Search results for '*Selective Attention' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  65
    Mika Koivisto & Antti Revonsuo (2007). Electrophysiological Correlates of Visual Consciousness and Selective Attention. Neuroreport 18 (8):753-756.
  2. Piotr Jaskoski, Rob H. J. van der Lubbe, Erik Schlotterbeck & Rolf Verleger (2002). Traces Left on Visual Selective Attention by Stimuli That Are Not Consciously Identified. Psychological Science 13 (1):48-54.
  3.  12
    J. R. Tresilian (1999). Selective Attention in Reaching: When is an Object Not a Distracter? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (11):407-408.
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  4.  4
    Anthony G. Greenwald (1972). Evidence of Both Perceptual Filtering and Response Suppression for Rejected Messages in Selective Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (1):58.
  5.  6
    Charles W. Eriksen & James F. Collins (1969). Temporal Course of Selective Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (2p1):254.
  6.  5
    Charles S. Harris & Ralph Norman Haber (1963). Selective Attention and Coding in Visual Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (4):328.
  7.  2
    Tamar Zelniker (1971). Perceptual Attenuation of an Irrelevant Auditory Verbal Input as Measured by an Involuntary Verbal Response in a Selective-Attention Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (1):52.
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  8.  5
    Geoffrey Underwood (1973). Control of Selective Attention and Interference of Processing in Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (1):28-34.
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  9.  4
    Ralph Norman Haber (1964). A Replication of Selective Attention and Coding in Visual Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (4):402.
  10.  2
    Anthony G. Greenwald (1970). Selective Attention as a Function of Signal Rate. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (1):48.
  11.  2
    John E. Northman & Howard Ranken (1973). Selective Attention in the Effect of Labeling on Symbolic Problem Solving. Journal of Experimental Psychology 98 (1):209.
  12.  1
    Harold L. Hawkins, Gerald B. Thomas, Joelle C. Presson, Andrew Cozic & David Brookmire (1974). Precategorical Selective Attention and Tonal Specificity in Auditory Recognition. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):530.
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  13.  10
    Anne M. Treisman & Jenefer G. Riley (1969). Is Selective Attention Selective Perception or Selective Response? A Further Test. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (1p1):27.
  14.  20
    C. D. Chambers & J. B. Mattingley (2005). Neurodisruption of Selective Attention: Insights and Implications. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):542-550.
    Mechanisms of selective attention are vital for coherent perception and action. Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience have yielded key insights into the relationship between neural mechanisms of attention and eye movements, and the role of frontal and parietal brain regions as sources of attentional control. Here we explore the growing contribution of reversible neurodisruption techniques, including transcranial magnetic stimulation and microelectrode stimulation, to the cognitive neuroscience of spatial attention. These approaches permit unique causal inferences concerning the relationship (...)
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  15.  9
    Manuel Liz (2008). Selective Attention. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 34:15-20.
    The aim of this paper is to focus on the phenomenon of selective attention as pointing out important psychological cases where it is arguable that we can have practical reasons without the capacity to carry out any relevant inference. Selective attention also would serve to show the possibility to have very basic demonstrative references to particular perceptual items without the possession of any concept. I will argue that if we assume 1) that believing can be taken as a (...)
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  16.  4
    W. P. Seeley (2012). Hearing How Smooth It Looks: Selective Attention and Crossmodal Perception in the Arts. Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):8.
    A broad range of behavior is associated with crossmodal perception in the arts. Philosophical explanations of crossmodal perception often make reference to neuroscientific discussions of multisensory integration in selective attention. This research demonstrates that superior colliculus plays a regulative role in attention, integrating unique modality specific visual, auditory, and somatosensory spatial maps into a common spatial framework for action, and that motor skill, emotional salience, and semantic salience contribute to the integration of auditory, visual, and somatosensory information in (...)
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  17.  20
    Diego Fernandez-Duque, Selective Attention in Early Dementia of Alzheimer Type.
    This study explored possible deficits in selective attention brought about by Dementia of Alzheimer Type (DAT). In three experiments, we tested patients with early DAT, healthy elderly, and young adults under low memory demands to assess perceptual filtering, conflict resolution, and set switching abilities. We found no evidence of impaired perceptual filtering nor evidence of impaired conflict resolution in early DAT. In contrast, early DAT patients did exhibit a global cost in set switching consistent with an inability to maintain (...)
