Search results for '*Sleep Wake Cycle' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Claudio Bassetti (2001). Disturbances of Consciousness and Sleep-Wake Functions. In Julien Bogousslavsky & Louis R. Caplan (eds.), Stroke Syndromes. Cambridge University Press 192-210.
  2.  28
    Aribert Rothenberger & Roumen Kirov (2005). Changes in Sleep-Wake Behavior May Be More Than Just an Epiphenomenon of ADHD. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):439-439.
    Sleep disturbances are common for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and are of great clinical significance. Brain dopamine plays an important role for both ADHD symptoms and sleep-wake regulation. We therefore suggest that one basic aspect of integrative brain-behavior relationship such as the sleep-wake cycle may certainly be addressed in a dynamic developmental theory of ADHD.
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  3.  20
    A. Ravelingien & A. Sandberg (2008). Sleep Better Than Medicine? Ethical Issues Related to "Wake Enhancement". Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e9-e9.
    This paper deals with new pharmacological and technological developments in the manipulation and curtailment of our sleep needs. While humans have used various methods throughout history to lengthen diurnal wakefulness, recent advances have been achieved in manipulating the architecture of the brain states involved in sleep. The progress suggests that we will gradually become able to drastically manipulate our natural sleep-wake cycle. Our goal here is to promote discussion on the desirability and acceptability of enhancing our control over (...)
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  4.  26
    J. Allan Hobson (2002). Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First-Person Account. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):377-390.
    Consciousness can be studied only if subjective experience is documented and quantified, yet first-person accounts of the effects of brain injury on conscious experience are as rare as they are potentially useful. This report documents the alterations in waking, sleeping, and dreaming caused by a lateral medullary infarct. Total insomnia and the initial suppression of dreaming was followed by the gradual recovery of both functions. A visual hallucinosis during waking that was associated with the initial period of sleep and dream (...)
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  5.  10
    Mark W. Mahowald (2004). Commentary on Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First Person Account by J. Allan Hobson. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):134-137.
  6.  2
    E. A. Graves (1936). The Effect of Sleep Upon Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (3):316.
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  7. Mircea Steriade (1978). Cortical Long-Axoned Cells and Putative Interneurons During the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):465.
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  8.  24
    David J. Mellor, Tamara J. Diesch, Alistair J. Gunn & Laura Bennet (2005). The Importance of 'Awareness' for Understanding Fetal Pain. Brain Research Reviews 49 (3):455-471.
  9.  1
    Douglas F. Watt (2002). Commentary on Professor Hobson's First-Person Account of a Lateral Medullary Stroke (CVA): Affirmative Action for the Brainstem in Consciousness Studies? Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):391-395.
  10.  19
    Oskar G. Jenni (2004). Sleep-Wake Processes Play a Key Role in Early Infant Crying. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):464-465.
    The crying curve across early infancy may reflect the developing interaction between circadian and homeostatic processes of sleep-wake regulation. Excessive crying may be interpreted as a misalignment of the two processes. On the basis of the proposed mechanism, excessive crying may be an honest signal of need, namely, to elicit parental resources to modulate the behavioral state.
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  11.  18
    D. Pare & R. Llinas (1995). Conscious and Pre-Conscious Processes as Seen From the Standpoint of Sleep-Waking Cycle Neurophysiology. Neuropsychologia 33:1155-1168.
  12.  31
    B. E. Jones (1998). The Neural Basis of Consciousness Across the Sleep-Waking Cycle. In H. Jasper, L. Descarries, V. Castellucci & S. Rossignol (eds.), Consciousness: At the Frontiers of Neuroscience. Lippincott-Raven
  13.  2
    Barbara E. Jones (1978). Toward an Understanding of the Basic Mechanisms of the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):495.
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  14.  2
    John Metz & Herbert Y. Meltzer (1978). Why Do Cortical Long-Axoned Cells and Putative Interneurons Behave Differently During the Sleep-Waking Cycle? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):499.
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  15.  2
    T. N. Oniani (1978). Cortical Unit Activity and the Functional Significance of the Sleep-Wakefulness Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):500.
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  16.  3
    J. Schlag (1978). On the Significance of Observations About Cortical Activity During the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):505.
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  17.  3
    K. Krnjević (1978). Cholinergic Control of Excitability in the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):496.
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  18. P. Dayan (2002). Helmholtz Machines and Sleep-Wake Learning. In M. Arbib (ed.), The Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks. MIT Press 522--525.
     
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  19.  6
    Thaddeus J. Marczynski (2000). Novel Concepts of Sleep-Wakefullness and Neuronal Information Coding. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):968-971.
