Search results for '*Social Behavior' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Tsuen‐ho Hsu & Kuei‐Feng Chang (2007). The Taxonomy, Model and Message Strategies of Social Behavior. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (3):279-294.
    In an era of rising social awareness, both academics and practitioners have been concerned about the effectiveness of pro-social consumer influence strategies. The main assumption here is that for social marketing to succeed one must first understand the factors underlying pro-social consumer behavior. Firstly, drawing on two dimensions the authors first identify four types of social behavior. Next, the model describes social behavior as a result of preceding social behavior motivation and actual social behavior intention. (...)
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  2.  10
    M. F. Rushworth, T. E. Behrens, P. H. Rudebeck & M. E. Walton (2007). Contrasting Roles for Cingulate and Orbitofrontal Cortex in Decisions and Social Behaviour. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):168-176.
    There is general acknowledgement that both the anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex are implicated in reinforcement-guided decision making, and emotion and social behaviour. Despite the interest that these areas generate in both the cognitive neuroscience laboratory and the psychiatric clinic, ideas about the distinctive contributions made by each have only recently begun to emerge. This reflects an increasing understanding of the component processes that underlie reinforcement- guided decision making, such as the representation of reinforcement expectations, the exploration, updating and representation (...)
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  3.  14
    Joachim I. Krueger & David C. Funder (2004). Towards a Balanced Social Psychology: Causes, Consequences, and Cures for the Problem-Seeking Approach to Social Behavior and Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):313-327.
    Mainstream social psychology focuses on how people characteristically violate norms of action through social misbehaviors such as conformity with false majority judgments, destructive obedience, and failures to help those in need. Likewise, they are seen to violate norms of reasoning through cognitive errors such as misuse of social information, self-enhancement, and an over-readiness to attribute dispositional characteristics. The causes of this negative research emphasis include the apparent informativeness of norm violation, the status of good behavior and judgment as unconfirmable (...)
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  4.  7
    Andrew Cornford (2012). Criminalising Anti-Social Behaviour. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (1):1-19.
    This paper considers the justifiability of criminalising anti-social behaviour through two-step prohibitions such as the Anti-Social Behaviour Order (ASBO). The UK government has recently proposed to abolish and replace the ASBO; however, the proposed new orders would retain many of its most controversial features. The paper begins by criticising the definition of anti-social behaviour employed in both the current legislation and the new proposals. This definition is objectionable because it makes criminalisation contingent upon the irrational judgements of (putative) victims, and (...)
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  5.  26
    Lucia Kršková, Alžbeta Talarovičová & Lucia Olexová (2010). Guinea Pigs—The “Small Great” Therapist for Autistic Children, Or: Do Guinea Pigs Have Positive Effects on Autistic Child Social Behavior? Society and Animals 18 (2):139-151.
    The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of a small therapeutic animal on the social behavior of nine autistic children. The social contacts of the autistic children were evaluated by a descriptive method of direct observation that was performed without and with the presence of a TA. In period one, contacts with an unfamiliar person and acquaintances were registered; in period two, contacts with the acquaintances and the TA were registered. The frequency of contacts of autistic (...)
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  6.  7
    Patrick Forber & Rory Smead (2015). Evolution and the Classification of Social Behavior. Biology and Philosophy 30 (3):405-421.
    Recent studies in the evolution of cooperation have shifted focus from altruistic to mutualistic cooperation. This change in focus is purported to reveal new explanations for the evolution of prosocial behavior. We argue that the common classification scheme for social behavior used to distinguish between altruistic and mutualistic cooperation is flawed because it fails to take into account dynamically relevant game-theoretic features. This leads some arguments about the evolution of cooperation to conflate dynamical scenarios that differ regarding the (...)
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  7.  12
    Michael Domjan, Brian Cusato & Ronald Villarreal (2000). Pavlovian Feed-Forward Mechanisms in the Control of Social Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):235-249.
    The conceptual and investigative tools for the analysis of social behavior can be expanded by integrating biological theory, control systems theory, and Pavlovian conditioning. Biological theory has focused on the costs and benefits of social behavior from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. In contrast, control systems theory is concerned with how machines achieve a particular goal or purpose. The accurate operation of a system often requires feed-forward mechanisms that adjust system performance in anticipation of future inputs. Pavlovian conditioning is (...)
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  8.  3
    Richard Schuster (2002). Cooperative Coordination as a Social Behavior. Human Nature 13 (1):47-83.
