite more than 30 years of research and more than 100 empirical studies on the issue, the results are still mixed. We argue that the heterogeneous results found in previous studies are not due exclusively to problems related with the measurement instruments or the samples used. Instead, we posit that a more fundamental problem related with the endogeneity (...)
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  8.  22
    Taïeb Hafsi & Gokhan Turgut (2013). Boardroom Diversity and its Effect on Social Performance: Conceptualization and Empirical Evidence. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):463-479.
    In this paper, we seek to answer two questions: (1) what does boardroom diversity stand for in the strategic management literature? And, (2) is there a significant relationship between boardroom diversity and corporate social performance. We first clarify the boardroom diversity concept, distinguishing between a structural diversity of boards and a demographic diversity in boards, and then we investigate its possible linkage to social performance in a sample of S&P500 firms. We find a significant relationship between (...)
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  9.  13
    Ioanna Boulouta (2013). Hidden Connections: The Link Between Board Gender Diversity and Corporate Social Performance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):185-197.
    This study examines whether and how female board directors may affect corporate social performance (CSP) by drawing on social role theory and feminist ethics literature. The empirical analysis, based on a sample of 126 firms drawn from the S&P500 group of companies over a 5-year period, suggests that board gender diversity (BGD) significantly affects CSP. However, this impact depends on the social performance metric under investigation. In particular, more gender diverse boards exert stronger influence on (...)
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  10.  16
    Hannes Leroy, Michael E. Palanski & Tony Simons (2012). Authentic Leadership and Behavioral Integrity as Drivers of Follower Commitment and Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (3):255-264.
    The literatures on both authentic leadership and behavioral integrity have argued that leader integrity drives follower performance. Yet, despite overlap in conceptualization and mechanisms, no research has investigated how authentic leadership and behavioral integrity relate to one another in driving follower performance. In this study, we propose and test the notion that authentic leadership behavior is an antecedent to perceptions of leader behavioral integrity, which in turn affects follower affective organizational commitment and follower work role performance. Analysis of a survey (...)
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  11.  49
    Bernadette M. Ruf, Krishnamurty Muralidhar, Robert M. Brown, Jay J. Janney & Karen Paul (2001). An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship Between Change in Corporate Social Performance and Financial Performance: A Stakeholder Theory Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 32 (2):143 - 156.
    Stakeholder theory provides a framework for investigating the relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance. This relationship is investigated by examining how change in CSP is related to change in financial accounting measures. The findings provide some support for a tenet in stakeholder theory which asserts that the dominant stakeholder group, shareholders, financially benefit when management meets the demands of multiple stakeholders. Specifically, change in CSP was positively associated with growth in sales for the (...)
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  12.  2
    Michael E. Palanski, Surinder S. Kahai & Francis J. Yammarino (2011). Team Virtues and Performance: An Examination of Transparency, Behavioral Integrity, and Trust. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):201 - 216.
    Virtue-based research in business ethics has increased over the last two decades, but most of the research has focused on the actions of an individual person. In this article, we examine the associations among team-level virtues using data from two studies. Specifically, we investigate whether transparency (usually thought to be an organizational-or collective-level construct), behavioral integrity (usually thought to be an individuallevel construct), and trust (usually thought to be an individual-level construct) can be conceptualized and operate at the team (...)
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  13.  10
    Nuttaneeya Ann Torugsa, Wayne O'Donohue & Rob Hecker (2013). Proactive CSR: An Empirical Analysis of the Role of its Economic, Social and Environmental Dimensions on the Association Between Capabilities and Performance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):383-402.
    Proactive corporate social responsibility (CSR) involves business practices adopted voluntarily by firms that go beyond regulatory requirements in order to actively support sustainable economic, social and environmental development, and thereby contribute broadly and positively to society. This empirical study examines the role of the economic, social and environmental dimensions of proactive CSR on the association between three specific capabilities—shared vision, stakeholder management and strategic proactivity—and financial performance in small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Using quantitative data collected from a (...)
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  14.  45
    M. Victoria López, Arminda Garcia & Lazaro Rodriguez (2007). Sustainable Development and Corporate Performance: A Study Based on the Dow Jones Sustainability Index. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (3):285 - 300.
