Search results for '*Self Report' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  32
    David B. King & Teresa L. DeCicco (2009). A Viable Model and Self-Report Measure of Spiritual Intelligence. International Journal of Transpersonal Studies 28 (1):68-85.
    A four-factor model of spiritual intelligence is first proposed. Supportive evidence is reviewed for the capacities of critical existential thinking, personal meaning production, transcendental awareness, and conscious state expansion. Based on this model, a 24-item self-report measure was developed and modified across two consecutive studies . The final version of the scale, the Spiritual Intelligence Self-Report Inventory , displayed excellent internal reliability and good fit to the proposed model. Correlational analyses with additional measures of meaning, metapersonal self-construal, mysticism, (...)
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  2.  8
    Melaina T. Vinski & Scott Watter (2012). Priming Honesty Reduces Subjective Bias in Self-Report Measures of Mind Wandering. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):451-455.
    Using self-report as a measure of conscious experience has been a point of contention in mind wandering research. Whereas prior work has focused on the introspective component of self-report validity, the current research introduces an honesty prime task to the current paradigm in order to assess the role of goal states and social factors on self-report accuracy. Findings provide evidence for an inflated report of mind wandering frequency arising from demand characteristics, intensified by the divergent properties (...)
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  3.  10
    Jill Shuster & Maggie E. Toplak (2009). Executive and Motivational Inhibition: Associations with Self-Report Measures Related to Inhibition. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):471-480.
    Inhibition involves the withholding or suppressing of attention or responses to irrelevant or distracting stimuli. We examined the relationship between five experimental tasks of inhibition, represented by two measures of executive, intentional control inhibition and three measures of motivational inhibition characterized by bottom-up interruption of affective and reward/punishment sensitive mechanisms. Associations between these experimental tasks with three self-report measures related to inhibition were also examined. Correlational analyses indicated a small but significant association between the measures in the executive domain (...)
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  4.  21
    Diego Fernandez-Duque, “Feeling More Regret Than I Would Have Imagined”: Self-Report and Behavioral Evidence.
    People tend to overestimate emotional responses to future events. This study examined whether such affective forecasting errors occur for feelings of regret, as measured by self-report and subsequent decision-making. Some participants played a pricing game and lost by a narrow or wide margin, while others were asked to imagine losing by such margins. Participants who experienced a narrow loss reported more regret than those who imagined a narrow loss. Furthermore, those experiencing a narrow loss behaved more cautiously in a (...)
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  5.  20
    Nancy Uddin & Peter R. Gillett (2002). The Effects of Moral Reasoning and Self-Monitoring on CFO Intentions to Report Fraudulently on Financial Statements. Journal of Business Ethics 40 (1):15 - 32.
    This study adapts the theory of reasoned action (Ajzen and Fishbein, 1980) to the behavior of fraudulent reporting on financial statements so as to examine the effects of moral reasoning and self-monitoring on intention to report fraudulently, using structural equation modeling. The paper seeks to investigate two of the red flags for financial statement fraud identified in Loebbecke et al.'s (1989) paper: client management displays a significant lack of moral fiber and client personnel exhibit strong personality anomalies. As expected, (...)
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  6. Melanie K. T. Takarangi, Deryn Strange & D. Stephen Lindsay (2014). Self-Report May Underestimate Trauma Intrusions. Consciousness and Cognition 27:297-305.
  7.  2
    Marie Louise Reinholdt-Dunne, Karin Mogg & Brendan P. Bradley (2013). Attention Control: Relationships Between Self-Report and Behavioural Measures, and Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression. Cognition and Emotion 27 (3):430-440.
  8.  19
    George Bonanno & Dacher Keltner (2004). Brief Report The Coherence of Emotion Systems: Comparing “on‐Line” Measures of Appraisal and Facial Expressions, and Self‐Report. Cognition and Emotion 18 (3):431-444.
  9.  2
    Michela Balconi & Adriana Bortolotti (2014). Self-Report, Personality and Autonomic System Modulation in Response to Empathic Conflictual Versus Non Conflictual Situation. Cognition and Emotion 28 (1):153-162.
  10.  3
    Christine Harris & Nancy Alvarado (2005). Facial Expressions, Smile Types, and Self-Report During Humour, Tickle, and Pain. Cognition and Emotion 19 (5):655-669.