    Coordinating behavior is widespread in contexts that include courtship, aggression, and cooperation for shared outcomes. The social significance of cooperative coordination (CC) is usually downplayed by learning theorists, evolutionary biologists, and game theorists in favor of an individual behavior → outcome perspective predicated on maximizing payoffs for all participants. To more closely model CC as it occurs under free-ranging conditions, pairs of rats were rewarded for coordinated shuttling within a shared chamber with unrestricted social interaction. Results show that (...)
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  9.  30
    John A. Bargh (2005). Bypassing the Will: Toward Demystifying the Nonconscious Control of Social Behavior. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press 37-58.
  10. Edwin E. Gantt, Jeffrey P. Lindstrom & Richard N. Williams (2016). The Generality of Theory and the Specificity of Social Behavior: Contrasting Experimental and Hermeneutic Social Science. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (3).
    Since its inception, experimental social psychology has arguably been of two minds about the nature and role of theory. Contemporary social psychology's experimental approach has been strongly informed by the “nomological-deductive” approach of Carl Hempel in tandem with the “hypothetico-deducive” approach of Karl Popper. Social psychology's commitment to this hybrid model of science has produced at least two serious obstacles to more fruitful theorizing about human experience: the problem of situational specificity, and the manifest impossibility of formulating meaningful general laws (...)
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  11.  35
    Dilek Cetindamar (2007). Corporate Social Responsibility Practices and Environmentally Responsible Behavior: The Case of the United Nations Global Compact. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):163 - 176.
    The aim of this paper is to shed some light on understanding why companies adopt environmentally responsible behavior and what impact this adoption has on their performance. This is an empirical study that focuses on the United Nations (UN) Global Compact (GC) initiative as a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) mechanism. A survey was conducted among GC participants, of which 29 responded. The survey relies on the anticipated and actual benefits noted by the participants in the GC. The results, while (...)
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  12.  7
    Akop P. Nazaretyan (2003). Power and Wisdom: Toward a History of Social Behavior. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (4):405–425.
    Cross-disciplinary studies carried out lately by Russian scholars discovered a causal relationship between the three variables: technological potential, cultural regulation quality, and social sustainability. The patterns called techno-humanitarian balance law, states that the higher production and war technologies' power, the more refined the behaviorregulation means that are required for self-preservation of the society. The article shows that the law has controlled social selection for all of human history and prehistory, discarding unbalanced social organisms, as far as they could not cope (...)
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  13.  12
    David Pastoriza, Miguel A. Ariño & Joan E. Ricart (2008). Ethical Managerial Behaviour as an Antecedent of Organizational Social Capital. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):329 - 341.
    There is a need of further research to understand how social capital in the organization can be fostered. Existing literature focuses on the design of reciprocity norms, procedures and stability employment practices as the main levers of social capital in the workplace. Complementary to these mechanisms, this paper explores the impact of ethical managerial behaviour on the development of social capital. We argue that a managerial behaviour based on the true concern for the well-being of employees, as well as their (...)
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  14.  50
    Jonas Nilsson (2008). Investment with a Conscience: Examining the Impact of Pro-Social Attitudes and Perceived Financial Performance on Socially Responsible Investment Behavior. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 83 (2):307 - 325.
    This article addresses the growing industry of retail socially responsible investment (SRI) profiled mutual funds. Very few previous studies have examined the final consumer of SRI profiled mutual funds. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to, in an exploratory manner, examine the impact of a number of pro-social, financial performance, and socio-demographic variables on SRI behavior in order to explain why investors choose to invest different proportions of their investment portfolio in SRI profiled funds. An ordinal logistic regression (...)
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  15.  11
    Pi-Yueh Cheng & Mei-Chin Chu (2013). Behavioral Factors Affecting Students' Intentions to Enroll in Business Ethics Courses: A Comparison of the Theory of Planned Behavior and Social Cognitive Theory Using Self-Identity as a Moderator. Journal of Business Ethics 124 (1):1-12.
    The current study used both Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior (TPB) and Bandura’s social cognitive theory (SCT) to examine the intentions of business undergraduate students toward taking elective ethics courses and investigated the role of self-identity in this process. The study was prospective in design; data on predictors and intentions were obtained during the first collection of data, whereas the actual behavior was assessed 10 days later. Our results indicated that the TPB was a better predictor of behavioral (...)
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  16.  2
    Alejandro Arango (2016). Animal Groups and Social Ontology: An Argument From the Phenomenology of Behavior. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):403-422.
    Through a critical engagement with Merleau-Ponty’s discussion of the concepts of nature, life, and behavior, and with contemporary accounts of animal groups, this article argues that animal groups exhibit sociality and that sociality is a fundamental ontological condition. I situate my account in relation to the superorganism and selfish individual accounts of animal groups in recent biology and zoology. I argue that both accounts are inadequate. I propose an alternative account of animal groups and animal sociality through a Merleau-Pontian (...)