    The goal of this paper is to examine whether business performance is affected by the adoption of practices included under the term Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). To achieve this goal, we analyse the relation between CSR and certain accounting indicators and examine whether there exist significant differences in performance indicators between European firms that have adopted CSR and others that have not. The effects of compliance with the requirements of CSR were determined on the basis of firms included in the (...)
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  15.  46
    Chi-Shiun Lai, Chih-Jen Chiu, Chin-Fang Yang & Da-Chang Pai (2010). The Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Brand Performance: The Mediating Effect of Industrial Brand Equity and Corporate Reputation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):457 - 469.
    In this article, the researchers explore the following question. Can corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the corporate reputation of a firm lead to its brand equity in business-to-business (B2B) markets? This study discusses CSR from customers' viewpoints by taking the sample of industrial purchasers from Taiwan small-medium enterprises. The aims of this study are to investigate: first, the effects of CSR and corporate reputation on industrial brand equity; second, the effects of CSR, corporate reputation, and brand equity (...)
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  16.  46
    Yongqiang Gao (2009). Corporate Social Performance in China: Evidence From Large Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):23 - 35.
    Based on a contest analysis of the official websites of top 100 companies in China in 2007, the paper reports the social performance of large Chinese companies. We try to focus on and answer the following three questions about CSP of large companies in China: (1) how is their overall social performance?; (2) what are the social issues they addressed?; and (3) what are the stakeholders they addressed? The results are also compared among different ownership (...)
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  17.  21
    Rob Bauer, Jeroen Derwall & Rogér Otten (2007). The Ethical Mutual Fund Performance Debate: New Evidence From Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (2):111 - 124.
    Although the academic interest in ethical mutual fund performance has developed steadily, the evidence to date is mainly sample-specific. To tackle this critique, new research should extend to unexplored countries. Using this as a motivation, we examine the performance and risk sensitivities of Canadian ethical mutual funds vis-à-vis their conventional peers. In order to overcome the methodological deficiencies most prior papers suffered from, we use performance measurement approaches in the spirit of Carhart (1997, Journal of Finance 52(1): 57–82) and Ferson (...)
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  18.  43
    Jennifer C. Chen, Dennis M. Patten & Robin W. Roberts (2008). Corporate Charitable Contributions: A Corporate Social Performance or Legitimacy Strategy? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):131 - 144.
    This study examines the relation between firms’ corporate philanthropic giving and their performance in three other social domains – employee relations, environmental issues, and product safety. Based on a sample of 384 U.S. companies and using data pooled from 1998 through 2000, we find that worse performers in the other social areas are both more likely to make charitable contributions and that the extent of their giving is larger than for better performers. Analyses of each separate area of social performance, (...)
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  19.  10
    Patrick M. Erwin (2011). Corporate Codes of Conduct: The Effects of Code Content and Quality on Ethical Performance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):535 - 548.
    Corporate codes of conduct are a practical corporate social responsibility (CSR) instrument commonly used to govern employee behavior and establish a socially responsible organizational culture. The effectiveness of these codes has been widely discussed on theoretical grounds and empirically tested in numerous previous reports that directly compare companies with and without codes of conduct. Empirical research has yielded inconsistent results that may be explained by multiple ancillary factors, including the quality of code content and implementation, which are excluded from (...)
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  20.  24
    Fahri Karakas (2010). Spirituality and Performance in Organizations: A Literature Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):89 - 106.
    The purpose of this article is to review spirituality at work literature and to explore how spirituality improves employees' performances and organizational effectiveness. The article reviews about 140 articles on workplace spirituality to review their findings on how spirituality supports organizational performance. Three different perspectives are introduced on how spirituality benefits employees and supports organizational performance based on the extant literature: (a) Spirituality enhances employee well-being and quality of life; (b) Spirituality provides employees a sense of purpose and meaning at (...)
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  21. Andrew Geeves, Doris J. F. McIlwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen (2013). To Think or Not To Think: The Apparent Paradox of Expert Skill in Music Performance. Educational Philosophy and Theory (6):1-18.
    Expert skill in music performance involves an apparent paradox. On stage, expert musicians are required accurately to retrieve information that has been encoded over hours of practice. Yet they must also remain open to the demands of the ever-changing situational contingencies with which they are faced during performance. To further explore this apparent paradox and the way in which it is negotiated by expert musicians, this article profiles theories presented by Roger Chaffin, Hubert Dreyfus and Tony and Helga Noice. For (...)
