Search results for '*Sleep Wake Cycle' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Claudio Bassetti (2001). Disturbances of Consciousness and Sleep-Wake Functions. In Julien Bogousslavsky & Louis R. Caplan (eds.), Stroke Syndromes. Cambridge University Press. 192-210.score: 390.0
  2. Mircea Steriade (1978). Cortical Long-Axoned Cells and Putative Interneurons During the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):465.score: 340.7
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  3. Aribert Rothenberger & Roumen Kirov (2005). Changes in Sleep-Wake Behavior May Be More Than Just an Epiphenomenon of ADHD. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):439-439.score: 300.0
    Sleep disturbances are common for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and are of great clinical significance. Brain dopamine plays an important role for both ADHD symptoms and sleep-wake regulation. We therefore suggest that one basic aspect of integrative brain-behavior relationship such as the sleep-wake cycle may certainly be addressed in a dynamic developmental theory of ADHD.
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  4. B. E. Jones (1998). The Neural Basis of Consciousness Across the Sleep-Waking Cycle. In H. Jasper, L. Descarries, V. Castellucci & S. Rossignol (eds.), Consciousness: At the Frontiers of Neuroscience. Lippincott-Raven.score: 243.3
  5. D. Pare & R. Llinas (1995). Conscious and Pre-Conscious Processes as Seen From the Standpoint of Sleep-Waking Cycle Neurophysiology. Neuropsychologia 33:1155-1168.score: 243.3
  6. K. Krnjević (1978). Cholinergic Control of Excitability in the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):496.score: 243.3
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  7. J. Schlag (1978). On the Significance of Observations About Cortical Activity During the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):505.score: 243.3
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  8. Barbara E. Jones (1978). Toward an Understanding of the Basic Mechanisms of the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):495.score: 243.3
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  9. John Metz & Herbert Y. Meltzer (1978). Why Do Cortical Long-Axoned Cells and Putative Interneurons Behave Differently During the Sleep-Waking Cycle? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):499.score: 243.3
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  10. T. N. Oniani (1978). Cortical Unit Activity and the Functional Significance of the Sleep-Wakefulness Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):500.score: 243.3
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  11. J. Allan Hobson (2002). Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First-Person Account. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):377-390.score: 225.0
  12. Mark W. Mahowald (2004). Commentary on Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First Person Account by J. Allan Hobson. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):134-137.score: 225.0
  13. E. A. Graves (1936). The Effect of Sleep Upon Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (3):316.score: 225.0
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  14. David J. Mellor, Tamara J. Diesch, Alistair J. Gunn & Laura Bennet (2005). The Importance of 'Awareness' for Understanding Fetal Pain. Brain Research Reviews 49 (3):455-471.score: 180.0
  15. Douglas F. Watt (2002). Commentary on Professor Hobson's First-Person Account of a Lateral Medullary Stroke (CVA): Affirmative Action for the Brainstem in Consciousness Studies? Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):391-395.score: 180.0
  16. Oskar G. Jenni (2004). Sleep-Wake Processes Play a Key Role in Early Infant Crying. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):464-465.score: 168.0
    The crying curve across early infancy may reflect the developing interaction between circadian and homeostatic processes of sleep-wake regulation. Excessive crying may be interpreted as a misalignment of the two processes. On the basis of the proposed mechanism, excessive crying may be an honest signal of need, namely, to elicit parental resources to modulate the behavioral state.
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  17. P. Dayan (2002). Helmholtz Machines and Sleep-Wake Learning. In M. Arbib (ed.), The Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks. Mit Press. 522--525.score: 140.0
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  18. [deleted]Loughran Sarah, Regel Sabine, Buetler Lilith, Wieser Martin, Riener Robert & Achermann Peter (2013). Sleep-Wake Behaviour and the EEG in Altered States of Consciousness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 140.0
  19. Thaddeus J. Marczynski (2000). Novel Concepts of Sleep-Wakefullness and Neuronal Information Coding. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):968-971.score: 135.0
    A new working hypothesis of sleep-wake cycle mechanisms is proposed, based on ontogeny and functional/anatomic compression of two stochastic neuronal models of information coding that complement each other in a key/lock fashion: the axonal arbor patterns (AAP – “hardware”) and the neuronal spike interval inequality patterns (SIIP – “software”). [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Revonsuo; Solms; Vertes & Eastman].
