Search results for '*Psychoanalysis' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Jim Hopkins (forthcoming). The Significance of Consilience: Psychoanalysis, Attachment, Neuroscience, and Evolution. In L. Brakel & V. Talvete (eds.), Psychoanalysis and Philosophy of Mind: Unconscious mentality in the 21st century. Karnac.score: 18.0
    This paper considers clinical psychoanalysis together with developmental psychology (particularly attachment theory), evolution, and neuroscience in the context a Bayesian account of confirmation and disconfrimation. -/- In it I argue that these converging sources of support indicate that the combination of relatively low predictive power and broad explanatory scope that characterise the theories of both Freud and Darwin suggest that Freud's theory, like Darwin's, may strike deeply into natural phenomena. -/- The same argument, however, suggests that conclusive confirmation for Freudian (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Sebastian Gardner (2000). Psychoanalysis and the Personal/Sub-Personal Distinction. Philosophical Explorations 3 (1):96-119.score: 16.0
    This paper attempts in the first instance to clarify the application of the personal/sub-personal distinction to psychoanalysis and to indicate how this issue is related to that of psychoanalysis" epistemology. It is argued that psychoanalysis may be regarded either as a form of personal psychology, or as a form of jointly personal and sub-personal psychology, but not as a form of sub-personal psychology. It is further argued that psychoanalysis indicates a problem with the personal/sub-personal distinction itself as understood by Dennett (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Steve Pile (1996). The Body and the City: Psychoanalysis, Space, and Subjectivity. Routledge.score: 16.0
    Over the last century, psychoanalysis has transformed the ways in which we think about our relationships with others. Psychoanalytic concepts and methods, such as the unconscious and dream analysis, have greatly impacted on social, cultural and political theory. Reinterpreting the ways in which geography has explored people's mental maps and their deepest feelings about places, The Body and the City outlines a new cartography of the subject. Mapping key coordinates of meaning, identity and power across the sites of body and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Farhad Dalal (2002). Race, Colour and the Process of Racialization: New Perspectives From Group Analysis, Psychoanalysis, and Sociology. Brunner-Routledge.score: 16.0
    Farhad Dalal argues that people differentiate between races in order to make a distinction between the "haves" and "must-not-haves", and that this process is cognitive, emotional and political rather than biological. Examining the subject over the past thousand years, Race, Colour and the Process of Racialisation covers theories of racism and a general theory of difference based on the works of Fanon, Elias, Matte-Blanco and Foulkes, as well as application of this theory to race and racism. Farhad Dalal concludes that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Paul Muench (1993). The Analogy Between Psychoanalysis and Wittgenstein's Later Philosophical Methods. Dissertation, University of Oxfordscore: 16.0
    Wittgenstein’s analogy between psychoanalysis and his later philosophical methods is explored and developed. Historical evidence supports the claim that Wittgenstein characterized an early version of his general remarks on philosophy (§§89-133 in the Philosophical Investigations) as a sustained comparison with psychoanalysis. A non-adversarial, therapeutic interpretation is adopted towards Wittgenstein which emphasizes his focus on dissolving the metaphysical puzzlement of particular troubled individuals. A “picture” of Freudian psychoanalysis is sketched which highlights several features of Freud’s therapeutic techniques and his conception of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jim Hopkins (2013). Understanding and Healing: Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis in the Era of Neuroscience. In FulfordW (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Psychiatry.score: 16.0
    This paper argues that psychoanalysis enables us to see mental disorder as rooted in emotional conflicts, particularly concerning aggression, to which our species has a natural liability. These can be traced in development, and seem rooted in both parent-offspring conflict and in-group cooperation for out-group conflict. In light of this we may hope that work in psychoanalysis and neuroscience will converge in indicating the most likely paths to a better neurobiological understanding of mental disorder.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Marcia Cavell (2006). Becoming a Subject: Reflections in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis. Oxford University Press.score: 16.0
    Marcia Cavell draws on philosophy, psychoanalysis, and the sciences of the mind in a fascinating and original investigation of human subjectivity. A "subject" is a creature, we may say, who recognizes herself as an "I," taking in the world from a subjective perspective; an agent, doing things for reasons, sometimes self-reflective, and able to assume responsibility for herself and some of her actions. If this is an ideal, how does a person become a subject, and what might stand in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Rosalind Minsky (1996). Psychoanalysis and Gender: An Introductory Reader. Routledge.score: 16.0