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  22.  20
    Jacob Brower & Vijay Mahajan (2013). Driven to Be Good: A Stakeholder Theory Perspective on the Drivers of Corporate Social Performance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):313-331.
    Despite growing evidence of the benefits to a firm of improving corporate social performance (CSP), many firms vary significantly in terms of their CSP activities. This research investigates how the characteristics of the stakeholder landscape influence a firm’s CSP breadth. Using stakeholder theory, we specifically propose that several factors increase the salience and impact of stakeholders’ demands on the firm and that, in response to these factors, a firm’s CSP will have greater breadth. A firm’s CSP breadth is (...)
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  23.  22
    Cory Searcy (2012). Corporate Sustainability Performance Measurement Systems: A Review and Research Agenda. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (3):239-253.
    Corporate sustainability performance measurement systems (SPMS) have been the subject of a growing amount of research. However, there are many challenges and opportunities associated with the design, implementation, use, and evolution of these systems that have yet to be addressed. The purpose of this article is to identify future directions for research in the design, implementation, use, and evolution of corporate SPMS. A concise review of key literature published between 2000 and 2010 is presented. The literature review focuses on research (...)
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  24.  14
    Kent Walker & Fang Wan (2012). The Harm of Symbolic Actions and Green-Washing: Corporate Actions and Communications on Environmental Performance and Their Financial Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):227-242.
    We examine over 100 top performing Canadian firms in visibly polluting industries as we seek to answer four research questions: What specific environmental issues are firms addressing? How do these issues differ between industries? Are both symbolic and substantive actions financially beneficial? Does green-washing, measured as the difference between symbolic and substantive action, and/or green-highlighting, measured as the combined effect of symbolic and substantive actions, pay? We find that substantive actions of environmental issues (green walk) neither harm nor (...)
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  25.  12
    Francisco Climent & Pilar Soriano (2011). Green and Good? The Investment Performance of US Environmental Mutual Funds. Journal of Business Ethics 103 (2):275-287.
    Increased concern for the environment has increased the number of investment opportunities in mutual funds specialized in promoting responsible environmental attitudes. This article examines the performance and risk sensitivities of US green mutual funds vis-à-vis their conventional peers. We also analyze and compare this performance relative to other socially responsible investing (SRI) mutual funds. In order to implement this analysis, we apply a CAPM-based methodology and find that in the 1987–2009 period, environ- mental funds had lower performance than conventional funds (...)
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  26.  36
    Rashid Ameer & Radiah Othman (2012). Sustainability Practices and Corporate Financial Performance: A Study Based on the Top Global Corporations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):61-79.
    Sustainability is concerned with the impact of present actions on the ecosystems, societies, and environments of the future. Such concerns should be reflected in the strategic planning of sustainable corporations. Strategic intentions of this nature are operationalized through the adoption of a long-term focus and a more inclusive set of responsibilities focusing on ethical practices, employees, environment, and customers. A central hypothesis, that we test in this paper is that companies which attend to this set of responsibilities under the term (...)
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  27.  92
    Pieter van Beurden & Tobias Gössling (2008). The Worth of Values – a Literature Review on the Relation Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):407-424.
    One of the older questions in the debate about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is whether it is worthwhile for organizations to pay attention to societal demands. This debate was emotionally, normatively, and ideologically loaded. Up to the present, this question has been an important trigger for empirical research in CSR. However, the answer to the question has apparently not been found yet, at least that is what many researchers state. This apparent ambivalence in CSR consequences invites a literature study (...)
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  28.  13
    Philip L. Baird, Pinar Celikkol Geylani & Jeffrey A. Roberts (2012). Corporate Social and Financial Performance Re-Examined: Industry Effects in a Linear Mixed Model Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):367-388.
    In this research, we shed new light on the empirical link between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP) via the application of empirical models and methods new to the CSP–CFP literature. Applying advanced financial models to a uniquely constructed panel dataset, we demonstrate that a significant overall CSP–CFP relationship exists and that this relationship is, in part, conditioned on firms’ industry-specific context. To accommodate the estimation of time-invariant industry and industry-interaction effects, we estimate linear mixed models in (...)
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  29.  51
    Marc Orlitzky (2001). Does Firm Size Comfound the Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Firm Financial Performance? Journal of Business Ethics 33 (2):167 - 180.
