Search results for '*Signal Detection (Perception)' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. James Kopp & James Livermore (1973). Differential Discriminability of Response Bias? A Signal Detection Analysis for Categorical Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (1):179.score: 609.0
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  2. Igor Dolgov & Michael K. McBeath (2005). A Signal-Detection-Theory Representation of Normal and Hallucinatory Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):761-762.score: 522.0
    Collerton et al.'s Perception and Attention Deficit (PAD) model argues that all recurrent complex visual hallucinations (RCVH) result from maladaptive, deficient sensory and attentional processing. We outline a constructivist-based representation of perception using signal detection theory, in which hallucinations are modeled as false alarms when confirmational perceptual information is lacking. This representation allows for some individuals to have RCVH due to a criterion shift associated with attentional proficiency that results in an increased awareness of the environment.
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  3. Daniel Sanabria, Charles Spence & Salvador Soto-Faraco (2007). Perceptual and Decisional Contributions to Audiovisual Interactions in the Perception of Apparent Motion: A Signal Detection Study. Cognition 102 (2):299-310.score: 435.0
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  4. Steven J. Hasse & Gary D. Fisk (2001). Confidence in Word Detection Predicts Word Identification: Implications for an Unconscious Perception Paradigm. American Journal of Psychology 114 (3):439-468.score: 360.0
  5. S. Nikolov, D. A. Rahnev & H. C. Lau (2009). Probabilistic Model of Onset Detection Explains Paradoxes in Human Time Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 1:37-37.score: 351.0
    A very basic computational model is proposed to explain two puzzling findings in the time perception literature. First, spontaneous motor actions are preceded by up to 1-2 s of preparatory activity (Kornhuber and Deecke, 1965). Yet, subjects are only consciously aware of about a quarter of a second of motor preparation (Libet, 1983). Why are they not aware of the early part of preparation? Second, psychophysical findings (Spence, 2001) support the principle of attention prior entry (Titchener, 1908), which states that (...)
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  6. Maria Chait Zahrah Jaunmahomed (2012). The Timing of Change Detection and Change Perception in Complex Acoustic Scenes. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 333.0
    We investigated how listeners perceive the temporal relationship of a light-flash and a complex acoustic signal. The stimulus mimics ubiquitous events in busy scenes which are manifested as a change in the pattern of on-going fluctuation. Detecting pattern emergence inherently requires integration over time; resulting in such events being detected later than when they occurred. How does delayed detection-time affect the perception of such events relative to other events in the scene? To model these situations, we use rapid sequences (...)
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  7. Zahrah Jaunmahomed & Maria Chait (2012). The Timing of Change Detection and Change Perception in Complex Acoustic Scenes. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 333.0
    We investigated how listeners perceive the temporal relationship of a light-flash and a complex acoustic signal. The stimulus mimics ubiquitous events in busy scenes which are manifested as a change in the pattern of on-going fluctuation. Detecting pattern emergence inherently requires integration over time; resulting in such events being detected later than when they occurred. How does delayed detection-time affect the perception of such events relative to other events in the scene? To model these situations, we use rapid sequences (...)
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  8. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (1999). Is Vision Continuous with Cognition? The Case for Cognitive Impenetrability of Visual Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):341-365.score: 306.0
    Although the study of visual perception has made more progress in the past 40 years than any other area of cognitive science, there remain major disagreements as to how closely vision is tied to general cognition. This paper sets out some of the arguments for both sides (arguments from computer vision, neuroscience, Psychophysics, perceptual learning and other areas of vision science) and defends the position that an important part of visual perception, which may be called early vision or just vision, (...)
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  9. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2000). Is Vision Continuous with Cognition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):341-365.score: 261.0
    Although the study of visual perception has made more progress in the past 40 years than any other area of cognitive science, there remain major disagreements as to how closely vision is tied to cognition. This target article sets out some of the arguments for both sides (arguments from computer vision, neuroscience, psychophysics, perceptual learning, and other areas of vision science) and defends the position that an important part of visual perception, corresponding to what some people have called early vision, (...)
