Search results for '*Sensory Neurons' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. W. L. Neuhuber (1990). Dichotomic Classification of Sensory Neurons: Elegant but Problematic. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):313-314.score: 33.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Lorne Mendell (1990). Somatic Spikes of Sensory Neurons May Provide a Better Sorting Criterion Than the Autonomic/Somatic Subdivision. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):312-313.score: 33.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. William G. Wright (2000). Neuronal and Behavioral Plasticity in Evolution: Experiments in a Model Lineage Evolutionary Changes in Sensory Neurons Correlate with Changes in Learning Phenotypes. Bioscience 50 (10):883-894.score: 33.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. G. Jancsó (1990). B-Afferents: A System of Capsaicin-Sensitive Primary Sensory Neurons? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):306-307.score: 33.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Andreas K. Engel & Wolf Singer (2001). Temporal Binding and the Neural Correlates of Sensory Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):16-25.score: 31.0
    Theories of binding have recently come into the focus of the consciousness debate. In this review, we discuss the potential relevance of temporal binding mechanisms for sensory awareness. Specifically, we suggest that neural synchrony with a precision in the millisecond range may be crucial for conscious processing, and may be involved in arousal, perceptual integration, attentional selection and working memory. Recent evidence from both animal and human studies demonstrates that specific changes in neuronal synchrony occur during all of these processes (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Wynand Van der Goes van Naters (2013). Inhibition Among Olfactory Receptor Neurons. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 31.0
  7. Bernard J. Baars & Katharine A. McGovern (2000). Consciousness Cannot Be Limited to Sensory Qualities: Some Empirical Counterexamples. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):11-13.score: 28.0
  8. John Schlag (1980). Are Parietal Saccade Neurons Sensory or Motor? Is the Question Worth Asking? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):515.score: 27.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Michael Colombo & Charles G. Gross (1996). Hippocampus, Delay Neurons, and Sensory Heterogeneity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):766.score: 27.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Lawrence Shapiro (2009). Making Sense of Mirror Neurons. Synthese 167 (3):439 - 456.score: 24.0
    The discovery of mirror neurons has been hailed as one of the most exciting developments in neuroscience in the past few decades. These neurons discharge in response to the observation of others’ actions. But how are we to understand the function of these neurons? In this paper I defend the idea that mirror neurons are best conceived as components of a sensory system that has the function to perceive action. In short, mirror neurons are part (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Francis Crick & Christof Koch (2000). The Unconscious Homunculus. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press. 3-11.score: 22.0
  12. Benjamin W. Libet (2000). Conscious and Unconscious Mental Activity. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):21-24.score: 22.0
  13. Bjorn H. Merker (2005). The Liabilities of Mobility: A Selection Pressure for the Transition to Consciousness in Animal Evolution. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):89-114.score: 22.0
  14. Ray S. Jackendoff (2000). Unconscious, Yes; Homunculus,??? Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):17-20.score: 22.0
  15. D. Smith (2000). Freudian Science of Consciousness: Then and Now. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):38-45.score: 22.0
  16. Jeffrey D. Schall (2000). Investigating Neural Correlates of Consciousness with Ambiguous Stimuli. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):32-35.score: 22.0
  17. Dominic H. ffytche & Delphine Pins (2003). Are Neural Correlates of Visual Consciousness Retinotopic? Neuroreport 14 (16):2011-2014.score: 22.0
  18. Stephen B. McMahon (1997). Are There Fundamental Differences in the Peripheral Mechanisms of Visceral and Somatic Pain? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):381-391.score: 22.0
    There are some conspicuous differences between the sensibilities of cutaneous and visceral tissues: (1) Direct trauma, which readily produces pain when applied to the skin, is mostly without effect in healthy visceral tissue. (2) Pain that arises from visceral tissues is initially often poorly localised and diffuse. (3) With time, visceral pains are often referred to more superficial structures. (4) The site of referred pain may also show hyperalgesia. (5) In disease states, the afflicted viscera may also become hyperalgesic. In (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jaak Panksepp (2000). The Cradle of Consciousness: A Periconscious Emotional Homunculus? Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):24-32.score: 22.0