    There has been some theoretical and empirical debate that the positive relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and firm financial performance (FFP) is spurious and in fact caused by a third factor, namely large firm size. This study examines this question by integrating three meta-analyses of more than two decades of research on (1) CSP and FFP, (2) firm size and CSP, and (3) firm size and FFP into one path-analytic model. The present study does not confirm (...)
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  30.  86
    Maria Ceu Cortez, Florinda Silva & Nelson Areal (2009). The Performance of European Socially Responsible Funds. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):573 - 588.
    Recent years have witnessed an increasing growth in mutual funds that invest according to social criteria. As a consequence, the financial performance of these portfolios has attracted the interest of academics and practitioners. This paper investigates the performance of a sample of socially responsible mutual funds from seven European countries investing globally and/or in the European market. Using unconditional and conditional models, we assess the performance of these funds in comparison to conventional and socially responsible benchmark portfolios. The results show (...)
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  31.  20
    Charles H. Cho, Dennis M. Patten & Robin W. Roberts (2006). Corporate Political Strategy: An Examination of the Relation Between Political Expenditures, Environmental Performance, and Environmental Disclosure. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):139 - 154.
    Two fundamental business ethics issues that repeatedly surface in the academic literature relate to business's role in the development of public policy [Suarez, S. L.: 2000, Does Business Learn? (The University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, MI); Roberts, R. W. and D. D. Bobek: 2004, Accounting, Organizations and Society 29(5-6), 565-590] and its role in responsibly managing the natural environment [Newton, L.: 2005, Business Ethics and the Natural Environment (Blackwell Publishing, Oxford)]. When studied together, researchers often examine if, and how, (...)
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  32.  27
    Pascual Berrone, Jordi Surroca & Josep A. Tribó (2007). Corporate Ethical Identity as a Determinant of Firm Performance: A Test of the Mediating Role of Stakeholder Satisfaction. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):35 - 53.
    In this article, we empirically assess the impact of corporate ethical identity (CEI) on a firm's financial performance. Drawing on formulations of normative and instrumental stakeholder theory, we argue that firms with a strong ethical identity achieve a greater degree of stakeholder satisfaction (SS), which, in turn, positively influences a firm's financial performance. We analyze two dimensions of the CEI of firms: corporate revealed ethics and corporate applied ethics. Our results indicate that revealed ethics has informational worth and (...)
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  33.  23
    Hoje Jo & Yongtae Kim (2008). Ethics and Disclosure: A Study of the Financial Performance of Firms in the Seasoned Equity Offerings Market. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):855 - 878.
    In this article, we examine the association between ethics and disclosure and the impact of this association on the long-term, post-issue performance of seasoned equity offerings (SEOs). We argue that firms with extensive disclosure are less likely to face information problems, and more likely to lead to an active shareholder monitoring, and therefore, engage in fewer unethical activities, such as aggressive earnings manipulation, and have better long-term, post-issue performance. Consistent with these predictions, this study presents evidence that disclosure is negatively (...)
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  34.  8
    Chen Song, Ryota Kanai, Stephen M. Fleming, Rimona S. Weil, D. Samuel Schwarzkopf & Geraint Rees (2011). Relating Inter-Individual Differences in Metacognitive Performance on Different Perceptual Tasks. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1787.
    Human behavior depends on the ability to effectively introspect about our performance. For simple perceptual decisions, this introspective or metacognitive ability varies substantially across individuals and is correlated with the structure of focal areas in prefrontal cortex. This raises the possibility that the ability to introspect about different perceptual decisions might be mediated by a common cognitive process. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether inter-individual differences in metacognitive ability were correlated across two different perceptual tasks where individuals made judgments (...)
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  35.  26
    Jyoti D. Mahadeo, Teerooven Soobaroyen & Vanisha Oogarah Hanuman (2012). Board Composition and Financial Performance: Uncovering the Effects of Diversity in an Emerging Economy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):375-388.
    We examine the key elements of board diversity (or heterogeneity) amongst listed companies operating in an emerging economy (Mauritius) and the extent to which these influence financial performance. Specifically, we ask whether there is evidence of tangible benefits in pursuing a strategy of board diversity in terms of gender-, age-, educational background and independence in a corporate context which has long been dominated by family-led and ‘closed’ boardrooms. In light of recent corporate governance developments which appear to foster greater diversity, (...)
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  36.  25
    Javier Gil-Bazo, Pablo Ruiz-Verdú & André A. P. Santos (2010). The Performance of Socially Responsible Mutual Funds: The Role of Fees and Management Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):243 - 263.