    What is object-relations theory and what does it have to do with literary studies? How can Freud's phallocentric theories be applied by feminist critics? In Psychoanalysis and Gender: An Introductory Reader Rosalind Minsky answers these questions and more, offering students a clear, straightforward overview without ever losing them in jargon. In the first section Minsky outlines the fundamentals of the theory, introducing the key thinkers and providing clear commentary. In the second section, the theory is demonstratedn by an anthology of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Maarten Boudry & Filip Buekens (2011). The Epistemic Predicament of a Pseudoscience: Social Constructivism Confronts Freudian Psychoanalysis. Theoria 77 (2):159-179.score: 16.0
    Social constructivist approaches to science have often been dismissed as inaccurate accounts of scientific knowledge. In this article, we take the claims of robust social constructivism (SC) seriously and attempt to find a theory which does instantiate the epistemic predicament as described by SC. We argue that Freudian psychoanalysis, in virtue of some of its well-known epistemic complications and conceptual confusions, provides a perfect illustration of what SC claims is actually going on in science. In other words, the features SC (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Cornelius Castoriadis (1997). World in Fragments: Writings on Politics, Society, Psychoanalysis, and the Imagination. Stanford University Press.score: 16.0
    This collection presents a broad and compelling overview of the most recent work by a world-renowned figure in contemporary thought. The book is in four parts: Koinonia, Polis, Psyche, Logos. The opening section begins with a general introduction to the author's views on being, time, creation, and the imaginary institution of society and continues with reflections on the role of the individual psyche in racist thinking and acting. The second part is a critique of those who now belittle and distort (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Andrew Smith (2000). Gothic Radicalism: Literature, Philosophy, and Psychoanalysis in the Nineteenth Century. St. Martin's Press.score: 16.0
    Applying ideas drawn from contemporary critical theory, this book historicizes psychoanalysis through a new and significant theorization of the Gothic. The central premise is that the nineteenth-century Gothic produced a radical critique of accounts of sublimity and Freudian psychoanalysis. This book makes a major contribution to an understanding of both the nineteenth century and the Gothic discourse which challenged the dominant ideas of that period. Writers explored include Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Michael P. Levine (ed.) (1999). The Analytic Freud: Philosophy and Psychoanalysis. Routledge.score: 16.0
    The Analytic Freud is an important and stimulating corrective to this overlooked but highly significant area. Moving away from the longstanding debate over the scientific status of Freudian theory, The Analytic Freud discusses the implications of Freud for philosophy in four clear sections: Philosophy of Mind Ethics Sexuality Civilization The essays discuss both the problems Freudian theory poses for contemporary philosophy and what philosophy can ask of Freudian theory. An international team of contributors explore the tensions and dialogue (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Dany Nobus (2013). That Obscure Object of Psychoanalysis. Continental Philosophy Review 46 (2):163-187.score: 16.0
    This essay examines how psychoanalytic conceptions of the subject and the object in the works of Freud and Lacan may contribute to a re-examination of the vexed issue of the subject–object relationship in science, philosophy and epistemology. For Freud, the ego is the essential subject, yet he regarded it as an always already objectified subject, which is objectively thinkable yet never subjectively knowable qua subject. Lacan conceptualised this Freudian principle of subjectivity with his notion of the divided (barred) subject, which (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Michael Parsons (2000). The Dove That Returns, the Dove That Vanishes: Paradox and Creativity in Psychoanalysis. Routledge.score: 16.0
    The nature of psychoanalysis seems contradictory - deeply personal, subjective and intuitive, yet requiring systematic theory and principles of technique. The objective quality of psychoanalytic knowledge is paradoxically dependent on the personal engagement of the knower with what is known. In The Dove that Returns, The Dove that Vanishes , Michael Parsons explores the tension of this paradox. As they respond to it, and struggle to sustain it creatively, analysts discover their individual identities. The work of outstanding clinicians such as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Lavinia Gomez (2005). The Freud Wars: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Psychoanalysis. Routledge.score: 16.0