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  20. J. A. Hobson, R. Lydic & H. A. Baghdoyan (1986). Evolving Concepts of Sleep Cycle Generation: From Brain Centers to Neuronal Populations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):371.score: 132.0
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  21. A. Ravelingien & A. Sandberg (2008). Sleep Better Than Medicine? Ethical Issues Related to "Wake Enhancement". Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e9-e9.score: 120.0
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  22. Serge Daan, Domien G. M. Beersma & Derk Jan Dijk (1986). Sleep Cycle or REM Sleep Generator? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):402.score: 120.0
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  23. Stephen L. Foote (1986). Sleep-Cycle Generation: Turning on, Turning Off, and Tuning Out. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):405.score: 120.0
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  24. [deleted]Paolo Manganotti, Emanuela Formaggio, Alessandra Del Felice, Silvia F. Storti, Alessandro Zamboni, Alessandra Bertoldo, Antonio Fiaschi & Gianna M. Toffolo (2013). Time-Frequency Analysis of Short-Lasting Modulation of EEG Induced by TMS During Wake, Sleep Deprivation and Sleep. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 120.0
  25. Paul A. M. van Dongen (1986). Reciprocal Interaction in Sleep Cycle Control: Description, Yes; Explanation, No. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):424.score: 120.0
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  26. Arindam Chakrabarti (1995). Sleep-Learning or Wake-Up Call?: Can Vedic Sentences Make Us Aware of Brahman? In Sibajiban Bhattacharyya & Ashok Vohra (eds.), The Philosophy of K. Satchidananda Murty. Distributed by Indian Book Centre. 157.score: 120.0
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  27. Michael Coll (forthcoming). To Sleep, Perchance to Wake Up and Talk Strangely": The Strangeness of Norman Malcolm's Dreaming. Sophia.score: 120.0
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  28. William Fishbein & Pnina F. Bright (1986). Revising Sleep Cycle Theory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):404.score: 120.0
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  29. Robert Freedman (1986). Sleep Cycle Generation: Testing the New Hypotheses. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):406.score: 120.0
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  30. V. Henn (1986). The Elusive Sleep Cycle Generator. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):408.score: 120.0
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  31. Robert A. Hicks & Ann M. Cavanaugh (1982). Oral Contraceptive Use, the Menstrual Cycle, and the Need for Sleep. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (4):215-216.score: 120.0
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  32. Barbara E. Jones (1986). The Need for a New Model of Sleep Cycle Generation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):409.score: 120.0
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  33. Michael E. Hasselmo (1999). Neuromodulation: Acetylcholine and Memory Consolidation. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (9):351-359.score: 90.0
    Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that hippocampal damage causes more severe disruption of episodic memories if those memories were encoded in the recent rather than the more distant past. This decrease in sensitivity to damage over time might reflect the formation of multiple traces within the hippocampus itself, or the formation of additional associative links in entorhinal and association cortices. Physiological evidence also supports a two-stage model of the encoding process in which the initial encoding occurs during active waking and (...)
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  34. Robert P. Vertes (2005). Sleep is for Rest, Waking Consciousness is for Learning and Memory – of Any Kind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):86-87.score: 60.0
    Although considerable attention has been paid to the possible involvement of sleep in memory processing, there is no substantial evidence for it. Walker describes a phenomenon of consolidation-based enhancement (CBE), whereby performance on select procedural tasks improves with overnight sleep; that is, without additional practice on the tasks. CBE, however, appears restricted to a few tasks, and even with these tasks CBE is not confined to sleep but also occurs during wakefulness. Sleep serves no unique role in this process. At (...)
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  35. Margaret Macdonald (1953). Sleeping and Waking. Mind 62 (April):202-215.score: 58.7
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  36. M. J. Baker (1954). Sleeping and Waking. Mind 63 (October):539-543.score: 58.7
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  37. W. von Leyden (1956). Sleeping and Waking. Mind 65 (April):241-245.score: 58.7
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  38. Allan Hobson (2004). A Model for Madness? Dream Consciousness: Our Understanding of the Neurobiology of Sleep Offers Insight Into Abnormalities in the Waking Brain. Nature 430 (6995):21.score: 58.0
  39. Wilse B. Webb & Harman W. Agnew (1967). Sleep Cycling Within Twenty-Four Hour Periods. Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (2, Pt.1):158-160.score: 58.0
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  40. N. Kleitman (1957). Sleep, Wakefulness, and Consciousness. Psychological Bulletin 54:354-359.score: 56.7
  41. R. J. Broughton (1982). Human Consciousness and Sleep/Waking Rhythms: A Review and Some Neuropsychological Considerations. Journal of Clinical Neuropsychology 4:193-218.score: 56.7
  42. K. Iwama & Y. Fukuda (1978). Sleep-Waking Studies on the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus and Visual Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):494.score: 56.7
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  43. Claude Gottesmann (2005). Waking Hallucinations Could Correspond to a Mild Form of Dreaming Sleep Stage Hallucinatory Activity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):766-767.score: 54.0
    There are strong resemblances between the neurobiological characteristics of hallucinations occurring in the particular case of schizophrenia and the hallucinatory activity observed during the rapid-eye-movement (dreaming) sleep stage: the same prefrontal dorsolateral deactivation; forebrain disconnectivity and disinhibition; sensory deprivation; and acetylcholine, monoamine, and glutamate modifications.