  11.  9
    Griffith Empathy Measure & Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (2012). Antisocial Process Screening Device, 56 Antisocial Tendencies, Self-Report Psychopathy Scale, 101 Antisociality, 123 Appeal to Nature Questionnaire, 184–187. [REVIEW] In Robyn Langdon & Catriona Mackenzie (eds.), Emotions, Imagination, and Moral Reasoning. Psychology Press 357.
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  12. Rainer Banse (2003). Beyond Verbal Self-Report: Priming Methods in Relationship Research. In Jochen Musch & Karl C. Klauer (eds.), The Psychology of Evaluation: Affective Processes in Cognition and Emotion. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates 245--274.
     
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  13.  5
    Roger A. Drake (1988). Cognitive Style Induced by Hemisphere Priming: Consistent Versus Inconsistent Self-Report. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (4):313-315.
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  14.  3
    Richard C. Goldstein & Paul Willner (2002). Self-Report Measures of Defeat and Entrapment During a Brief Depressive Mood Induction. Cognition and Emotion 16 (5):629-642.
  15.  2
    Hope R. Conte & Rosemarie Ratto (1997). Self-Report Measures of Psychological Mindedness. In M. McCallum & W. Piper (eds.), Psychological Mindedness: A Contemporary Understanding. Lawrence Erlbaum 1--26.
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  16.  1
    Emily Talbot, Gareth J. Williams & Rebecca F. Larkin (2014). Brief Report: The Relationship Between Writing Transcription Skills and Writing Measures Differs Between Children Who Self-Report Being Monolingual or Bilingual. Educational Studies 40 (1):116-120.
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  17. Marcel Zentner & Eerola & Tuomas (2011). Self-Report Measures and Models. In Patrik N. Juslin & John Sloboda (eds.), Handbook of Music and Emotion: Theory, Research, Applications. OUP Oxford
     
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  18. Monica Greco & Ronald Baenninger (1989). Self-Report as a Valid Measure of Yawning in the Laboratory. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (1):75-76.
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  19. David Linden (2012). Overcoming Self-Report : Possibilities and Limitations of Brain Imaging in Psychiatry. In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I Know What You're Thinking: Brain Imaging and Mental Privacy. Oxford University Press 123.
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  20. Emery Schubert (2011). Continuous Self-Report Methods. In Patrik N. Juslin & John Sloboda (eds.), Handbook of Music and Emotion: Theory, Research, Applications. OUP Oxford
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  21. R. Jay Turner (2001). Stress: Measurement by Self-Report and Interview. In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences.
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  22. F. C. Verhulst, J. Van der Ende & H. Koot (forthcoming). Manual for the Youth Self Report (in Dutch) Rotterdam: Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Erasmus Medical Centre. Sophia.
     
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  23. Michael L. Anderson, Report on DARPA Workshop on Self-Aware Computer Systems.
    Self Aware Computer Systems is an area of basic research, and we are only in the initial stages of our understanding of what it means: What it means to be self aware; what a self aware system can do that a system without it cannot do; and what are some of the immediate practical applications and challenge problems. This paper is a report capturing some of the salient points discussed during the DARPA workshop on Self Aware Computer Systems held (...)
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  24. Anthony J. Marcel (2003). Introspective Report - Trust, Self-Knowledge and Science. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (9-10):167-186.
    This paper addresses whether we have transparent accurate access to our own conscious experience. It first sketches the origin and social history of this issue in the seventeenth century, when the trust one can have in self- knowledge was disputed in the religious, social and scientific domains. It then reviews evidence that our conscious experience is disunified in several ways and has two levels, can be opaque to us, and contains much that is non-explicit; and that attending to one's experience (...)
     
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  25.  3
    Aletheia Peters Bajotto & Jose Roberto Goldim (2011). Case-Report: Autonomy and Self Determination of an Elderly Population in South Brazil. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (2).
  26.  1
    Joaquin F. Sousa-Poza & Robert Rohrberg (1976). Communicational and Interactional Aspects of Self-Disclosure: A Preliminary Report on Theory and Method. Semiotica 16 (4).
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  27.  4
    Adam Dodek (2011). Courthouse Cancellations and Challenges to Self-Regulation: Correspondent's Report From Canada. Legal Ethics 14 (1):125-128.