    The Freud Wars offers a comprehensive introduction to the crucial question of the justification of psychoanalysis. Part I examines three powerful critiques of psychoanalysis in the context of a recent controversy about its nature and legitimacy: is it a bankrupt science, an innovative science, or not a science at all but a system of interpretation? The discussion makes sense of the entrenched disagreement about the validity of psychoanalysis, and demonstrates how the disagreement is rooted in the theoretical ambiguity of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Siegfried Zepf (2007). The Relationship Between the Unconscious and Consciousness: A Comparison of Psychoanalysis and Historical Materialism. Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society 12 (2):105-123.score: 16.0
  17. Alan Roland (1996). Cultural Pluralism and Psychoanalysis: The Asian and North American Experience. Routledge.score: 16.0
    The influence of culture and sociohistorical change on all aspects of the psyche and on psychoanalytic theory is the missing dimension in psychoanalysis. This dimension is especially relevant to clinicians in the mental health field--whether psychoanalyst, psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker or marriage counselor--to enable them to understand what is at stake in working with those from various Asian cultures in North America and European societies. It is even more relevant than most clinicians realize to working with those from one's own (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jessica Benjamin (1997). Shadow of the Other: Intersubjectivity and Gender in Psychoanalysis. Routledge.score: 16.0
    Shadow of the Other is a discussion of how the individual has two sorts of relationships with an "other"--other individuals. The first regards the other as a s work apart is her brilliant utilization of a systematic dialectical approach to her subject, always maintaining the delicate balance between opposing tensions: masculinity and femininity, subjectivity and objectivity, passivity and activity, love and aggression, fantasy and reality, modernism and postmodernism, the intrapsychic and the intersubjective. Benjamin s work apart is her brilliant utilization (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Franco Scalzone & Guglielmo Tamburrini (2013). Human-Robot Interaction and Psychoanalysis. AI and Society 28 (3):297-307.score: 16.0
    Psychological attitudes towards service and personal robots are selectively examined from the vantage point of psychoanalysis. Significant case studies include the uncanny valley effect, brain-actuated robots evoking magic mental powers, parental attitudes towards robotic children, idealizations of robotic soldiers, persecutory fantasies involving robotic components and systems. Freudian theories of narcissism, animism, infantile complexes, ego ideal, and ideal ego are brought to bear on the interpretation of these various items. The horizons of Human-robot Interaction are found to afford new and fertile (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Paul Marcus (2003). Ancient Religious Wisdom, Spirituality, and Psychoanalysis. Praeger.score: 16.0
    Unlike most books on psychoanalysis and religion, where psychoanalysis is regarded as a superior mode of understanding, this work explains how psychoanalysis ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Charles Bingham (2002). On Paulo Freire's Debt to Psychoanalysis: Authority on the Side of Freedom. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (6):447-464.score: 16.0
    Paulo Freire's major work, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, owes adebt to psychoanalysis. In particular, as this paper argues,Freire's account of teacher authority needs to be understoodthrough psychoanalytic sensibilities. Paulo Freire maintains thatteacher authority can be ``on the side of freedom.'' This is ahighly charged claim given that liberalist traditions generallycast authority as the enemy of freedom. Breaking with liberalunderstandings of authority, Freire's ``authority on the sideof freedom'' is a matter of maintaining the delicate psychicbalance that leads neither to domination nor (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Louise Gyler (2010). The Gendered Unconscious: Can Gender Discourses Subvert Psychoanalysis? Routledge.score: 16.0
    This book investigates the nature of Feminist interventions in psychoanalysis by comparing the status and treatment of women in two different psychoanalytic ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Meg Harris Williams (2010). The Aesthetic Development: The Poetic Spirit of Psychoanalysis: Essays on Bion, Meltzer, Keats. Karnac.score: 16.0
    Psychoanalysis : an art or a science? -- Aesthetic concepts of Bion and Meltzer -- The domain of the aesthetic object -- Sleeping beauty -- Moving beauty -- Psychoanalysis as an art form.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Peter Homans (1989). The Ability to Mourn: Disillusionment and the Social Origins of Psychoanalysis. University of Chicago Press.score: 16.0
    Peter Homans offers a new understanding of the origins of psychoanalysis and relates the psychoanalytic project as a whole to the sweep of Western culture, past and present. He argues that Freud's fundamental goal was the interpretation of culture and that, therefore, psychoanalysis is fundamentally a humanistic social science. To establish this claim, Homans looks back at Freud's self-analysis in light of the crucial years from 1906 to 1914 when the psychoanalytic movement was formed and shows how these experiences culminated (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Ranjana Khanna (2003). Dark Continents: Psychoanalysis and Colonialism. Duke University Press.score: 16.0