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  10. Daniel Holender & Katia Duscherer (2004). Unconscious Perception: The Need for a Paradigm Shift. Perception and Psychophysics 66 (5):872-881.score: 234.0
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  11. G. Knoblich & T. T. J. Kircher (2004). Deceiving Oneself About Being in Control: Conscious Detection of Changes in Visuomotor Coupling. Journal of Experimental Psychology - Human Perception and Performance 30 (4):657-66.score: 234.0
  12. Michael Snodgrass, Edward Bernat & Howard Shevrin (2004). Unconscious Perception: A Model-Based Approach to Method and Evidence. Perception and Psychophysics 66 (5):846-867.score: 234.0
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  13. Steven J. Haase & Gary D. Fisk (2004). Valid Distinctions Between Conscious and Unconscious Perception? Perception and Psychophysics 66 (5):868-871.score: 234.0
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  14. Talis Bachmann (2004). Inaptitude of the Signal Detection Theory, Useful Vexation From the Microgenetic View, and Inevitability of Neurobiological Signatures in Understanding Perceptual (Un)Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):101-106.score: 228.0
  15. Remigiusz Szczepanowski & Luiz Pessoa (2007). Fear Perception: Can Objective and Subjective Awareness Measures Be Dissociated? Journal of Vision 7 (4):1-17.score: 225.0
  16. Michael Snodgrass (2002). Disambiguating Conscious and Unconscious Influences: Do Exclusion Paradigms Demonstrate Unconscious Perception? American Journal of Psychology 115 (4):545-579.score: 225.0
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  17. Luiz Pessoa, Shruti Japee & Leslie G. Ungerleider (2005). Visual Awareness and the Detection of Fearful Faces. Emotion 5 (2):243-247.score: 225.0
  18. Gary D. Fisk & Steven J. Haase (2006). Exclusion Failure Does Not Demonstrate Unconscious Perception II: Evidence From a Forced-Choice Exclusion Task. Vision Research 46 (25):4244-4251.score: 225.0
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  19. C. Loose & P. Stoerig (2004). Blindsight: Simultaneous Recordings of 2AFC Signal Detection and Psychosensory Pupil Responses Reveal Greater Pupillary Sensitivity. In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell Publishing. 130-130.score: 219.0
  20. Gregory Hickok Jonathan Henry Venezia, Kourosh Saberi, Charles Chubb (2012). Response Bias Modulates the Speech Motor System During Syllable Discrimination. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 210.0
    Recent evidence suggests that the speech motor system may play a significant role in speech perception. Repetitive TMS applied to a speech region of premotor cortex impaired syllable identification, while stimulation of motor areas for different articulators selectively facilitated identification of phonemes relying on those articulators. However, in these experiments performance was not corrected for response bias. It is not currently known how response bias modulates activity in these networks. The present fMRI experiment was designed to produce specific, measureable changes (...)
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  21. Jon Driver Vincenzo Romei, Benjamin De Haas, Robert M. Mok (2011). Auditory Stimulus Timing Influences Perceived Duration of Co-Occurring Visual Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 183.0
    There is increasing interest in multisensory influences upon sensory-specific judgements, such as when auditory stimuli affect visual perception. Here we studied whether the duration of an auditory event can objectively affect the perceived duration of a co-occurring visual event. On each trial, participants were presented with a pair of successive flashes and had to judge whether the first or second was longer. Two beeps were presented with the flashes. The order of short and long stimuli could be the same across (...)
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  22. Petra Stoerig, Aspasia Zontanou & Alan Cowey (2002). Aware or Unaware: Assessment of Cortical Blindness in Four Men and a Monkey. Cerebral Cortex 12 (6):565-574.score: 180.0
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  23. Luiz Pessoa, Shruti Japee, David Sturman & Leslie G. Ungerleider (2006). Target Visibility and Visual Awareness Modulate Amygdala Responses to Fearful Faces. Cerebral Cortex 16 (3):366-375.score: 180.0
  24. Simon Evans & Paul Azzopardi (2007). Evaluation of a 'Bias-Free' Measure of Awareness. Spatial Vision. Special Issue 20 (1-2):61-77.score: 180.0
  25. Ceri T. Trevethan, Arash Sahraie & Larry Weiskrantz (2007). Can Blindsight Be Superior to 'Sighted-Sight?'. Cognition 103 (3):491-501.score: 180.0
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  26. Renée Baillargeon (2004). Can 12 Large Clowns Fit in a Mini Cooper? Or When Are Beliefs and Reasoning Explicit and Conscious? Developmental Science 7 (4):422-424.score: 180.0
  27. Slawomir J. Skwarek David L. Bimler (2013). Processing Facial Expressions of Emotion: Upright Vs. Inverted Images. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 171.0
    We studied discrimination of briefly presented Upright vs. Inverted emotional facial expressions (FEs), hypothesising that inversion would impair emotion decoding by disrupting holistic FE processing. Stimuli were photographs of seven emotion prototypes, of a male and female poser (Ekman and Friesen, 1976), and eight intermediate morphs in each set. Subjects made speeded Same/Different judgements of emotional content for all Upright (U) or Inverted (I) pairs of FEs, presented for 500 ms, 100 times each pair. Signal Detection Theory revealed the (...)