    A new working hypothesis of sleep-wake cycle mechanisms is proposed, based on ontogeny and functional/anatomic compression of two stochastic neuronal models of information coding that complement each other in a key/lock fashion: the axonal arbor patterns (AAP – “hardware”) and the neuronal spike interval inequality patterns (SIIP – “software”). [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Revonsuo; Solms; Vertes & Eastman].
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  20.  4
    J. A. Hobson, R. Lydic & H. A. Baghdoyan (1986). Evolving Concepts of Sleep Cycle Generation: From Brain Centers to Neuronal Populations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):371.
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  21. Arindam Chakrabarti (1995). Sleep-Learning or Wake-Up Call?: Can Vedic Sentences Make Us Aware of Brahman? In Sibajiban Bhattacharyya & Ashok Vohra (eds.), The Philosophy of K. Satchidananda Murty. Distributed by Indian Book Centre 157.
     
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  22.  4
    Michael Coll (forthcoming). To Sleep, Perchance to Wake Up and Talk Strangely": The Strangeness of Norman Malcolm's Dreaming. Sophia.
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  23.  3
    Paul A. M. van Dongen (1986). Reciprocal Interaction in Sleep Cycle Control: Description, Yes; Explanation, No. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):424.
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  24.  1
    Barbara E. Jones (1986). The Need for a New Model of Sleep Cycle Generation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):409.
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  25.  1
    Serge Daan, Domien G. M. Beersma & Derk Jan Dijk (1986). Sleep Cycle or REM Sleep Generator? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):402.
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  26.  1
    Stephen L. Foote (1986). Sleep-Cycle Generation: Turning on, Turning Off, and Tuning Out. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):405.
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  27. William Fishbein & Pnina F. Bright (1986). Revising Sleep Cycle Theory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):404.
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  28. Robert Freedman (1986). Sleep Cycle Generation: Testing the New Hypotheses. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):406.
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  29. V. Henn (1986). The Elusive Sleep Cycle Generator. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):408.
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  30. Robert A. Hicks & Ann M. Cavanaugh (1982). Oral Contraceptive Use, the Menstrual Cycle, and the Need for Sleep. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (4):215-216.
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  31.  42
    Michael E. Hasselmo (1999). Neuromodulation: Acetylcholine and Memory Consolidation. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (9):351-359.
    Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that hippocampal damage causes more severe disruption of episodic memories if those memories were encoded in the recent rather than the more distant past. This decrease in sensitivity to damage over time might reflect the formation of multiple traces within the hippocampus itself, or the formation of additional associative links in entorhinal and association cortices. Physiological evidence also supports a two-stage model of the encoding process in which the initial encoding occurs during active waking and (...)
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  32.  19
    John Antrobus, Toshiaki Kondo, Ruth Reinsel & George Fein (1995). Dreaming in the Late Morning: Summation of REM and Diurnal Cortical Activation. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (3):275-299.
    Since the discovery that the characteristics of dreaming sleep are far stronger in Stage 1 rapid eye movement sleep than in any other biological state, investigators have attempted to determine the relative responsibility of the tonic versus the phasic properties of REM sleep for the different characteristics of dreaming–features such as the amount of information in the dream report, the brightness and clarity of the visual images, shifts in thematic continuity, and incongruities of image and meaning. The present experiment is (...)
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  33.  2
    Kunjumon Vadakkan (2016). Substantive Nature of Sleep in Updating the Temporal Conditions Necessary for Inducing Units of Internal Sensations. Sleep Science 9.
    Unlike other organs that operate continuously, such as the heart and kidneys, many of the operations of the nervous system shut down during sleep. The evolutionarily conserved unconscious state of sleep that puts animals at risk from predators indicates that it is an indispensable integral part of systems operation. A reasonable expectation is that any hypothesis for the mechanism of the nervous system functions should be able to provide an explanation for sleep. In this regard, the semblance hypothesis is examined. (...)
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  34.  6
    Jana Speth, Trevor A. Harley & Clemens Speth (2016). Auditory Verbal Experience and Agency in Waking, Sleep Onset, REM, and Non‐REM Sleep. Cognitive Science 40 (4):n/a-n/a.
    We present one of the first quantitative studies on auditory verbal experiences and auditory verbal agency voices or characters”) in healthy participants across states of consciousness. Tools of quantitative linguistic analysis were used to measure participants’ implicit knowledge of auditory verbal experiences and auditory verbal agencies, displayed in mentation reports from four different states. Analysis was conducted on a total of 569 mentation reports from rapid eye movement sleep, non-REM sleep, sleep onset, and waking. Physiology was controlled with the nightcap (...)
