Search results for '*Sensory Neurons' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  3
    W. L. Neuhuber (1990). Dichotomic Classification of Sensory Neurons: Elegant but Problematic. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):313-314.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  1
    G. Jancsó (1990). B-Afferents: A System of Capsaicin-Sensitive Primary Sensory Neurons? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):306-307.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  1
    Lorne Mendell (1990). Somatic Spikes of Sensory Neurons May Provide a Better Sorting Criterion Than the Autonomic/Somatic Subdivision. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):312-313.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  4
    John Schlag (1980). Are Parietal Saccade Neurons Sensory or Motor? Is the Question Worth Asking? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):515.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  1
    Michael Colombo & Charles G. Gross (1996). Hippocampus, Delay Neurons, and Sensory Heterogeneity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):766.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  83
    Andreas K. Engel & Wolf Singer (2001). Temporal Binding and the Neural Correlates of Sensory Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):16-25.
    Theories of binding have recently come into the focus of the consciousness debate. In this review, we discuss the potential relevance of temporal binding mechanisms for sensory awareness. Specifically, we suggest that neural synchrony with a precision in the millisecond range may be crucial for conscious processing, and may be involved in arousal, perceptual integration, attentional selection and working memory. Recent evidence from both animal and human studies demonstrates that specific changes in neuronal synchrony occur during all of these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   28 citations  
  7. Bernard J. Baars & Katharine A. McGovern (2000). Consciousness Cannot Be Limited to Sensory Qualities: Some Empirical Counterexamples. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):11-13.
  8.  87
    Bjorn H. Merker (2005). The Liabilities of Mobility: A Selection Pressure for the Transition to Consciousness in Animal Evolution. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):89-114.
    The issue of the biological origin of consciousness is linked to that of its function. One source of evidence in this regard is the contrast between the types of information that are and are not included within its compass. Consciousness presents us with a stable arena for our actions—the world—but excludes awareness of the multiple sensory and sensorimotor transformations through which the image of that world is extracted from the confounding influence of self-produced motion of multiple receptor arrays mounted on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  9.  96
    Lawrence Shapiro (2009). Making Sense of Mirror Neurons. Synthese 167 (3):439 - 456.
    The discovery of mirror neurons has been hailed as one of the most exciting developments in neuroscience in the past few decades. These neurons discharge in response to the observation of others’ actions. But how are we to understand the function of these neurons? In this paper I defend the idea that mirror neurons are best conceived as components of a sensory system that has the function to perceive action. In short, mirror neurons are part (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  95
    Benjamin W. Libet (2000). Conscious and Unconscious Mental Activity. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):21-24.
  11.  58
    Ray S. Jackendoff (2000). Unconscious, Yes; Homunculus,??? Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):17-20.
  12. Francis Crick & Christof Koch (2000). The Unconscious Homunculus. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press 3-11.
  13. Jaak Panksepp (2000). The Cradle of Consciousness: A Periconscious Emotional Homunculus? Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):24-32.
  14.  7
    James C. Prechtl & Terry L. Powley (1990). B-Afferents: A Fundamental Division of the Nervous System Mediating Homeostasis? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):289-300.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  25
    D. Smith (2000). Freudian Science of Consciousness: Then and Now. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):38-45.
  16.  21
    Jeffrey D. Schall (2000). Investigating Neural Correlates of Consciousness with Ambiguous Stimuli. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):32-35.
  17. Dominic H. ffytche & Delphine Pins (2003). Are Neural Correlates of Visual Consciousness Retinotopic? Neuroreport 14 (16):2011-2014.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Stephen B. McMahon (1997). Are There Fundamental Differences in the Peripheral Mechanisms of Visceral and Somatic Pain? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):381-391.
    There are some conspicuous differences between the sensibilities of cutaneous and visceral tissues: (1) Direct trauma, which readily produces pain when applied to the skin, is mostly without effect in healthy visceral tissue. (2) Pain that arises from visceral tissues is initially often poorly localised and diffuse. (3) With time, visceral pains are often referred to more superficial structures. (4) The site of referred pain may also show hyperalgesia. (5) In disease states, the afflicted viscera may (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. James H. Schwartz (2000). The Unconscious Homunculus: Comment. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):36-37.
