Search results for '*Prefrontal Cortex' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Liane Young, Antoine Bechara, Daniel Tranel, Hanna Damasio, Marc Hauser & Antonio Damasio (2010). Damage to Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Impairs Judgment of Harmful Intent. Neuron 65 (6):845-851.
    Moral judgments, whether delivered in ordinary experience or in the courtroom, depend on our ability to infer intentions. We forgive unintentional or accidental harms and condemn failed attempts to harm. Prior work demonstrates that patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex deliver abnormal judgments in response to moral dilemmas and that these patients are especially impaired in triggering emotional responses to inferred or abstract events, as opposed to real or actual outcomes. We therefore predicted that VMPC patients would (...)
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  2.  3
    Prefrontal Cortex (2002). The Structured Event Complex and the Human. In Donald T. Stuss & Robert T. Knight (eds.), Principles of Frontal Lobe Function. Oxford University Press 292.
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  3.  15
    A. Bechara, A. R. Damasio, H. Damasio & S. W. Anderson (1993). Insensitivity to Future Consequences Following Damage to Human Prefrontal Cortex. Cognition 50 (1-3):7-15.
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  4.  67
    A. Etkin, T. Egner & R. Kalisch (2011). Emotional Processing in Anterior Cingulate and Medial Prefrontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):85-93.
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  5.  15
    Massimo Turatto, Marco Sandrini & Carlo Miniussi (2004). The Role of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Visual Change Awareness. Neuroreport 15 (16):2549-2552.
  6. K. G. Thompson & Jeffrey D. Schall (2000). Antecedents and Correlates of Visual Detectoin and Awareness in Macaque Prefrontal Cortex. Vision Research 40 (10):1523-38.
  7.  4
    Earl K. Miller & Jonathan D. Cohen (2001). An Integrative Theory of Prefrontal Cortex Function. Annual Review of Neuroscience 24 (1):167-202.
    The prefrontal cortex has long been suspected to play an important role in cognitive control, in the ability to orchestrate thought and action in accordance with internal goals. Its neural basis, however, has remained a mystery. Here, we propose that cognitive control stems from the active maintenance of patterns of activity in the prefrontal cortex that represent goals and the means to achieve them. They provide bias signals to other brain structures whose net effect is to guide the (...)
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  8.  1
    Vinod Goel & Oshin Vartanian (2005). Dissociating the Roles of Right Ventral Lateral and Dorsal Lateral Prefrontal Cortex in Generation and Maintenance of Hypotheses in Set-Shift Problems. Cerebral Cortex 15 (8):1170-1177.
    Although patient data have traditionally implicated the left prefrontal cortex in hypothesis generation, recent lesion data implicate right PFC in hypothesis generation tasks that involve set shifts. To test the involvement of the right prefrontal cortex in a hypothesis generation task involving set shifts, we scanned 13 normal subjects with fMRI as they completed Match Problems and a baseline task. In Match Problems subjects determined the number of possible solutions for each trial. Successful solutions are indicative of set (...)
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  9.  45
    Fabian Grabenhorst & Edmund T. Rolls (2011). Value, Pleasure and Choice in the Ventral Prefrontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):56-67.
    Rapid advances have recently been made in understanding how value-based decision-making processes are implemented in the brain. We integrate neuroeconomic and computational approaches with evidence on the neural correlates of value and experienced pleasure to describe how systems for valuation and decision-making are organized in the prefrontal cortex of humans and other primates. We show that the orbitofrontal and ventromedial prefrontal (VMPFC) cortices compute expected value, reward outcome and experienced pleasure for different stimuli on a common value scale. Attractor (...)
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  10.  54
    Kai Vogeley, M. Moskopp Kurthen, P. Falkai & W. Maier (1999). Essential Functions of the Human Self Model Are Implemented in the Prefrontal Cortex. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (3):343-363.
    The human self model comprises essential features such as the experiences of ownership, of body-centered spatial perspectivity, and of a long-term unity of beliefs and attitudes. In the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, it is suggested that clinical subsyndromes like cognitive disorganization and derealization syndromes reflect disorders of this self model. These features are neurobiologically instantiated as an episodically active complex neural activation pattern and can be mapped to the brain, given adequate operationalizations of self model features. In its unique capability of (...)