    This article is currently available as a free download on ingentaconnect.
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  28.  7
    Arthur W. Burks, Von Neumann's Self-Reproducing Automata : Technical Report.
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  29.  2
    David Dozois & Keith Dobson (2003). Brief Report the Structure of the Self‐Schema in Clinical Depression: Differences Related to Episode Recurrence. Cognition and Emotion 17 (6):933-941.
  30. Jonathan Smallwood (2004). Brief Report Self-Reference, Ambiguity, and Dysphoria. Cognition and Emotion 18 (7):999-1007.
  31.  2
    Stephen M. Croucher, Alfred DeMaris, Audra R. Diers-Lawson & Shannon Roper (forthcoming). Self-Reporting and the Argumentativeness Scale: An Empirical Examination. Argumentation:1-21.
    This study has two purposes. First, the study evaluates the reliability of self-reports of argumentativeness by comparing self-reported argumentativeness with two other reports of the same target: evaluations by friends and evaluations by intimates. Second, the study examines whether particular characteristics presage a larger or smaller disparity in different reporters’ reports. We found the reliability of both the approach and avoidance subscales to be acceptable for the intimate partner’s responses, but only marginally acceptable when the scale was answered by a (...)
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  32.  3
    Franziska Zuber & Muel Kaptein (2013). Painting with the Same Brush? Surveying Unethical Behavior in the Workplace Using Self-Reports and Observer-Reports. Journal of Business Ethics (3):1-32.
    Research by academics, professional organizations, and businesses on ethics in the workplace often relies on surveys that ask employees to report how frequently they have observed others engaging in unethical behavior. But what do these frequencies in observer-reports say about the frequencies of committed unethical behavior? This paper is the first to address this question by empirically exploring the relationship between observer- and self-reports. Our survey research among the Swiss working population shows that for all 37 different forms of (...)
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  33.  84
    Lars Hall, Petter Johansson & Thomas Strandberg (2012). Lifting the Veil of Morality: Choice Blindness and Attitude Reversals on a Self-Transforming Survey. PLoS ONE 7 (9):e45457. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.
    Every day, thousands of polls, surveys, and rating scales are employed to elicit the attitudes of humankind. Given the ubiquitous use of these instruments, it seems we ought to have firm answers to what is measured by them, but unfortunately we do not. To help remedy this situation, we present a novel approach to investigate the nature of attitudes. We created a self-transforming paper survey of moral opinions, covering both foundational principles, and current dilemmas hotly debated in the media. This (...)
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  34.  12
    Mardi J. Horowitz (2012). Self-Identity Theory and Research Methods. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M14.
    Identity disturbances are common in clinical conditions and personality measures need to extend to assessment of coherence in underlying levels of self-coherence. The problem has been difficult to solve because self-organization is a complex unconscious set of mind/brain processes embedded in social roles and values. Theory helps us address this problem and suggests methods and limitations of interpretation that involve self-reports of subjects, observers who rate subjects, and narrative analyses of verbal communications from subjects.
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  35.  8
    Alex Gillespie & Flora Cornish (2010). Intersubjectivity: Towards a Dialogical Analysis. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 40 (1):19-46.
    Intersubjectivity refers to the variety of possible relations between perspectives. It is indispensable for understanding human social behaviour. While theoretical work on intersubjectivity is relatively sophisticated, methodological approaches to studying intersubjectivity lag behind. Most methodologies assume that individuals are the unit of analysis. In order to research intersubjectivity, however, methodologies are needed that take relationships as the unit of analysis. The first aim of this article is to review existing methodologies for studying intersubjectivity. Four methodological approaches are reviewed: comparative self- (...), observing behaviour, analysing talk and ethnographic engagement. The second aim of the article is to introduce and contribute to the development of a dialogical method of analysis. The dialogical approach enables the study of intersubjectivity at different levels, as both implicit and explicit, and both within and between individuals and groups. The article concludes with suggestions for using the proposed method for researching intersubjectivity both within individuals and between individuals and groups. (shrink)
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  36.  38
    Yutaka Nakamura & R. Chapman (2002). Measuring Pain: An Introspective Look at Introspection. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):582-592.