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  17.  14
    Alejandro Arango (2016). Animal Groups and Social Ontology: An Argument From the Phenomenology of Behavior. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):403-422.
    Through a critical engagement with Merleau-Ponty’s discussion of the concepts of nature, life, and behavior, and with contemporary accounts of animal groups, this article argues that animal groups exhibit sociality and that sociality is a fundamental ontological condition. I situate my account in relation to the superorganism and selfish individual accounts of animal groups in recent biology and zoology. I argue that both accounts are inadequate. I propose an alternative account of animal groups and animal sociality through a Merleau-Pontian (...)
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  18.  2
    David Sloan Wilson & Kevin M. Kniffin (1999). Multilevel Selection and the Social Transmission of Behavior. Human Nature 10 (3):291-310.
    Many evolutionary models assume that behaviors are caused directly by genes. An implication is that behavioral uniformity should be found only in groups that are genetically uniform. Yet, the members of human social groups often behave in a uniform fashion, despite the fact that they are genetically diverse. Behavioral uniformity can occur through a variety of psychological mechanisms and social processes, such as imitation, consensus decision making, or the imposition of social norms. We present a series of models in which (...)
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  19.  8
    Touko Piiparinen (2006). Reclaiming the Human Stratum, Acknowledging the Complexity of Social Behaviour: From the Linguistic Turn to the Social Cube in Theory of Decision-Making. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 36 (4):425–452.
    Roy Bhaskar's Social Cube model based on critical realist philosophy has not been dealt with in theory of decision-making at any length, nor has it raised any notable debate in social theory in general. The model demonstrates that decision-making is regulated and transformed by a constantly evolving complexity of mechanisms emerging from physical, mental, material, human and social levels of reality. With the help of this device, Graham Allison's argument against the Rational Actor Model that decisions are not so much (...)
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  20.  60
    Longinos Marin, Salvador Ruiz & Alicia Rubio (2009). The Role of Identity Salience in the Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Consumer Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):65 - 78.
    Based on the assumption that consumers will reward firms for their support of social programs, many organizations have adopted corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. Drawing on social identity theory, a model of influence of CSR on loyalty is developed and tested using a sample of real consumers. Results demonstrate that CSR initiatives are linked to stronger loyalty both because the consumer develops a more positive company evaluation, and because one identifies more strongly with the company. Moreover, identity salience is shown (...)
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  21.  12
    John D. Greenwood (1982). On the Relation Between Laboratory Experiments and Social Behaviour: Causal Explanation and Generalization. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 12 (3):225–250.
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  22.  12
    K. Marten & S. Psarakos (1992). Using Self-View Television to Distinguish Between Self-Examination and Social Behavior in the Bottlenose Dolphin. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):205-24.
    In mirror mark tests dolphins twist, posture, and engage in open-mouth and head movements, often repetitive. Because postures and an open mouth are also dolphin social behaviours, we used self-view television as a manipulatable mirror to distinguish between self-examination and social behavior. Two dolphins were exposed to alternating real-time self-view and playback of the same to determine if they distinguished between them. The adult male engaged in elaborate open-mouth behaviors in mirror mode, but usually just watched when playing back (...)
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  23.  10
    Michael Argyle & Brian R. Little (1972). Do Personality Traits Apply to Social Behaviour? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 2 (1):1-33.
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  24.  16
    G. P. Ginsburg (1990). The Ecological Perception Debate: An Affordance of the Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 20 (4):347–364.
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  25. W. G. Runciman, John Smith & R. I. M. Dunbar (1996). Evolution of Social Behaviour Patterns in Primates and Man: A Joint Discussion Meeting of the Royal Society and the British Academy. Proceedings of the British Academy 88.
    Introduction, W G Runciman Social Evolution in Primates: The Role of Ecological Factors and Male Behaviour, Carel P van Schaik Determinants of Group Size in Primates: A General Model, R I M Dunbar Function and Intention in the Calls of Non-Human Primates, Dorothy L Cheney & Robert M Seyfarth Why Culture is Common, but Cultural Evolution is Rare, Robert Boyd & Peter J Richerson An Evolutionary and Chronological Framework for Human Social Behaviour, Robert A Foley Friendship and the Banker?s Paradox: (...)
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  26.  4
    D. W. Rajecki, Jeffrey Lee Rasmussen, Clinton R. Sanders, Susan J. Modlin & Angela M. Holder (1999). Good Dog: Aspects of Humans' Causal Attributions for a Companion Animal's Social Behavior. Society and Animals 7 (1):17-34.