    In this article, we shed light on the debate about the financial performance of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds by separately analyzing the contributions of before-fee performance and fees to SRI funds' performance, and by investigating the role played by fund management companies in the determination of those variables. We apply the matching estimator methodology to obtain our results and find that in the period 1997–2005, US SRI funds had better beforeand after-fee performance than conventional funds with similar characteristics. (...)
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  37.  40
    Rim Makni, Claude Francoeur & François Bellavance (2009). Causality Between Corporate Social Performance and Financial Performance: Evidence From Canadian Firms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):409 - 422.
    This study assesses the causal relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and financial performance (FP). We perform our empirical analyses on a sample of 179 publicly held Canadian firms and use the measures of CSP provided by Canadian Social Investment Database for the years 2004 and 2005. Using the “Granger causality” approach, we find no significant relationship between a composite measure of a firm’s CSP and FP, except for market returns. However, using individual measures of CSP, (...)
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  38.  12
    Pascal Paillé, Yang Chen, Olivier Boiral & Jiafei Jin (2013). The Impact of Human Resource Management on Environmental Performance: An Employee-Level Study. Journal of Business Ethics 121 (3):1-16.
    This field study investigated the relationship between strategic human resource management, internal environmental concern, organizational citizenship behavior for the environment, and environmental performance. The originality of the present research was to link human resource management and environmental management in the Chinese context. Data consisted of 151 matched questionnaires from top management team members, chief executive officers, and frontline workers. The main results indicate that organizational citizenship behavior for the environment fully mediates the relationship between strategic human (...)
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  39. Supriti Mishra & Damodar Suar (2010). Does Corporate Social Responsibility Influence Firm Performance of Indian Companies? Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):571 - 601.
    This study examines whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) towards primary stakeholders influences the financial and the non-financial performance (NFP) of Indian firms. Perceptual data on CSR and NFP were collected from 150 senior-level Indian managers including CEOs through questionnaire survey.Hard data on financial performance (FP) of the companies were obtained from secondary sources. A questionnaire for assessing CSR was developed with respect to six stakeholder groups - employees, customers, investors, community, natural environment, and suppliers. A composite measure (...)
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  40.  5
    John B. Bingham, W. Gibb Dyer Jr, Isaac Smith & Gregory L. Adams (2011). A Stakeholder Identity Orientation Approach to Corporate Social Performance in Family Firms. Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):565-585.
    Extending the dialogue on corporate social performance (CSP) as descriptive stakeholder management (Clarkson, Acad Manage Rev 20:92, 1995), we examine differences in CSP activity between family and nonfamily firms. We argue that CSP activity can be explained by the firm’s identity orientation toward stakeholders (Brickson, Admin Sci Quart 50:576, 2005; Acad Manage Rev 32:864, 2007). Specifically, individualistic, relational, or collectivistic identity orientations can describe a firm’s level of CSP activity toward certain stakeholders. Family firms, we suggest, adopt a (...)
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  41.  30
    Han Donker, Deborah Poff & Saif Zahir (2008). Corporate Values, Codes of Ethics, and Firm Performance: A Look at the Canadian Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):527 - 537.
    In this empirical study, we present two new models that are corporate ethics based. The first model numerically quantifies the corporate value index (CV-Index) based on a set of predefined parameters and the second model estimates the market-to-book values of equity in relation to the CV-Index as well as other parameters. These models were applied to Canadian companies listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX). Through our analysis, we found statistically significant evidence that corporate values (CV-Index) positively correlated with firm (...)
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  42.  11
    X. H. Meng, S. X. Zeng & C. M. Tam (2013). From Voluntarism to Regulation: A Study on Ownership, Economic Performance and Corporate Environmental Information Disclosure in China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):217-232.
    This article examines whether economic performance could affect EID and how the relationship is determined by the form of ownership from voluntarism to regulation under the current Chinese context. In this study, our empirical results show that the relationship between firms’ performance and EID is complex and the interactive impact of ownership and economic performance on EID significantly varies from voluntary disclosure to mandatory disclosure. This study provides a more comprehensive understanding of the motivations in corporate EID. (...)
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  43.  33
    Nikolay A. Dentchev (2004). Corporate Social Performance as a Business Strategy. Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):397 - 412.