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  44. J. T. Rowley, R. Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1998). Eyelid Movements and Mental Activity at Sleep Onset. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):67-84.score: 54.0
    The nature and time course of sleep onset (hypnagogic) mentation was studied in the home environment using the Nightcap, a reliable, cost-effective, and relatively noninvasive sleep monitor. The Nightcap, linked to a personal computer, reliably identified sleep onset according to changes in perceived sleepiness and the appearance of hypnagogic dream features. Awakenings were performed by the computer after 15 s to 5 min of sleep as defined by eyelid quiescence. Awakenings from longer periods of sleep were associated with (1) an (...)
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  45. Axel Cleeremans, Learned Material Content and Acquisition Level Modulate Cerebral Reactivation During Posttraining Rapid-Eye-Movements Sleep.score: 54.0
    We have previously shown that several brain areas are activated both during sequence learning at wake and during subsequent rapid-eye-movements (REM) sleep (Nat. Neurosci. 3 (2000) 831– 836), suggesting that REM sleep participates in the reprocessing of recent memory traces in humans. However, the nature of the reprocessed information remains open. Here, we show that regional cerebral reactivation during posttraining REM sleep is not merely related to the acquisition of basic visuomotor skills during prior practice of the serial reaction (...)
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  46. Melanie G. Rosen (2013). What I Make Up When I Wake Up: Anti-Experience Views and Narrative Fabrication of Dreams. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 54.0
    I propose a narrative fabrication thesis of dream reports, according to which dream reports are often not accurate representations of experiences that occur during sleep. I begin with an overview of anti-experience theses of Norman Malcolm and Daniel Dennett who reject the received view of dreams, that dreams are experiences we have during sleep which are reported upon waking. Although rejection of the first claim of the received view, that dreams are experiences that occur during sleep, is implausible, I evaluate (...)
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  47. Jean-Luc Nancy (2009). The Fall of Sleep. Fordham University Press.score: 54.0
    Philosophers have largely ignored sleep, treating it as a useless negativity, mere repose for the body or at best a source for the production of unconscious signs out of the night of the soul.In an extraordinary theoretical investigation written with lyric intensity, The Fall of Sleep puts an end to this neglect by providing a deft yet rigorous philosophy of sleep. What does it mean to fallasleep? Might there exist something like a reasonof sleep, a reason at work in its (...)
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  48. Piero Salzarulo (2000). Time Course of Dreaming and Sleep Organization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1000-1000.score: 54.0
    The complexity and mysteriousness of mental processes during sleep rule out thinking only in term of generators. How could we know exactly what mental sleep experience (MSE) is produced and when? To refer to REM versus NREM as separate time windows for MSE seems insufficient. We propose that in each cycle NREM and REM interact to allow mentation to reach a certain degree of complexity and consolidation in memory. Each successive cycle within a sleep episode should contribute to (...)
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  49. C. S. Jenkins (2005). Sleeping Beauty: A Wake-Up Call. Philosophia Mathematica 13 (2):194-201.score: 50.0
    This note concerns a puzzle about probability which has recently caught the attention of a number of philosophers. According to the current philosophical consensus, the solution to the puzzle reveals that one can acquire new information, sufficient to change one's credences in certain events, just by having a certain experience, even though one knew all along that one would have an experience which felt exactly like this. I argue that the philosophical consensus is mistaken.
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  50. Francesca Siclari, Joshua J. LaRocque, Bradley R. Postle & Giulio Tononi (2013). Assessing Sleep Consciousness Within Subjects Using a Serial Awakening Paradigm. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 50.0
    Dreaming - a particular form of consciousness that occurs during sleep - undergoes major changes in the course of the night. We aimed to outline state-dependent features of consciousness using a paradigm with multiple serial awakenings/questionings that allowed for within as well as between subject comparisons. Seven healthy participants who spent 44 experimental study nights in the laboratory were awakened by a computerized sound at 15-30 minute intervals, regardless of sleep stage, and questioned for the presence or absence of sleep (...)
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