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  28. Yasser Mohammad & Toyoaki Nishida (2009). Interactive Perception for Amplification of Intended Behavior in Complex Noisy Environments. AI and Society 23 (2):167-186.score: 126.0
    The detection of a human’s intended behavior is one of the most important skills that a social robot should have in order to become acceptable as a part of human society, because humans are used to understand the actions of other humans in a goal-directed manner and they will expect the social robot to behave similarly. A breakthrough in this area can advance several research branches related to social intelligence such as learning by imitation and mutual adaptation. To achieve (...)
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  29. [deleted]Florian Lanz, Véronique Moret, Eric Michel Rouiller & Gérard Loquet (2013). Multisensory Integration in Non-Human Primates During a Sensory-Motor Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 99.0
    Daily our central nervous system receives inputs via several sensory modalities, processes them and integrates information in order to produce a suitable behaviour. The amazing part is that such a multisensory integration brings all information into a unified percept. An approach to start investigating this property is to show that perception is better and faster when multimodal stimuli are used as compared to unimodal stimuli. This forms the first part of the present study conducted in a non-human primate’s model (n=2) (...)
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  30. [deleted]Claudia Lappe, Olaf Steinsträter & Christo Pantev (2013). Rhythmic and Melodic Deviations in Musical Sequences Recruit Different Cortical Areas for Mismatch Detection. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 99.0
    The mismatch negativity (MMN), an event-related potential (ERP) representing the violation of an acoustic regularity, is considered as a pre-attentive change detection mechanism at the sensory level on the one hand and as a prediction error signal on the other hand, suggesting that bottom-up as well as top-down processes are involved in its generation. Rhythmic and melodic deviations within a musical sequence elicit a mismatch negativity in musically trained subjects, indicating that acquired musical expertise leads to better discrimination accuracy (...)
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  31. Hakwan Lau (2008). A Higher Order Bayesian Decision Theory of Consciousness. In Rahul Banerjee & B. K. Chakrabarti (eds.), Models of Brain and Mind: Physical, Computational, and Psychological Approaches. Elsevier.score: 87.0
    It is usually taken as given that consciousness involves superior or more elaborate forms of information processing. Contemporary models equate consciousness with global processing, system complexity, or depth or stability of computation. This is in stark contrast with the powerful philosophical intuition that being conscious is more than just having the ability to compute. I argue that it is also incompatible with current empirical findings. I present a model that is free from the strong assumption that consciousness predicts superior performance. (...)
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  32. Gibran Manasseh, Chloe De Balthasar, Bruno Sanguinetti, Enrico Pomarico, Nicolas Gisin, Rolando Grave De Peralta & Sara L. Gonzalez Andino (2013). Retinal and Post-Retinal Contributions to the Quantum Efficiency of the Human Eye Revealed by Electrical Neuroimaging. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 87.0
    The retina is one of the best known quantum detectors with rods able to reliably respond to single photons. However, estimates on the number of photons eliciting conscious perception, based on signal detection theory, are systematically above these values after discounting by retinal losses. One possibility is that there is a trade-off between the limited motor resources available to living systems and the excellent reliability of the visual photoreceptors. On this view, the limits to sensory thresholds are not set (...)
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  33. [deleted]László Balázs Endre Takács, István Sulykos, István Czigler, Irén Barkaszi (2013). Oblique Effect in Visual Mismatch Negativity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 81.0
    We investigated whether visual orientation anisotropies (known as oblique effect) exist in non-attended visual changes using event-related potentials (ERP). We recorded visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) which signals violation of sequential regularities. In the visual periphery unattended, task-irrelevant Gábor patches were displayed in an oddball sequence while subjects performed a tracking task in the central field. A moderate change (50°) in the orientation of stimuli revealed no consistent change-related components. However we found orientation-related differences around 170 ms in occipito-temporal areas in (...)
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  34. [deleted]Jeremy Gaston Jason Sherwin (2013). Soldiers and Marksmen Under Fire: Monitoring Performance with Neural Correlates of Small Arms Fire Localization. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 60.0
    Important decisions in the heat of battle occur rapidly and a key aptitude of a good combat soldier is the ability to determine whether he is under fire. This rapid decision requires the soldier to make a judgment in a fraction of a second, based on a barrage of multisensory cues coming from the auditory, tactile and visual domains. The present study uses an auditory oddball paradigm to examine listener ability to differentiate shooter locations from audio recordings of small arms (...)