  20. James C. Prechtl & Terry L. Powley (1990). B-Afferents: A Fundamental Division of the Nervous System Mediating Homeostasis? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):289-300.score: 22.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. James H. Schwartz (2000). The Unconscious Homunculus: Comment. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):36-37.score: 22.0
  22. Peter A. Tass Oleksandr V. Popovych (2012). Desynchronizing Electrical and Sensory Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 21.0
    Coordinated reset (CR) stimulation is a desynchronizing stimulation technique based on timely coordinated phase resets of sub-populations of a synchronized neuronal ensemble. It has initially been computationally developed for electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS), to enable an effective desynchronization and unlearning of pathological synchrony and connectivity (anti-kindling). Here we computationally show for ensembles of spiking and bursting model neurons interacting via excitatory and inhibitory adaptive synapses that a phase reset of neuronal populations as well as a desynchronization and an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Oleksandr V. Popovych & Peter A. Tass (2012). Desynchronizing Electrical and Sensory Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 21.0
    Coordinated reset (CR) stimulation is a desynchronizing stimulation technique based on timely coordinated phase resets of sub-populations of a synchronized neuronal ensemble. It has initially been computationally developed for electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS), to enable an effective desynchronization and unlearning of pathological synchrony and connectivity (anti-kindling). Here we computationally show for ensembles of spiking and bursting model neurons interacting via excitatory and inhibitory adaptive synapses that a phase reset of neuronal populations as well as a desynchronization and an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Shannon Spaulding (2013). Mirror Neurons and Social Cognition. Mind and Language 28 (2):233-257.score: 18.0
    Mirror neurons are widely regarded as an important key to social cognition. Despite such wide agreement, there is very little consensus on how or why they are important. The goal of this paper is to clearly explicate the exact role mirror neurons play in social cognition. I aim to answer two questions about the relationship between mirroring and social cognition: What kind of social understanding is involved with mirroring? How is mirroring related to that understanding? I argue that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Chris A. Kramer (2012). As If: Connecting Phenomenology, Mirror Neurons, Empathy, and Laughter. Phaenex 7 (1):275-308.score: 18.0
    The discovery of mirror neurons in both primates and humans has led to an enormous amount of research and speculation as to how conscious beings are able to interact so effortlessly among one another. Mirror neurons might provide an embodied basis for passive synthesis and the eventual process of further communalization through empathy, as envisioned by Edmund Husserl. I consider the possibility of a phenomenological and scientific investigation of laughter as a point of connection that might in the (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Shannon Spaulding (2012). Mirror Neurons Are Not Evidence for the Simulation Theory. Synthese 189 (3):515-534.score: 18.0
    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in theories of mindreading. New discoveries in neuroscience have revitalized the languishing debate. The discovery of so-called mirror neurons has revived interest particularly in the Simulation Theory (ST) of mindreading. Both ST proponents and theorists studying mirror neurons have argued that mirror neurons are strong evidence in favor of ST over Theory Theory (TT). In this paper I argue against the prevailing view that mirror neurons are evidence for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Luca Barlassina (2011). After All, It’s Still Replication: A Reply to Jacob on Simulation and Mirror Neurons. Res Cogitans 8 (1):92-111.score: 18.0
    Mindreading is the ability to attribute mental states to other individuals. According to the simulation theory (ST), mindreading is based on the ability the mind has of replicating others' mental states and processes. Mirror neurons (MNs) are a class of neurons that fire both when an agent performs a goal-directed action and when she observes the same type of action performed by another individual. Since MNs appear to form a replicative mechanism in which a portion of the observer's (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Randolph Blake, Duje Tadin, Kenith V. Sobel, Tony A. Raissian & Sang Chul Chong (2006). Strength of Early Visual Adaptation Depends on Visual Awareness. Pnas Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 103 (12):4783-4788.score: 18.0