    Genealogies -- Psychoanalysis and archaeology -- Freud in the sacred grove -- Colonial rescriptings -- War, decolonization, psychoanalysis -- Colonial melancholy -- Haunting and the future -- The ethical ambiguities of transnational feminism -- Hamlet in the colonial archive.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Roland Peterson & Sybe Terwee (1994). Can Functionalism Provide the Proper Basis for a Core Theory of Psychoanalysis? Philosophical Psychology 7 (4):463-469.score: 16.0
    Before embarking upon the project of reformulating psychoanalysis in the 'scientific' terminology of cognitive science, we should first clearly define what psychoanalysis is about and what it is not about. Cognitive science is based upon a functionalistic philosophy of the mind. As a consequence such a project would require a functionalistic core theory of psychoanalysis. But Freud's claim of the therapeutic effect of psychoanalysis, attained through the rendering conscious of what is unconscious or the making personal of what is experienced (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Stephen J. Costello (2010). Hermeneutics and the Psychoanalysis of Religion. Peter Lang.score: 16.0
    This book is a philosophical study of the Freudian psychoanalysis of religion from a hermeneutical perspective.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Carla Mazzio & Douglas Trevor (eds.) (2000). Historicism, Psychoanalysis, and Early Modern Culture. Routledge.score: 16.0
    Did people in early modern Europe have a concept of an inner self? Carla Mazzio and Douglas Trevor have brought together an outstanding group of literary, cultural, and history scholars to answer this intriguing question. Through a synthesis of historicism and psychoanalytic criticism, the contributors explore the complicated, nuanced, and often surprising union of history and subjectivity in Europe centuries before psychoanalytic theory. Addressing such topics as "fetishes and Renaissances," "the cartographic unconscious," and "the topographic imaginary," these essays move beyond (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Sonu Shamdasani & Michael Münchow (eds.) (1994). Speculations After Freud: Psychoanalysis, Philosophy, and Culture. Routledge.score: 16.0
    Speculations After Freud confronts the dilemmas of contemporary psychoanalysis by bringing together some of the most influential and best known writers on psychoanalysis and culture. These advocates and critics of psychoanalysis, both institutional and theoretical, reveal the powerful role psychoanalytic speculation plays in all areas of culture. Psychoanalysis has played a pivotal role in challenging the modernist notions of rationality and selfhood. It offers an alternative means of examining how identity is engendered, yet its identity has come into question because (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. André Haynal (1993). Psychoanalysis and the Sciences: Epistemology--History. University of California Press.score: 16.0
    The relationship existing between science and psychoanalysis has long been tense, critical, even hostile. Andre Haynal addresses this relationship by examining three questions: how is psychoanalytic "knowledge" established? what methodology and epistemology underlie psychoanalytic theory? and what are the historical circumstances that have shaped psychoanalysis? Haynal is familiar with the full spectrum of analytic thought and begins with a systematic discussion of analytic theory. The second part of the book covers a series of historical topics and includes discussions of Freud (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Louise Braddock & Michael Lacewing (eds.) (2007). The Academic Face of Psychoanalysis: Papers in Philosophy, the Humanities, and the British Clinical Tradition. Routledge.score: 16.0
    Ever since Freud, psychoanalysts have explored the connections between psychoanalysis and literature and psychoanalysis and philosophy, while literary criticism, social science and philosophy have all reflected on and made use of ideas from psychoanalytic theory. The Academic Face of Psychoanalysis presents contributions from these fields and gives the reader an insight into different understandings and applications of psychoanalytic theory. This book comprises twelve contributions from experts in their fields covering philosophy, psychoanalysis, sociology and literary theory. The chapters are divided into (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. L. Layton (2007). What Psychoanalysis, Culture And Society Mean To Me. Mens Sana Monographs 5 (1):146.score: 16.0
    _The paper reviews some ways that the social and psychic have been understood in psychoanalysis and argues that a model for understanding the relation between the psychic and the social must account both for the ways that we internalize oppressive norms as well as the ways we resist them. The author proposes that we build our identities in relation to other identities circulating in our culture and that cultural hierarchies of sexism, racism, classism push us to split off part of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Cynthia Baum-Baicker & Dominic A. Sisti (2012). Clinical Wisdom in Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: A Philosophical and Qualitative Analysis. Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (1):13.score: 16.0