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  35. K. Ramakrishna Rao & John R. Palmer (1987). The Anomaly Called Psi: Recent Research and Criticism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):539-51.score: 54.0
    Over the past hundred years, a number of scientific investigators claim to have adduced experimental evidence for phenomena information” seems to behave like a weak signal that has to compete for the information-processing resources of the organism, a reduction of ongoing sensorimotor activity may facilitate ESP detection. Such a meaningful convergence of results suggests that psi phenomena may represent a unitary, coherent process whose nature and compatibility with current physical theory have yet to be determined. The theoretical implications and (...)
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  36. [deleted]Karsten Specht (2013). Mapping a Lateralization Gradient Within the Ventral Stream for Auditory Speech Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 48.0
    Recent models on speech perception propose a dual stream processing network, with a dorsal stream, extending from the posterior temporal lobe of the left hemisphere through inferior parietal areas into the left inferior frontal gyrus, and a ventral stream that is assumed to originate in the primary auditory cortex in the upper posterior part of the temporal lobe and to extend towards the anterior part of the temporal lobe, where it may connect to the ventral part of the inferior frontal (...)
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  37. Yue Chen Jejoong Kim, Daniel Norton, Ryan McBain, Dost Ongur (2013). Deficient Biological Motion Perception in Schizophrenia: Results From a Motion Noise Paradigm. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 48.0
    Background: Schizophrenia patients exhibit deficient processing of perceptual and cognitive information. However, it is not well understood how basic perceptual deficits contribute to higher level cognitive problems in this mental disorder. Perception of biological motion, a motion-based cognitive recognition task, relies on both basic visual motion processing and social cognitive processing, thus providing a useful paradigm to evaluate the potentially hierarchical relationship between these two levels of information processing. Methods: In this study, we designed a biological motion paradigm in which (...)
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  38. Harold T. Nefs, Louise O'Hare & Julie M. Harris (2010). Two Independent Mechanisms for Motion-In-Depth Perception: Evidence From Individual Differences. Frontiers in Psychology 1:155-155.score: 42.0
    Our forward-facing eyes allow us the advantage of binocular visual information: using the tiny differences between right and left eye views to learn about depth and location in three dimensions. Our visual systems also contain specialized mechanisms to detect motion-in-depth from binocular vision, but the nature of these mechanisms remains controversial. Binocular motion-in-depth perception could theoretically be based on first detecting binocular disparity and then monitoring how it changes over time. The alternative is to monitor the motion in the right (...)
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  39. Alfredo Pereira & Gene Johnson (2003). Toward an Explanation of the Genesis of Ketamine-Induced Perceptual Distortions and Hallucinatory States. Brain and Mind 4 (3):307-326.score: 33.0
    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) channel has been proposed to function as a coincidence-detection mechanism for afferent and reentrant signals, supporting conscious perception, learning, and memory formation. In this paper we discuss the genesis of distorted perceptual states induced by subanesthetic doses of ketamine, a well-known NMDA antagonist. NMDAR blockage has been suggested to perturb perceptual processing in sensory cortex, and also to decrease GABAergic inhibition in limbic areas (leading to an increase in dopamine excitability). We propose that perceptual distortions (...)
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  40. Alfredo Pereira Jr (2003). Toward an Explanation of the Genesis of Ketamine-Induced Perceptual Distortions and Hallucinatory States. Brain and Mind 4 (3):307-326.score: 33.0
    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) channel has been proposed to function as a coincidence-detection mechanism for afferent and reentrant signals, supporting conscious perception, learning, and memory formation. In this paper we discuss the genesis of distorted perceptual states induced by subanesthetic doses of ketamine, a well-known NMDA antagonist. NMDAR blockage has been suggested to perturb perceptual processing in sensory cortex, and also to decrease GABAergic inhibition in limbic areas (leading to an increase in dopamine excitability). We propose that perceptual distortions (...)
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  41. Ned Block (ed.) (1981). Readings In Philosophy Of Psychology, V. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.score: 27.0
    Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and ... V. Influence of imaged pictures and sounds on detection of visual and auditory signals. ...
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  42. E. C. Hui (2008). A Survey of the Ethics Climate of Hong Kong Public Hospitals. Clinical Ethics 3 (3):132-140.score: 27.0
    The main objective of the study was to survey health-care practitioners' (HCPs) perception of health-care practices that are of medical–ethical importance in Hong Kong public hospitals, and to identify the moral issues that concern them most. A total of 2718 doctors, nurses, allied health and administrative workers from 14 hospitals participated. HCPs considered that communication/conflict between patients/families and HCPs was the most important issue, followed by issues concerning patients' rights and values. The ‘ethics climate’ in Hong Kong public hospitals was (...)