    The measurement of pain depends upon subjective reports, but we know very little about how research subjects or pain patients produce self-reported judgments. Representationalist assumptions dominate the field of pain research and lead to the critical conjecture that the person in pain examines the contents of consciousness before making a report about the sensory or affective magnitude of pain experience as well as about its nature. Most studies to date have investigated what Fechner termed “outer psychophysics”: the relationship between (...)
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  37. Timothy Lane (2015). Self, Belonging, and Conscious Experience: A Critique of Subjectivity Theories of Consciousness. In Rocco Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed consciousness: New essays on psychopathology and theories of consciousness. MIT Press
    Subjectivity theories of consciousness take self-reference, somehow construed, as essential to having conscious experience. These theories differ with respect to how many levels they posit and to whether self-reference is conscious or not. But all treat self-referencing as a process that transpires at the personal level, rather than at the subpersonal level, the level of mechanism. -/- Working with conceptual resources afforded by pre-existing theories of consciousness that take self-reference to be essential, several attempts have been made to explain seemingly (...)
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  38.  22
    Frederic Gilbert (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression: Postoperative Feelings of Self-Estrangement, Suicide Attempt and Impulsive–Aggressive Behaviours. Neuroethics 6 (3):473-481.
    The goal of this article is to shed light on Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) postoperative suicidality risk factors within Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD) patients, in particular by focusing on the ethical concern of enrolling patient with history of self-estrangement, suicide attempts and impulsive–aggressive inclinations. In order to illustrate these ethical issues we report and review a clinical case associated with postoperative feelings of self-estrangement, self-harm behaviours and suicide attempt leading to the removal of DBS devices. Could prospectively identifying and (...)
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  39.  10
    Frederic Gilbert (2015). Self-Estrangement & Deep Brain Stimulation: Ethical Issues Related to Forced Explantation. Neuroethics 8 (2):107-114.
    Although being generally safe, the use of Deep Brain Stimulation has been associated with a significant number of patients experiencing postoperative psychological and neurological harm within experimental trials. A proportion of these postoperative severe adverse effects have lead to the decision to medically prescribe device deactivation or removal. However, there is little debate in the literature as to what is in the patient’s best interest when device removal has been prescribed; in particular, what should be the conceptual approach to ethically (...)
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  40.  4
    Sarah E. Duffy, Michele I. Feist & Steven McCarthy (2014). Moving Through Time: The Role of Personality in Three Real‐Life Contexts. Cognitive Science 38 (8):1662-1674.
    In English, two deictic space-time metaphors are in common usage: the Moving Ego metaphor conceptualizes the ego as moving forward through time and the Moving Time metaphor conceptualizes time as moving forward toward the ego . Although earlier research investigating the psychological reality of these metaphors has typically examined spatial influences on temporal reasoning , recent lines of research have extended beyond this, providing initial evidence that personality differences and emotional experiences may also influence how people (...)
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  41.  4
    Ulfert Gronewold, Anna Gold & Steven E. Salterio (2013). Reporting Self-Made Errors: The Impact of Organizational Error-Management Climate and Error Type. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):189-208.
    We study how an organization’s error-management climate affects organizational members’ beliefs about other members’ willingness to report errors that they discover when chance of error detection by superiors and others is extremely low. An error-management climate, as a component of the organizational climate, is said to be “high” when errors are accepted as part of everyday life as long as they are learned from and not repeated. Alternatively, the error-management climate is said to be an “error averse” climate when (...)
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  42.  4
    Virginia L. Wiseman (1999). Culture, Self-Rated Health and Resource Allocation Decision-Making. Health Care Analysis 7 (3):207-223.
    It has been observed that some groups in society tend to report their health to be better than would be expected through more objective measures. The available evidence suggests that while variations in self-assessed measures of health may act as good proxies of mortality and morbidity in homogeneous populations, in some groups, such as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of Australia, these subjective measures may provide a misleading picture. Useful insights into the formation of health perceptions can (...)
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  43. Petter Johansson, Lars Hall, Sverker Sikstrom & Andreas Olsson (2005). Failure to Detect Mismatches Between Intention and Outcome in a Simple Decision Task. Science 310:116-119.
    A fundamental assumption of theories of decision-making is that we detect mismatches between intention and outcome, adjust our behavior in the face of error, and adapt to changing circumstances. Is this always the case? We investigated the relation between intention, choice, and introspection. Participants made choices between presented face pairs on the basis of attractiveness, while we covertly manipulated the relationship between choice and outcome that they experienced. Participants failed to notice conspicuous mismatches between their intended choice and the outcome (...)