    To precisely define wisdom has been an ongoing task of philosophers for millennia. Investigations into the psychological dimensions of wisdom have revealed several features that make exemplary persons "wise." Contemporary bioethicists took up this concept as they retrieved and adapted Aristotle's intellectual virtue of phronesis for applications in medical contexts. In this article, we build on scholarship in both psychology and medical ethics by providing an account of clinical wisdom qua phronesis in the context of the practice of psychoanalysis and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Tamara Fischmann, Michael O. Russ & Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber (2013). Trauma, Dream and Psychic Change in Psychoanalyses: A Dialogue Between Psychoanalysis and the Neurosciences. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:877.score: 16.0
    How can a fruitful dialogue with neuroscientists add knowledge to the unconscious – the specific research object of psychoanalysis? Apparently a growing number of worldwide research groups have begun to realize that the neurosciences and psychoanalysis can benefit from each other in interesting ways. Sometimes empirical studies evoke challenging research questions for both research fields. In the on-going LAC-Depressionstudy, for example, one interesting and unexpected finding for both research fields is that a large majority of chronically depressed in long-term psychoanalytic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Hylarie Kochiras (2006). Freud Said--Or Simon Says? Informed Consent and the Advancement of Psychoanalysis as a Science. Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy 9 (2):227-241.score: 16.0
    Is it ever permissible to publish a patient’s confidences without permission? I investigate this question for the field of psychoanalysis. Whereas most medical fields adopted a 1995 recommendation for consent requirements, psychoanalysis continues to defend the traditional practice of nonconsensual publication. Both the hermeneutic and the scientific branches of the field justify the practice, arguing that it provides data needed to help future patients, and both branches advance generalizations and causal claims. However the hermeneutic branch embraces methods tending to undermine (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ann Pellegrini (1997). Performance Anxieties: Staging Psychoanalysis, Staging Race. Routledge.score: 16.0
    Performance Anxieties looks at the on-going debates over the value of psychoanalysis for feminist theory and politics--specifically concerning the social and psychical meanings of racialization. Beginning with an historicized return to Freud and the meaning of Jewishness in Freud's day, Ann Pellegrini indicates how "race" and racialization are not incidental features of psychoanalysis or of modern subjectivity, but are among the generative conditions of both. Performance Anxieties stages a series of playful encounters between elite and popular performance texts--Freud meets Sarah (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Herman Westerink (2012). The Heart of Man's Desire: Lacanian Psychoanalysis and Early Reformation Thought. Routledge.score: 16.0
    Working from an innovative perspective, this book explores the close relationship between Freudian psychoanalysis and the ideas of the early Reformation.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Ariane Bazan (2011). The Grand Challenge for Psychoanalysis – and Neuropsychoanalysis: Taking on the Game. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 16.0
    The Grand Challenge for Psychoanalysis – and Neuropsychoanalysis: Taking on the Game.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Todd McGowan (2012). Cognitive Science Meets Psychoanalysis. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 16.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Georg Northoff (2012). Psychoanalysis and the Brain – Why Did Freud Abandon Neuroscience? Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 16.0
    Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, was initially a neuroscientist but abandoned neuroscience completely after he made a last attempt to link both in his writing, ‘Project of a Scientific Psychology’, in 1895. The reasons for his subsequent disregard of the brain remain unclear though. I here argue that one central reason may be that the approach to the brain during his time was simply not appealing to Freud. More specifically, Freud was interested in revealing the psychological predispositions of psychodynamic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jean Walton (2001). Fair Sex, Savage Dreams: Race, Psychoanalysis, Sexual Difference. Duke University Press.score: 16.0
    "In this groundbreaking book Jean Walton subjects psychoanalysis to a sustained and highly illuminating ethnographic critique.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jens de Vleminck (ed.) (2010). Sexuality and psychoanalysis: Philosophical Criticisms. Leuven University Press.score: 16.0
    The relationship between sexuality and psychoanalysis can be described in terms of an old and stormy love affair. the same can be said about the relationship ...