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  11. Vinod Goel & Raymond J. Dolan (2003). Reciprocal Neural Response Within Lateral and Ventral Medial Prefrontal Cortex During Hot and Cold Reasoning. NeuroImage 20 (4):2314-2321.
    Logic is widely considered the basis of rationality. Logical choices, however, are often influenced by emotional responses, sometimes to our detriment, sometimes to our advantage. To understand the neural basis of emotionally neutral and emotionally salient reasoning we studied 19 volunteers using event-related fMRI, as they made logical judgments about arguments that varied in emotional saliency. Despite identical logical form and content categories across “hot” and “cold” reasoning conditions, lateral and ventral medial prefrontal cortex showed reciprocal response patterns as (...)
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  12.  12
    Tadas Stumbrys, Daniel Erlacher & Michael Schredl (2013). Testing the Involvement of the Prefrontal Cortex in Lucid Dreaming: A tDCS Study. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1214-1222.
    Recent studies suggest that lucid dreaming might be associated with increased brain activity over frontal regions during rapid eye movement sleep. By applying transcranial direct current stimulation , we aimed to manipulate the activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during REM sleep to increase dream lucidity. Nineteen participants spent three consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. On the second and third nights they randomly received either 1 mA tDCS for 10 min or sham stimulation during each REM period starting (...)
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  13. Vinod Goel & Jordan Grafman (2000). Role of the Right Prefrontal Cortex in Ill-Structured Planning. Cognitive Neuropsychology 17 (5):415-436.
    We tested an architect with a lesion to the right prefrontal cortex in a real-world architectural design/planning task that required him to develop a new design for our lab space and compared his performance to an age- and education-matched architect. The patient understood the task and even observed that “this is a very simple problem.” His sophisticated architectural knowledge base was still intact and he used it quite skilfully during the problem structuring phase. However, the patient's problem-solving behaviour differed (...)
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  14.  29
    D. Ben Shalom (2000). Developmental Depersonalization: The Prefrontal Cortex and Self-Functions in Autism. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):457-460.
    The human self model suggests that the construct of self involves functions such as agency, body-centered spatial perspectivity, and long-term unity. Vogeley, Kurthen, Falkai, and Maieret (1999) suggest that agency is subserved by the prefrontal cortex and other association areas of the cortex, spatial perspectivity by the prefrontal cortex and the parietal lobes, and long-term unity by the prefrontal cortex and the temporal lobes and that all of these functions are impaired in schizophrenia. Exploring the connections (...)
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  15.  37
    Alexander Heinzel & Georg Northoff (2009). Emotional Feeling and the Orbitomedial Prefrontal Cortex: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations. Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):443 – 464.
    Emotional feeling can be defined as the affective constituent of emotions representing a subjective experience such as, for example, feeling love or hate. Several recent neuroimaging studies have focused on this affective component of emotions thereby aiming to characterise the underlying neural correlates. These studies indicate that the orbitomedial prefrontal cortex is crucially involved in the processing of emotional feeling. It is the aim of this paper to analyse the extent to which the present state of the art in (...)
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  16. Corrina J. Frye, Hillary S. Schaefer & Andrew L. Alexander, Individual Differences in Amygdala and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Activity Are Associated with Evaluation Speed and Psychological Well-Being.
    & Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined whether individual differences in amygdala activation in response to negative relative to neutral information are related to differences in the speed with which such information is evaluated, the extent to which such differences are associated with medial prefrontal cortex function, and their relationship with measures of trait anxiety and psychological well-being (PWB). Results indicated that faster judgments of negative relative to neutral information were associated with increased left and right amygdala activation. (...)
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  17.  22
    Georg Northoff & Alexander Heinzel (2009). Emotional Feeling and the Orbitomedial Prefrontal Cortex: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations. Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):443-464.
    Emotional feeling can be defined as the affective constituent of emotions representing a subjective experience such as, for example, feeling love or hate. Several recent neuroimaging studies have focused on this affective component of emotions thereby aiming to characterise the underlying neural correlates. These studies indicate that the orbitomedial prefrontal cortex is crucially involved in the processing of emotional feeling. It is the aim of this paper to analyse the extent to which the present state of the art in (...)
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  18.  14
    Naoyuki Osaka (2003). How Does the Attentional Pointer Work in Prefrontal Cortex? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):751-751.