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  35.  25
    R. Schmidt & G. Gendolla (2008). Dreaming of White Bears: The Return of the Suppressed at Sleep Onset. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):714-724.
    The present study examined the effects of thought suppression on sleep-onset mentation. It was hypothesized that the decrease of attentional control in the transition to sleep would lead to a rebound of a suppressed thought in hypnagogic mentation. Twenty-four young adults spent two consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Half of the participants were instructed to suppress a target thought, whereas the other half freely thought of anything at all. To assess target thought frequency, three different measures were used in (...)
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  36.  11
    Robert Stickgold, Edward Pace-Schott & J. Allan Hobson (1994). A New Paradigm for Dream Research: Mentation Reports Following Spontaneous Arousal From REM and NREM Sleep Recorded in a Home Setting. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):16-29.
    The "Nightcap," a relatively nonintrusive and "user-friendly" sleep monitoring system, was used by 11 subjects on 10 consecutive nights in their homes. Eighty-eight sleep mentation reports were obtained after spontaneous awakenings from Nightcap-identified REM sleep and 61 were obtained from NREM awakenings. Sleep mentation was recalled in 83% of REM reports and 54% of NREM reports. The median length of REM reports was 148 words compared to 21 words for NREM reports. Twenty-four percent of the REM reports were over 500 (...)
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  37.  4
    J. T. Rowley, R. Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1998). Eyelid Movements and Mental Activity at Sleep Onset. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):67-84.
    The nature and time course of sleep onset (hypnagogic) mentation was studied in the home environment using the Nightcap, a reliable, cost-effective, and relatively noninvasive sleep monitor. The Nightcap, linked to a personal computer, reliably identified sleep onset according to changes in perceived sleepiness and the appearance of hypnagogic dream features. Awakenings were performed by the computer after 15 s to 5 min of sleep as defined by eyelid quiescence. Awakenings from longer periods of sleep were associated with (1) an (...)
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  38.  24
    Axel Cleeremans, Learned Material Content and Acquisition Level Modulate Cerebral Reactivation During Posttraining Rapid-Eye-Movements Sleep.
    We have previously shown that several brain areas are activated both during sequence learning at wake and during subsequent rapid-eye-movements (REM) sleep (Nat. Neurosci. 3 (2000) 831– 836), suggesting that REM sleep participates in the reprocessing of recent memory traces in humans. However, the nature of the reprocessed information remains open. Here, we show that regional cerebral reactivation during posttraining REM sleep is not merely related to the acquisition of basic visuomotor skills during prior practice of the serial reaction (...)
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  39.  1
    Piero Salzarulo (2000). Time Course of Dreaming and Sleep Organization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1000-1000.
    The complexity and mysteriousness of mental processes during sleep rule out thinking only in term of generators. How could we know exactly what mental sleep experience (MSE) is produced and when? To refer to REM versus NREM as separate time windows for MSE seems insufficient. We propose that in each cycle NREM and REM interact to allow mentation to reach a certain degree of complexity and consolidation in memory. Each successive cycle within a sleep episode should contribute to (...)
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  40.  1
    Jason T. Rowley, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1998). Eyelid Movements and Mental Activity at Sleep Onset. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):67-84.
    The nature and time course of sleep onset mentation was studied in the home environment using the Nightcap, a reliable, cost-effective, and relatively noninvasive sleep monitor. The Nightcap, linked to a personal computer, reliably identified sleep onset according to changes in perceived sleepiness and the appearance of hypnagogic dream features. Awakenings were performed by the computer after 15 s to 5 min of sleep as defined by eyelid quiescence. Awakenings from longer periods of sleep were associated with an increase in (...)
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  41.  2
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2009). The Fall of Sleep. Fordham University Press.
    Philosophers have largely ignored sleep, treating it as a useless negativity, mere repose for the body or at best a source for the production of unconscious signs out of the night of the soul.In an extraordinary theoretical investigation written with lyric intensity, The Fall of Sleep puts an end to this neglect by providing a deft yet rigorous philosophy of sleep. What does it mean to fallasleep? Might there exist something like a reasonof sleep, a reason at work in its (...)
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  42. Susan J. Blackmore (1991). Lucid Dreaming: Awake in Your Sleep? Skeptical Inquirer 15:362-370.
    What could it mean to be conscious in your dreams? For most of us, dreaming is something quite separate from normal life. When we wake up from being chased by a ferocious tiger, or seduced by a devastatingly good-looking Nobel Prize winner we realize with relief or disappointment that "it was only a dream.".