  29. Florian Lanz, Véronique Moret, Eric Michel Rouiller & Gérard Loquet (2013). Multisensory Integration in Non-Human Primates During a Sensory-Motor Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Daily our central nervous system receives inputs via several sensory modalities, processes them and integrates information in order to produce a suitable behaviour. The amazing part is that such a multisensory integration brings all information into a unified percept. An approach to start investigating this property is to show that perception is better and faster when multimodal stimuli are used as compared to unimodal stimuli. This forms the first part of the present study conducted in a non-human primate’s model (n=2) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Xing Tian & David Poeppel (2012). Mental Imagery of Speech: Linking Motor and Perceptual Systems Through Internal Simulation and Estimation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    The neural basis of mental imagery has been investigated by localizing the underlying neural networks, mostly in motor and perceptual systems, separately. However, how modality-specific representations are top-down induced and how the action and perception systems interact in the context of mental imagery is not well understood. Imagined speech production (‘articulation imagery’), which induces the kinesthetic feeling of articulator movement and its auditory consequences, provides a new angle because of the concurrent involvement of motor and perceptual systems. On the basis (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. M. V. Butz (2008). Intentions and Mirror Neurons: From the Individual to Overall Social Reality. Commentary on the Target Artcle by Ernst von Glasersfeld. Constructivist Foundations 3 (2):87-89.score: 18.0
    Open peer commentary on the target article “Who Conceives of Society?” by Ernst von Glasersfeld. First paragraph: Cognitive psychology, neurobiology, and cognitive systems research provide diverse clues as to how we are able to incrementally construct representations of the perceived environment and how we consequently understand other individuals and society. The construction of an individual’s reality starts with the capability to control one’s own body and to be able to predict the usual sensory effects caused by body movements. To be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Thomas J. Perrault Jr, Barry E. Stein & Benjamin A. Rowland (2011). Non-Stationarity in Multisensory Neurons in the Superior Colliculus. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    The superior colliculus (SC) integrates information from multiple sensory modalities to facilitate the detection and localization of salient events. The efficacy of “multisensory integration” is traditionally measured by comparing the magnitude of the response elicited by a cross-modal stimulus to the responses elicited by its modality-specific component stimuli, and because there is an element of randomness in the system, these calculations are made using response values averaged over multiple stimulus presentations in an experiment. Recent evidence suggests that multisensory integration in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. David Poeppel Xing Tian (2012). Mental Imagery of Speech: Linking Motor and Perceptual Systems Through Internal Simulation and Estimation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    The neural basis of mental imagery has been investigated by localizing the underlying neural networks, mostly in motor and perceptual systems, separately. However, how modality-specific representations are top-down induced and how the action and perception systems interact in the context of mental imagery is not well understood. Imagined speech production (‘articulation imagery’), which induces the kinesthetic feeling of articulator movement and its auditory consequences, provides a new angle because of the concurrent involvement of motor and perceptual systems. On the basis (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Stefano Sandrone (2013). Self Through the Mirror (Neurons) and Default Mode Network: What Neuroscientists Found and What Can Still Be Found There. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Self through the Mirror (Neurons) and Default Mode Network: What Neuroscientists Found and What Can Still be Found There.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Synesthetic Binding and the Reactivation Model of Memory. In Ophelia Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blendings: New essays on synaesthesia. Oxford University Press.score: 17.0
    Despite the recent surge in research on, and interest in, synesthesia, the mechanism underlying this condition is still unknown. Feedforward mechanisms involving overlapping receptive fields of sensory neurons as well as feedback mechanisms involving a lack of signal disinhibition have been proposed. Here I show that a broad range of studies of developmental synesthesia indicate that the mechanism underlying the phenomenon may involve reinstatement of brain activity in different sensory or cognitive streams in a way that is similar to (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Vittorio Gallese (2005). Embodied Simulation: From Neurons to Phenomenal Experience. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):23-48.score: 15.0