  20.  13
    Maria Brincker (2015). Beyond Sensorimotor Segregation: On Mirror Neurons and Social Affordance Space Tracking. Cognitive Systems Research 34:18-34.
    <span class='Hi'>Mirror</span> neuron research has come a long way since the early 1990s, and many theorists are now stressing the heterogeneity and complexity of the sensorimotor properties of fronto-parietal circuits. However, core aspects of the initial ‘<span class='Hi'>mirror</span> <span class='Hi'>mechanism</span>’ theory, i.e. the idea of a symmetric encapsulated mirroring function translating sensory action perceptions into motor formats, still appears to be shaping much of the debate. This article challenges the empirical plausibility of the sensorimotor segregation implicit in the original <span (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  40
    R. P. Behrendt (2003). Hallucinations: Synchronisation of Thalamocortical ? Oscillations Underconstrained by Sensory Input. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):413-451.
    What we perceive is the product of an intrinsic process and not part of external physical reality. This notion is consistent with the philosophical position of transcendental idealism but also agrees with physiological findings on the thalamocortical system. -Frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in thalamocortical networks, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent oscillations under constraints of sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. Perception and conscious experience may be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  64
    R. P. Behrendt & C. Young (2004). Hallucinations in Schizophrenia, Sensory Impairment, and Brain Disease: A Unifying Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):771-787.
    Based on recent insight into the thalamocortical system and its role in perception and conscious experience, a unified pathophysiological framework for hallucinations in neurological and psychiatric conditions is proposed, which integrates previously unrelated neurobiological and psychological findings. Gamma-frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in networks of thalamocortical circuits, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent gamma oscillations under constraints of afferent sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. If perception is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23. P. R. (2003). Hallucinations: Synchronisation of Thalamocortical Oscillations Underconstrained by Sensory Input. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):413-451.
    What we perceive is the product of an intrinsic process and not part of external physical reality. This notion is consistent with the philosophical position of transcendental idealism but also agrees with physiological findings on the thalamocortical system. -Frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in thalamocortical networks, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent oscillations under constraints of sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. Perception and conscious experience may be (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  1
    M. V. Butz (2008). Intentions and Mirror Neurons: From the Individual to Overall Social Reality. Constructivist Foundations 3 (2):87-89.
    Open peer commentary on the target article “Who Conceives of Society?” by Ernst von Glasersfeld. First paragraph: Cognitive psychology, neurobiology, and cognitive systems research provide diverse clues as to how we are able to incrementally construct representations of the perceived environment and how we consequently understand other individuals and society. The construction of an individual’s reality starts with the capability to control one’s own body and to be able to predict the usual sensory effects caused by body movements. To be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  66
    Randolph Blake, Duje Tadin, Kenith V. Sobel, Tony A. Raissian & Sang Chul Chong (2006). Strength of Early Visual Adaptation Depends on Visual Awareness. Pnas Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 103 (12):4783-4788.
  26.  40
    Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Synesthetic Binding and the Reactivation Model of Memory. In Ophelia Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blendings: New essays on synaesthesia. Oxford University Press
    Despite the recent surge in research on, and interest in, synesthesia, the mechanism underlying this condition is still unknown. Feedforward mechanisms involving overlapping receptive fields of sensory neurons as well as feedback mechanisms involving a lack of signal disinhibition have been proposed. Here I show that a broad range of studies of developmental synesthesia indicate that the mechanism underlying the phenomenon may involve reinstatement of brain activity in different sensory or cognitive streams in a way that is similar to (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  1
    M. V. Butz (2008). Intentions and Mirror Neurons: From the Individual to Overall Social Reality. Commentary on the Target Artcle by Ernst von Glasersfeld. Constructivist Foundations 3 (2):87-89.