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. L. Layton (2013). Psychoanalysis and Politics: Historicising Subjectivity. Mens Sana Monographs 11 (1):68.score: 16.0
    In this paper, I compare three different views of the relation between subjectivity and modernity: one proposed by Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, a second by theorists of institutionalised individualisation, and a third by writers in the Foucaultian tradition of studies of the history of governmentalities. The theorists were chosen because they represent very different understandings of the relation between contemporary history and subjectivity. My purpose is to ground psychoanalytic theory about what humans need in history and so to question what it means (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Paula Quigley (2011). Undoing the Image: Film Theory and Psychoanalysis. Film-Philosophy 15 (1):13-32.score: 16.0
    The primary aim of this article is to point up an essential attitude, an anxiety even, that has inflected – and perhaps inhibited - our engagement with film. Film theory has been marked by a ‘refusal to see, a looking away’ (Mulvey & Wollen 1976, 36), and my suggestion is that this has achieved its fullest expression in those strands of film theory heavily influenced by psychoanalysis. These, in turn, have remained within a gendered conceptual framework whereby the discursive or (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. David M. Black (ed.) (2006). Psychoanalysis and Religion in the Twenty-First Century: Competitors or Collaborators? Routledge.score: 16.0
    Freud described religion as the universal obsessional neurosis, and uncompromisingly rejected it in favor of "science". Ever since, there has been the assumption that psychoanalysts are hostile to religion. Yet, from the beginning, individual analysts have questioned Freud's blanket rejection of religion. In this book, David Black brings together contributors from a wide range of schools and movements to discuss the issues. They bring a fresh perspective to the subject of religion and psychoanalysis, answering vital questions such as: · How (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Cristiana Cimino & Antonello Correale (2005). Projective Identification and Consciousness Alteration: A Bridge Between Psychoanalysis and Neuroscience? International Journal of Psychoanalysis 86 (1):51-60.score: 16.0
  47. Andrea Hurst (2008). Derrida Vis-à-Vis Lacan: Interweaving Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis. Fordham University Press.score: 16.0
    The "ruin" of the transcendental tradition -- Freud and the transcendental relation -- Derrida: Differance and the "plural logic of the aporia" -- The im-possibility of the psyche -- The death drive and the im-possibility of psychoanalysis -- Institutional psychoanalysis and the paradoxes of archivization -- The Lacanian real -- Sexual difference -- Feminine sexuality -- The transcendental relation in Lancanian psychoanalysis -- The death drive and ethical action -- The "talking cure": language and psychoanalysis.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Patrick B. Kavanaugh (2012). Stories From the Bog: On Madness, Philosophy, and Psychoanalysis. Amsterdam.score: 16.0
    This collection of short stories and essays call into question the medical-scientific narrative, its understandings of psychoanalysis and madness, and the identity, purpose and ethics that flow from and sustain its narrative. These stories are gathered from meetings with people on in-patient units and in private practice. Emphasis is placed on the centrality of the Freudian unconscious in the process of listening, understanding and responding in the analytic discourse. Collectively, they reintroduce the identity of the analytic practitioner as the shaman (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Paul Marcus (2008). Being for the Other: Emmanuel Levinas, Ethical Living and Psychoanalysis. Marquette University Press.score: 16.0
    The challenge of Levinas to psychoanalysis -- Responsibility for the other -- The horror of existence -- Love without lust -- Eroticism and family love -- Making suffering sufferable -- Religion without promises -- Towards a Levinasian-animated, ethically-infused psychoanalysis.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Carlo Semenza (2004). Unconscious How? Concluding Remarks to the New York Meeting on the "Unconscious in Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychoanalysis". Neuro-Psychoanalysis 6 (1):87-89.score: 16.0
1 — 50 / 1000