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  43.  64
    Jennifer M. Windt (2010). The Immersive Spatiotemporal Hallucination Model of Dreaming. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):295-316.
    The paper proposes a minimal definition of dreaming in terms of immersive spatiotemporal hallucination (ISTH) occurring in sleep or during sleep–wake transitions and under the assumption of reportability. I take these conditions to be both necessary and sufficient for dreaming to arise. While empirical research results may, in the future, allow for an extension of the concept of dreaming beyond sleep and possibly even independently of reportability, ISTH is part of any possible extension of this definition and thus is (...)
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  44.  35
    Tracey L. Kahan & S. LaBerge (1994). Lucid Dreaming as Metacognition: Implications for Cognitive Science. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (2):246-64.
    Evidence of reflective awareness and metacognitive monitoring during REM sleep dreaming poses a significant challenge to the commonly held view of dream cognition as necessarily deficient relative to waking cognition. To date, dream metacognition has not received the theoretical or experimental attention it deserves. As a result, discussions of dream cognition have been underrepresented in theoretical accounts of consciousness. This paper argues for using a converging measures approach to investigate the range and limits of cognition and metacognition across the sleep–wakefulness (...)
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  45.  13
    Roumen Kirov (2007). The Sleeping Brain, the States of Consciousness, and the Human Intelligence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):159-159.
    A large number of experimental results clearly indicate that sleep has an important role for human intelligence. Sleep-wake stages and their specific patterns of brain activation and neuromodulation subserve human memory, states of consciousness, and modes of information processing that strongly relate to intelligence. Therefore, human intelligence should be explained in a broader framework than is implicated by neuroimaging data alone.
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  46. Mark Solms (2000). Dreaming and Rem Sleep Are Controlled by Different Brain Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):843-850.
    The paradigmatic assumption that REM sleep is the physiological equivalent of dreaming is in need of fundamental revision. A mounting body of evidence suggests that dreaming and REM sleep are dissociable states, and that dreaming is controlled by forebrain mechanisms. Recent neuropsychological, radiological, and pharmacological findings suggest that the cholinergic brain stem mechanisms that control the REM state can only generate the psychological phenomena of dreaming through the mediation of a second, probably dopaminergic, forebrain mechanism. The latter mechanism (and thus (...)
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  47. Bradley Monton (2002). Sleeping Beauty and the Forgetful Bayesian. Analysis 62 (1):47–53.
    1. Consider the case of Sleeping Beauty: on Sunday she is put to sleep, and she knows that on Monday experimenters will wake her up, and then put her to sleep with a memory-erasing drug that causes her to forget that waking-up. The researchers will then flip a fair coin; if the result is Heads, they will allow her to continue to sleep, and if the result is Tails, they will wake her up again on Tuesday. Thus, when (...)
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  48.  18
    Tore A. Nielsen (2000). A Review of Mentation in Rem and NRem Sleep: “Covert” Rem Sleep as a Possible Reconciliation of Two Opposing Models. [REVIEW] Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):851-866.
    Numerous studies have replicated the finding of mentation in both rapid eye movement (REM) and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. However, two different theoretical models have been proposed to account for this finding: (1) a one-generator model, in which mentation is generated by a single set of processes regardless of physiological differences between REM and NREM sleep; and (2) a two-generator model, in which qualitatively different generators produce cognitive activity in the two states. First, research is reviewed demonstrating conclusively that (...)
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  49.  27
    Matteo Colombo, Jun Lai & Vincenzo Crupi, Sleeping Beauty Goes to the Lab: The Psychology of Self-Locating Evidence.
    The Sleeping Beauty Problem is a challenging puzzle in probabilistic reasoning, which has attracted enormous attention and still fosters ongoing debate. The problem goes as follows: Suppose that some researchers are going to put you to sleep. During the two days that your sleep will last, they will briefly wake you up either once or twice, depending on the toss of a fair coin. After each waking, they will put you back to sleep with a drug that makes you (...)
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  50.  29
    Joseph R. DesJardins & Ernest Diedrich (2003). Learning What It Really Costs: Teaching Business Ethics with Life-Cycle Case Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):33-42.
    Sustainability informs the framework for a seminar that we teach for junior and senior undergraduates entitled "The Ethics and Economics of Sustainable Societies." One of the class requirements has each student research and write a life-cycle case study, an exercise in which they trace the full, or partial, life-cycle of some product with which they are familiar. Students are expected to examine the economic, ethical, and ecological implications along each step in the life-cycle of the product. We (...)
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