    Open peer commentary on the target article “Who Conceives of Society?” by Ernst von Glasersfeld. First paragraph: Cognitive psychology, neurobiology, and cognitive systems research provide diverse clues as to how we are able to incrementally construct representations of the perceived environment and how we consequently understand other individuals and society. The construction of an individual’s reality starts with the capability to control one’s own body and to be able to predict the usual sensory effects caused by body movements. To (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  34
    Rick A. Adams, Harriet R. Brown & Karl J. Friston (2015). Bayesian Inference, Predictive Coding and Delusions. Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3:51-88.
    This paper considers psychotic symptoms in terms of false inferences or beliefs. It is based on the notion that the brain is an organ of inference that actively constructs hypotheses to explain or predict its sensations. This perspective provides a normative account of action and perception that emphasises probabilistic representations; in particular, the confidence or precision of beliefs about the world. We consider sensory attenuation deficits, catatonia and delusions as various expressions of the same core pathology: namely, an aberrant encoding (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  21
    Terence V. Sewards & Mark A. Sewards (2001). On the Correlation Between Synchronized Oscillatory Activities and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (4):485-495.
    Recent experiments have shown that the amplitudes of cortical gamma band oscillatory activities that occur during anesthesia are often greater than amplitudes of similar activities that occur without anesthesia. This result is apparently at odds with the hypothesis that synchronized oscillatory activities constitute the neural correlate of consciousness. We argue that while synchronization and oscillatory patterning are necessary conditions for consciousness, they are not sufficient. Based on the results of a binocular rivalry study of Fries et al. (1997), we propose (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  30.  44
    John Michael (2012). Mirror Neurons and Social Cognition: An Expanded Simulationist Framework. In Henk W. de Regt (ed.), Epsa Philosophy of Science: Amsterdam 2009. Springer 217--226.
    In this paper, I critically assess the thesis that the discovery of mirror neuron systems provides empirical support for the simulation theory of social cognition. This thesis can be analyzed into two claims: that MNSs are involved in understanding others’ intentions or emotions; and that the way in which they do so supports a simulationist viewpoint. I will be giving qualified support to both claims. Starting with, I will present theoretical and empirical points in support of the view that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  27
    John Michael (2012). Mirror Systems and Simulation: A Neo-Empiricist Interpretation. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):565-582.
    It is often claimed that the discovery of mirror neurons supports simulation theory (ST). There has been much controversy about this, however, as there are various competing models of the functional contribution of mirror systems, only some of which characterize mirroring as simulation in the sense required by ST. But a brief review of these models reveals that they all include simulation in some sense . In this paper, I propose that the broader conception of simulation articulated by neo-empiricist (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  90
    Maria Brincker (2010). Moving Beyond Mirroring - a Social Affordance Model of Sensorimotor Integration During Action Perception. Dissertation, City University of New York
    The discovery of so-called ‘mirror neurons’ - found to respond both to own actions and the observation of similar actions performed by others - has been enormously influential in the cognitive sciences and beyond. Given the self-other symmetry these neurons have been hypothesized as underlying a ‘mirror mechanism’ that lets us share representations and thereby ground core social cognitive functions from intention understanding to linguistic abilities and empathy. I argue that mirror neurons are important for very different (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  43
    Hermann G. W. Burchard (2014). The Cognitive Gap, Neural Darwinism & Linguistic Dualism —Russell, Husserl, Heidegger & Quine. Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):244-264.
    Guided by key insights of the four great philosophers mentioned in the title, here, in review of and expanding on our earlier work (Burchard, 2005, 2011), we present an exposition of the role played by language, & in the broader sense, λογοζ, the Logos, in how the CNS, the brain, is running the human being. Evolution by neural Darwinism has been forcing the linguistic nature of mind, enabling it to overcome & exploit the cognitive gap between an animal and its (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  33
    Hermann Burchard (2011). The Role of Conscious Attention in Perception. Foundations of Science 16 (1):67-99.
    Impressions, energy radiated by phenomena in the momentary environmental scene, enter sensory neurons, creating in afferent nerves a data stream. Following Kant, by our inner sense the mind perceives its own thoughts as it ties together sense data into an internalized scene. The mind, residing in the brain, logically a Language Machine, processes and stores items as coded grammatical entities. Kantian synthetic unity in the linguistic brain is able to deliver our experience of the scene as we appear to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  35.  9
    Yorick Wilks (1982). Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (3):191-195.