    Lay theories or assumptions about nonhuman animal mentality undoubtedly influence relations between people and companion animals. In two experiments respondents gave their impressions of the mental and motivational bases of companion animal social behavior through measures of causal attribution. When gauged against the matched actions of a boy, as in the first experiment, respondents attributed a dog's playing to internal, dispositional factors buta dog's biting to external, situational factors. A second experiment that focused on a dog's bite revealed clear (...)
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  27.  3
    Klaus Jaffe (2001). On the Relative Importance of Haplo-Diploidy, Assortative Mating and Social Synergy on the Evolutionary Emergence of Social Behavior. Acta Biotheoretica 49 (1):29-42.
    Advances in multiagent simulation techniques make it possible to study more realistic dynamics of complex systems and allow evolutionary theories to be tested. Here I use simulations to assess the relative importance of reproductive systems (haplodiploidy vs. diploidy), mate selection (assortative mating vs. random mating) and social economics (pay-off matrices of evolutionary games) in the evolutionary dynamics leading to the emergence of social cooperation in the provision of parental care. The simulations confirm that haplo-diploid organisms and organisms mating assortatively have (...)
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  28.  5
    Angela M. Holder, Jeffrey Lee Rasmussen, D. W. Rajecki, Susan J. Modlin & Clinton R. Sanders (1999). Good Dog: Aspects of Humans' Causal Attributions for a Companion Animal's Social Behavior. Society and Animals 7 (1):17-34.
    Lay theories or assumptions about nonhuman animal mentality undoubtedly influence relations between people and companion animals. In two experiments respondents gave their impressions of the mental and motivational bases of companion animal social behavior through measures of causal attribution. When gauged against the matched actions of a boy, as in the first experiment, respondents attributed a dog's playing to internal, dispositional factors buta dog's biting to external, situational factors. A second experiment that focused on a dog's bite revealed clear (...)
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  29.  16
    Galen Bodenhausen (1991). Identity and Cooperative Social Behavior: Pseudospeciation or Human Integration? World Futures 31 (2):95-106.
    (1991). Identity and cooperative social behavior: Pseudospeciation or human integration? World Futures: Vol. 31, Cooperation: Toward a Post-Modern Ethic, pp. 95-106.
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  30.  19
    Karl E. Weick & Lloyd E. Sandelands (1990). Social Behavior in Organizational Studies. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 20 (4):323–346.
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  31.  10
    Michael Argyle Andbrian R. Little (1972). Do Personality Traits Apply to Social Behaviour? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 2 (1):1–33.
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  32.  10
    Paul F. Secord (1990). Explaining Social Behavior. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10 (2):25-38.
    Although over the past century psychology has gained some understanding of human capacities like perception, memory, and learning, considerably less progress has been made in understanding social behavior. The roots of this problem lie in the fact that the theoretical and methodological approaches historically taken by psychology are more suited to investigating capacities than they are to studying social behavior. Social behavior will only be understood through taking an approach that takes full account of the social nature (...)
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  33.  11
    D. W. Hamlyn (1990). Philosophy and the Theory of Social Behaviour. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 20 (4):297–304.
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  34.  3
    H. S. U. Tsuen-ho & Kuei-feng Chang (2007). The Taxonomy, Model and Message Strategies of Social Behavior. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (3):279–294.
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  35.  11
    C. N. Slobodchikoff (2000). Feed-Forward and the Evolution of Social Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):265-266.
    Feed-forward Pavlovian conditioning can serve as a proximate mechanism for the evolution of social behavior. Feed-forward can provide the impetus for animals to associate other individuals' presence, and cooperation with them, with the acquisition of resources, whether or not the animals are genetically related. Other social behaviors such as play and grooming may develop as conditioned stimuli in feed-forward social systems.
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  36.  9
    William Outhwaite (1990). Realism, Naturalism and Social Behaviour. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 20 (4):365–377.
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  37.  6
    Jechil Sieratzki & Bencie Woll (2005). Cerebral Asymmetry: From Survival Strategies to Social Behaviour. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):613-614.
    We describe a possible link between coordinated lateralised group behaviour serving species survival in lower vertebrates and a striking lateralisation phenomenon found in human social behaviour: the universal preference for cradling a young infant on the left side. Our exploration offers a different perspective on the role of cerebral asymmetry for the survival of both the individual and the species.
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  38.  5
    Michael Domjan, Brian Cusato & Ronald Villarreal (2000). Extensions, Elaborations, and Explanations of the Role of Evolution and Learning in the Control of Social Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):269-276.