    The same neural structures involved in the unconscious modeling of our acting body in space also contribute to our awareness of the lived body and of the objects that the world contains. Neuroscientific research also shows that there are neural mechanisms mediating between the multi-level personal experience we entertain of our lived body, and the implicit certainties we simultaneously hold about others. Such personal and body-related experiential knowledge enables us to understand the actions performed by others, and to directly decode (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. R. P. Behrendt & C. Young (2004). Hallucinations in Schizophrenia, Sensory Impairment, and Brain Disease: A Unifying Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):771-787.score: 15.0
    Based on recent insight into the thalamocortical system and its role in perception and conscious experience, a unified pathophysiological framework for hallucinations in neurological and psychiatric conditions is proposed, which integrates previously unrelated neurobiological and psychological findings. Gamma-frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in networks of thalamocortical circuits, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent gamma oscillations under constraints of afferent sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. If perception is (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. R. P. Behrendt (2003). Hallucinations: Synchronisation of Thalamocortical ? Oscillations Underconstrained by Sensory Input. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):413-451.score: 15.0
    What we perceive is the product of an intrinsic process and not part of external physical reality. This notion is consistent with the philosophical position of transcendental idealism but also agrees with physiological findings on the thalamocortical system. -Frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in thalamocortical networks, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent oscillations under constraints of sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. Perception and conscious experience may be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. John Michael (2012). Mirror Systems and Simulation: A Neo-Empiricist Interpretation. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):565-582.score: 15.0
    It is often claimed that the discovery of mirror neurons supports simulation theory (ST). There has been much controversy about this, however, as there are various competing models of the functional contribution of mirror systems, only some of which characterize mirroring as simulation in the sense required by ST. But a brief review of these models reveals that they all include simulation in some sense . In this paper, I propose that the broader conception of simulation articulated by neo-empiricist (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Stephen P. Turner (2007). Mirror Neurons and Practices: A Response to Lizardo. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (3):351–371.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Terence V. Sewards & Mark A. Sewards (2001). On the Correlation Between Synchronized Oscillatory Activities and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (4):485-495.score: 15.0
    Recent experiments have shown that the amplitudes of cortical gamma band oscillatory activities that occur during anesthesia are often greater than amplitudes of similar activities that occur without anesthesia. This result is apparently at odds with the hypothesis that synchronized oscillatory activities constitute the neural correlate of consciousness. We argue that while synchronization and oscillatory patterning are necessary conditions for consciousness, they are not sufficient. Based on the results of a binocular rivalry study of Fries et al. (1997), we propose (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. P. R. (2003). Hallucinations: Synchronisation of Thalamocortical Oscillations Underconstrained by Sensory Input. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):413-451.score: 15.0
    What we perceive is the product of an intrinsic process and not part of external physical reality. This notion is consistent with the philosophical position of transcendental idealism but also agrees with physiological findings on the thalamocortical system. -Frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in thalamocortical networks, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent oscillations under constraints of sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. Perception and conscious experience may be (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Fausto Caruana (2010). «Learning to See». The Role of the Mirror Neurons System, Between Neuroscience of Perception and Ordinary Language Analysis. Rivista di Filosofia 101 (3):333-354.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. G. A. Ojemann, J. Ojemann & N. F. Ramsey (2012). Relation Between Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Single Neuron, Local Field Potential (LFP) and Electrocorticography (ECoG) Activity in Human Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:34-34.score: 15.0