    The current model, based on event-related potential (ERP) studies, posits that the working-memory system is a state of activated long-term memory; this appears comprehensive, but it needs further detailed analysis of functional neural connectivity analysis within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and between the posterior and prefrontal cortex. Specifically, the role of dorsolateral PFC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is probably critical for PFC's attentional controller. Neural implementation of the executive function in working memory appears critical to build (...)
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  19.  9
    James A. Waltz, Barbara J. Knowlton & Keith J. Holyoak (1998). Relational Complexity, the Central Executive, and Prefrontal Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):846-847.
    Halford et al.'s analysis of relational complexity provides a possible framework for characterizing the symbolic functions of the prefrontal cortex. Studies of prefrontal patients have revealed that their performance is selectively impaired on tasks that require integration of two binary relations (i.e., tasks that Halford et al.'s analysis would identify as three-dimensional). Analyses of relational complexity show promise of helping to understand the neural substrate of thinking.
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  20.  3
    Elisa Ciaramelli & Giuseppe di Pellegrino (2011). Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex and the Future of Morality. Emotion Review 3 (3):308-309.
    The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) is crucial for moral behavior, yet the mechanism through which the VMPFC promotes moral behavior remains unclear. In this article, we emphasize that moral choice is often intertemporal, requiring foregoing short-term gains in favor of future outcomes of larger value. We propose that the VMPFC may be necessary for mental time travel (MTT), a cognitive process enabling vivid preexperiencing of future outcomes. By providing anticipated outcomes that inform decisions, MTT may promote farsighted, moral behaviors.
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  21. A. C. Roberts, T. W. Robbins & L. Weiskrantz (eds.) (1998). The Prefrontal Cortex: Executive and Cognitive Functions. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The role of the prefrontal cortex is one of the most topical and important areas of research in contemporary neuropsychology. This cortical region appears to be linked with executive processes affecting many diverse areas of cognitive function. Working memory, information processing, behavioural organization, attention, judgement, and the ability to cope with novel experiences are just some of the diverse processes it affects. This book brings together contributions from some of the world's leading researchers on the prefrontal cortex. They (...)
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  22.  43
    C. E. Curtis & M. D'Esposito (2003). Persistent Activity in the Prefrontal Cortex During Working Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (9):415-423.
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  23. John Jonides, David Badre, Clayton Curtis, Sharon L. Thompson-Schill & Edward E. Smith (2002). Mechanisms of Conflict Resolution in Prefrontal Cortex. In Donald T. Stuss & Robert T. Knight (eds.), Principles of Frontal Lobe Function. Oxford University Press
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  24.  30
    Paul W. Burgess, Iroise Dumontheil & Sam J. Gilbert (2007). The Gateway Hypothesis of Rostral Prefrontal Cortex Function. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (7):290-298.
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  25.  12
    Mark A. Elliott, Markus Conci & Hermann J. Müller (2003). Prefrontal Cortex and the Generation of Oscillatory Visual Persistence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):733-734.
    In this commentary, the formation of “pre-iconic” visual-prime persistence is described in the context of prime-specific, independent-component activation at prefrontal and posterior EEG-recording sites. Although this activity subserves neural systems that are near identical to those described by Ruchkin and colleagues, we consider priming to be a dynamic process, identified with patterns of coherence and temporal structure of very high precision.
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  26.  98
    Scott F. Nolde, Marcia K. Johnson & Carol L. Raye (1998). The Role of Prefrontal Cortex During Tests of Episodic Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (10):399-406.
  27.  36
    Julian Paul Keenan, Mark A. Wheeler, Gordon G. Gallup & Alvaro Pascual-Leone (2000). Self-Recognition and the Right Prefrontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (9):338-344.
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  28.  45
    R. J. R. Blair (2007). The Amygdala and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex in Morality and Psychopathy. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (9):387-392.
  29. Stefano Bembich, Andrea Clarici, Cristina Vecchiet, Giulio Baldassi, Gabriele Cont & Sergio Demarini (2014). Differences in Time Course Activation of Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Associated with Low or High Risk Choices in a Gambling Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  30.  1
    Evgeniya Kirlilna, Na Yu, Alexander Jelzow, Heidrun Wabnitz, Arthur M. Jacobs & Ilias Tachtsidis (2013). Identifying and Quantifying Main Components of Physiological Noise in Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy on the Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  31. Michael Koenigs, Liane Young, Ralph Adolphs, Daniel Tranel, Fiery Cushman, Marc Hauser & Antonio Damasio (2007). Damage to the Prefrontal Cortex Increases Utilitarian Moral Judgements. Nature 446 (7138):908-911.