    Having the ambition to contribute to the practical value of the theory on corporate social performance (CSP), this paper approaches the question whether CSP can contribute to the competitive advantage of firms. We adopted an explorative case-study methodology to explore the variety of positive and negative effects of CSP on the competitiveness of organizations. As this study aimed at identifying as great variety of these effects as possible, we selected a diversified group of respondents. Data was thus collected (...)
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  44.  29
    Stewart Jones, Sandra van der Laan, Geoff Frost & Janice Loftus (2008). The Investment Performance of Socially Responsible Investment Funds in Australia. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):181 - 203.
    Interest in the notion of the possible financial sacrifice suffered by socially responsible investment (SRI) fund investors for considering ethical, social and environmental issues in their investment decisions has spawned considerable academic interest in the performance of SRI funds. Both the Australian and international research literature have yielded largely mixed results. However, several of these studies are hampered by methodological problems which can obscure the significance of reported results, such as the use of small sample sizes, inconsistencies in the time (...)
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  45.  16
    José Salazar, Bryan W. Husted & Markus Biehl (2012). Thoughts on the Evaluation of Corporate Social Performance Through Projects. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):175-186.
    Corporate social performance (CSP) has become a widely applied concept, discussed in most large firms’ corporate reports and the academic literature alike. Unfortunately, CSP has largely been employed as a way of demonstrating corporate social responsibility (CSR) in practice, or to justify the business case for CSR in academia by relating some measure of CSP to some measure of financial performance. In this article, we discuss multiple shortcomings to these approaches. We argue that (1) CSR activities (...)
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  46.  56
    Belaid Rettab, Anis Ben Brik & Kamel Mellahi (2009). A Study of Management Perceptions of the Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Organisational Performance in Emerging Economies: The Case of Dubai. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):371 - 390.
    Although a number of studies have shown that corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities often lead to greater organisational performance in western developed economies, researchers are yet to examine the strategic value of CSR in emerging economies. Using survey data from 280 firms operating in Dubai, this study examines the link between CSR activities and organisational performance. The results show that CSR has a positive relationship with all three measures of organisational performance: financial performance, employee commitment, (...)
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  47.  2
    Jeffrey S. Harrison & Joseph E. Coombs (2012). The Moderating Effects From Corporate Governance Characteristics on the Relationship Between Available Slack and Community-Based Firm Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):409-422.
    Recent perspectives on community investments suggest that they are opportunities for firms to create value for shareholders and other stakeholders. However, many corporate managers are still influenced by a widely held belief that such investments erode profits and are therefore unjustifiable from an agency perspective. In this paper, we refine and test theory regarding countervailing forces that influence community-based firm performance. We hypothesize that high levels of available slack will be associated with higher community-based performance, but that this relationship will (...)
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  48.  4
    Mikko H. Manner (2010). The Impact of CEO Characteristics on Corporate Social Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):53 - 72.
    While there are growing bodies of research examining both the differences between strongly and poorly socially performing firms, and the impact of firm leaders on other strategic outcomes, little has been done in examining the effect of firm leaders on corporate social performance (CSP). This study directly addresses this issue by using upper echelon theory, and the KLD Research Analytics CSP ratings, to show that observable CEO characteristics predict differences in CSP between firms, even when firm and industry (...)
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  49.  41
    K. Gregory Jin, Ronald Drozdenko & Sara DeLoughy (2013). The Role of Corporate Value Clusters in Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Performance: A Study of Financial Professionals and Implications for the Financial Meltdown. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):15-24.
    This article delves into a potential mindset that may be responsible for the recent financial meltdown. Research relating to this mindset from different perspectives is reviewed. The findings from this literature review are used to create a conceptual framework for the empirical, ethical, and corporate social responsibility study of financial professionals. Data were collected from a survey of the professional membership of a large national association of financial professionals. This article reports the results of the analysis of (...)
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  50.  68
    Jacques Igalens & Jean-Pascal Gond (2005). Measuring Corporate Social Performance in France: A Critical and Empirical Analysis of ARESE Data. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):131 - 148.
    This article studies the idea of Corporate Social Performance (CSP) from a critical perspective using empirical elements derived from analysis of year 2000 ARESE data. ARESE is the French first mover social rating agency providing quantified data about the Social Performance of French companies. The paper starts out by reviewing leading CSP models and discussing problems inherent to the measurement of this construct before going on to present and analyse ARESE data - whose suitability for (...)
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