    The relation between changes in the blood oxygen dependent metabolic changes imaged by fMRI and neural events directly recorded from human cortex from single neurons, LFPs and ECoG is critically reviewed, based on the published literature including findings from the authors’ laboratories. All these data are from special populations, usually patients with medically refractory epilepsy, as this provides the major opportunity for direct cortical neuronal recording in humans. For LFP and ECoG changes are often sought in different frequency bands, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Mauro Ursino Cristiano Cuppini, Elisa Magosso (2011). Organization, Maturation, and Plasticity of Multisensory Integration: Insights From Computational Modeling Studies. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 15.0
    In this paper, we present two neural network models - devoted to two specific and widely investigated aspects of multisensory integration - in order to evidence the potentialities of computational models to gain insight into the neural mechanisms underlying organization, development and plasticity of multisensory integration in the brain. The first model considers visual-auditory interaction in a midbrain structure named Superior Colliculus (SC). The model is able to reproduce and explain the main physiological features of multisensory integration in SC (...) and to describe how SC integrative capability – not present at birth - develops gradually during postnatal life depending on sensory experience with cross-modal stimuli. The second model tackles the problem of how tactile stimuli on a body part and visual (or auditory) stimuli close to the same body part are integrated in multimodal parietal neurons to form the perception of peripersonal (i.e., near) space. The model investigates how the extension of peripersonal space - where multimodal integration occurs - may be modified by experience such as use of a tool to interact with the far space. The utility of the modelling approach relies on several aspects: i) The two models, although devoted to different problems and simulating different brain regions, share some common mechanisms (lateral inhibition and excitation, non-linear neuron characteristics, recurrent connections, competition, Hebbian rules of potentiation and depression) that may govern more generally the fusion of senses in the brain, and the learning and plasticity of multisensory integration. ii) The models may help interpretation of behavioural and psychophysical responses in terms of neural activity and synaptic connections. iii) The models can make testable predictions that can help guiding future experiments in order to validate, reject, or modify the main assumptions. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Stephen L. Macknik & Susana Martinez-Conde (2004). Dichoptic Visual Masking Reveals That Early Binocular Neurons Exhibit Weak Interocular Suppression: Implications for Binocular Vision and Visual Awareness. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 16 (6):1049-1059.score: 15.0
  47. Lorelei D. Shoemaker & Paola Arlotta (2010). Untangling the Cortex: Advances in Understanding Specification and Differentiation of Corticospinal Motor Neurons. Bioessays 32 (3):197-206.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Robert Briscoe (forthcoming). Bodily Action and Distal Attribution in Sensory Substitution. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Proceedings of the British Academy.score: 14.0
    According to proponents of the sensorimotor contingency theory of perception (Hurley & Noë 2003, Noë 2004, O’Regan 2011), active control of camera movement is necessary for the emergence of distal attribution in tactile-visual sensory substitution (TVSS) because it enables the subject to acquire knowledge of the way stimulation in the substituting modality varies as a function of self-initiated, bodily action. This chapter, by contrast, approaches distal attribution as a solution to a causal inference problem faced by the subject’s perceptual systems. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (2012). Movement and Mirror Neurons: A Challenging and Choice Conversation. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):385-401.score: 14.0
    This paper raises fundamental questions about the claims of art historian David Freedberg and neuroscientist Vittorio Gallese in their article "Motion, Emotion and Empathy in Esthetic Experience." It does so from several perspectives, all of them rooted in the dynamic realities of movement. It shows on the basis of neuroscientific research how connectivity and pruning are of unmistakable import in the interneuronal dynamic patternings in the human brain from birth onward. In effect, it shows that mirror neurons are contingent (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. David Suarez, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan & Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Non-Sensory Feelings. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press.score: 14.0
    One of the central limitations of sensory substitution devices (SSDs) is their inability to reproduce the non-sensory feelings that are normally associated with visual experiences, especially hedonic and aesthetic responses. This limitation is sometimes reported to cause SSD users frustration. To make matters worse, it is unclear that improvements in acuity, bandwidth, or training will resolve the issue. Yet, if SSDs are to actually reproduce visual experience in its fullness, it seems that the reproduction of non-sensory feelings will be of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000