    When John von Neumann turned his interest to computers, he was one of the leading mathematicians of his time. In the 1940s, he helped design two of the first stored-program digital electronic computers. He authored reports explaining the functional organization of modern computers for the first time, thereby influencing their construction worldwide (von Neumann, 1945; Burks et al., 1946). In the first of these reports, von Neumann described the computer as analogous to a brain, with an input “organ” (analogous to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Perceptual Learning. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press
    When a user integrates a sensory substitution device into her life, the process involves perceptual learning, that is, ‘relatively long-lasting changes to an organism’s perceptual system that improve its ability to respond to its environment’ (Goldstone 1998: 585). In this paper, I explore ways in which the extensive literature on perceptual learning can be applied to help improve sensory substitution devices. I then use these findings to answer a philosophical question. Much of the philosophical debate surrounding sensory substitution devices concerns (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37. David Suarez, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan & Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Non-Sensory Feelings. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press
    One of the central limitations of sensory substitution devices (SSDs) is their inability to reproduce the non-sensory feelings that are normally associated with visual experiences, especially hedonic and aesthetic responses. This limitation is sometimes reported to cause SSD users frustration. To make matters worse, it is unclear that improvements in acuity, bandwidth, or training will resolve the issue. Yet, if SSDs are to actually reproduce visual experience in its fullness, it seems that the reproduction of non-sensory feelings will be of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Robert Briscoe (forthcoming). Bodily Action and Distal Attribution in Sensory Substitution. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Proceedings of the British Academy
    According to proponents of the sensorimotor contingency theory of perception (Hurley & Noë 2003, Noë 2004, O’Regan 2011), active control of camera movement is necessary for the emergence of distal attribution in tactile-visual sensory substitution (TVSS) because it enables the subject to acquire knowledge of the way stimulation in the substituting modality varies as a function of self-initiated, bodily action. This chapter, by contrast, approaches distal attribution as a solution to a causal inference problem faced by the subject’s perceptual systems. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Shannon Spaulding (2013). Mirror Neurons and Social Cognition. Mind and Language 28 (2):233-257.
    Mirror neurons are widely regarded as an important key to social cognition. Despite such wide agreement, there is very little consensus on how or why they are important. The goal of this paper is to clearly explicate the exact role mirror neurons play in social cognition. I aim to answer two questions about the relationship between mirroring and social cognition: What kind of social understanding is involved with mirroring? How is mirroring related to that understanding? (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  40. Richard Gray (2014). Pain, Perception and the Sensory Modalities: Revisiting the Intensive Theory. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):87-101.
    Pain is commonly explained in terms of the perceptual activity of a distinct sensory modality, the function of which is to enable us to perceive actual or potential damage to the body. However, the characterization of pain experience in terms of a distinct sensory modality with such content is problematic. I argue that pain is better explained as occupying a different role in relation to perception: to indicate when the stimuli that are sensed in perceiving anything by means of a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  59
    Andreas K. Engel, P. Fries, P. Kreiter Konig, M. Brecht & Wolf Singer (1999). Temporal Binding, Binocular Rivalry, and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (2):128-51.
    Cognitive functions like perception, memory, language, or consciousness are based on highly parallel and distributed information processing by the brain. One of the major unresolved questions is how information can be integrated and how coherent representational states can be established in the distributed neuronal systems subserving these functions. It has been suggested that this so-called ''binding problem'' may be solved in the temporal domain. The hypothesis is that synchronization of neuronal discharges can serve for the integration of distributed neurons (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   31 citations  
  42. Chris A. Kramer (2012). As If: Connecting Phenomenology, Mirror Neurons, Empathy, and Laughter. Phaenex 7 (1):275-308.
    The discovery of mirror neurons in both primates and humans has led to an enormous amount of research and speculation as to how conscious beings are able to interact so effortlessly among one another. Mirror neurons might provide an embodied basis for passive synthesis and the eventual process of further communalization through empathy, as envisioned by Edmund Husserl. I consider the possibility of a phenomenological and scientific investigation of laughter as a point of connection that might in the (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Kevin Warwick (2013). Artificial Intelligence: The Basics. Routledge.