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  32.  35
    Amir Muzur, Edward F. Pace-Schott & J. Allan Hobson (2002). The Prefrontal Cortex in Sleep. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):475-481.
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  33.  22
    Gary Lupyan, Daniel Mirman, Roy Hamilton & Sharon L. Thompson-Schill (2012). Categorization is Modulated by Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Over Left Prefrontal Cortex. Cognition 124 (1):36-49.
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  34.  16
    Erik Lumer & Geraint Rees (1999). Covariation of Activity in Visual and Prefrontal Cortex Associated with Subjective Visual Perception. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 96 (4):1669-1673.
  35. Masoud Tahmasian, David C. Knight, Andrei Manoliu, Dirk Schwerthöffer, Martin Scherr, Chun Meng, Junming Shao, Henning Peters, Anselm Doll, Habibolah Khazaie, Alexander Drzezga, Josef Bäuml, Claus Zimmer, Hans Förstl, Afra M. Wohlschläger, Valentin Riedl & Christian Sorg (2013). Aberrant Intrinsic Connectivity of Hippocampus and Amygdala Overlap in the Fronto-Insular and Dorsomedial-Prefrontal Cortex in Major Depressive Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  36.  29
    Jun Tanji, Keisetsu Shima & Hajime Mushiake (2007). Concept-Based Behavioral Planning and the Lateral Prefrontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (12):528-534.
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  37. Nicolas P. Rougier & Randall C. O'Reilly (forthcoming). A Gated Prefrontal Cortex Model of Dynamic Task Switching. Cognitive Science.
     
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  38.  37
    Frank Krueger, Aron K. Barbey & Jordan Grafman (2009). The Medial Prefrontal Cortex Mediates Social Event Knowledge. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):103-109.
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  39.  30
    Christopher D. Frith (1996). The Role of the Prefrontal Cortex in Self-Consciousness: The Case of Auditory Hallucinations. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 351:1505-12.
  40.  7
    John Duncan & Earl K. Miller (2002). Cognitive Focus Through Adaptive Neural Coding in the Primate Prefrontal Cortex. In Donald T. Stuss & Robert T. Knight (eds.), Principles of Frontal Lobe Function. Oxford University Press
  41. Brittany S. Cassidy & Angela H. Gutchess (2012). Structural Variation Within the Amygdala and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Predicts Memory for Impressions in Older Adults. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  42. Ray J. Dolan (2008). The Human Amygdala and Orbital Prefrontal Cortex in Behavioural Regulation. In Jon Driver, Patrick Haggard & Tim Shallice (eds.), Mental Processes in the Human Brain. OUP Oxford
     
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  43.  16
    Jonathan B. Freeman & Ryan M. Stolier (2014). The Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Constructing Personality Models. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (11):571-572.
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  44. Robert T. Knight & M. Grabowecky (1995). Escape From Linear Time: Prefrontal Cortex and Conscious Experience. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press
  45. K. Vogeley, M. Kurthen, P. Falkai & W. Maier (1999). The Prefrontal Cortex Generates the Basic Constituents of the Self. Consciousness and Cognition 8:343-363.
     
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  46.  14
    Mark G. Stokes (2015). ‘Activity-Silent’ Working Memory in Prefrontal Cortex: A Dynamic Coding Framework. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (7):394-405.
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  47.  17
    Hyeon-Ae Jeon & Angela D. Friederici (2015). Degree of Automaticity and the Prefrontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (5):244-250.
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  48.  1
    Jordan Grafman & Frank Krueger (2009). The Prefrontal Cortex Stores Structured Event Complexes That Are the Representational Basis for Cognitively Derived Actions. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press 197--213.
  49.  1
    Michael Petrides & Deepak N. Pandya (2002). Association Pathways of the Prefrontal Cortex and Functional Observations. In Donald T. Stuss & Robert T. Knight (eds.), Principles of Frontal Lobe Function. Oxford University Press 1--31.
  50.  43
    Terrence W. Deacon (1996). Why a Brain Capable of Language Evolved Only Once: Prefrontal Cortex and Symbol Learning. Zygon 31 (4):635-670.
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