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  43. Joost X. Maier, Multisensory Integration of Dynamic Faces and Voices in Rhesus Monkey Auditory Cortex.score: 27.0
    In the social world, multiple sensory channels are used concurrently to facilitate communication. Among human and nonhuman pri- mates, faces and voices are the primary means of transmitting social signals (Adolphs, 2003; Ghazanfar and Santos, 2004). Primates recognize the correspondence between species-specific facial and vocal expressions (Massaro, 1998; Ghazanfar and Logothetis, 2003; Izumi and Kojima, 2004), and these visual and auditory channels can be integrated into unified percepts to enhance detection and discrimination. Where and how such communication signals are (...)
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  44. [deleted]Cynthia G. Wible (2012). Hippocampal Temporal-Parietal Junction Interaction in the Production of Psychotic Symptoms: A Framework for Understanding the Schizophrenic Syndrome. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 27.0
    A framework is described for understanding the schizophrenic syndrome at the brain systems level. It is hypothesized that over-activation of dynamic gesture and social perceptual processes in the temporal-parietal occipital junction (TPJ), posterior superior temporal sulcus (PSTS) and surrounding regions produce the syndrome (including positive and negative symptoms, their prevalence, prodromal signs and cognitive deficits). Hippocampal system hyper-activity and atrophy have been consistently found in schizophrenia. Hippocampal activity is highly related to activity in the TPJ and may be a source (...)
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  45. Andero Uusberg, Helen Uibo, Kairi Kreegipuu, Maria Tamm, Aire Raidvee & Jüri Allik (2013). Unintentionality of Affective Attention Across Visual Processing Stages. Frontiers in Psychology 4:969.score: 27.0
    Affective attention involves bottom-up perceptual selection that prioritizes motivationally significant stimuli. To clarify the extent to which this process is automatic, we investigated the dependence of affective attention on the intention to process emotional meaning. Affective attention was manipulated by presenting IAPS images with variable arousal and intentionality by requiring participants to make affective and non-affective evaluations. Polytomous rather than binary decisions were required from the participants in order to elicit relatively deep emotional processing. The temporal dynamics of prioritized processing (...)
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  46. Valesca Kooijman, Caroline Junge, Elizabeth K. Johnson, Peter Hagoort & Anne Cutler (2013). Predictive Brain Signals of Linguistic Development. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    The ability to extract word forms from continuous speech is a prerequisite for constructing a vocabulary and emerges in the first year of life. Electrophysiological (ERP) studies of speech segmentation by nine- to 12-month-old listeners in several languages have found a left-localized negativity linked to word onset as a marker of word detection. We report an ERP study showing significant evidence of speech segmentation in Dutch-learning seven-month-olds. In contrast to the left-localized negative effect reported with older infants, the observed (...)
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  47. Nienke van Atteveldt Sanne ten Oever, Alexander T. Sack, Katherine L. Wheat, Nina Bien (2013). Audio-Visual Onset Differences Are Used to Determine Syllable Identity for Ambiguous Audio-Visual Stimulus Pairs. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Content and temporal cues have been shown to interact during audiovisual (AV) speech identification. Typically, the most reliable unimodal cue is used more strongly to identify specific speech features; however, visual cues are only used if the audiovisual stimuli are presented within a certain temporal integration window (TWI). This suggests that temporal cues denote whether unimodal stimuli belong together, that is, whether they should be integrated. It is not known whether temporal cues also provide information about the identity of a (...)
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  48. [deleted]Catherine Tallon-Baudry Valentin Wyart, Stanislas Dehaene (2012). Early Dissociation Between Neural Signatures of Endogenous Spatial Attention and Perceptual Awareness During Visual Masking. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    The relationship between spatial attention and conscious access has often been pictured as a single causal link: spatial attention would provide conscious access to weak stimuli by increasing their effective contrast during early visual processing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed whether the early attentional amplification of visual responses, around 100 ms following stimulus onset, had a decisive impact on conscious detection. We recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals while participants focused their attention toward or away from masked stimuli which were (...)
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  49. [deleted]Jean Lorenceau Anne-Lise Paradis, Shasha Morel, Peggy Seriès (2012). Speeding Up the Brain: When Spatial Facilitation Translates Into Latency Shortening. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    Waves of activity following a focal stimulation are reliably observed to spread across the cortical tissue. The origin of these waves remains unclear and the underlying mechanisms and function are still debated. In this study, we ask whether waves of activity modulate the MEG signals recorded in humans during visual stimulation with Gabor patches sequentially flashed along a vertical path, eliciting a perception of vertical apparent motion. Building upon the functional properties of long-rang horizontal connections, proposed to contribute to spreading (...)
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