    'if AI is outside your field, or you know something of the subject and would like to know more then Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a brilliant primer.' - Nick Smith, Engineering and Technology Magazine November 2011 Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a concise and cutting-edge introduction to the fast moving world of AI. The author Kevin Warwick, a pioneer in the field, examines issues of what it means to be man or machine and looks at advances in robotics which (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  44.  67
    Ann-Sophie Barwich (2014). A Sense So Rare: Measuring Olfactory Experiences and Making a Case for a Process Perspective on Sensory Perception. Biological Theory 9 (3):258-268.
    Philosophical discussion about the reality of sensory perceptions has been hijacked by two tendencies. First, talk about perception has been largely centered on vision. Second, the realism question is traditionally approached by attaching objects or material structures to matching contents of sensory perceptions. These tendencies have resulted in an argumentative impasse between realists and anti-realists, discussing the reliability of means by which the supposed causal information transfer from object to perceiver takes place. Concerning the nature of sensory experiences and their (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45. Colin Allen (2004). Animal Pain. Noûs 38 (4):617-43.
    Which nonhuman animals experience conscious pain?1 This question is central to the debate about animal welfare, as well as being of basic interest to scientists and philosophers of mind. Nociception—the capacity to sense noxious stimuli—is one of the most primitive sensory capacities. Neurons functionally specialized for nociception have been described in invertebrates such as the leech Hirudo medicinalis and the marine snail Aplysia californica (Walters 1996). Is all nociception accompanied by conscious pain, even in relatively primitive animals (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  46. Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Full Report.
    This report highlights and explores five questions that arose from the workshop on sensory substitution and augmentation at the British Academy, March 26th through 28th, 2013.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  57
    Malika Auvray & Erik Myin (2009). Perception With Compensatory Devices: From Sensory Substitution to Sensorimotor Extension. Cognitive Science 33 (6):1036–1058.
    Sensory substitution devices provide through an unusual sensory modality (the substituting modality, e.g., audition) access to features of the world that are normally accessed through another sensory modality (the substituted modality, e.g., vision). In this article, we address the question of which sensory modality the acquired perception belongs to. We have recourse to the four traditional criteria that have been used to define sensory modalities: sensory organ, stimuli, properties, and qualitative experience (Grice, 1962), to which we have added the criteria (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  48.  79
    Shannon Spaulding (2012). Mirror Neurons Are Not Evidence for the Simulation Theory. Synthese 189 (3):515-534.
    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in theories of mindreading. New discoveries in neuroscience have revitalized the languishing debate. The discovery of so-called mirror neurons has revived interest particularly in the Simulation Theory (ST) of mindreading. Both ST proponents and theorists studying mirror neurons have argued that mirror neurons are strong evidence in favor of ST over Theory Theory (TT). In this paper I argue against the prevailing view that mirror neurons are evidence for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  49. Ophelia Deroy & Malika Auvray (2015). Beyond Vision: The Vertical Integration of Sensory Substitution Devices. In D. Stokes, M. Matthen & S. Biggs (eds.), Perception and Its Modalities. Oxford University Press
    What if a blind person could 'see' with her ears? Thanks to Sensory Substitution Devices (SSDs), blind people now have access to out-of-reach objects, a privilege reserved so far for the sighted. In this paper, we show that the philosophical debates have fundamentally been mislead to think that SSDs should be fitted among the existing senses or that they constitute a new sense. Contrary to the existing assumption that they get integrated at the sensory level, we present a new thesis (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  7
    Jiri Benovsky (forthcoming). Against Aesthetic-Sensory Dependence. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics.
    In his book 'The metaphysics of beauty' Nick Zangwill argues for the claim that aesthetic properties metaphysically necessarily depend on sensory properties. This claim plays a role in his argument against physicalist aesthetic realism as well as in the formulation of his own response-dependence view. In this article, I offer reasons to resist the aesthetic/sensory dependence claim by a discussion of the case of theories, theorems, proofs, and similar theoretical objects, which do possess genuinely aesthetic properties, while these (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000