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  18.  10
    S. E. Black, Selective Attention in Early Dementia of Alzheimer Type.
    This study explored possible deficits in selective attention brought about by Dementia of Alzheimer Type (DAT). In three experiments, we tested patients with early DAT, healthy elderly, and young adults under low memory demands to assess perceptual filtering, conflict resolution, and set switching abilities. We found no evidence of impaired perceptual filtering nor evidence of impaired conflict resolution in early DAT. In contrast, early DAT patients did exhibit a global cost in set switching consistent with an inability to maintain (...)
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  19.  1
    Shen Tu, Jiang Qiu, Ulla Martens & Qinglin Zhang (2013). Category-Selective Attention Modulates Unconscious Processes in the Middle Occipital Gyrus. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):479-485.
    Many studies have revealed the top-down modulation on unconscious processing. However, there is little research about how category-selective attention could modulate the unconscious processing. In the present study, using functional magnetic resonance imaging , the results showed that category-selective attention modulated unconscious face/tool processing in the middle occipital gyrus . Interestingly, MOG effects were of opposed direction for face and tool processes. During unconscious face processing, activation in MOG decreased under the face-selective attention compared with tool-selective (...). This result was in line with the predictive coding theory. During unconscious tool processing, however, activation in MOG increased under the tool-selective attention compared with face-selective attention. The different effects might be ascribed to an interaction between top-down category-selective processes and bottom-up processes in the partial awareness level as proposed by Kouider, De Gardelle, Sackur, and Dupoux . Specifically, we suppose an “excessive activation” hypothesis. (shrink)
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  20. George Sperling, Stephen A. Wurst & Zhong-Lin Lu (1993). 12 Using Repetition Detection to Define and Localize the Processes of Selective Attention. In David E. Meyer & Sylvan Kornblum (eds.), Attention and Performance Xiv. The MIT Press 14--265.
  21.  16
    Nilli Lavie (2005). Distracted and Confused?: Selective Attention Under Load. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):75-82.
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  22.  4
    D. E. Broadbent (1952). Failures of Attention in Selective Listening. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (6):428.
  23. George R. Mangun, Steven A. Hillyard & Steven J. Luck (1993). " IQ Electrocortical Substrates of Visual Selective Attention". In David E. Meyer & Sylvan Kornblum (eds.), Attention and Performance Xiv. The MIT Press 14--219.
  24. William A. Johnston & Veronica J. Dark (1986). Selective Attention. Annu. Rev. Psychol 37:43-75.
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  25.  22
    Behrad Noudoost & Tirin Moore (2011). The Role of Neuromodulators in Selective Attention. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (12):585.
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  26.  1
    Peter Hamilton (1969). Selective Attention in Multisource Monitoring Tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (1p1):34.
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  27.  21
    Adam Gazzaley & Anna C. Nobre (2012). Top-Down Modulation: Bridging Selective Attention and Working Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (2):129-135.
  28.  13
    Alice Mado Proverbio & Alberto Zani (2005). ERP Studies of Selective Attention to Non-Spatial Features. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press
  29. D. E. Broadbent (1970). Stimulus Set and Response Set: Two Kinds of Selective Attention. In D. Mostofsky (ed.), Attention: Contemporary Theory and Analysis. Appleton-Century-Crofts 51--60.
     
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  30.  5
    Eliane Vurpillot & William A. Ball (1979). The Concept of Identity and Children's Selective Attention. In G. Hale & M. Lewis (eds.), Attention and Cognitive Development. Plenum. 23--42.
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  31.  1
    B. M. Stafford (2009). Thoughts Not Our Own: Whatever Happened to Selective Attention? Theory, Culture and Society 26 (2-3):275-293.
    There are now many important contributions to the scientific study of the brain-mind continuum. These results come both from research into non-ordinary states of consciousness and into the brain's intrinsic, largely unconscious mechanisms. The larger potential of such investigations consists precisely in making the parameters of our cognitive system apparent. But they also reveal the socio-cultural uses to which these parameters are currently, or in the foreseeable future, being applied. This article wrestles with that fact. Specifically, it examines the implications (...)