    Reactions to the target article included requests for extensions and elaborations of the schema we proposed and discussions of apparent shortcomings of our approach. In general, we welcome suggestions for extension of the schema to additional kinds of social behavior and to forms of learning other than Pavlovian conditioning. Many of the requested elaborations of the schema are consistent with our approach, but some may limit its generality. Many of the apparent shortcomings that commentators discussed do not seem problematic. (...)
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  39.  5
    Dennis Krebs (2000). On Levels of Analysis and Theoretical Integration: Models of Social Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):260-261.
    Evolutionary theory supplies a framework for integrative models of social behavior. In addition to those that include conditioning, evolutionary theory is equipped to explain the acquisition of structures designed to enable individuals to learn by observing others, create mental models of the environment, and coordinate social interactions by taking the perspectives of others.
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  40.  2
    Edmund Fantino & Stephanie Stolarz-Fantino (2000). Fish Displaying and Infants Sucking: The Operant Side of the Social Behavior Coin. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):254-255.
    We applaud Domjan et al. for providing an elegant account of Pavlovian feed-forward mechanisms in social behavior that eschews the pitfall of purposivism. However, they seem to imply that they have provided a complete account without provision for operant conditioning. We argue that operant conditioning plays a central role in social behavior, giving examples from fish and infant behavior.
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  41. Jon Elster (2015). Explaining Social Behavior: More Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press.
    In this new edition of his critically acclaimed book, Jon Elster examines the nature of social behavior, proposing choice as the central concept of the social sciences. Extensively revised throughout, the book offers an overview of key explanatory mechanisms, drawing on many case studies and experiments to explore the nature of explanation in the social sciences; an analysis of the mental states - beliefs, desires, and emotions - that are precursors to action; a systematic comparison of rational-choice models of (...)
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  42. Charles W. Smith (1990). The Practice and Practicality of Maintaining the Theoretical: Twenty Years of the Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 20 (4):285–291.
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  43.  51
    Jon Elster (2007). Explaining Social Behavior: More Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is an expanded and revised edition of the author's critically acclaimed volume Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences.
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  44.  11
    Longinos Matin, Salvador Ruiz & Alicia Rubio (2009). The Role of Identity Salience in the Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Consumer Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):65 - 78.
    Based on the assumption that consumers will reward firms for their support of social programs, many organizations have adopted corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. Drawing on social identity theory, a model of influence of CSR on loyalty is developed and tested using a sample of real consumers. Results demonstrate that CSR initiatives are linked to stronger loyalty both because the consumer develops a more positive company evaluation, and because one identifies more strongly with the company. Moreover, identity salience is shown (...)
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  45.  5
    Christina Lee (1998). Alternatives to Cognition: A New Look at Explaining Human Social Behavior. L. Erlbaum.
    Presents a thoughtful open-minded approach, beyond that of conventional cognitivism, using alternative perspectives such as socio-cultural contexts and social interaction, to explain behavior. For social and exptl. psychologists, and clinicians.
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  46.  7
    Yuhei Inoue & Aubrey Kent (2014). A Conceptual Framework for Understanding the Effects of Corporate Social Marketing on Consumer Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 121 (4):621-633.
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  47.  16
    Friedel Bolle, Yves Breitmoser, Jana Heimel & Claudia Vogel (2012). Multiple Motives of Pro-Social Behavior: Evidence From the Solidarity Game. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 72 (3):303-321.
    The article analyses experimental “solidarity games” with two benefactors and one beneficiary. Depending on their motive for giving—e.g., warm glow, altruism, or guilt—the benefactors’ response functions are either constant, decreasing, or increasing. If motives interact, or if envy is a concern, then more complex (unimodal) shapes may emerge. Controlling for random utility perturbations, we determine which and how many motives affect individual decision making. The main findings are that the motives of about 75% of the subjects can be identified fairly (...)
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  48.  2
    Vladimir Cervin (1956). Individual Behavior in Social Situations: Its Relation to Anxiety, Neuroticism, and Group Solidarity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (2):161.
  49.  1
    W. M. Lepley (1939). The Social Facilitation of Locomotor Behavior in the Albino Rat. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (1):106.
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  50. John S. Wilkins (2015). Gods Above: Naturalizing Religion in Terms of Our Shared Ape Social Dominance Behavior. Sophia 54 (1):77-92.
    To naturalize religion, we must identify what religion is, and what aspects of it we are trying to explain. In this paper, religious social institutional behavior is the explanatory target, and an explanatory hypothesis based on shared primate social dominance psychology is given. The argument is that various religious features, including the high status afforded the religious, and the high status afforded to deities, are an expression of this social dominance psychology in a context for which it did not (...)
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