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  44.  47
    Anthony Greenwald, A Unified Theory of Implicit Attitudes, Stereotypes, Self-Esteem, and Self-Concept.
    This theoretical integration of social psychology’s main cognitive and affective constructs was shaped by 3 influences: (a) recent widespread interest in automatic and implicit cognition, (b) development of the Implicit Association Test (IAT; A. G. Greenwald, D. E. McGhee, & J. L. K. Schwartz, 1998), and (c) social psychology’s consistency theories of the 1950s, especially F. Heider’s (1958) balance theory. The balanced identity design is introduced as a method to test correlational predictions of the theory. Data obtained with this method (...)
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  45.  41
    L. -C. Huang, C. -H. Chen, H. -L. Liu, H. -Y. Lee, N. -H. Peng, T. -M. Wang & Y. -C. Chang (2013). The Attitudes of Neonatal Professionals Towards End-of-Life Decision-Making for Dying Infants in Taiwan. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):382-386.
    The purposes of research were to describe the neonatal clinicians' personal views and attitudes on neonatal ethical decision-making, to identify factors that might affect these attitudes and to compare the attitudes between neonatal physicians and neonatal nurses in Taiwan. Research was a cross-sectional design and a questionnaire was used to reach different research purposes. A convenient sample was used to recruit 24 physicians and 80 neonatal nurses from four neonatal intensive care units in Taiwan. Most participants agreed with suggesting a (...)
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  46.  84
    Eric Schwitzgebel (2012). Self-Ignorance. In JeeLoo Liu & John Perry (eds.), Consciousness and the Self. Cambridge University Press
    Philosophers tend to be pretty impressed by human self-knowledge. Descartes (1641/1984) thought our knowledge of our own stream of experience was the secure and indubitable foundation upon which to build our knowledge of the rest of the world. Hume – who was capable of being skeptical about almost anything – said that the only existences we can be certain of are our own sensory and imagistic experiences (1739/1978, p. 212). Perhaps the most prominent writer on self-knowledge in contemporary philosophy is (...)
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  47.  1
    Adrian Coyle, Maria Knapp & Edmond O'Dea (1996). Decision Making in HIV Testing Among a Group with Low HIV Risk. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2 (3):223-230.
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  48.  1
    Christopher T. Burris & John K. Rempel (2012). The Crystal Globe: Emotional Empathy and the Transformation of Self. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1526-1532.
    To test whether emotional empathy is linked to altered perceptions of self in relation to other and/or context, participants read one of two tragic news stories and then completed a self-report empathy measure, as well as an abridged version of Hood’s Mysticism scale either before or after the article. Exposure to a needy other in the story tended to result in greater self-reported mystical experience. Men with a history of mystical experience reported more empathy, but the latter was disconnected (...)
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  49.  3
    Karin Bakracevic Vukman & Marta Licardo (2009). How Cognitive, Metacognitive, Motivational and Emotional Self‐Regulation Influence School Performance in Adolescence and Early Adulthood. Educational Studies 36 (3):259-268.
    This contribution aims to examine how different areas of self?regulation are related to academic achievement in adolescents and young adults. The study involved participants, drawn from following age groups: 14?15, 17?18 and 22?23. In order to get information about cognitive, metacognitive, motivational and emotional aspects of self?regulation, self?report questionnaires were used. Differences between age?groups revealed following tendency: there has been a decrease in all fields of self?regulation from age of 14 (end of primary school) to the age of about (...)
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  50.  7
    Sandra T. Sigmon, Kelly J. Rohan, Diana Dorhofer, Lisa A. Hotovy, Peter C. Trask & Nina Boulard (1997). Effects of Consent Form Information on Self-Disclosure. Ethics and Behavior 7 (4):299 – 310.
    When researchers encounter preexisting psychological distress in participants, ethical codes provide little guidance on how to balance issues of beneficence and autonomy. Although researchers may inform participants what will occur given responses indicating distress, this information may lead to biased self-reports. This important issue was addressed in this study by manipulating consent form information regarding the type of psychopathology to be assessed and various levels of possible follow-up. In comparing responses on self-report measures of anxiety, depression, and general psychological (...)
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