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  32. G. Billock, C. Koch & D. Psaltis (2005). Selective Attention as an Optimal Computational Strategy. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press 18--23.
  33. Can Attention Modulate (2005). In This Chapter We Review Our Recent Experiments Targeting the Issue of Whether Visual Selective Attention Can Modulate Synes-Thetic Experience. Our Research has Focused on Color-Graphemic Synesthesia, in Which Letters, Numbers, and Words Elicit Vivid Experiences of Color. Al-Though the Specific Associations Between Inducing Stimuli and the Colors They Elicit Aretypically Idiosyncratic, They Remain Highly Consistent Over Time for Individual Synesthetes (Baron-Cohen, Harrison, Goldstein &Wyke, 1993; Baron-Cohen, Wyke &Binnie, 1987). [REVIEW] In Robertson, C. L. & N. Sagiv (eds.), Synesthesia: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press
     
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  34. Robert G. Eason (1981). Visual Evoked Potential Correlates of Early Neural Filtering During Selective Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (4):203-206.
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  35.  6
    Karin Mogg, James McNamara, Mark Powys, Hannah Rawlinson, Anna Seiffer & Brendan P. Bradley (2000). Selective Attention to Threat: A Test of Two Cognitive Models of Anxiety. Cognition and Emotion 14 (3):375-399.
  36.  29
    Stephen Luck, Leonardo Chelazzi, Steven Hillyard & Robert Desimone (1997). Neural Mechanisms of Spatial Selective Attention in Areas V1, V2, and V4 of Macaque Visual Cortex. Journal of Neurophysiology 77 (1):24-42.
  37.  1
    Martin Eimer & Anna Grubert (2015). A Dissociation Between Selective Attention and Conscious Awareness in the Representation of Temporal Order Information. Consciousness and Cognition 35:274-281.
  38. Anthony G. Greenwald (1970). A Double Stimulation Test of Ideomotor Theory with Implications for Selective Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (3):392.
  39. Alexandra Frischen, Daniel Loach & Steven P. Tipper (2009). Seeing the World Through Another Person’s Eyes: Simulating Selective Attention Via Action Observation. Cognition 111 (2):212-218.
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  40. John Campbell (1997). Sense, Reference and Selective Attention. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 71 (71):55-98.
    Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1997), 55-74, with a reply by Michael Martin.
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  41.  3
    Tony T. Wells & Christopher G. Beevers (2010). Biased Attention and Dysphoria: Manipulating Selective Attention Reduces Subsequent Depressive Symptoms. Cognition and Emotion 24 (4):719-728.
  42. Steven J. Luck & Michelle Ford (1998). On the Role of Selective Attention in Visual Perception. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 95 (3):825-830.
  43.  6
    Karin Mogg & Brendan P. Bradley (1999). Selective Attention and Anxiety: A Cognitive-Motivational Perspective. In Tim Dalgleish & M. J. Powers (eds.), Handbook of Cognition and Emotion. Wiley 145--170.
  44.  86
    Michael G. F. Martin (1997). Sense, Reference and Selective Attention II. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):75–98.
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  45.  2
    Jan W. de Fockert & Andrew J. Bremner (2011). Release of Inattentional Blindness by High Working Memory Load: Elucidating the Relationship Between Working Memory and Selective Attention. Cognition 121 (3):400-408.
  46.  12
    Bruno van Swinderen (2005). The Remote Roots of Consciousness in Fruit-Fly Selective Attention? Bioessays 27 (3):321-330.
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  47.  19
    S. Kim & Bob Rehder (2009). Knowledge Effect the Selective Attention in Category Learning: An Eyetracking Study. In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. 230--235.
  48.  7
    Jon Driver & Gordon C. Baylis (1993). Cross-Modal Negative Priming and Interference in Selective Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (1):45-48.
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  49.  1
    Charles W. Eriksen & James E. Hoffman (1974). Selective Attention: Noise Suppression or Signal Enhancement? Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (6):587-589.
  50. Annette C. Baier (1996). The Vital but Dangerous Art of Ignoring: Selective Attention and Self-Deception. In Roger T. Ames & Wimal Dissanayake (eds.), Self and Deception: A Cross-Cultural Philosophical Enquiry. Albany: SUNY Press
     
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